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2010 urban soccer collaborative achieving quality outputs

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This presentation provides a brief overview of Girls in the Game programs, sample assessment tools from our best practices manual; and some of our best practices for leading the program and recruiting …

This presentation provides a brief overview of Girls in the Game programs, sample assessment tools from our best practices manual; and some of our best practices for leading the program and recruiting participants.


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  • Questions that are not directly related to the topic being discussed will be placed in the parking lot to be addressed at a later time.
  • There are so many amazing programs here – and what makes these groups so amazing are the dedicated adults who are leading them. Who knows the #1 reason why kids join sports programs? (FUN). This is true and one of the most critical factors that determines whether they’ll keep coming. As adults – we know sports programs, especially those that use youth development, are so much more than fun and games. Today, we want to tell you a little about our program, why it works, how it works and hope some of our suggestions may work for you. Girls in the Game does not solely teach girls how to play sports, we use sports to teach girls. We focus on 4 pillars: Sports. Health. Leadership. Life
  • We know girls are strong and smart and when given the chance they can develop their full potential and make the world a better place. Kids learn by doing (so do we) – so in our programs we have an opportunity to NOT JUST TELL, BUT SHOW THEM and let them experience what it feels like to feel capable, confident and healthy. If we are standing on the sidelines with our whistles or talking to other adults, we will miss those teachable moments found through play. We have the best jobs – we have the opportunity to make a difference everyday and help the kids we work with do the same. These are the year round programs we lead for over 3,000 girls in Chicago every year.
  • We often get asked why girls. It’s a good question and I have a good answer. One size does not fit all – although there are so many co-ed programs I know who are doing outstanding work – and lead numerous successful mixed gender programs (art, music, tutoring, etc.) the reality is that addressing the needs of the whole girl or boy (sports, health, nutrition, body image, self -esteem and leadership) is very different -- and I mean more than recess, free play or even a league – what I am talking about is using our programs to impact youth development. Differences PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: exposure, comfort, physical abilities, process vs. outcome HEALTH: hygiene, body-image, etc. LEADERSHIP: speaking up, using your voice, dealing with aggression, feelings, etc.
  • The three components are always integrated – Can’t play, but eat poorly Can’t eat well, but not move Underlying issues of self-esteem, worth and belonging have got to be addresses Ongoing and long-term Pay it forward Families Evaluation
  • Today we are going to focus on one of our core programs and the research that shows it works: Girls in the Game Elementary – our after school program for girls in grades 3-5 30 weeks, 90 minutes – about half the time is dedicated to the sport and the remaining half to health/nutrition and leadership skills (all include a total of at least 60 minutes of physical activity) Minimize waiting in lines Small groups Directions and Overviews are given while stretching Interactive lessons How many have the opportunity to evaluate your programs? Girls in the Game is very fortunate – and has had a strong relationship with Dr Bohnert and the research team from Loyola University for many years. Amanda Ward, one of the leaders of the research team is going to provide a brief overview of the most recent findings of their independent evaluation of our program.
  • The Best Practice Manual offers youth service providers a comprehensive guide to develop and implement a quality and successful youth program. We have taken what we know works and created a comprehensive guide build and improve programming.
  • The chapters we have included are what we believe to be all the pieces to create and implement a quality youth program. Plan for putting policies and procedures in place for a quality program.
  • RECRUIT participants Successful recruitment involves identifying a target population, choosing effective recruitment locations and methods and speaking about the program with girls and their parents or guardians. Once enrolled, communication with participants and their parents or guardians prior to the program start is recommended.
  • We encourage you to look at each of these items and evaluate your program based on each item, but we would like you to assess yourself on the last item in the list. 3- have this in place and is effective 2 we have started but needs work 1- we do not have this in place Gather into groups and rate yourselves on #5.
  • According to how you assessed yourself on the assessment look at each question on the chart and answer them for your group. Come up with the Best Practice or best way to address the issue and record it on the poster.
