Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION

1,276
views

Published on

Young Leaders Program -National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies Tokyo, Japan 2012

Young Leaders Program -National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies Tokyo, Japan 2012

Published in: Education, News & Politics

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,276
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
66
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. by Ginandjar KartasasmitaNational Graduate Institute for Policy Studies Tokyo, Japan 2012
  • 2. THE INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO • a country of 240 million (as of 2010), • an archipelago strung 5000 kilometers along the equator. • more than 13,000 islands, 5,000 are inhabited. • more than 200 ethnic groups and 350 languages and dialects. • 85 to 90% are Muslims.  Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 2
  • 3. Release of Political  Prisoners International  Multi Party Acknowledgement Freedom  of  Speech • Strong Parliament • Constitutional Political Human Rights Court Gus Dur Rule of Law • Robust Civil   Habibie Society Good Governance • Free Press Decentralization Megawati SBY Early Stage of  Economic Recovery Fall of  Reversed New Order Economic  Constitutional Return of  Reform 1999 2004 Democratic Downturn Election Amendments Election Government Economic Stability Early Stage of  Return of Growth Economic  Recovery Return of Poverty  Reduction Foundation for  Sustainable  Economic Growth Fight Against  Corruption Independence of  Economic Monetary  Regional  Authority Autonomy Dismantling  Monopolies Peace in Free and Fair  •Aceh Competition •Papua Good Corporate  Governance Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 3
  • 4. Active Formal  Opposition Externally Induced SBY vs MEGAWATI Economic  Dynamic Response Economic & 2008 2010 SBY Political Crisis Election Reelected Condition Political  Response Dissatisfied  PublicNostalgia forOriginal  1945 Constitution Call for 5th AmendmentDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 4
  • 5. CONTENTSA HISTORICAL OVERVIEW – THE PRE‐COLONIAL KINGDOMS  – DUTCH COLONIALISM  – RISE OF INDONESIA’S NATIONALISM  – CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE  – BIRTH OF A NATION  – WAR OF INDEPENDENCE 1945 ‐ 1949  – RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE  – AN ATTEMPT AT LIBERAL DEMOCRACY  – THE TURBULENT YEARS  – GUIDED DEMOCRACY  – THE CONFRONTATION AGAINST THE WEST  – SUKARNO: THE ROMANTIC REVOLUTIONARY  – THE END OF GUIDED DEMOCRACY AND THE RISE OF THE NEW  ORDER  5
  • 6. CONTENTSINDONESIA UNDER THE NEW ORDER – POLITICAL SYSTEM UNDER THE NEW ORDER  – TO WHAT EXTENT WAS INDONESIA A DEMOCRACY ?  – “FUSION” OF POLITICAL PARTY (1973)  – DEMOCRATIC OR NON‐DEMOCRATIC?  – WHAT KEPT THE REGIME IN POWER SO LONG?  – DEVELOPMENT TRILOGY  – POLITICAL STABILITY  – ECONOMIC GROWTH AND EQUITY  – WHAT WENT WRONG?  – A RENEWED MANDATE: WASTED OPPORTUNITY FOR CHANGE – THE FLASH POINT – THE FINAL CURTAIN  – CONCLUSION 6
  • 7. CONTENTS ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY  HABIBIE GOVERNMENT – INAUSPICIOUS BEGINNING  – THE LEGITIMACY DILEMMA  – MPR SESSION  – MPR SPECIAL SESSION  – OPPOSITION AGAINST HABIBIE  – HABIBIE’S POLITICAL PILLARS  – COMMUNAL STRIFE  – LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY  – POLITICAL PARTIES AND GENERAL ELECTION 1999  – SOME OF THE IMPORTANT POLITICAL LAWS  – IRONICALLY  – THE PITFALLS  – EAST TIMOR  – BANK BALI CASE  – THE END OF THE BEGINNING 7
  • 8. CONTENTSABDURRAHMAN WAHID GOVERNMENT  – DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION  – THE EUPHORIA  – POLITICAL LIMBO  – DISHONORING THE DEAL  – ECONOMIC SLIPPAGE  – DEJA VU?  – CORRUPTION SCANDALS  – DEMOCRATIC REVERSAL  – IMPEACHMENT MEGAWATI GOVERNMENT – THE DOWNSIDE  – AUTHORITARIAN NOSTALGIA  8
  • 9. CONTENTSCONSTITUTIONAL REFORM – THE CONSTITUTION: A SACRED DOCUMENT?  – THE WEAKNESSES OF THE ORIGINAL UUD ‘45  – THE EVOLVING POLITICAL SYSTEM  – GOALS OF REFORM  – THE METHODOLOGICAL MODEL OF CONSTITUTIONAL  REFORM  – THE MECHANICS OF REFORM AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION  – THE AMENDMENT PROCESS  – THE FIRST AMENDMENT 1999  – THE SECOND AMENDMENT 2000  – THE THIRD AMENDMENT 2001  – THE FOURTH AMENDMENT 2002  – STRONG FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY  9
  • 10. CONTENTS PRACTICING DEMOCRACY: The 2004 General  Elections: Significant Beginnings   – CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM  – STATE INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE AMENDED CONSTITUTION  – REMAKING THE POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS  – LEGISLATIVE ELECTION  – LEGISLATIVE ELECTION  – PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION  – THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE 2004 ELECTION  – DIRECT REGIONAL ELECTIONS  2009 GENERAL ELECTION DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION: An Unfinished  Business LESSONS TO BE LEARNED POST‐SCRIPT 10
  • 11. A HISTORICAL OVERVIEW 11
  • 12. THE PRE‐COLONIAL KINGDOMS RULED BY SEVERAL HINDU/BUDDHIST  KINGDOMS. ESTABLISHED CONTACTS AND RELATIONS WITH  OTHER POWERS IN ASIA SUCH AS CHINA, INDIA,  AND CONTINENTAL SOUTH EAST ASIA . IN THE ISLAMIC ERA MOSTLY MUSLIM  KINGDOMS SPREAD THROUGHOUT THE  ARCHIPELAGO.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 12
  • 13. DUTCH COLONIALISM  FIRST CAME TO INDONESIA AT THE END OF THE  16TH CENTURY AS TRADERS, AND LATER AS  COLONIZERS. THE COLONIAL RULE WAS ESTABLISHED GRADUALLY,  ISLAND‐BY‐ISLAND, AFTER CONQUERING OR  TRICKING THE VARIOUS KINGDOMS TO  SUBSERVIENCE. BY PLAYING OFF INDIGENOUS KINGDOMS AGAINST  EACH OTHER AND EXPLOITING DIVISIONS AND  SCRAMBLES FOR POWER WITHIN THE ROYAL  HOUSEHOLDS. THE DUTCH RULED THE INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO  FOR AROUND THREE AND A HALF CENTURIES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 13
  • 14. RISE OF INDONESIA’S NATIONALISM  MAY 20, 1908 THE BIRTH OF AN INTELLECTUAL  ORGANIZATION BUDI UTOMO, COMMEMORATED  AS THE  “NATIONAL AWAKENING DAY.”  OCTOBER 28, 1928 DECLARATION OF THE YOUTH  OATH: ONE COUNTRY, ONE NATION, ONE  LANGUAGE: INDONESIA. IN WORLD WAR II, THE JAPANESE MILITARY DROVE  OUT THE DUTCH AND OCCUPIED INDONESIA AS THE  NEW COLONIAL RULER.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 14
  • 15. CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE  THE DEFEAT OF THE DUTCH AT THE HANDS OF AN  ASIAN POWER FUELED THE RISE OF INDIGENOUS  RESISTANCES. THE JAPANESE ALLOWED A COMMITTEE TO BE  ESTABLISHED TO “INVESTIGATE THE PREPARATION  OF INDEPENDENCE.” WHAT PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATION THE  INDEPENDENT INDONESIA STATE SHOULD BE BUILT?Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 15
  • 16.  THE FOUNDING FATHERS OF INDONESIA’S  INDEPENDENCE AGREED ON PANCASILA AS THE  STATE PHILOSOPHY. PANCASILA: 1) BELIEF IN THE ONE AND ONLY  GOD; 2) JUST AND CIVILIZED HUMANITY; 3) THE  UNITY OF INDONESIA; 4) DEMOCRACY; 5) SOCIAL  JUSTICE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 16
