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Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald
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Emerald Cities - Joan Fitzgerald

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A presentation held by Ms Joan Fitzgerald, professor in law, policy and society at the Northeastern University i Boston.

A presentation held by Ms Joan Fitzgerald, professor in law, policy and society at the Northeastern University i Boston.

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  • The SecureAire systems are comprised of two types: Building construction and retrofits; This falls under the commercial systems. These systems are either installed in a air handler, ductwork, or you can employ the APS 2000. The APS 2000 is a self-contained system with the fan, filtration and the Just Air system built-in. the APS 2000 can be installed above a specific area and ductwork can be run to the area. Healthcare, education, and commercial construction fall under this category. Self-contained units; these units are self-contained roll around systems. Like their brother the APS 2000 these systems our complete self-contained systems with fan, filter, and Just Air. These systems can be utilized in offices, retail outlet’s, home healthcare, etc.
  • Transcript

    • 1.  
    • 2. Freiburg, Germany
    • 3.  
    • 4.  
    • 5.  
    • 6. Freiburg Train Station
    • 7. Badenova Stadion Solar addition
    • 8. Fraunhofer Institute
    • 9.  
    • 10.  
    • 11.  
    • 12.  
    • 13. Strategy/ Sector   Renewable Energy Green Building/Energy Efficiency Recycling/ Waste-to-Energy Transportation Linking Strategies create connections between elements of sustainability strategies and economic or workforce development. Transformational Strategies attempt to transform or “green” existing economic sectors or strength. Leapfrogging Strategies attempt to build entirely new green sectors and jobs.
    • 14. Sector Strategy Renewable Energy Green Building/Energy Efficiency* Recycling/ Waste-to-Energy Transportation Linking strategies create connections between elements of sustainability strategies and economic or workforce development. Berkeley, CA Berkeley FIRST Richmond, CA Solar Richmond Los Angeles, CA Green Building Initiatives Milwaukee, WI Me 2, Chicago, IL Waste to Profit Network United Kingdom National Industrial Symbiosis Programme Denver, CO Transit-oriented development Los Angeles, CA The Coalition for Clean and Safe Ports Transformational strategies attempt to transform or “green” existing economic sectors or [strengths]. XXXXXXX From glass to solar panels Pittsburgh, PA Green Building Alliance Syracuse, NY Growing an indoor environmental quality sector New York City NYC Green Manufacturing Initiative Bronx, NYC Sustainable South Bronx Portland, OR Building local streetcars Leapfrogging strategies attempt to build entirely new green sectors and jobs. Austin, TX Creating a solar industry Cleveland, OH region Creating a wind industry Los Angeles, CA RENEW LA King County/(Seattle, WA Biowaste to Biodiesel Portland, OR A Niche Bicycle Industry
    • 15. Sector Strategy Renewable Energy Green Building/Energy Efficiency* Recycling/ Waste-to-Energy Transportation Linking strategies create connections between elements of sustainability strategies and economic or workforce development. Berkeley, CA Berkeley FIRST Richmond, CA Solar Richmond Los Angeles, CA Green Building Initiatives Milwaukee, WI Me 2, Chicago, IL Waste to Profit Network United Kingdom National Industrial Symbiosis Programme Denver, CO Transit-oriented development Los Angeles, CA The Coalition for Clean and Safe Ports Transformational strategies attempt to transform or “green” existing economic sectors or [strengths]. TOLEDO, OHIO From glass to solar panels Pittsburgh, PA Green Building Alliance Syracuse, NY Growing an indoor environmental quality sector New York City NYC Green Manufacturing Initiative Bronx, NYC Sustainable South Bronx Portland, OR Building local streetcars Leapfrogging strategies attempt to build entirely new green sectors and jobs. Austin, TX Creating a solar industry Cleveland, OH region Creating a wind industry Los Angeles, CA RENEW LA King County/(Seattle, WA Biowaste to Biodiesel Portland, OR A Niche Bicycle Industry
    • 16.  
    • 17.  
    • 18. First Solar, Perrysville, Ohio First Solar, Malaysia