  • These steps are important because it improves retention, builds a positive relationship with parents, ensures parents that their child is safe at programming, communicate expectations of participant/parent/coaches, and sends a message that we are committed to making this a quality and positive experience for everyone involved. How many of you do some or all of these things?
  • To make sure that our messages are being communicated in a consistent way we created scripts for staff to use when calling parents or guardians. This helps staff feel more comfortable when calling and eliminates miscommunication between program staff and families. Here is a sample script.
  • LEAD the program Quality programs provide a safe and engaging environment that motivates participants to reach their fullest potential. While there is no single component for success, the skills, preparedness and commitment of the individuals leading the program is essential.
  • We encourage you to look at each of these items and evaluate your program based on each item, but we would like you to assess yourself on the highlighted items on the list. 3- have this in place and is effective 2 we have started but needs work 1- we do not have this in place
  • According to how you assessed yourself on the assessment look at each question on the chart and answer them for your group. Come up with the Best Practice or best way to address the issue and record it on the poster.
  • Strategy: Proximity When to use : When a participant has trouble waiting for her turn or when two participants talk or disrupt activity. Description: The Coach sits or moves close to a participant who has difficulty focusing or two participants who are being disruptive. Coaches should be spread out throughout the room. Example: “I need a place in the circle, and I would like to sit by both of you.” Or a cue to the other Coach could be “I am going to work with this half of the group and Coach (name) will work with the other group.”
  • We believe it is important that girls make a commitment to attend all days of programming. To ensure this we have a detailed plan for retention.
  • Professional development for interested youth service providers on specific topics.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Program Quality Standards: Components of a “Healthy” Youth Development Program Achieving Quality Inputs Presenters Amy Skeen Monique Turner Kristi Skala
    • 2. Workshop Objectives
      • I. Hear about Girls in the Game, a successful program model that uses an integrated curriculum of physical activity, nutrition education and leadership/self-esteem development
      • II. Experience Girls in the Game Best Practice Manual through assessment activities
      • III. Learn Best Practices for Recruiting Participants and Leading the Program
      • Learn how you can become a part of Spring Training
    • 3. Parking Lot ?
    • 4. Sports. Health. Leadership. Life.
    • 5. Mission Girls in the Game provides and promotes sports & fitness opportunities, nutrition & health education, and leadership development to enhance the overall health and well-being of all girls.                                                                                                                     Since 1995, has emerged as a leading girls' health and fitness organization in Chicago. Every year, Girls in the Game empowers more than 3,000 girls to make healthier choices and develop the confidence and leadership skills they need to succeed on and off the field. From yoga and lacrosse to soccer and dance, Girls in the Game, exposes girls to a wide and energizing mix of sports and fitness activities year round. Our Programs: Girls’ Advisory Board After School Summer Camp Varsity Squad Game Days Leadership Development Parent and Family Initiatives Spring Training Girls are encouraged to get in the game —any game—so they can learn teamwork and determination, and to make choices that lead to a happier, healthier life.
    • 6. About the Girls Girls in the Game welcomes girls from diverse backgrounds and abilities, ages 6-18. Participants live in a cross-section of neighborhoods on the north, south, and west sides of Chicago, as well as in the suburbs.
    • 7.
      • About our Model
      • Girls in the Game is one of the only
      • organizations, in Chicago and the nation,
      • that addresses girls’ physical, mental, and
      • emotional health with a comprehensive
      • approach to their well-being. 
      • Unlike many traditional youth programs,
      • Girls in the Game:
      • addresses the needs of the whole girl
      • exposes girls to multiple sports and fitness activities always integrated with nutrition & health education and leadership development
      • engages girls and young women ages 6-18 year-round and for the long term
      • provides peer-to-peer education as well as parent and community involvement
      • uses a comprehensive program that’s proven to work
    • 8.