  • 17.  THE JAKARTA CHARTER:  BELIEF IN ONE AND ONLY GOD AND ENSURING  THE FREEDOM OF WORSHIP, WITH AN  ADDITIONAL STIPULATION THAT THE ISLAMIC  SYARIAH (OR LAWS) SHOULD BE PRACTICED BY  ITS ADHERENTS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 17
  • 18. BIRTH OF A NATION  ALL THE NECESSARY ELEMENTS FOR AN INDEPENDENT  NATION HAD ALREADY EXISTED WHEN THE JAPANESE  SURRENDERED TO THE ALLIED POWERS. AUGUST 17 1945, SUKARNO AND HATTA ON BEHALF  OF THE PEOPLE, PROCLAIMED THE INDEPENDENCE OF  INDONESIA. AUGUST 18, 1945: THE PROMULGATION OF THE 1945  CONSTITUTION, AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF  GOVERNMENT WITH SUKARNO AS PRESIDENT AND  HATTA AS VICE PRESIDENT. INDONESIA UNDER THE 1945 CONSTITUTION: A  NATIONALIST, NON‐SECTARIAN, UNITARIAN REPUBLIC  WITH A PRESIDENTIAL SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 18
  • 19. WAR OF INDEPENDENCE 1945 ‐ 1949  THE DUTCH REFUSED TO RECOGNIZE THE  INDEPENDENCE OF THEIR FORMER COLONY.  ASSISTED BY THEIR ALLIES PUT AN ATTEMPT TO  REESTABLISH CONTROL.  THE FLEDGLING NATION HAD ALSO TO FACE  DOMESTIC CHALLENGES: MUSLIM EXTREMISTS  AND COMMUNIST REVOLT IN 1948.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 19
  • 20. RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE IN DECEMBER 1949, THE DUTCH FINALLY RECOGNIZED  THE INDEPENDENCE OF INDONESIA IN THE FORM OF  A FEDERATED REPUBLIC. AUGUST L950 THE FEDERAL STATE WAS ABOLISHED  AND THE UNITARIAN REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA  REESTABLISHED. PROVISIONAL CONSTITUTION OF 1950: A  PARLIAMENTARY SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT HEADED  BY A PRIME MINISTER RESPONSIBLE TO A PARLIAMENT,  WHILE THE PRESIDENT WAS ONLY THE HEAD OF STATE  AND HAD ALMOST NO POLITICAL POWER.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 20
  • 21. AN ATTEMPT AT LIBERAL DEMOCRACY  IN 1955 A FREE AND FAIR MULTIPARTY ELECTION IN THE FIRST  GENERAL ELECTION, TO ELECT THE PARLIAMENT AND THE  CONSTITUTIONAL ASSEMBLY (KONSTITUANTE). THE WEAK SHORT‐LIVED GOVERNMENTS CREATED A  LEADERSHIP VACUUM AND INDECISIVENESS AT TIME WHEN  STRONG LEADERSHIP WAS NEEDED. IN 1957 THE GOVERNMENT DECLARED A STATE OF EMERGENCY THE KONSTITUANTE FAILED TO REACH THE NECESSARY  MAJORITY TO GET AN AGREEMENT ON A NEW CONSTITUTION. ON JULY 5TH, L959, THE PRESIDENT SUKARNO DISSOLVED THE  PARLIAMENT AND KONSTITUANTE WITH A PRESIDENTIAL  DECREE AND RESTORED THE 1945 CONSTITUTION. SUKARNO DECLARED THAT LIBERAL DEMOCRACY, HAD FAILED  IN INDONESIA AND HAD BROUGHT ONLY DISUNITY AND MISERY  TO THE PEOPLE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 21
  • 22. THE TURBULENT YEARS CENTRAL AUTHORITY BEING CHALLENGED BY SEPARATIST  MOVEMENTS IN THE REGIONS. THE DARUL ISLAM CONTINUED TO POSE SECURITY  PROBLEMS. CONFLICT WITH THE FORMER COLONIAL MASTER HAD  RESUMED, AS THE DUTCH KEPT THEIR HOLD ON WEST  IRIAN. SINCE MOST WESTERN COUNTRIES SUPPORTED THE  DUTCH POSITION ON THE WEST IRIAN ISSUE, INDONESIA  TURNED TO THE EASTERN BLOC TO PROCURE THE  MILITARY EQUIPMENT. THE RISE OF THE MILITARY ROLE IN POLITICS: THE DUAL  FUNCTIONS OF MILITARY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 22
  • 23. GUIDED DEMOCRACY  SUKARNO PROCLAIMED “GUIDED DEMOCRACY” AS THE  SUITABLE SYSTEM FOR INDONESIA. THE PROVISIONAL MPR CONFERRED UPON SUKARNO  THE TITLE OF THE GREAT LEADER OF THE REVOLUTION,  WHICH IN EFFECT CARRIED MORE POWER THAN WHAT  THE MERE TITLE MAY SUGGEST. SUKARNO ENDED INDONESIA’S FIRST ATTEMPT AT  DEMOCRACY. INDONESIA NOW JOINED THE GROUP OF  COUNTRIES TO REVERSE FROM DEMOCRACY TO  AUTHORITARIANISM. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 23
  • 24. THE CONFRONTATION AGAINST THE WEST PRESIDENT SUKARNO WAS OPPOSED TO THE  ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW MALAYSIAN STATE, AND  ACCUSED IT AS NO MORE THAN A WESTERN  NEOCOLONIAL PLOY. TO UNDERTAKE MILITARY CONFRONTATION, INDONESIA  BECAME MORE DEPENDENT ON ECONOMIC AND MILITARY  AID FROM THE SOVIET BLOC. SUKARNO DEVELOPED THE IDEA OF FORMING THE NEW  EMERGING FORCE AS A COUNTERWEIGHT TO WESTERN‐ DOMINATED INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. ISOLATION FROM THE REST OF THE WORLD REACHED ITS  PEAK WHEN SUKARNO ANNOUNCED INDONESIA’S  WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNITED NATIONS IN JANUARY  1965.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 24
  • 25. SUKARNO: THE ROMANTIC REVOLUTIONARY THE ORDINARY INDONESIAN PEOPLE LOVED  SUKARNO HE WAS A MAN OF VISION, AN ARDENT  NATIONALIST ALBEIT A ROMANTIC IDEALIST.  HE IMBUED AMONG THE PEOPLE THE PRIDE OF  BEING INDONESIAN AND SPENT ALL HIS ADULT LIFE  PROJECTING THE DIGNITY OF A NATION WITH LONG  HISTORY, CULTURE, AND TRADITION. HE WAS REGARDED IN MANY PARTS OF THE WORLD  AS A GREAT LEADER AND A WORLD STATESMANDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 25
  • 26.  INDONESIA UNDER SUKARNO TOOK A LEADING  ROLE IN ASIAN AFRICAN COUNTRIES SOLIDARITY  AND FIGHT AGAINST COLONIALISM SUKARNO TOGETHER WITH THIRD WORLD LEADERS  INITIATED THE NON‐ALIGNED MOVEMENT, WHICH  UNTIL TODAY STILL EXISTS BUT HIS MISGUIDED ECONOMIC POLICIES BASED ON  THE NOTION OF A “GUIDED ECONOMY” BROUGHT  CHAOS TO THE ECONOMY AND INCREASED  SUFFERING FOR THE COMMON PEOPLEDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 26
  • 27. THE END OF GUIDED DEMOCRACY AND  THE RISE OF THE NEW ORDER ON SEPTEMBER 30TH 1965, AN ABORTED COUP  D’ETAT WAS ALLEGEDLY STAGED BY THE  COMMUNIST PARTY TWO MILITARY FIGURES ESCAPED FROM THE  ASSASSINATION ATTEMPT, GENERAL NASUTION AND  MAYOR GENERAL SUHARTO PROCEEDED TO MOBILIZE THE LOYAL MILITARY  FORCES, AND NEUTRALIZED THE UNITS THAT WERE  INVOLVED IN THE MUTINY.  THE RIFT OF PRESIDENT SUKARNO AND THE  MILITARY CAME INTO THE OPEN. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 27
  • 28.  ON MAY 11TH 1966 PRESIDENT SUKARNO, UNDER  PRESSURE FROM THE MILITARY AND THE PUBLIC,  ISSUED A LETTER OF INSTRUCTION TO ACCEDE  AUTHORITY OF DAY‐TO‐DAY GOVERNMENT TO  GENERAL SUHARTO IN THE 1968 THE PROVISIONAL MPR DISMISSED  SUKARNO AS PRESIDENT AND APPOINTED GENERAL  SUHARTO AS HIS SUCCESSOR, HENCE RISE OF THE  NEW ORDERDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 28
  • 29. INDONESIA UNDER THE NEW ORDER 29
  • 30. MPR is manifestation of the  people sovereignty has the  People’s Consultative Assembly  authority to: (MPR)  Amend the Constitution.   Elect the President and/or Vice  President.   Impeach the President and/or  Vice‐President. Parliament  Regional  Functional   Determine the State Policy  (DPR) Representatives Group Guidelines. Elected directly  Elected by  Appointed:  by the people Regional  Representative of mass  Assembly organization and Civil  SocietyDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 30
  • 31. POLITICAL SYSTEM UNDER  THE NEW ORDER THE NEW ORDER REGIME RELIED HEAVILY ON A SET  OF STRUCTURES OF IDEAS BASED ON INDONESIAN  CULTURES, ESPECIALLY JAVANESE CULTURE. THE NEW ORDER CARRIED OVER THE “GUIDED  DEMOCRACY” PRINCIPLES OF THE PRECEDING REGIME,  THROUGH A MORE REFINED AND SUBTLE METHOD. THE COMMUNISTS AND THEIR IDEOLOGY BECAME   “PUBLIC ENEMY NUMBER ONE”; ISLAMIC EXTREMISM  RANKED SECOND THE NEW ORDER TRIED TO DEFINE ITS POLITICAL  IDEOLOGY BETWEEN “WESTERN” INDIVIDUALISM AND  “EASTERN” COLLECTIVISM.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 31