    • 19. Xunlight’s founders with their prototype product Xunlight Toledo, Ohio
    • 20. Evergreen Solar
    • 21. WITH THE NEWS that the state’s premier solar energy company, Evergreen Solar, is facing financial struggles, many are questioning whether the state was wise to “bet’’ on solar energy by providing an unprecedented level of state loans, grants, and land deals. Indeed, the rationality of states bidding against each other to attract biotech, information tech, and now renewable energy companies by offering the biggest subsidy package is part of a decades-long debate. A case could be made that Massachusetts is better positioned to develop a wind production industry than solar. But the bigger question is whether the United States will be a leading player in the production of renewable energy and other clean technologies -or cede that role to Germany, Japan, and increasingly China. In the absence of a coherent national renewable energy policy, states and cities have been moving forward on their own. The predominant strategy has been to require utilities to purchase a set percentage of their energy - known as a renewable portfolio standard - from renewable sources, invest in some research, offer subsidies to attract companies, and maybe provide some worker training. The payoff for any given state may be anywhere from a few hundred to a couple of thousand jobs. While we applaud each success, this approach does not add up to the United States becomin g a leader in renewable energy. Thursday, October 22, 2009 Even when states and cities do all the right things, success is not guaranteed. Consider Austin, a city that has a comprehensive strategy to develop a solar production industry in a state that has been a leader in renewable energy. All of its planning and investment has resulted in one company staying in the area, HelioVolt, a producer of thin-film solar power cells. Two other solar companies incubated in Austin moved to other states, taking advantage of attractive incentive packages. And Austin Energy’s new 30-megawatt solar energy farm will use Suntech modules made in China and assembled in the United States. By Joan Fitzgerald Image by: Clayton Hansen
    • 22. Source: Electronics, Design, Strategy News. Top 10 Photovoltaic and Wind Turbine Manufacturers Solar Wind Company Country Of Origin Cell Technology Capacity 2008  (announced) Company Country Of Origin Installed Capacity 2009 (in MW) Sharp Electronics Japan Crystalline* 870 Vestas Denmark 35,000 Q-Cells Germany Crystalline* 834 BEnercon Germany 19,000 Suntech Power Holdings Ltd. China Crystalline* 590 Gamesa Spain 16,000 First Solar USA Thin-film 484 GE Wind Germany/US 15,000 SolarWorld Germany Crystalline 460 Siemens Denmark/Germany 8800 Sanyo Japan Crystalline 365 Suzlon India 6000 BP Solar UK Crystalline 480 Nordex Germany 5400 Kyocera Japan Crystalline 300 Acciona Spain 4300 Motech Industries Inc. Taiwan Crystalline 330 Repower Germany 3000 Solarfun Power Holdings China Crystalline 360 Goldwind China 2889 Total for Top 10     5073 Total for Top 10   115,389
    • 23. Source: Pew Charitable Trusts Environment Group
    • 24.  
    • 25. Renewable Portfolio Standards State renewable portfolio standard State renewable portfolio goal www.dsireusa.org / November 2009 Solar water heating eligible * † Extra credit for solar or customer-sited renewables Includes non-renewable alternative resources WA: 15% by 2020* CA: 33% by 2020
      • NV : 25% by 2025*
      • AZ: 15% by 2025
      • NM: 20% by 2020 (IOUs)
      • 10% by 2020 (co-ops)
      HI: 40% by 2030 Minimum solar or customer-sited requirement TX: 5,880 MW by 2015 UT: 20% by 2025*
      • CO: 20% by 2020 (IOUs)
      • 10% by 2020 (co-ops & large munis)*
      MT: 15% by 2015 ND: 10% by 2015 SD: 10% by 2015 IA: 105 MW MN: 25% by 2025 (Xcel: 30% by 2020)
      • MO: 15 % by 2021
      WI : Varies by utility; 10% by 2015 goal MI: 10% + 1,100 MW by 2015*
      • OH : 25% by 2025 †
      ME: 30% by 2000 New RE: 10% by 2017
      • NH: 23.8% by 2025
      • MA: 15% by 2020 + 1% annual increase (Class I Renewables)
      RI: 16% by 2020 CT: 23% by 2020
      • NY: 24% by 2013
      • NJ: 22.5% by 2021
      • PA: 18% by 2020 †
      • MD: 20% by 2022
      • DE: 20% by 2019*
      • DC: 20% by 2020
      VA: 15% by 2025*
      • NC : 12.5% by 2021 (IOUs)
      • 10% by 2018 (co-ops & munis)
