The Presentation Thespian

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Multiple studies have found that speakers who are perceived as credible, attractive and trustworthy are much more effective at persuading an audience and having them retain their message. …

Multiple studies have found that speakers who are perceived as credible, attractive and trustworthy are much more effective at persuading an audience and having them retain their message.

This provides presenters with an easy opportunity to capitalize on these findings. By simply recognizing the theatrics of presentations and dressing the part, presenters can gain instant initial credibility.

I taken this idea and made a fully interactive tutorial. Through this tutorial you’ll learn how to use theatrical concepts to increase your appearance as a credible and trustworthy presenter.

Download and run in PowerPoint for interactivity to work.

More in: Design , Technology , Business
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  • Copyright 2011 Glenna Shaw

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  • 1. The Credible and Trustworthy PresenterA Tutorial for Presenters and Slide Designers By Glenna Shaw
  • 2. This tutorial is organized into sections. Each section contains an introductory page and multiple instructional pages. Instructional pages are organized into text and images. Use the navigation buttonsClick on the menu items to jump to different sections shown below to move through the pages. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References Main Menu | Introduction | Using this Tutorial | Life is a Play | Source Credibility
  • 3. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References Main Menu | Introduction | Using this Tutorial | Life is a Play | Source Credibility
  • 4. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References Main Menu | Introduction | Using this Tutorial | Life is a Play | Source Credibility
  • 5. "All the worlds a stage" is one of William Shakespeare’s most frequently quoted passages perhaps because of the simple truth of those words. In every interaction we play a role for that specific interaction and presenting is no exception. By recognizing this truth and planning for it we can gain a great deal of “bang for our buck” in ensuring the success of our presentations. By simply wearing the right clothes, using attractive props and rehearsing effectively we can significantly increase our audience’s ability to accept and retain our message.The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References Main Menu | Introduction | Using this Tutorial | Life is a Play | Source Credibility
  • 6. A Yale University multi-year,multi-project research intopersuasive communicationshowed the speaker shouldbe credible, trustworthy andattractive to the audience. Speaker AttractivenessTwo subsequent studieshave verified these findings.This is valuable informationfor a presenter since it offersan easy and effectivemethod for increasing the Speaker Credibility & Trustworthinessimpact of yourpresentations. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References Main Menu | Introduction | Using this Tutorial | Life is a Play | Source Credibility
  • 7. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Roles | The Star | The Audience | Casting | Casting Guide
  • 8. Obviously the presenter is the star of the presentation. As the lead character, presenters have a responsibility to ensure they appear knowledgeable on the topic of the presentation. A presenter dressed as a rapper speaking on the topic of banking would lose credibility fast, regardless of their level of expertise on the subject.The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Roles | The Star | The Audience | Casting | Casting Guide
  • 9. Unlike movie stars, who aredressed solely for the role theyplay, presenters must directlyconnect with their audience.An astute presenter takes intoaccount what the audience willbe wearing as well as the topicof the presentation whenplanning their wardrobe.A presenter who’s dressedcasually while the audience isin suits won’t garner as muchrespect or trust. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Roles | The Star | The Audience | Casting | Casting Guide
  • 10. For this tutorial I’ve identified theTopics Styles most common topics and styles of attire for presenters and their Business Professional audience. Sales Shirtsleeves While not comprehensive, it provides an effective starting Scientific Academic point for planning your wardrobe. Research Medical The casting guide on the next Medical Business slide provides recommendations Casual to get you started. Technical You should experiment since you Social Technical may find a combination of styles Political Casual are more effective. Steve Jobs is Uniform a great example of this, utilizing elements of academic, technical and casual to create his own personal brand. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Roles | The Star | The Audience | Casting | Casting Guide
  • 11. Presentation Topics Business Sales Scientific/ Medical Technical Social/ Research Political Professional Professional Professional Academic Professional Professional Professional Shirtsleeves Professional Shirtsleeves Academic Shirtsleeves Shirtsleeves Shirtsleeves Academic Professional Professional Academic Professional Technical BusinessAudience Attire Casual Medical Professional Professional Medical Medical Technical Business Casual Business Business Shirtsleeves Academic Business Technical Business Casual Casual Casual Casual Technical Business Shirtsleeves Academic Medical Technical Business Casual Casual Casual Business Shirtsleeves Academic Business Technical Business Casual Casual Casual Uniform Professional Professional Academic Medical Technical Professional Uniform Uniform Uniform Uniform Presenter’s Recommended Attire The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Roles | The Star | The Audience | Casting | Casting Guide