  • 32.  IN THE “PANCASILA DEMOCRACY” SYSTEM, THE  WESTERN IDEA OF OPPOSITION WAS REJECTED.  THE SUHARTO REGIME WENT TO GREAT LENGTHS  TO ESTABLISH DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTIONS SUCH AS  POLITICAL PARTIES, GENERAL ELECTIONS, AND  ELECTED PARLIAMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 32
  • 33. TO WHAT EXTENT WAS INDONESIA A DEMOCRACY ?   GOLKAR, THE RULING ‘PARTY’, WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1964  ORIGINALLY AS AN EXTENDED ARM OF THE MILITARY TO  COMBAT THE COMMUNIST PARTY (PKI) THROUGH  POLITICAL MEANS.  THE FIRST ELECTION UNDER THE NEW ORDER WAS HELD IN  1971 PARTICIPATED BY NINE POLITICAL PARTIES AND  GOLKAR.  IN 1973 THE “FUSION” WAS COMPLETED, IN WHICH THE  ISLAMIC PARTIES MERGED INTO PPP, AND THE NATIONALIST  AND CHRISTIAN PARTIES “FUSED” INTO PDI.  IN EVERY GENERAL ELECTION FROM 1977 TO 1997 WAS  CONTESTED BY THESE THREE PARTIES.  GOLKAR UNFAILINGLY WINNING EVERY ELECTION,  GARNERING AT LEAST TWO THIRD OF THE VOTES. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 33
  • 34. “FUSION” OF POLITICAL PARTY (1973) GOLKAR PPP: PDI: NU PNI Parkindo Parmusi Katolik PSII IPKI Perti MurbaDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 34
  • 35. DEMOCRATIC OR NON‐DEMOCRATIC? THE WAY THE SYSTEM WORKED DURING THE NEW ORDER  OBVIOUSLY DID NOT MEET THE BASIC PRINCIPLES REQUIRED  IN A DEMOCRACY IN TERMS OF POLITICAL PARTIES,  ELECTIONS AND REPRESENTATION AS ARGUED BY MOST  SCHOLARLY LITERATURE.  THE EXISTENCE OF CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS AND INTEREST  GROUPS WAS HIGHLY REGULATED, AND ONLY THE ONES  THAT WERE ESTABLISHED OR RECOGNIZED BY THE  GOVERNMENT WERE ALLOWED TO EXIST, THESE INCLUDING  THE BUSINESS, LABOR, JOURNALIST, YOUTH, AND WOMEN  ORGANIZATIONS.  THE ABSENCE OF EFFECTIVE OPPOSITION IS ONE OF THE  ESSENTIAL ARGUMENTS REFUTING THE NEW ORDER’S  CLAIM TO DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 35
  • 36. WHAT KEPT THE REGIME IN POWER SO LONG? IF INDONESIA WAS NOT A TRUE DEMOCRATIC SYSTEM OF  GOVERNMENT, WHAT KEPT THE SYSTEM IN POWER FOR SO  LONG AND WHAT WAS THE SOURCE OF ITS RESILIENCE?   PABOTTINGI (1995: 225) REFLECTING THE VIEW OF MANY  ANALYSTS SUGGESTS THAT “…INCUMBENTS AND  SUPPORTERS OF THE NEW ORDER ARGUE ITS LEGITIMACY  ON TWO KEY GROUNDS: POLITICAL STABILITY AND  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.”   THE ENDLESS POLITICAL STRIFE OF THE PREVIOUS SYSTEM OF  PARLIAMENTARY DEMOCRACY AND GUIDED DEMOCRACY  CREATED ACUTE POLITICAL INSTABILITY THAT RENDERED  DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS IMPOSSIBLE AND EVEN  THREATENED THE SURVIVAL OF THE STATE.  Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 36
  • 37.  HUNTINGTON ARGUES THAT MANY AUTHORITARIAN REGIMES  INITIALLY JUSTIFY THEMSELVES BY WHAT HE CALLS A  “NEGATIVE LEGITIMACY,” BASING THEIR CLAIM OF LEGITIMACY  ON THE FAILURE OF DEMOCRATIC SYSTEMS AND PROMISING  THAT THE NEW REGIME IS COMBATING INTERNAL SUBVERSION,  REDUCING SOCIAL TURMOIL, REESTABLISHING LAW AND  ORDER, ELIMINATING CORRUPTION AND VENAL CIVILIAN  POLITICIANS, AND ENHANCING NATIONAL VALUES.   THESE WERE THE EXACT RATIONALES THE NEW ORDER PUT  FORWARD WHEN IT EMERGED IN 1966 WITH THE SUPPORT OF  STUDENTS, INTELLECTUALS AND VARIOUS MASS AND  RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS.   AND INDEED THOSE OBSERVATIONS HELP EXPLAIN WHY THE  NEW ORDER GOVERNMENT UNDER SUHARTO HAD BEEN ABLE  TO STAY IN POWER FOR SO LONG: IT DELIVERED!  Day2_GRIPS  www.ginandjar.com 37
  • 38.  AT ITS INCEPTION THE NEW ORDER CONSIDERED ITSELF TO  BE A REFORMIST GOVERNMENT SUPPORTED BY POPULAR  MOVEMENTS OF STUDENTS AND INTELLECTUALS.  ITS  DRIVE HAD THREE MAIN THRUSTS: A RETURN TO THE 1945  CONSTITUTION; TO CREATE POLITICAL STABILITY; AND TO  AMELIORATE THE PEOPLE’S SUFFERING THROUGH  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.   THE NEW ORDER CREDO OF “THE DEVELOPMENT  TRILOGY,” REFERRED TO POLITICAL STABILITY, ECONOMIC  GROWTH, AND EQUITY.  THIS BECAME THE BATTLE CRY OF  THE NEW ORDER WITH EVERYTHING ELSE SUBORDINATED  TO IT. AND TO A FAIR DEGREE THE NEW ORDER ACHIEVED ITS  GOALS. Day2_GRIPS  www.ginandjar.com 38
  • 39. DEVELOPMENT TRILOGY Stability Growth EquityDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 39
  • 40. POLITICAL STABILITY THE POLITICAL SYSTEM HAD PRODUCED THE  INTENDED RESULT: POLITICAL STABILITY THAT HAD  ENDURED FOR THREE DECADES, SUSTAINING  ECONOMIC GROWTH WHICH IN TURN FURTHER  REINFORCED ITS CLAIM TO LEGITIMACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 40
  • 41. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND EQUITY POLITICAL STABILITY ASSURED, AND WITH  UNIFORMITY OF PURPOSE AND METHOD THE NEW  ORDER EARNESTLY EMBARKED ON ECONOMIC  DEVELOPMENT, WHICH WAS WIDELY CONSIDERED  AS SUCCESSFUL USING VARIOUS STANDARD OF  MEASUREMENTS.  AVERAGE ANNUAL GROWTH IN EXCESS OF 7% LED  TO A MORE THAN 10‐FOLD RISE IN INDONESIANS’  PER CAPITA INCOME AND A DECLINE IN THE  NUMBER OF PEOPLE IN POVERTY FROM AN  ESTIMATED 70% OF THE POPULATION IN THE L960S  TO AROUND 11% BY THE MID‐1990S.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 41
  • 42.  LIFE EXPECTANCY ROSE AND INFANT MORTALITY  DECLINED DRAMATICALLY.  EIGHT OUT OF TEN OF THE POPULATION HAD  ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE AND TWO OUT OF THREE  TO SAFE DRINKING WATER, SELF‐SUFFICIENCY IN  RICE PRODUCTION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 42
  • 43. WHAT WENT WRONG? HUNTINGTON (1991: 54‐55) MAKES THE POINT  THAT THE LEGITIMACY OF AN AUTHORITARIAN  REGIME MIGHT BE UNDERMINED EVEN IF IT DOES  DELIVER ON ITS PROMISES.  “BY ACHIEVING ITS PURPOSE, IT LOST ITS PURPOSE.  THIS REDUCED THE REASONS WHY THE PUBLIC  SHOULD SUPPORT THE REGIME, GIVEN OTHER  COSTS (E.G. LACK OF FREEDOM) CONNECTED WITH  THE REGIME”(1991: 55).  HE POSITS THAT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  PROVIDED THE BASIS FOR DEMOCRACY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 43
  • 44.  HE CITES THE FAMOUS—ALBEIT MUCH CONTESTED‐‐ LIPSET HYPOTHESIS CONCERNING THE RELATIONSHIP  OF WEALTH AND DEMOCRACY: THE WEALTHY  COUNTRIES ARE DEMOCRATIC AND THE MOST  DEMOCRATIC COUNTRIES ARE WEALTHY. HE ARGUES THAT: “IN POOR COUNTRIES  DEMOCRATIZATION IS UNLIKELY; IN RICH COUNTRIES IT  HAS ALREADY OCCURRED.  IN BETWEEN THERE IS A POLITICAL TRANSITION ZONE;  COUNTRIES IN THAT PARTICULAR ECONOMIC STRATUM  ARE MOST LIKELY TO TRANSIT TO DEMOCRACY AND  MOST COUNTRIES THAT TRANSIT TO DEMOCRACY WILL  BE IN THAT STRATUM.” (1991: 60).Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 44
  • 45.  HE MAINTAINS THAT A SOCIAL SCIENTIST WHO  WISHED TO PREDICT FUTURE DEMOCRATIZATION  “WOULD HAVE DONE REASONABLY WELL IF HE  SIMPLY FINGERED THE NON‐DEMOCRATIC  COUNTRIES IN THE $1,000‐$3,000 (GNP PER CAPITA)  TRANSITION ZONE” (1991: 63). FURTHER STUDIES, IN PARTICULAR AN EXTENSIVE  QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS DONE BY  PRZEWORSKY ET.AL. (2000: 92) HAS LENT SUPPORT  TO HUNTINGTON’S THRESHOLD ARGUMENT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 45