      VT: (1) RE meets any increase in retail sales by 2012; (2) 20% RE & CHP by 2017 29 states & DC have an RPS 6 states have goals KS: 20% by 2020
      • OR : 25% by 2025 (large utilities )*
      • 5% - 10% by 2025 (smaller utilities)
      • IL: 25% by 2025
      WV: 25% by 2025* †
    • 26. Source: Pew Charitable Trusts Environment Group, 2011
    • 27. Source: Pew Charitable Trusts Environment Group, 2011
    • 28. Source: John Sakoda, New Enterprise Associates
    • 29. Sector Strategy Renewable Energy Green Building/Energy Efficiency* Recycling/ Waste-to-Energy Transportation Linking strategies create connections between elements of sustainability strategies and economic or workforce development. Berkeley, CA Berkeley FIRST Richmond, CA Solar Richmond Los Angeles, CA Green Building Initiatives Milwaukee, WI Me 2, Chicago, IL Waste to Profit Network United Kingdom National Industrial Symbiosis Programme Denver, CO Transit-oriented development Los Angeles, CA The Coalition for Clean and Safe Ports Transformational strategies attempt to transform or “green” existing economic sectors or [strengths]. Toledo, OH From glass to solar panels Pittsburgh, PA Green Building Alliance Syracuse, NY Growing an indoor environmental quality sector New York City NYC Green Manufacturing Initiative Bronx, NYC Sustainable South Bronx Portland, OR Building local streetcars Leapfrogging strategies attempt to build entirely new green sectors and jobs. Austin, TX Creating a solar industry Cleveland, OH region Creating a wind industry Los Angeles, CA RENEW LA King County/(Seattle, WA Biowaste to Biodiesel Portland, OR A Niche Bicycle Industry
    • 30.  
    • 31. © 2010 goLAstreetcar | Los Angeles Streetcar, Inc.
    • 32.  
    • 33. Sector Strategy Renewable Energy Green Building/Energy Efficiency* Recycling/ Waste-to-Energy Transportation Linking strategies create connections between elements of sustainability strategies and economic or workforce development. Berkeley, CA Berkeley FIRST Richmond, CA Solar Richmond Los Angeles, CA Green Building Initiatives Milwaukee, WI Me 2, Chicago, IL Waste to Profit Network United Kingdom National Industrial Symbiosis Programme Denver, CO Transit-oriented development Los Angeles, CA The Coalition for Clean and Safe Ports Transformational strategies attempt to transform or “green” existing economic sectors or [strengths]. Toledo, OH From glass to solar panels Pittsburgh, PA Green Building Alliance Syracuse, NY Growing an indoor environmental quality sector New York City NYC Green Manufacturing Initiative Bronx, NYC Sustainable South Bronx Portland, OR Building local streetcars Leapfrogging strategies attempt to build entirely new green sectors and jobs. Austin, TX Creating a solar industry Cleveland, OH region Creating a wind industry Los Angeles, CA RENEW LA King County/(Seattle, WA Biowaste to Biodiesel Portland, OR A Niche Bicycle Industry
    • 34. Recycled Glass Countertops
    • 35. IceStone Durable Surfaces are made from 100% recycled glass and cement to create a high performance, green concrete material.
    • 36. Leadership Team: The project team includes the University of Pittsburgh’s Dr. Melissa Bilec, who is Co- Director of the Center for Sustainable Transportation Infrastructure, Assistant Director of Education and Outreach at the Mascaro Sustainability Initiative, and Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Fellow University of Pittsburgh faculty on the project team include Dr. Amy E. Landis, Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Dr. Kim L. Needy, P.E., CPIM, Associate Professor in the Department of Industrial Engineering. The private sector partner is Tegrant Corporation, represented by Robert Niklewicz, Vice President of Engineering, and Kevin Grogan, Vice President of Marketing and Business Development.
    • 37. Sustainable, Affordable, Low-Temperature Water System to Heat and Cool a Neighborhood of Buildings Contact: Tom Harley ▪ Geothermal Energy Systems ▪ 724.349.2520 ▪ tharley@trarchitects.com
    • 38. Retrofitted into existing HVAC Systems Self-Contained Units Retail Outlets (Beauty Shops, Auto Repair, etc . ) Home Health Care Healthcare, Education, and Commercial Construction New Building Construction The Systems In Duct System Air Purification System (APS-C) Air Purification System (APS-R) Air Purification System 2000 ID
    • 39.  

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