Cross-border cooperation in the electricity sector - the Nordic example

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Seminar
NORDIC ENERGY WAYS – WHAT‘S IN IT FOR US?
Monday, 2 June 2014

Arne Mogren, European Climate Foundation, gave a presentation on the history of electricity and Nordic electricity cooperation.

Published in: Environment, Technology, Business
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Cross-border cooperation in the electricity sector - the Nordic example

  1. 1. CROSS-BORDER COOPERATION IN THE ELECTRICITY SECTOR - THE NORDIC EXAMPLE
  2. 2. In the very beginning … 1 Pearl Street Station started generating electricity on September 4, 1882, serving an initial load of 400 lamps at 85 customers.
  3. 3. The development of interconnection capacity in the Nordic region 2Source: Annual report 1998, Nordel
  4. 4. The history of Nordel 3 2000-2009 TSOs 1992-2000 Competition- unbundling 1963-1992 Vertical integration Pre- Nordel interconnections Nordel ENTSO-E, RG Nordic Source: Sweco, 2013
  5. 5. Nordel’s organisation in 1992 4Source: Nordel
  6. 6. The electricity transmission grid in the Baltic Sea Region 5
  7. 7. How is the decarbonisation of power supposed to play out? 6 2010 2020 2030 2050 50% 50% 20% 80% 80% 20% 3.3701 TWh 4.900 TWh Source: ECF – Roadmap 2050 1: Eurostat (online data code: nrg_105a) EU-27, Norway and Switzerland RES Thermal New wave of electrification - from 20 to 35/40% of end use
  8. 8. 7 The context – interaction has grown more complex over time Basic electrification + Play a major role in industrialisation/automatisation + A tax base + Open up for competition + Resource efficiency seen from society’s perspective 6/5/2014 Food for thought 7 Drivers Target forced on markets Pricing emissions Subsidies Emission standards Governance Organising markets Infrastructure Public demand Technology breakthroughs Obstacles Low-quality interventions adding costs Political inability to defend long-term benefits from “cost-attacks” by pressure groups Lack of governance capacity to handle the transition Lack of support from the main stream Inability to handle interdependencies Volume disease problems A weak Europe

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