  • 46.  IN HIS ACCOUNTABILITY SPEECH TO THE MPR ON  MARCH 1, 1998, PRESIDENT SUHARTO (1998: 16)  REPORTED THAT IN1996, THE YEAR BEFORE THE  ECONOMIC CRISIS SWEPT INDONESIA, ITS GNP PER  CAPITA HAD REACHED $1,155.  ACCORDING TO HUNTINGTON’S THEORY, AT THAT  STAGE INDONESIA HAD ENTERED THE TRANSITION  ZONE, WHICH MEANT THAT EVENTUALLY SOONER  OR LATER POLITICAL CHANGE WOULD HAPPEN. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 46
  • 47.  THREE DECADES OF DEVELOPMENT HAD  SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASED THE LEVEL AND REACH  OF EDUCATION ACROSS THE NATION AND SOCIAL  CLASSES.  WITH EDUCATION CAME ENLIGHTENMENT AND  EMANCIPATION FROM CULTURAL RESTRICTION,  FREEING PEOPLE FROM THE SHACKLES OF OLD  INHIBITIONS AND TRADITIONS.  WITH EDUCATION PEOPLE RECOGNIZED THAT THERE  WERE MORE NEEDS THAN JUST PRIMARY NEEDS OF  FOOD, CLOTHING AND SHELTER. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 47
  • 48.  INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE BROUGHT ABOUT THE  OPENING UP NOT OF ONLY THE INDONESIAN MARKET TO  FOREIGN GOODS BUT ALSO THE INDONESIAN SOCIETY TO  FOREIGN IDEAS.  WITH GLOBALIZATION CAME NOT ONLY THE INTEGRATION  OF MARKETS BUT ALSO THE INTRODUCTION AND  EVENTUAL INTEGRATION OF IDEAS.  WITH THE IMPROVEMENT OF LIVING STANDARD  RESULTING FROM WIDESPREAD BENEFIT OF ECONOMIC  DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION A STRONG MIDDLE  CLASS HAD BEEN FORMED SOON TO BECOME THE BACK  BONE OF THE FORCES FOR POLITICAL EMANCIPATION AND  REFORM.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 48
  • 49.  THE SUPPOSED ULTIMATE VICTORY OF DEMOCRACY AGAINST  ALL OTHER SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT (SEE FUKUYAMA,  1992) HAS CHANGED THE PEOPLE’S POLITICAL ATTITUDES,  OR AT LEAST THE ELITE’S PERCEPTION, OF LIBERAL  DEMOCRACY AS AN EVIL SYSTEM.  THOUSANDS OF INDONESIANS WHO STUDIED AT FOREIGN  UNIVERSITIES, MOST OF THEM IN WESTERN COUNTRIES,  LEARNED FIRST HAND THE SOCIO‐CULTURAL VALUES THAT  HAS BEEN THE DRIVING FORCE BEHIND THE SCIENTIFIC AND  TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES THAT RESULTED IN THE  AFFLUENCE OF THE WESTERN SOCIETIES.  THEY RETURNED HOME IMBUED WITH THE SPIRIT OF  FREEDOM, WHICH WAS A POTENT SOURCE OF INSPIRATION  AND MOTIVATION TO CHANGE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 49
  • 50.  THE BREAKDOWN OF BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION,  THE MAIN FORCE BEHIND GLOBALIZATION AND THE  DRIVE TOWARD A HIGHER DEGREE OF CIVILIZATION,  SWEPT INDONESIA WITH READILY AVAILABLE AND UP TO  DATE INFORMATION.  IT FREED THE INDIVIDUALS FROM THE CONSTRAINTS OF  TIME AND SPACE. CENSORSHIP WAS NO LONGER RELEVANT, BECAUSE ONE  COULD ACCESS INFORMATION THROUGH THE INTERNET,  CNN OR CABLE TV, OR JUST TRAVEL.  THE DIFFUSION OF DEMOCRATIC IDEALS BY THE END OF  THE 20TH CENTURY WAS UNSTOPPABLE. THE INFORMATION BERLIN WALL WAS CRUMBLING  DOWN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 50
  • 51.  WHEN THE GOVERNMENT CLOSED DOWN THE  POPULAR INDONESIA MAGAZINE, TEMPO, BECAUSE  OF IT CRITICAL TONE, IT SIMPLY RESURFACED AS AN  INTERNET WEBSITE.  PEOPLE CLOSELY FOLLOWED THE FALL OF NON‐ DEMOCRATIC SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT IN THE  FORMER COMMUNIST COUNTRIES, THE PHILIPPINES  AND KOREA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 51
  • 52.  AT THE HEIGHT OF THE PRAISE FOR THE NEW  ORDER ACHIEVEMENT, MANY INDONESIAN  SCHOLARS AND CRITICS NOTED THE LACK OF  DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE AS ONE OF THE MAJOR  CRITICISM OF THE NEW ORDER. THEY ARGUED THAT THE INDONESIAN ECONOMIC  SUCCESS HAD BENEFITED THE URBAN AND  INDUSTRIAL SECTOR WHILE (RELATIVELY)  MARGINALIZING THE RURAL AND TRADITIONAL  SECTORS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 52
  • 53.  AN INDONESIAN SOCIAL SCIENTIST, PABOTTINGI,  NOTED THAT NEW ORDER ECONOMIC POLICIES AND  PRACTICES THAT HAD RESULTED IN “INORDINATE  DOMINANCE OF THE NON‐PRIBUMI IN THE  NATIONAL ECONOMY, PARTICULARLY IN THE URBAN  AND MODERN SECTOR”, AND OFFERS A PREDICTION  THAT THE ANTAGONISM BETWEEN THE PRIBUMI  AND THE NON‐PRIBUMI “COULD WELL BE THE  ACHILLES HEEL OF THE NEW ORDER”. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 53
  • 54.  WHILE ECONOMICALLY THE GOVERNMENT WAS  COMMITTED TO AND INTENTLY PURSUING OPEN  POLICIES, POLITICALLY THE GOVERNMENT KEPT A  TIGHT A GRIP.  THE TIGHTENING CONTROL OVER POLICIES AND  DECISION MAKING PROCESSES IN THE HANDS OF  THE PRESIDENT HAD NOT ONLY STRENGTHENED  THE FORCES OF CHANGE WITHIN SOCIETY BUT ALSO  DISILLUSIONED HIS ORIGINAL AND TRADITIONAL  SUPPORTERS, EVEN THOSE WITHIN THE  GOVERNMENT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 54
  • 55.  THE EMERGING ROLE OF ISLAM AS A FORCE OF  CHANGE SHOULD ALSO NOT BE UNDERESTIMATED.  UHLIN (1997:82) AGUES THAT MANY INDONESIAN  PRO‐DEMOCRACY ACTIVISTS ARE MORE THAN  NOMINALLY MUSLIM AND THEY OFTEN USE ISLAMIC  DISCOURSES TO MOTIVATE THE STRUGGLE FOR  DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 55
  • 56.  AMONG THE SOCIAL FORCES THAT WERE POISED  AGAINST THE NEW ORDER, THE MOST CONSISTENT  AND MILITANT WERE THE STUDENTS.  IN THE HISTORY OF THE NATION, EVEN BEFORE  INDEPENDENCE, THE INDONESIAN YOUTH AND  STUDENTS PLAYED PIVOTAL ROLE.  THEY PARTICIPATED IN EVERY IMPORTANT EVENT IN  THE NATION COURSE OF HISTORY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 56
  • 57.  THERE IS NO MAJOR POLITICAL CHANGE IN  INDONESIA THAT DID NOT INVOLVE THE YOUTH  AND STUDENTS. BY THE 1970S, STUDENT ACTIVISM HAD BEEN  DIRECTED AGAINST THE NEW ORDER GOVERNMENT.  IN 1974 STUDENTS STAGED HUGE  DEMONSTRATIONS, AGAINST CORRUPTION AND  AGAINST JAPANESE FOREIGN INVESTMENT; MANY  OF THE LEADERS OF THE INCIDENT KNOWN AS  MALARI WERE TRIED AND JAILED.  Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 57
  • 58.  IN 1978 THERE WAS AGAIN A WAVE OF STUDENT  PROTESTS.  STUDENT ACTIVISM CONTINUED INTO THE 1980S  AND 1990S SOME TAKING UP NATIONAL ISSUES LIKE  CORRUPTION, HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY,  OTHERS LOCAL ISSUES, SUCH AS EVICTION OF  PEOPLE FROM AREAS DESIGNATED FOR  DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS, AND ENVIRONMENTAL  AND LABOR ISSUES RELATED TO THEIR AREA. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 58
  • 59.  ALTHOUGH THE STUDENT MOVEMENTS MOST OF  THE TIME WERE WIDELY SCATTERED, UNFOCUSED  AND UN‐COORDINATED AND WERE ISOLATED FROM  BROAD POPULAR SUPPORT, THEY WERE  SUCCESSFUL IN GALVANIZING THE SILENT MAJORITY  TO BE CONCERNED ABOUT CURRENT POLITICAL  ISSUES CONFRONTING THE NATION.  UHLIN NOTES THAT THE STUDENT ACTIVISM OF THE  LATE 1980S AND EARLY 1990S HAS CONTRIBUTED  TO A RADICALIZATION OF THE DEMOCRATIC  OPPOSITION IN INDONESIA. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 59
  • 60.  WITH ALL THE CHANGING SOCIAL STRUCTURES AND  NORMS, AND THE FORCES ARRAYED AGAINST THE NEW  ORDER, FROM OUTSIDE AND WITHIN ITS OWN RANK, IT  WAS ONLY A MATTER OF TIME BEFORE HUNTINGTON’S  PREDICTION WOULD BE REALIZED.  IT WOULD, HOWEVER, STILL NEED A CATALYST TO  QUICKEN THE PACE OF CHANGE.  THE ECONOMIC CRISIS WAS THE TRIGGER THAT WOULD  SET THE CHAIN OF EVENTS THAT EVENTUALLY LEAD TO  THE POLITICAL CHANGE.  EMPIRICAL OBSERVATIONS LED HUNTINGTON (1991: 59)  TO BELIEVE THAT CRISES PRODUCED BY EITHER RAPID  GROWTH OR ECONOMIC RECESSION WEAKENED  AUTHORITARIANISM. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 60
