Zero to social 101

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Basics of using social media as a nonprofit, including through your GlobalGiving project page. This presentation includes background on social media, how it is used daily, definitions and getting …

Basics of using social media as a nonprofit, including through your GlobalGiving project page. This presentation includes background on social media, how it is used daily, definitions and getting started how-to suggestions

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  • 1. From Zero to Social
  • 2. So you want to be more social?
  • 3. OK…Let’s Go
  • 4. What is Social Media?
  • 5. Yikes!
  • 6.  
  • 7. Social Media Plus…. is YOU
  • 8. Collaboration
  • 9. You read the paper
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14. You drink coffee
  • 15.  
  • 16.  
  • 17. You listen to the radio
  • 18.  
  • 19. You go to a conference
  • 20.  
  • 21.  
  • 22. You eat dinner
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25. You watch TV
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28.  
  • 29. You give to charity
  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
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  • 36.  
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  • 41.  
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  • 44.  
  • 45.  
  • 46.  
  • 47. Where do I start?
    • What are your objectives?
    • Is your audience is already on a network?
    • Does your organization specialize in a media that has its own network? (video, photos, blogging, products)
    • Does your country or region have its own popular network(s)?
  • 48. Choose a Name
    • DO: Make it your organization’s name
    • DON’T: Use an acronym, unless it’s well-known or short
    • DO: Use a word or phrase that describes what you do
    • DO: Include your city or country if you are local to that region
    • DO: Make sure you can use that same name on other networks. Use NameChk to review.
    • DON’T: Misspell or leave letters off words unless it’s part of your organization’s name
    • DO: Try to get your brand name back if someone is squatting on it
  • 49. First Steps
    • Only commit to as many networks as you have resources for.
    • Identify a lead, create guidelines fitting to your organization
    • Know your allies and stakeholders
    • Identify your audience
  • 50. What can I talk about?
    • News
    • Events
    • Pictures
    • Beneficiary stories
    • Articles about your org
    • Articles about your cause
    • Donor opportunities
    • Feedback (good and bad)
    • “ insider” information
    • Videos
    • Questions for your network
    • New features
    • Links from partners or blogs
    • Promotions for others
    • Volunteer opportunities
    • Job openings
  • 51. Twitter
    • Micro-blogging platform
    • You send updates or “tweets” in 140 characters or less
    • Tweets are seen by your followers – people who opt in
    • You see tweets from people you are following
    • Unlike Facebook, following doesn’t have to be reciprocal
    • Twitter.com is the 3 rd most popular social network site
    • In June 2010, Twitter had 190 million users tweeting 65 million times/day (techcrunch)
  • 52. How can YOU use Twitter?
    • Twitter answers the question…
    • What are you interested in?
    • What has your attention right now?
  • 53. GlobalGiving’s TweetCloud
  • 54. How YOU can use Twitter
    • If you want to know Tiger Woods’ stats over the last year…
    • … use Google
    • If you want to know if Tiger Woods made that last putt…
    • … use Twitter
  • 55. Twitter Vocabulary
    • @reply (at reply)
    • Direct Message
    • ReTweet
    • Hashtag
    • Twitter Client
  • 56. @Reply
    • Using the @ symbol before a username is how you respond to someone or reference them.
    • This will appear in their timeline; they will see that you were talking about them.
    • @reply in the beginning of a tweet is conversational
    • @ in the middle or end of a tweet is a “mention”
    • When you start a tweet with @, only your followers who also follow that person will see the tweet.
  • 57. Direct Message (DM)
    • Direct Messages (DM) are private messages that are not part of the public timeline.
    • Only people you follow can send you a DM.
    • Do NOT set up auto-reply DMs. They are considered spam.
    • You can send a DM by starting a tweet with D username. You do not need the @
  • 58. ReTweet (RT)
    • ReTweet (RT) is republishing someone else’s message and attributing it to them.
    • How to: RT @username : their message; Twitter also has a direct form of RT.
    • You can include additional messages before the retweeted message to add commentary.
    • If you aren’t directly quoting someone but want to attribute them, you can use Via @username .
  • 59. Hashtag #
    • Hashtags are a way to categorize a tweet.
    • Often you can participate in topical conversations by using or following a hashtag.
    • Hashtags can be topics, locations, teams, events, themes, etc. (#redsox, #dc, #kenya, #educationnation)
    • Many public events will have an official hashtag for others to follow and contribute commentary.
    • Hashtags increase visibility; they can be seen by people following the hashtag, even if they aren’t following you.
    • They are a good way to find people you’d be interested in following.
  • 60. Twitter Client
    • Twitter.com
    • TweetDeck
    • HootSuite
    • Seesmic
    • SMX: Thrive
    • Mobile
  • 61. Tips for Twitter
    • Be authentic
    • Start and reply to conversations, especially ones about you or your cause
    • Stick to 140 characters…or fewer if you want to be RTed
    • Your RT magic number = 140 - (username + 6). Keep your tweets under that number of maximum RTing.
    • Remember the 80/20 rule – don’t only talk about yourself. 80% engaging, educational and informative, only 20% about the brand.
    • Be conversational; ask questions, give opinions, share feedback; provide news.
  • 62. Tips for Twitter
    • Facebook and Twitter are not the same platform. Post separately
    • @ include people and orgs when you refer to them so they know you’re talking about them. Do a simple Google search if you don’t know their name.
    • Use a URL shortener to save space: bit.ly, ow.ly, tinyurl, etc
    • Follower count is about quality not quantity
    • Twitter updates are not Facebook status updates
    • Use Twitter to crowdsource
    • Use Twitter to gain momentum for events and create in-person relationships. Have a Tweet-up! www.twtvite.com
  • 63. Twitter Directories
    • WeFollow
    • Just Tweet It
    • Twellow
    • Mashable’s Twitter List Directory
    • Others’ Twitter Lists
  • 64. Facebook
    • More than 500 million active users
    • 50% of these users log on daily, 70% monthly
    • Facebook has surpassed Google as the #1 site in the US
    • It is estimated that someone who has “liked” a Facebook brand will spend an average of $71.84 more per year.
  • 65. How to start on Facebook
    • DON’T: Set up a user profile for your org. Profiles are for people; Pages are for organizations
    • DO: Keep your page name short and relevant
    • DO: Use your logo as your picture
    • DO: Fill out your information tab thoroughly and completely
    • DON’T: Auto-feed an RSS onto the page
    • DO: Be authentic, engaging and honest
  • 66. How to use Facebook
    • Regular interaction, but mind the 80/20 rule
    • Post articles, pictures, questions and commentary
    • Enable feedback on your wall and posts
    • You might get negative feedback, but that’s ok! Let your fans defend you. They will, unless it’s a true problem.
    • You can have a rule about civility or offensive language
    • Facebook and Twitter are not the same platform. Post separately.
    • Add comments or questions to articles you post.
    • Think about ways to engage your fans where they already are – on Facebook.
  • 67. Resources
    • Social Media Revolution
    • NameChk – find out if your org name is registered
    • Social Media ROI – how to justify what you’re doing
    • Facebook Page Best Practices – by Zoetica
    • So you want a Facebook Fanpage for your Nonprofit? – by Beth Kanter
    • How Charities are Finding the Good with Facebook Fanpages (case studies)
    • Facebook Bestpractices for Nonprofits (beyond the basics)
    • 26 Slideshares on Social Media for Nonprofits
    • 10 Facebook resources for nonprofits
    • Social Media Starter Kit – by AARP
    • Mashable’s Social Media Page