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GIS In Local Government Global Image
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GIS In Local Government Global Image GIS In Local Government Global Image Presentation Transcript

  • Presentation by: Werner Fourie GIS Gl b l I Global Image (Pt ) Ltd (Pty) www.globalimage.co.za www.gipapyrus.com
  • Hardware Software People Data
  • Municipalities consists of different departments, most occupied p p , p with service delivery of some or other sort (infrastructure, housing etc.) g ) Service delivery requires planning – legislation compels municipalities to perform certain programmes on a recurring basis – IDP, SDF, WSMP etc. Service delivery implies development – certain checks and balances needs to be in place: Land Use Management S h L dU M t Schemes etc. t
  • In return for services delivered, beneficiaries of those services need to pay for it (unless subsidized) – municipalities need to have systems in place that can account for payments etc. Service delivery is driven from a top down perspective – National -> Provincial -> District Municipality ->Local Municipality. Funding. Loans, Subsidies, Rates and Taxes g , ,
  • National Department requires information regarding backlogs: request this from Province. Province request backlog fi P i t b kl figures f from L Local l Municipalities. Local Municipalities revert back to National Datasets to provide the answer. The answer is often contained in the strategic documents of the municipality (Census etc.) The Phenomenon of “NO INFORMATION” NO INFORMATION
  • Core Datasets conomic vertising on ental Informatio phic / Socio Ec Signage & Outdoor Adv Town Planning Scheme Land Use Infomration nformation Aerial Photography culation Services - Usage Eng - Fcailities U Demograp Eng - Retic Environme Treasury In Base Map Eng - Bulk Cadastre Total Town Planning 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 Housing and L d H i d Land 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 Town Engineer 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 IDP Officer 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 13 Municipal Functions Parks 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 Treasury 1 1 1 1 4 Engineering E i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 F Valuations 1 1 1 1 1 5 Building Control 1 1 1 1 1 5 Tourism and Local Economic Development 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 Health 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 Traffic T ffi 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 Fire Department, 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 Safety & Security 1 1 1 3 Total 14 9 10 9 5 6 3 4 13 4 8 3 13
  • Core Datasets onomic ertising Environment Information Demographic / Socio Eco Signage & Outdoor Adve Town Plannin Scheme omration Treasury Information graphy Eng - Reticulation age ng tal es Aerial Photog Services - Usa Land Use Info Eng - Fcailitie O Base Map Eng - Bulk Cadastre Total Spatial Development Framework 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 Valuation Role 1 1 1 1 1 5 Municipal Programmes Water Master Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 Road Master Plan 1 1 1 1 4 Sewer Master Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 Disaster Management Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 Local Economic Development Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 Land Use Management Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 Environmental Conservation Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 M Outdoor Advertising Management Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 Integrated Development Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 13 Total 7 9 9 6 6 4 4 5 9 9 9 3 9
  • The NO INFORMATION Municipality. Infrastructure Investment Frameworks Core i C inputs required t i d Updated Population. Service Levels.
  • Census 2001 & Cadastre 2007
  • Census 2001 & SPOT 2006/7
  • 2001 Census & 2006/7 SPOT Imagery
  • IDENTIFYING HOUSEHOLD GROWTH 2001 - 2007
  • QUANTIFYING HOUSEHOLD GROWTH 2001 - 2007
  • STATSSA DWELLING FRAME 2007
  • CLASSIFYING FORMAL CADASTRE
  • ROADS (BEFORE) Length= 1522Km
  • ROADS (AFTER) Paved = 505Km Unpaved = 4 213 Km
  • Updated informal households Updated formal households Update U d t service l i levels per S b l l Sub-place : spent t time with technical services Capture roads, assign road surface, calculate length. Provide backlog figures to professional team.
  • GIS Departments – often “overly” occupied with detail. ( (ensuring up to date cadastre etc.).) GIS Departments often neglect strategic level information (e g Population etc) (e.g. etc). GIS Officials have technical skills, but often lack the knowledge to really assist departments on projects. Departmental officials know what is required, but p q , often lack the knowledge to ask the right questions from GIS Officials.
  • Though GIS officials know how to generate data, they often do NOT know how to use this data to generate results results.
  • Data: Raw text, numbers, images, sounds. , , g , (Cadastre, SG Diagrams, SPOT Images etc.) Information: Data processed and in context. p (Cadastre overlaid with SPOT Images) Knowledge: Information that is absorbed, g enhanced and applied to add value to an individual or an organization. (Information above used t id tif and quantify growth – d to identify d tif th development of an infrastructure investment framework) Wikipedia
  • Data is information, Knowledge (or information know-how) has to do with the process of learning, understanding, and applying information. California Management Review, Vol. 44, No. 4, Summer 2002
  • Knowledge worker, a term coined by Peter Drucker in 1959, is one who works primarily with information or one who develops and uses knowledge in the workplace. Due to the constant industrial growth in North America and globally, globally there is increasing need for an academically capable workforce. In direct response to this, Knowledge Workers are now estimated to outnumber all other workers in North America by at least a four to one margin ( y g (Haag et al, 2006, pg 4). g , , pg. ) A Knowledge Worker's benefit to a company could be in the form of developing business intelligence, increasing the value of intellectual capital, gaining insight into customer p p ,g g g preferences, or a , variety of other important gains in knowledge that aid the business Wikipedia
  • A knowledge worker is anyone who works for a g y living at the tasks of developing or using knowledge. For example, a knowledge worker might b someone who works at any of the tasks i h be h k t f th t k of planning, acquiring, searching, analyzing, organizing, storing, programming, distributing, organizing storing programming distributing marketing, or otherwise contributing to the transformation and commerce of information and those (often the same people) who work at using the knowledge so p g produced Wikipedia
  • Hardware Software Knowledge People Datad Knowledge l Workers
  • Knowledge workers = Smart People
  • Never stop learning p g Are constantly alert for new information Accept change See knowledge as fuelling personal growth Solve problems and help colleagues do so S too Create and accumulate knowledge Communicate and share knowledge g © N. M. Duffy 2004
  • Can work in teams Use IT effectively in pursuing knowledge Think Thi k systemically t i ll Welcome empowerment in their organizations p g Continually search for better ways to do things Interact with people as well as technology © N. M. Duffy 2004
  • Devotes time and resources to development Encourages acceptance of personal responsibility for learning learning. Rewards knowledge sharing and dissemination. Has high computer literacy. Rewards team performance. © N. M. Duffy 2004
  • Teaches its staff to learn Grows its research capacity Rewards employee k R d l knowledge l d Measures knowledge sharing g g Has someone responsible for co-ordinating Knowledge Management © N. M. Duffy 2004
  • The case study = not rocket science, yet something SO simple is not being addressed by many local authorities authorities. Municipalities will HAVE to bridge the time gap b t between N ti National P l Programmes such as h the Census. GIS Officers need to be custodians of Strategic Status Quo information. g
  • We are neglecting the “human” component of g g p GIS. GIS officers need to make the shift from technical staff (support staff) to knowledge workers. GIS officers need to be more proactive in terms of their personal development development. A key requirement for Knowledge Workers to thrive = Intelligent Organizations Organizations.