  • 61.  EVENTS LEADING TO THE FALL OF THE NEW ORDER HAD  SHOWN THE SYMPTOMS OBSERVED BY HAGGARD AND  KAUFMAN (1999: 76) THAT ECONOMIC CRISES  UNDERMINE THE ‘AUTHORITARIAN BARGAINS’ FORGED  BETWEEN RULERS AND KEY SOCIOPOLITICAL  CONSTITUENTS.  THE FAILURE OF PRESIDENT SUHARTO TO SALVAGE HIS  GOVERNMENT AND TO WITHDRAW VOLUNTARILY  FOLLOWED THEIR GENERAL OBSERVATION THAT “THE  RESULTING ISOLATION (OF AN ECONOMIC CRISIS) TENDS  TO FRAGMENT THE RULING ELITE FURTHER AND  REDUCE ITS CAPACITY TO NEGOTIATE FAVORABLE  TERMS OF EXIT” (IBID.). Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 61
  • 62.  HOWEVER, IT WAS NOT THE FIRST TIME THAT THE NEW  ORDER WAS FACED WITH SERIOUS CRISES.  ALTHOUGH ARGUABLY THE 1997/98 CRISIS WAS THE  SEVEREST AND THE MOST DEVASTATING IN TERMS OF  ITS IMPACT ON THE GENERAL POPULACE‐‐ THE  NEGATIVE GROWTH OF ALMOST –15% RESULTING IN  THE REDUCTION OF REAL INCOME AND INCREASE IN  POVERTY AND UNEMPLOYMENT‐‐ STILL OTHER NON‐ DEMOCRATIC (BY WESTERN LIBERAL DEMOCRACY  STANDARDS) REGIMES IN THE SAME GEOGRAPHICAL  REGION SUCH AS MALAYSIA AND SINGAPORE COULD  WEATHER THE CRISIS AND THEIR REGIMES SURVIVED  AND OUTLASTED THE CRISIS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 62
  • 63.  MANY OF THE OPPOSING FORCES IDENTIFIED ABOVE  WERE LONG PRESENT, LATENT IN THE  UNDERCURRENT OF INDONESIAN POLITICS FOR  YEARS.  BY THEMSELVES HOWEVER, THEY DID NOT PRESENT A  SUFFICIENT CHALLENGE CAPABLE OF ENDING  SUHARTO’S RULE. THE NEW ORDER’S CENTRALIZED POWER STRUCTURE  AND CAREFUL CONTROL OF POLITICAL COMPETITION  WOULD HAVE ENSURED THE SECURITY OF THE  PRESIDENT POSITION.  THE SOCIAL CONTRACT, IN THIS VIEW, HAS CERTAIN  INERTIA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 63
  • 64.  BUT THE NEW ORDER DID FALL.  MANY STUDIES HAVE BEEN UNDERTAKEN  THEREAFTER, ATTEMPTING TO FIND THE ANSWER  TO THE QUESTION OF WHY PRESIDENT SUHARTO  FAILED TO OVERCOME THIS PARTICULAR CRISIS.  MANY OBSERVERS AGREE THAT FOR PRESIDENT  SUHARTO, WHO RESTED HIS CLAIM TO RULE ON HIS  ABILITY TO DELIVER ECONOMIC GROWTH, THE  ECONOMIC CRISIS DEEPLY UNDERMINED HIS  LEGITIMACY AND LEFT HIM AFTER SO MANY YEARS  IN POWER, AT LAST, VULNERABLE TO CREDIBLE  CHALLENGE FOR POWER. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 64
  • 65.  DURING THE 1997/98 CRISIS PRESIDENT SUHARTO  WAS DELIBERATING BETWEEN POLICY ACTIONS,  AND HIS INDECISIVENESS HAD CAUSED THE CRISIS  TO DEEPEN AND EVENTUALLY LED TO HIS FALL.   IT WAS IN CONTRAST WITH THE DECISIVENESS  SHOWN BY MALAYSIA’S MAHATHIR AND THE  LEADERS OF SINGAPORE IN DEALING WITH THE  FINANCIAL CRISIS IN THEIR RESPECTIVE COUNTRIES.  BRESNAN (1999) FOR ONE REMARKS THAT THE  PRESIDENT, “WHO HAD MADE MANY HARD  DECISIONS OVER THE PREVIOUS THREE DECADES,  WAS UNABLE TO DO SO IN 1998.”Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 65
  • 66.  OBVIOUSLY THERE WAS AN INTERNATIONAL  DIMENSION TO THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC  CRISIS OCCURRING IN INDONESIA IN 1998.  THE US AND IMF HAD OFTEN BEEN BLAME FOR THE  PROLONGED CRISIS THAT EVENTUALLY LED TO THE  FALL OF PRESIDENT SUHARTO.  MANY OBSERVERS HAVE ARGUED THAT THE WEST  HAD DONE THEIR BEST IN ASSISTING THE  INDONESIAN GOVERNMENT IN FIGHTING THE  CRISIS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 66
  • 67.  SOME ANALYSTS, HOWEVER WOULD NOT DISCOUNT  THE ROLE THE US PLAY IN THE DOWNFALL OF  SUHARTO.  ALTHOUGH FOR MANY YEARS INDONESIA ‐‐AS A  STAUNCH ANTI COMMUNIST NATION‐‐ HAD ALWAYS  BEEN ABLE TO COUNT ON THE SUPPORT OF THE  WEST, BY THE MID 90’S INDONESIA’S RELATIONS WITH  THE WEST HAD SOMEWHAT SOURED.  AFTER THE COLD WAR ENDED, WITHOUT A  COMMUNIST THREAT WESTERN DONOR COUNTRIES  WERE INCREASINGLY LESS CONCERNED ABOUT  BAILING OUT IN INEFFICIENT FOREIGN ECONOMIES  ESPECIALLY THAT ARE FACING SOCIAL AND POLITICAL  PROBLEMS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 67
  • 68.  MOUNTING CRITICISM ON THE WAY INDONESIA  HANDLED THE EAST TIMOR QUESTION AND THE  ALLEGATIONS OF HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES HAD  PRECIPITATED STRINGENT CALLS IN THE US CONGRESS  TO LINK AID AND ASSISTANCE TO HUMAN RIGHTS  RECORDS.  BEFORE THE CRISIS THERE WERE ALREADY FORCES, IN  FAVOR OF POLITICAL CHANGE, ARRAYED AGAINST THE  NEW ORDER REGIME. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 68
  • 69.  HOWEVER IN THE ABSENCE OF THE NECESSARY  CATALYST THOSE ELEMENTS WERE INERT, AND EVEN IF  CHANGE SHOULD HAPPEN IT COULD TAKE A LONG  WHILE, SUCH AS WHEN SUHARTO PASS AWAY OR  SUHARTO BECAME PHYSICALLY INCAPABLE TO LEAD.  THE FINANCIAL CRISIS PROVIDED THE CATALYST THAT  SET OFF A PROCESS OF CHANGE.   THE HALVING OF PER CAPITA INCOME TRANSLATED  INTO SOCIAL MISERY: UNEMPLOYMENT, HUNGER,  RIOTS, AND DEATH. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 69
  • 70. A RENEWED MANDATE:  WASTED OPPORTUNITY FOR CHANGE REFLECTED IN THE GENERAL ELECTION OF 1997, SUHARTO  STILL HELD A STRONG GRIP ON THE POLITICAL SYSTEM HE WAS READY TO STEP DOWN AND SPENT THE REST OF  HIS LIFE IN RELIGIOUS PURSUIT IF THE PEOPLE REALLY DID  NOT WANT HIM ANYMORE MARCH 11TH, 1998 SUHARTO WAS INDEED RE‐ELECTED  FOR ANOTHER FIVE‐YEAR TERM BY THE MPR PAST PERFORMANCES OF DEVELOPMENT WAS NO  LONGER SEEN AS A PANACEA, WHILE A GROWING  NUMBER, INCLUDING MANY WHO WERE IN THE  GOVERNMENT, WERE ALREADY LOOKING FOR AN  ALTERNATIVE TO THE EXISTING SYSTEM Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 70
  • 71.  THE TIME HAD COME FOR POLITICAL REFORMS, BUT  CHANGING THE LEADERSHIP AT THE TIME OF CRISIS  WAS NOT REGARDED AS A GOOD IDEA SUHARTO’S CHOICE OF HABIBIE AS HIS VICE  PRESIDENT, APPOINTMENT OF HIS DAUGHTER AND  SOME CRONIES TO THE CABINET WAS MET WITH  WIDE SPREAD CRITICISM AND ACCUSATION OF  NEPOTISM AN OPPORTUNITY FOR A RENEWED START TO  REBUILD THE CONFIDENCE OF THE PEOPLE AND  ENGAGED IN CONCERTED EFFORTS TO REGAIN  CONTROL OF THE ECONOMY WAS WASTED Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 71
  • 72. THE FLASH POINT WHILE THE ECONOMY SHOWED SAME IMPROVEMENT, IN  THE POLITICAL FRONT, THE SITUATION DETERIORATED. SUHARTO HAD NO INTENTION TO UNDERTAKE REFORMS  AS THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC SITUATION DEMANDED. HOWEVER, THE ELITES AND LEADERS OF THE VARIOUS  REFORM MOVEMENTS WERE STILL WARY OF SUHARTO’S  POWER.  THE HIKE IN FUEL PRICES CHANGED EVERYTHING. THE CULMINATION OF POLITICAL CONFRONTATION WAS  REACHED WHEN IN EARLY MAY 1998 UNDER STRONG  PRESSURE FROM THE IMF, THE GOVERNMENT  ANNOUNCED A RISE IN FUEL PRICES, WITH THE  ACCOMPANYING CONSEQUENCES OF A RISE IN PUBLIC  TRANSPORTATION FARES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 72
  • 73.  DURING THE CONFRONTATION BETWEEN THE SECURITY  APPARATUS AND THE STUDENT ON MAY 12, FOUR  STUDENTS WERE SHOT TO DEAD (TRISAKTI INCIDENT). THE FLASH POINT WAS REACHED ON MAY 14TH 1998, IN  WHAT WAS THEN KNOWN AS THE MAY RIOTS.  THE MAY 1998 RIOT HAD A PARTICULAR SIGNIFICANCE  ASIDE FROM THE INTENSITY OF THE VIOLENCE. THE RIOTS HAD DEVASTATING EFFECTS ON THE  SUHARTO GOVERNMENT. IT SET THE STAGE FOR THE ENDGAME OF THE POLITICAL  DRAMA. Day2_GRIPS 2012 V www.ginandjar.com 73
