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Storyboarding for Film
 

Storyboarding for Film

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How to create a storyboard for Film.

How to create a storyboard for Film.

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    Storyboarding for Film Storyboarding for Film Presentation Transcript

    • Storyboarding for Film Giulianno Morales Marietti Universidad del Sagrado Corazón
    • Giulianno Morales Marietti gmarietti aroba live punto com @GiuliannoMM filmtalkwith.wordpress.com
    • Agenda Section 1 Breaking down your script. Section 2 Evaluating each shot. Section 3 Creating a shot list. Conclusion Constructing storyboard panels.
    • Section 1 Breaking down your Script
    • ● Break down the screenplay into shots.
    • ● Break down the screenplay into shots. Shot: a film sequence photographed continuously by one camera.
    • Types of shots
    • ● Break down the screenplay into shots. Shot: a film sequence photographed continuously by one camera. ● Figure out what you want the shots to entail.
    • ● Break down the screenplay into shots. Shot: a film sequence photographed continuously by one camera. ● Figure out what you want the shots to entail. ● Transform ideas into storyboard panels.
    • Basic storyboard panel
    • Section 2 Evaluating the shots.
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions:
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions: ● What is the location setting?
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions: ● ● What is the location setting? How many actors do I need in the shot?
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions: ● ● ● What is the location setting? How many actors do I need in the shot? Any important props or vehicles in the shot?
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions: ● ● ● ● What is the location setting? How many actors do I need in the shot? Any important props or vehicles in the shot? What type of shot is it? (close-up, wide-shot,etc.)
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions: What is the location setting? ● How many actors do I need in the shot? ● Any important props or vehicles in the shot? ● What type of shot is it? (close-up, wide-shot,etc.) ● What is the shot’s angle? High angle? Low angle? ●
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions: What is the location setting? ● How many actors do I need in the shot? ● Any important props or vehicles in the shot? ● What type of shot is it? (close-up, wide-shot,etc.) ● What is the shot’s angle? High angle? Low angle? ● Do actors or vehicle need to move within the frame, and what is the direction of that action in the shot? ●
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions: What is the location setting? ● How many actors do I need in the shot? ● Any important props or vehicles in the shot? ● What type of shot is it? (close-up, wide-shot,etc.) ● What is the shot’s angle? High angle? Low angle? ● Do actors or vehicle need to move within the frame, and what is the direction of that action in the shot? ● In what direction does the camera go? ●
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● What is the location setting? How many actors do I need in the shot? Any important props or vehicles in the shot? What type of shot is it? (close-up, wide-shot,etc.) What is the shot’s angle? High angle? Low angle? Do actors or vehicle need to move within the frame, and what is the direction of that action in the shot? In what direction does the camera go? Do you need special lighting?
    • While planning each shot panel, ask yourself these questions: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● What is the location setting? How many actors do I need in the shot? Any important props or vehicles in the shot? What type of shot is it? (close-up, wide-shot,etc.) What is the shot’s angle? High angle? Low angle? Do actors or vehicle need to move within the frame, and what is the direction of that action in the shot? In what direction does the camera go? Do you need special lighting? Do you need any special effects?
    • Section 3 Creating a shot list.
    • ● Decide whether you want to storyboard every shot or just the ones that require special planning, like action or special effects.
    • ● Decide whether you want to storyboard every shot or just the ones that require special planning, like action or special effects. ● If you want to keep a certain style throughout the film like low angles, special lenses, or a certain lighting style (for example, shadows) then you may want to storyboard every shot.
    • ● Decide whether you want to storyboard every shot or just the ones that require special planning, like action or special effects. ● If you want to keep a certain style throughout the film like low angles, special lenses, or a certain lighting style (for example, shadows) then you may want to storyboard every shot. ● If you only want to storyboard certain scenes that may require special planning keep a shot list of all the events or scenes that jump out at you so that you can translate them into separate storyboard panels.
    • Here’s an example of a shot list:
    • Conclusion Constructing storyboard panels.
    • A storyboard panel is basically just a box containing the illustration of the shot you envision for your film.
    • Ways to obtain storyboard panels:
    • Ways to obtain storyboard panels: ● You can either purchase pads of storyboard panels.
    • Ways to obtain storyboard panels: ● You can either purchase pads of storyboard panels. ● Draw your own panels — four to six on a regular 8-1/2 x 11 piece of paper (keeping them at a legible size).
    • Ways to obtain storyboard panels: ● You can either purchase pads of storyboard panels. ● Draw your own panels — four to six on a regular 8-1/2 x 11 piece of paper (keeping them at a legible size). ● Print blank storyboard panels using your desktop computer.
    • Quick steps to design your own storyboard panels:
    • Quick steps to design your own storyboard panels: 1. Decide which shape and size of panel to use.
    • Quick steps to design your own storyboard panels: 1. Decide which shape and size of panel to use. ● A television storyboard panel resembles a square, only slightly wider.
    • Quick steps to design your own storyboard panels: 1. Decide which shape and size of panel to use. ● A television storyboard panel resembles a square, only slightly wider. ● Theatrical feature-film storyboards are rectangular in shape, almost twice as wide as a television screen.
    • 2. Draw the shape of the panel and add a thick black border (approximately 1/2 inch in width) around the square or rectangle.
    • 2. Draw the shape of the panel and add a thick black border (approximately 1/2 inch in width) around the square or rectangle. ● Placing a border around each panel helps you to see each panel as a definitive separate shot, and subliminally creates the illusion of a TV or darkened theater around your shot, giving you an idea of what that individual image will look like.
    • 3. Lastly, create a description panel by drawing a 1-inch empty box just below the bottom of the frame panel
    • 3. Lastly, create a description panel by drawing a 1-inch empty box just below the bottom of the frame panel ● Use this box to write down important information that describes in detail what the illustration doesn't show or enhances what is drawn in the frame above. For example, include any important dialogue, camera directions, scene numbers, or special-effects instructions.
    • There you have it!
    • There you have it! Once you’ve finished, your storyboard should look a little like this:
    • Thank you for your time!