      • An innovative citywide collaborative with schools, parks, and community centers to provide after-school programming for girls in grades 3-5
          • Evidence based
          • Integrates physical activity, nutrition & health and leadership development
          • 30 weeks of programming, 90 minute sessions
          • Age appropriate, girl-specific
          • Aligned to standards
          • Offers healthy snack
          • Includes community service
          • Girls in the Game on the Go
          • (parent and family take-homes)
      Girls in the Game After School Elementary
    • 9.  
    • 10.
      • Spring Training
      • Best Practice Manual Chapters
        • BUILD the team
        • ESTABLISH the program
        • RECRUIT participants
        • LEAD the program
        • INVOLVE parents and guardians
        • ENSURE safety and health
        • EVALUATE program effectiveness
    • 11. Recruit Participants
      • SELECT the age group
      • ESTABLISH enrollment criteria
      • DEVELOP a recruitment process
      • COLLECT registration packets
      • WELCOME participants
    • 12. RECRUIT PARTICIPANTS ASSESSMENT
      • (Rank yourself: 3=completed, 2=started, 1=not started)
      •  
      •  
      • 1. We have identified a target age group or population that is best
      • served by the program. 3 2 1
      • 2. We have enrollment criteria which determine who can participate
      • and who is placed on a waiting list. 3 2 1
      • 3. Coaches follow a standardized process for recruiting participants. 3 2 1
      • 4. We have a standardized and effective method for collecting completed
      • registrations. 3 2 1
      • 5. We have a standardized and effective process for welcoming
      • participants to the program. 3 2 1
    • 13. RECRUIT PARTICIPANTS ACTION PLAN  Review the items in the Recruit Participants Assessment sheet. Record each item that received a rank of 1 or 2 in the Action Plan below. This tool can help provide a measurable plan to improve skill or operations, as needed. What needs improvement? What will be done? Who is responsible and what resources are needed? When will this be completed? 1. We have identified a target age group or population that is best served by the program. 2. We have enrollment criteria which determine who can participate and who is placed on a waiting list. 3. Coaches follow a standardized process for recruiting participants. 4. We have a standardized and effective method for collecting completed registrations. 5. We have a standardized and effective process for welcoming participants to the program.
    • 14. Recruit Participants
      • WELCOME Participants
      • Send welcome letter to all parents or guardians
      • Coordinator or Coach calls each parent or guardian
      • Coaches call parents to give positive feedback within the first two weeks
      • Coaches track all calls in a call log
    • 15. Sample Call Script
      • When speaking with a parent or guardian:
      • “ Hello, this is Coach __________ with Girls in the Game Elementary, and I am calling to welcome (participant name). Our program will take place on (day of the week) from (time) at (location). The goals of the program are for girls to learn how to be active, make healthy choices and feel good about themselves, all while having fun and meeting friends. We sent home information on the program which describes the sports and fitness, nutrition and health education and leadership development activities she will learn. Do you have any questions? Thank you for your time. May I speak with (participant) to welcome her personally?”