  • 74. THE FINAL CURTAIN  MAY 17TH 1998 THE STUDENTS HAD PRACTICALLY  OCCUPIED THE PARLIAMENT BUILDING TO PRESSURE  PARLIAMENT TO ACT. THE CALL FOR REFORM AND FOR THE RESIGNATION OF  THE PRESIDENT GREW LOUDER AND WAS JOINED BY A  WIDER CIRCLE. THE SUPPORT FROM THE MILITARY, WHICH UP TO NOW  HAD BEEN THE FOUNDATION OF PRESIDENT SUHARTO’S  POLITICAL POWER, HAD ALSO BEGUN TO CRACK. MAY 18TH1998 THE LEADERSHIP OF THE PARLIAMENT  ANNOUNCED THEIR COLLECTIVE OPINION THAT  SUHARTO HAD TO RESIGN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 74
  • 75.  ON MAY 19TH AFTER MEETING WITH THE MODERATE  MUSLIM LEADERS PRESIDENT SUHARTO TOLD A PRESS  CONFERENCE ABOUT CALLING AN EARLIER GENERAL  ELECTION THAT WOULD FACILITATE HIS EARLIER  RESIGNATION, OF REPEALING THE POLITICAL LAWS THAT  HAD BEEN THE TARGET OF MANY OF THE REFORMERS’  DEMANDS AND THE CREATION OF A REFORM  COMMITTEE.   HE ALSO STATED HIS INTENTION TO RESHUFFLE THE  CABINET AND FORM A REFORM CABINET.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 75
  • 76.  SOME MINISTERS REALIZED THAT THE STATUS QUO  COULD NOT BE MAINTAINED ANY LONGER.  MAY 20TH 1998 THE ECONOMIC MINISTRIES MET:  TO REVIEW THE ECONOMIC SITUATION AND THE  POLITICAL COMPLICATIONS, AND DECIDED THAT  THE PRESIDENT SHOULD BE MADE AWARE OF THE  GRAVE SITUATION  IF A POLITICAL SOLUTION COULD NOT BE REACHED  WITHIN A WEEK THE ECONOMY WOULD COLLAPSE  FORMING A NEW CABINET WOULD NOT SOLVE THE  PROBLEM  THEY WOULD UNANIMOUSLY DECLINE TO JOIN IN THE  NEW (REFORM) CABINET.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 76
  • 77.  SUHARTO ALSO FAILED TO GET THE SUPPORT FROM  PARLIAMENT LEADERS ON ESTABLISHING THE REFORM  COMMITTEE.  LOSING THE SUPPORT OF THE MILITARY, THE CABINET,  THE PARLIAMENT, AND THE FAILURE TO ESTABLISH THE  REFORM COMMITTEE, ON MAY 21ST 1998 PRESIDENT  SUHARTO RESIGNED HIS PRESIDENCY.  VICE PRESIDENT BJ HABIBIE ASSUMED THE PRESIDENCY.  THUS ENDED THE ERA OF THE NEW ORDER.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 77
  • 78. CONCLUSION WHILE THE ECONOMIC CRISIS UNDOUBTEDLY WAS THE  IMMEDIATE CAUSE OF THE POLITICAL UNREST THAT  ENDED SUHARTO’S LONG REIGN, THE FAILURE OF THE  NEW ORDER GOVERNMENT TO DEAL WITH THE  POLITICAL WEAKNESSES OF THE SOCIETY CONTRIBUTED  TO ITS DEMISE.   SUHARTO, WHO HAD SHOWN CONSIDERABLE  FLEXIBILITY IN AGREEING TO NUMEROUS ECONOMIC  REFORMS, ALTHOUGH ADMITTEDLY NOT ALL WERE  FULLY IMPLEMENTED, SHOWED LITTLE INCLINATION TO  FOLLOW THROUGH ON A PARALLEL REBUILDING OF THE  POLITICAL SYSTEM. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 78
  • 79.  WHETHER SUHARTO COULD HAVE WEATHERED THE  ECONOMIC CRISIS IF THE NEW ORDER REGIME HAD  EVOLVED INTO A MORE REPRESENTATIVE AND OPEN  POLITICAL SYSTEM WILL NEVER BE KNOWN.   BUT THERE IS LITTLE DOUBT THAT THE FAILURE TO  CREATE CHANNELS FOR POLITICAL DISSENT LAID  THE GROUNDWORK FOR THE DESIRE TO SEE THE  NEW ORDER REGIME END, EVEN IF THAT ENTAILED  A RISK OF OPEN CONFLICT BETWEEN CIVIL SOCIETY  AND THE ARMED FORCES. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 79
  • 80.  THE CRACKS IN THE RANKS OF THE NEW ORDER  HAD COME TO THE SURFACE, AS THE NEW ORDER  SUPPORTERS WITHIN AND OUTSIDE THE  GOVERNMENT, INCLUDING THOSE IN THE MILITARY  HAD GROWN ALIENATED BY THE WAY HE HANDLED  THE CRISIS, AND BY HIS INABILITY TO RECOGNIZE  THE WEAKNESSES IN THE GOVERNMENT’S POLICIES  AND INSTITUTIONS AND THE URGENT NEED TO  EMBARK ON REFORMS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 80
  • 81.  IT IS EVIDENT THAT THE INABILITY OF PRESIDENT  SUHARTO TO BRING INDONESIA OUT OF THE CRISIS,  COMBINED WITH THE GROWING DOMESTIC AND  INTERNATIONAL AWARENESS THAT HIS RESPONSE  TO THE CRISIS—ECONOMIC AS WELL POLITICAL‐‐ WAS DIGGING THE COUNTRY INTO A DEEPER ABYSS,  DESTROYED THE HOBBESIAN COMPACT THAT HAD  KEPT THE COUNTRY UNITED AND POLITICALLY  STABLE ON THE PATH OF DEVELOPMENT. THE CONCLUSION: CRISIS FORCED A REWRITING OF  THE SOCIAL CONTRACT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 81
  • 82. ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY 82
  • 83. HABIBIE GOVERNMENT
  • 84.  THE OBJECTIVES:   AS THE COUNTRY WAS DEEP IN CRISIS, A CONTINUATION  OF POLICIES, ESPECIALLY IN THE ECONOMY, SHOULD BE  MAINTAINED;   IT HAD TO BE RID OF THE CHARACTERS WHOM PEOPLE  SAW AS THE PERSONIFICATION OF NEPOTISM;   IT SHOULD REFLECT THE SPIRIT OF REFORM, AND   BE BROADLY REPRESENTATIVE OF INDONESIA’S VARIOUS  SHADES OF INTERESTS AND POLITICAL ASPIRATIONS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 84
  • 85.  THE AGENDA:  FOREMOST IN THE POLITICAL AGENDA WAS THE  REPEAL OF THE MUCH‐REVILED POLITICAL LAWS THAT  WERE THE FOUNDATION OF THE NEW ORDER  POLITICAL SYSTEM—THE LAWS ON POLITICAL PARTIES,  ELECTIONS, AND THE REPRESENTATIVE ASSEMBLIES.   ON THE ECONOMY, THE PRIORITY WAS TO ALLEVIATE  THE IMPACT OF THE CRISIS ON THE POPULACE,  ESPECIALLY THOSE WHO WERE ECONOMICALLY WEAK,  AND TO GET THE ECONOMY ON ITS FEET AND MOVING  AGAIN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 85
  • 86. INAUSPICIOUS BEGINNING HABIBIE STARTED HIS PRESIDENCY AMIDST  WIDESPREAD MISGIVINGS.  THE COUNTRY WAS IN DEEP POLITICAL TURMOIL.  HIS CLAIM TO PRESIDENCY WAS QUESTIONED.  THE RESIGNATION OF SUHARTO HAD NOT HALTED  THE DEMONSTRATIONS AND PROTESTS.  MANY OPPONENTS OF THE NEW ORDER SHIFTED  THEIR ATTACKS TO TARGET HABIBIE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 86
  • 87.  HIS BIOGRAPHER, BILVEER SINGH (2000),  ACKNOWLEDGES THAT HABIBIE BROUGHT WITH HIM  MANY NEGATIVE IMAGES OF A NEGATIVE RECORD,  “INCLUDING HIS PENCHANT FOR ’WASTEFUL MEGA‐ PROJECTS’, HIS POOR OR LACK OF UNDERSTANDING  ABOUT THE WORKINGS OF THE ECONOMY, HIS LACK  OF ACCEPTANCE BY ABRI (THE INDONESIAN MILITARY),  OF BEING A FRONT OR TOOL FOR ISLAMIC  FUNDAMENTALISM, AND PROBABLY WORST OF ALL,  OF BEING NOTHING MORE THAN A PAWN AND  PUPPET OF SUHARTO.”Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 87
  • 88. THE LEGITIMACY DILEMMA HABIBIE’S PRESIDENCY FROM THE BEGINNING WAS  PLAGUED BY DOUBTERS OF ITS LEGITIMACY. ONE ARGUMENT AGAINST HABIBIE’S LEGITIMACY  WAS BASED ON A TECHNICALITY: THE WAY BY WHICH  THE TRANSFER OF THE PRESIDENCY WAS PERFORMED. OTHER MORE SERIOUS ARGUMENTS AGAINST  HABIBIE TAKING OVER THE PRESIDENCY WERE BASED  ON LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL GROUNDS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 88
  • 89.  IN LINE WITH THE MESSAGE OF THE CONSTITUTION  THE PRESIDENT RECEIVED HIS MANDATE FROM THE  MPR, AND THEREFORE IF HE RESIGNED, HE HAD TO  RETURN THE MANDATE TO THE SAME INSTITUTION— THE MPR, WHICH WOULD THEN WITHDRAW THE  MANDATE AND GAVE IT TO A NEW PRESIDENT.  OTHERS ARGUED THAT SUHARTO AND HABIBIE WAS A  “PACKAGE” ELECTED BY THE MPR—AND HABIBIE WAS  SUHARTO’S CHOICE FOR VICE PRESIDENT— WHEN  SUHARTO RESIGNED, HABIBIE SHOULD ALSO GO, AND  THE MPR SHOULD APPOINT A NEW PRESIDENT (AND  VICE PRESIDENT).Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 89
  • 90.  ON THE OTHER HAND HABIBIES’ SUPORTERS ARGUED  THAT THE CONSTITUTION STIPULATED THAT SHOULD  THE PRESIDENT DIE OR RESIGN, BE REMOVED OR  DISABLED FROM EXECUTING THE DUTY OF THE  PRESIDENCY, THE VICE PRESIDENT SHOULD REPLACE  HIM UNTIL THE EXPIRY OF HIS TERM.  THAT SHOULD MEAN THAT HABIBIE HAD THE  CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT TO HOLD THE PRESIDENCY  UNTIL 2003.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 90