  • 12. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 13. While stereotyping is usually considered to be negative and narrow minded, by matching your appearance to your audience’s expectations you gain instant credibility. A speaker is more trustworthy if they meet our archetype for the topic on which they are speaking. Commercials for health products use this with great success by simply putting a lab coat on the person endorsing the product. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 14. The professional is well- groomed and wears a business suit. Hair is neatly cut and styled. The suit jacket is always worn. Shoes are high quality and polished. Men wear ties. Think banker, lawyer and politician. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 15. Shirtsleeves is a slightly more relaxed professional. Shirtsleeves is a dress shirt and dress pants or skirt. Basically it’s a suit without the jacket. Ties can be loosened or removed. Sleeves can be rolled up. Think “Let’s get more comfortable even though we’re wearing a suit.” The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 16. The academic looks scholarly. Button down shirts with sweaters, textured jackets with semi-casual slacks and glasses all work well. Hair can be more casually styled and beards on men enhance the effect. Think college professor, scholar or scientist. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 17. Medical attire is comprised of a lab coat, and/or scrubs and optionally a stethoscope. However, if a medical presentation is outside the medical environment such as a conference, a professional suit is the better choice. Think Doctor. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 18. Business casual attire is typically a shirt and less formal pants. A tie is optional for men. In many organizations, the business casual “suit” is comprised of a polo shirt and khaki pants most likely because of its association with golf, the stereotypical professional’s sport. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 19. Gone are the days of the geek with horn rimmed glasses and pocket protectors. Today’s technical experts are well served with a dress shirt (usually light colored) and dark pants. Preferred is any attire that advertises expertise such as a branded shirt or a jacket. Certification pins/badges increase credibility. Think techie or modern geek. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 20. Jeans, loose shirts and T- shirts are the hallmarks of casual attire. Although your audience may be wearing jeans, it is almost never desirable for a presenter to be casually dressed when speaking. There are exceptions such as a dress shirt paired with “dress” jeans but typically casual clothes detract from credibility. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 21. No other attire gives instant credibility and trustworthiness as much as a uniform when it matches the topic. Firefighters and police use this to their advantage when speaking before classrooms. If you have the right to wear a uniform and it matches your topic you should always wear the uniform regardless of your audience’s attire. Think police, firefighters and military. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 22. I have a jacket that showcases badges and pins recognizing my expertise in PowerPoint. I always wear my “PowerPoint Nascar” jacket when attending events even if I don’t wear it when presenting. This jacket, combined with my techie clothes and trademark long ponytail, creates a brand that immediately identifies me as a PowerPoint technical expert. If you are a frequent presenter a brand is a great thing to develop. Examples of effective branding include: Steve Jobs, with his long sleeved black crew neck shirt tucked into jeans, neatly trimmed beard and wire-rim glasses, appeared the geeky scholar. Nigel Holmes, with his trademark bright blue framed glasses and shoes as well as his engaging use of props, leaves the impression of a brilliant, approachable, semi-mad scientist. And Dave Paradi, with his trademark business suits, brands himself as the presentation expert for professionals. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | ReferencesThe Wardrobe | Archetypes | Professional | Shirtsleeves | Academic | Medical | Business Casual | Technical | Casual | Uniform | Branding
  • 23. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Props | The Bio | The Slide Show | Business Cards
  • 24. A short, one or two paragraph bio is usually your first introduction to your audience. If you have expertise in several disciplines (as I do), showcase the accomplishments that are directly relevant to the presentation topic and leave the others off. Your bio is your first step in credibility for your audience.The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Props | The Bio | The Slide Show | Business Cards
  • 25. Business cards are a tangible representation of your expertise and you want them to accurately reflect your credibility. Effective business cards are attractive and, if possible, stand out in some unique way.The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Props | The Bio | The Slide Show | Business Cards
  • 26. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Script | Rehearsal
  • 27. You must rehearse your presentation. No matter how gifted a speaker you are, just “winging it” will inevitably expose your lack of preparedness and severely damage your credibility. Rehearse your script in front of a mirror and be sure to include a dress rehearsal in the clothes you plan to wear.The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References The Script | Rehearsal
  • 28. The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References References | Sources
  • 29. • Hovland, Carl I. “Reconciling Conflicting Results Derived from Experimental and Survey Studies of Attitude Change.” American Psychologist, Vol 14(1), (Jan 1959): 8- 17• Shailendra Pratap Jain and Steven S. Posavac. “Prepurchase Attribute Verifiability, Source Credibility, and Persuasion.” Journal of Consumer Psychology .Vol. 11, No. 3 (2001): 169-180• Eagly, Alice H., and Shelly Chaiken. "An Attribution Analysis of Communicator Characteristics On Opinion Change: the Case of Communicator Attractiveness." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 32.1 (1975): 136-44.• Joffe, H. "The Power of Visual Material: Persuasion, Emotion and Identification." Diogenes 55.1 (2008): 84-93 The Theatrics of Presentations | The Roles | The Wardrobe | The Props | The Script | References References | Sources