    • 16. Lead the Program
      • CREATE a welcoming environment
      • DEVELOP a set routine
      • ESTABLISH group norms and expectations
      • GUIDE AND MANAGE challenging behavior
      • ENGAGE resistant or withdrawn girls
      • MINIMIZE exclusion or separation
      • CONCLUDE each session with a wrap up
      • UTILIZE retention strategies
    • 17. LEAD THE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT  (Rank yourself: 3=completed, 2=started, 1=not started)
      • 1. Coaches are familiar with the activity space in advance of the first day of programming. 3 2 1
      • 2. Coaches model best practices for youth (i.e. no gum, pop, cell phones). 3 2 1
      • 3. Programming follows a regular schedule and routine. 3 2 1
      • 4. Participants understand and follow rules. 3 2 1
      • 5. We have a policy for managing challenging youth behavior. 3 2 1
      • 6. Our coaches are trained on and understand the reasons for youth misbehavior. 3 2 1
      • 7. Our coaches effectively use behavior management strategies before using time outs, breaks
      • or other discipline methods. 3 2 1
      • 8. Our coaches effectively encourage youth to support each other and attempt to successfully resolve
      • conflicts on their own before adult intervention. 3 2 1
      • 9. Our coaches help develop a positive learning environment by using positive reinforcement and
      • giving participants choices. 3 2 1
      • 10. Our coaches are trained to effectively engage resistant or withdrawn youth. 3 2 1
      • 11. Our coaches are trained to effectively minimize exclusion or separation. 3 2 1
      • 12. We have a standardized and effective process to wrap up each session. 3 2 1
      • 13. We implement effective retention strategies that result in high attendance. 3 2 1
    • 18. LEAD THE PROGRAM ACTION PLAN   Review the items in the Lead the Program Assessment sheet. Record each item that received a rank of 1 or 2 in the Action Plan below. This tool can help provide a measurable plan to improve skill or operations, as needed. What needs improvement? What will be done? Who is responsible and what resources are needed? When will this be completed? 6. 7. Our coaches effectively use behavior management strategies before using time outs, breaks or other discipline methods. 8. 9. 13.
    • 19. Lead the Program
      • GUIDE AND MANAGE challenging behavior
      • Consistent coaching among both coaches
      • Provide specific praise and encouragement
      • Encourage participants to support each other
      • Utilize multiple strategies to reinforce participants positive behavior
      • Strategy: Nonverbal Reinforcement
      • When to use: A participant displays positive behavior and the Coach cannot verbally acknowledge the action because she is far away or the activity is too loud.
      • Description: Warm smile, reassuring nod, high five or thumbs up.
      • Example: A participant retrieves a basketball ball and gives it to her teammate to take a turn and then looks toward the Coach who responds with a thumb-up.
    • 20. Lead the Program
      • MINIMIZE exclusion or separation
      • Recognize participants for a variety of skills
      • Avoid tactics that may make participants hostile or anxious
      • Coaches select teams and partners using various methods
        • Assign each participant a different number and have each participant with an odd number pair up with a participant with an even number.
        • Group participants by favorite subjects, birthday months, how many siblings they have, etc.
    • 21. Lead the Program
      • UTILIZE retention strategies
      • w21
      • Set attendance expectation and goals
      • Take attendance and keep records on file
      • Implement retention strategies
        • 1 st absence- Send miss you cards
        • 2 nd absence- Call home and gets confirmation of rejoining
        • 3 rd final attempt to confirm participation and if needed send withdraw notice
    • 22. Spring Training
      • Professional Development
      • Certification Program
        • Best Practice Manual
        • Spring Training Curriculum
        • Follow up support
      • Web Based access
        • Resources
        • Tools
        • For more information on Spring Training please go to our website
        • www.girlsinthegame.org
    • 23. Amy Skeen, MSW, LCSW, Executive Director , holds her Master ユ s Degree in Social Work from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Amy has fifteen years of experience in nonprofit program operations, specifically working with youth and families. She earned a Type 73 certificate that qualifies her to provide social work services to children with special needs in a school setting. Amy has received numerous awards for her leadership including One of Chicago ユ s Top Women Making a Difference for Girls, (Women Employed 2008). Kristi Skala, MS, Training and Evaluation Manager , holds her Masters in School and College Health Programs from Indiana University. Kristi is passionate about health education for youth, especially knowing the impact sports and living a healthy lifestyle had on her growing up. Upon graduating from her Master ユ s program she became the Curriculum Developer for the Physical Education Walk Across Illinois School Fitness Program. Monique Turner, Programs Director , holds a Masters of Arts in Educational Leadership/School Leadership from Northeastern Illinois University. Prior to joining Girls in the Game, Monique led programs at the Chicago Park District and Chicago Public Schools. Monique is passionate about coordinating healthy lifestyle programs for girls because girls who are physically active are more likely to be successful in and out of school. About the Presenters