  • 91.  WITHIN THE GOVERNMENT, AMONG THE CABINET  MINISTERS, THERE WERE ALSO SOME DOUBTS AS TO  WHETHER THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD CONTINUE  UNTIL THE FORMER PRESIDENT’S TERM ENDED.  THEY WERE OF THE OPINION THAT THE PRESENT  GOVERNMENT WAS ONLY “TRANSITIONAL” AND A  FRESH GENERAL ELECTION SHOULD BE UNDERTAKEN  TO ESTABLISH A NEW MANDATE FROM THE PEOPLE.  IT WAS BASED NOT ON THE QUESTION OF  CONSTITUTIONAL LEGITIMACY BECAUSE THE  MESSAGE OF THE CONSTITUTION WAS VERY CLEAR,  BUT MORE ON POLITICAL AND MORAL GROUNDS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 91
  • 92.  TO MANY OF HIS CRITICS IT WAS DIFFICULT TO  SEPARATE THE FIGURE OF HABIBIE AND SUHARTO, AND  THE ASCENSION OF HABIBIE TO PRESIDENCY COULD  ONLY HAPPEN BECAUSE OF THAT PARTICULAR  RELATIONSHIP.  FOR HABIBIE TO BE ABLE TO CLAIM POLITICAL AND  MORAL LEGITIMACY, HE HAD TO GET THE MANDATE  FOR HIMSELF.  MANY SAW THE EXISTING MPR AS LACKING THE  LEGITIMACY TO DECIDE ON WHO SHOULD BE THE NEXT  PRESIDENT, AS IT WAS THE SAME MPR THAT ELECTED  SUHARTO UNANIMOUSLY LESS THEN THREE MONTHS  BEFORE.  THEREFORE, THEY ARGUED, A NEW ELECTION SHOULD  BE HELD AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 92
  • 93.  AFTER AN INTENSIVE BEHIND‐THE‐SCREEN POLITICAL  CONSULTATION, A CONSENSUS WITHIN THE  GOVERNMENT EMERGED THAT AN EARLY GENERAL  ELECTION SHOULD BE CALLED.  THE DECISION TO CALL FOR AN EARLY ELECTION  HOWEVER HAD TO OVERCOME A LEGAL HURDLE.  THE MPR HAD DECREED IN THE MARCH 1998  GENERAL SESSION THAT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE  FIVE‐YEAR PRESIDENTIAL TERM, A GENERAL ELECTION  SHOULD BE HELD IN 2002 TO ELECT A NEW  PRESIDENT IN 2003. AND ONLY THE MPR COULD REVOKE AND AMEND AN  MPR DECREE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 93
  • 94. MPR SESSION ACCORDING TO THE CONSTITUTION, THE MPR MEETS  IN:  GENERAL SESSION  SPECIAL SESSION  DURING THE NEW ORDER, MPR MET ONLY ONCE IN  FIVE YEAR IN GENERAL SESSION TO ELECT THE  PRESIDENT. WITH REFORM, MPR MEETS EVERY YEAR IN ANNUAL  SESSION TO RECEIVE REPORTS FROM THE EXECUTIVE,  THE PARLIAMENT, THE SUPREME COURT, THE  SUPREME AUDIT BOARD, AND THE SUPREME  ADVISORY BOARD.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 94
  • 95. MPR SPECIAL SESSION THE MPR CONVENED A SPECIAL SESSION ON  NOVEMBER 10‐13, 1998 THE MPR ISSUED DECREES ON: 1. THE RESCHEDULING OF THE ELECTIONS 2. TO REVOKE THE 1983 MPR DECREE, REQUIRING A  NATIONAL REFERENDUM TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION. 3. WITHDRAWING THE EXTRAORDINARY POWERS GIVEN TO  THE PRESIDENT, 4. ON HUMAN RIGHTS, ON CORRUPTION, COLLUSION AND  NEPOTISM —IN WHICH THE FORMER PRESIDENT WAS  SINGLED OUT— 5. REVOKING THE GUIDANCE FOR THE PROPAGATION AND  IMPLEMENTATION OF PANCASILA OR P4.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 95
  • 96. 6. LIMITING THE PRESIDENTIAL TERMS OF OFFICE—IN THE  UNAMENDED CONSTITUTION THERE WAS NO  LIMITATION—TO A MAXIMUM OF TWO TERMS. ON THE  ECONOMY, THE MPR ISSUED A NEW GUIDELINE ON  ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY. 7. AN IMPORTANT DECREE THAT WOULD HAVE SIGNIFICANT  AND LONG‐TERM EFFECT ON THE COUNTRY’S  GOVERNANCE WAS A GUIDELINE ON REGIONAL  AUTONOMY AND DECENTRALIZATION, INCLUDING FISCAL  DECENTRALIZATION.  8. ON THE ROLE OF THE MILITARY, TO HAVE GRADUAL  WITHDRAWAL OF THE MILITARY FROM POLITICS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 96
  • 97.  THE MPR DECISIONS SERVE AS CONSTITUTIONAL  BASIS THAT WOULD CONSTITUTE THE FOUNDATION  FOR DEMOCRATIZATION, IMPROVEMENT OF  GOVERNANCE, AND PROTECTION OF HUMAN  RIGHTS, INITIATED OR ENACTED BY THE HABIBIE  GOVERNMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 97
  • 98. OPPOSITION AGAINST HABIBIE THE SPECIAL SESSION OF THE MPR MET AMIDST A  TENSE POLITICAL ATMOSPHERE, AS STUDENTS,  ENCOURAGED BY DIE‐HARD OPPONENTS OF HABIBIE  AMONG THE POLITICAL ELITE, WERE DEMANDING THAT  HABIBIE SHOULD BE BROUGHT DOWN. IN THE DAYS LEADING TO THE SPECIAL SESSION THE  CAPITAL WAS TRANSFORMED INTO A MILITARY  COMPLEX, WITH SECURITY APPARATUS MANNING  STRATEGIC SECTIONS OF THE CITY.  TO SUPPORT THE MILITARY EFFORTS THE COMMANDER  OF THE ARMED FORCE, WIRANTO DECIDED TO RECRUIT  CIVILIANS AS VOLUNTEERS (PAMSWAKARSA). Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 98
  • 99.  UNAVOIDABLY THESE GROUPS OF VIGILANTES WOULD  CLASH WITH STUDENTS IN VARIOUS PARTS OF THE  CITY, MAKING THE SITUATION EVEN TENSER. ON THE FINAL DAY OF THE MPR SESSION THINGS  CAME TO A HEAD.  THE CARNAGE OCCURRED IN THE SEMANGGI AREA, IN  FRONT OF ATMAJAYA UNIVERSITY, A PRIVATE  CATHOLIC INSTITUTION, WHICH HAD BEEN A HOTBED  OF ANTI‐HABIBIE STUDENTS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 99
  • 100.  IN THE CONFRONTATIONS THAT TOOK PLACE IN THE  AFTERNOON OF NOVEMBER 13, SHOTS WERE FIRED  AND AT THE END OF THE DAY 13 HAD DIED, AMONG  THEM WERE FOUR STUDENTS AND ONE MILITARY  PERSONNEL.  HUNDREDS WERE INJURED, MANY NEEDING  HOSPITALIZATION. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 100
  • 101.  THE INCIDENT, WHICH CAME TO BE KNOWN AS THE  SEMANGGI TRAGEDY, LEFT ANOTHER SCAR ON THE  NATIONAL PSYCHE ALONGSIDE THE TRISAKTI TRAGEDY.  ELSEWHERE A NUMBER OF MEMBERS OF  PAMSWAKRSA WERE LYNCHED BY ANGRY MOBS,  MANY IN A GRUESOME MANNER. AFTER THE MPR SESSION ENDED THE OPPOSITION  AGAINST HABIBIE HAD REDIRECTED ITS FOCUS TO THE  ELECTION THE FOLLOWING YEAR.  THE UNSEATING OF HABIBIE HAD BECOME THE  AGENDA OF MANY POLITICIANS FROM VARIOUS  POLITICAL SPECTRA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 101
  • 102. HABIBIE’S POLITICAL PILLARS HABIBIE RELIED ON THE SUPPORT OF THREE  POLITICAL FORCES: THE MILITARY, GOLKAR, AND  POLITICAL ISLAM. THE MILITARY UNDER GEN. WIRANTO (A FORMER ADC  TO PRESIDENT SUHARTO) WAS SUPPORTIVE OF  HABIBIE.  BOTH OF THEM, BEING VERY CLOSE TO THE FORMER  PRESIDENT, NEEDED AND SUPPORTED EACH OTHER IN  THE ENSUING POLITICAL GAME.  AT THE ONSET OF HIS PRESIDENCY HABIBIE HAD  VETOED THE OPPOSITION FROM HIS ADVISERS AND  SENIOR MILITARY FIGURES TO HAVING WIRANTO  CONTINUED IN THE TOP MILITARY POSITION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 102
  • 103.  POLITICAL ISLAM WAS BASICALLY SYMPATHETIC TO  HABIBIE, REGARDED AS A PERSON WHO HAD BEEN  ABLE TO TURN THE TIDE OF LONG‐TIME PREJUDICE  AGAINST ISLAM IN INDONESIAN POLITICS.  HIS POSITION AS THE CHAIRMAN OF ICMI HAD  HELPED IMPROVE THE STATURE OF MANY  PROFESSIONALS AND POLITICIANS WITH ISLAMIC  CREDENTIALS.  AS ICMI GATHERED MUSLIM INTELLECTUALS FROM  VARIOUS BACKGROUNDS, HABIBIE’S SUPPORT  AMONG POLITICAL ISLAM HAD BECOME MORE  WIDESPREAD. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 103
  • 104.  THE OPPOSITION TO HABIBIE MOUNTED BY STUDENTS  BASED IN THE CAMPUS OF A CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY  ALSO HAD DRIVEN MANY MUSLIM STUDENTS TO  SUPPORT HABIBIE, OR AT LEAST CHOOSE NOT  PARTICIPATE IN THE MOVEMENT DIRECTED AGAINST  HABIBIE.  UNLIKE THE UNITED FRONT AGAINST SUHARTO  SHOWN BY THE STUDENTS IN MAY 1998, THE  STUDENTS WERE NO LONGER AS UNITED WITH  REGARD TO HABIBIE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 104
  • 105. COMMUNAL STRIFE IN THE MEANTIME, THE SECURITY APPARATUS HAD  TO DEAL WITH COMMUNAL STRIFE IN SEVERAL  REGIONS OF THE COUNTRY: IN EAST JAVA  (BANYUWANGI), MALUKU (AMBON), SOUTH  SULAWESI, AND WEST KALIMANTAN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 105
  • 106. ACEH ANOTHER TROUBLE SPOT FLARED UP IN ACEH, THE  WESTERNMOST PROVINCE OF INDONESIA.  ACEH HAD BEEN LONG SIMMERING IN CONFLICTS  BETWEEN SEPARATIST ELEMENTS OF THE  POPULATION AND THE GOVERNMENT FORCES.  DURING THE NEW ORDER THE SEPARATIST  MOVEMENT WAS HARSHLY DEALT WITH THROUGH  MILITARY ACTION. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 106
  • 107.  AT THE END OF THE NEW ORDER, THE SITUATION HAD  BEEN PUT UNDER CONTROL AND THE REBEL  MOVEMENT HAD BECOME MORE OR LESS DORMANT,  ALTHOUGH THERE WERE STILL REMNANTS OF REBELS  UNDER THE NAME OF FREE ACEH MOVEMENT  (GERAKAN ACEH MERDEKA OR GAM).  IN EARLY 1999, HOWEVER, THE SITUATION BEGAN TO  HEAT UP AGAIN. THE IMMEDIATE CAUSE OF THE UPSURGE OF  HOSTILITIES WAS A SERIES OF KIDNAPPINGS AND  KILLINGS OF SOLDIERS, SOME OF WHOM WERE ON  LEAVE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 107
  • 108.  THE MILITARY MOUNTED AN OPERATION TO  RESPOND TO THE ATTACKS AND THE SITUATION  FURTHER ESCALATED.   IN THE PROCESS MANY CIVILIANS BECAME  VICTIMS OF THE ENSUING VIOLENCE, PROVOKING  OUTCRIES OF BRUTALITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS  ABUSES BY THE MILITARY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 108
  • 109.  IN MARCH 1999, HABIBIE, ACCOMPANIED BY SENIOR  MEMBERS OF HIS CABINET AND THE COMMANDER OF THE  ARMED FORCES, VISITED THE PROVINCE AND INITIATED A  DIALOGUE WITH REPRESENTATIVES OF THE LOCAL  COMMUNITY AT THE GRAND MOSQUE OF THE CAPITAL OF  THE PROVINCE, BANDA ACEH.  STUDENTS DEMANDED TO BE ALLOWED TO JOIN THE  DIALOGUE AND WERE PERMITTED. IN THE COURSE OF THE  HEATED DIALOGUE HABIBIE APOLOGIZED FOR THE EXCESSES  COMMITTED BY THE MILITARY IN THE PAST AND PROMISED  THAT SUCH THINGS WOULD NOT HAPPEN AGAIN. HE  PROMISED TO PROSECUTE ANY MEMBER OF THE SECURITY  FORCES THAT WAS INVOLVED IN HUMAN RIGHTS  VIOLATIONS. HE PLEDGED THAT THE GOVERNMENT WOULD  PAY FOR THE REBURIAL OF THE VICTIMS OF THE MILITARY OPERATIONS WHO HAD BEEN BURIED IN MASS GRAVES. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 109
  • 110.  POLITICAL PRISONERS WOULD BE RELEASED AND FUNDS FOR DEVELOPMENT IN THE PROVINCE  WOULD BE INCREASED INCLUDING FUNDING  FOR FINANCIAL AID FOR VICTIMS OF PAST  MILITARY OPERATIONS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 110
  • 111.  IN SEPTEMBER A LAW WAS PASSED THAT GAVE  ACEH A SPECIAL STATUS (LAW NO 44/1999).  THE NEW LAW ON FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION  (LAW NO 25/1999) PROVIDED THE PROVINCE  WITH A CERTAIN DEGREE OF AUTHORITY OVER,  AND SUBSTANTIAL RETURNS FROM, THEIR  NATURAL WEALTH, PARTICULARLY FROM THE GAS  FIELDS IN ARUN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 111
  • 112.  THUS TWO OF THE MAIN GRIEVANCES, THE DEMAND  FOR SYARIAH LAW AND EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION OF  RESOURCES, HAD BEEN BASICALLY ADDRESSED.  HOWEVER THE RELAXATION OF THE SECURITY  SITUATION WAS EXPLOITED BY GAM AS A WAY TO  EXPAND THEIR CONTROL OF THE TERRITORY AND  POPULATION.  AT THE TIME HABIBIE LEFT OFFICE IN OCTOBER 1999,  THE CONFLICT IN ACEH HAD BEEN NOT RESOLVED. (THE ACEH CONFLICT WOULD ONLY BE RESOLVED AFTER  THE GOVERNMENT WAS READY TO NEGOTIATE AND  REACH AN AGREEMENT WITH GAM; THE HELSINKI  AGREEMENT SIGNED ON AUGUST 15, 2005 IN HELSINKI,  FINLAND)Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 112
  • 113. PAPUA IRIAN JAYA (PAPUA) WAS ANOTHER HOT SPOT. THE  PROVINCE HAD BEEN PLAGUED BY SEPARATIST  MOVEMENTS DEMANDING INDEPENDENCE FOR  YEARS.  AS IN ACEH, THIS SEPARATIST MOVEMENT WAS  TRIGGERED BY FEELINGS OF INJUSTICE SUFFERED BY  THE PEOPLE OF WEST IRIAN (PAPUANS), WHICH,  THOUGH WAS ONE OF THE NATURALLY RICHEST  PROVINCES OF INDONESIA, REMAINED THE MOST  BACKWARD IN THE WHOLE NATION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 113
  • 114.  A LAW WAS LATER PASSED TO ALLOW FOR A SPECIAL  STATUS FOR THE PROVINCE OF PAPUA, INCLUDING  ECONOMIC PRIVILEGES (LAW NO. 21/2001). ON JULY 17, 2006 PAPUA WAS DIVIDED INTO 2  PROVINCES: PAPUA AND WESTERN IRIAN JAYA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 114
  • 115. LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY THE RECOGNITION OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLE OF THE  SEPARATION OF POWERS OF THE EXECUTIVE,  LEGISLATIVE AND JUDICIAL BRANCHES OF  GOVERNMENT REVOKING THE MUCH HATED NEW ORDER POLITICAL  LAWS, AND ESTABLISH NEW LAW ON MULTIPARTY  POLITICAL SYSTEM, AND FREE GENERAL ELECTIONS. FREEING THE PRESS FROM GOVERNMENT CONTROL  AND CENSORSHIP.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 115
  • 116.  THE DUAL FUNCTION OF THE MILITARY WAS REVOKED THE POLICE WERE SEPARATED FROM THE MILITARY. BASIC HUMAN RIGHTS WERE GIVEN STRONG LEGAL  PROTECTION. “POLITICAL PRISONERS” WERE RELEASED FROM  DETENTION. EAST TIMORESE WERE GRANTED A REFERENDUM TO  DETERMINE THEIR OWN DESTINY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 116
  • 117.  IN JULY 1999 A MULTIPARTY ELECTION WAS HELD. THE  ELECTION WAS  SUPERVISED BY AN ELECTORAL  COMMITTEE OF THE PARTICIPATING POLITICAL PARTIES  AND WATCHED  BY THOUSANDS OF FOREIGN  OBSERVERS.   IT WAS UNIVERSALLY AGREED THAT THE ELECTION WAS  OPEN, FAIR AND CLEAN. THE RESULT REFLECTED THE  WILL OF THE PEOPLE AND THUS HERALDED THE RE‐ BIRTH OF DEMOCRACY IN INDONESIA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 117
  • 118. POLITICAL PARTIES AND GENERAL ELECTION 1999 No Parties Seats Vote (%) 1 PDIP 153 34 2 GOLKAR 120 22 3 PPP 58 13 4 PKB 51 11 5 PAN 34 7 6 PBB 13 2 7 PK 7 1 8 Others 26 10 9 ABRI 38 Total 462 Note: From 48 political parties participating, 21 parties representedDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 118
  • 119.  DURING HABIBIE’S PRESIDENCY THE GOVERNMENT WORKED  TOGETHER WITH PARLIAMENT TO PRODUCE 67 LAWS THAT  FORMED THE LEGAL FOUNDATION FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT  OF THE STRONG POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS  THAT ARE ESSENTIAL TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A  DEMOCRATIC NATION WITH A MARKET ECONOMY.  OF THE 67 LAWS 16 ARE ON THE ECONOMY, 32 ARE  POLITICAL LAWS AND 19 CONCERN HUMAN RIGHTS.  FIVE OF THE LAWS ORIGINATED FROM THE PARLIAMENT, IN  ITSELF A SIGNIFICANT DEPARTURE FROM POLITICAL  PRACTICES UNDER THE NEW ORDER, WHEN THE  PARLIAMENT PLAYED SECOND FIDDLE AND WAS REGARDED  AS MERE RUBBER‐STAMP TO THE GOVERNMENT.  IT SHOWED THAT THE PARLIAMENT HAS BEGUN TO  ESTABLISH ITSELF AS THE LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY IN THE  COUNTRY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 119
  • 120. SOME OF THE IMPORTANT POLITICAL LAWSLaw No 2/1999 on political partiesLaw No 3/1999 on general electionLaw No 4/1999 on the composition and status of the People’s Consultative Assembly MPR, the parliament DPR, and the regional representative councilsLaw No 5/1998 the convention against torture and crueltyLaw No 9/1999 the right to freely speak, demonstrate or strikeLaw No 22/1999 on the decentralization of government down to the district levelDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 120
  • 121. Some of the important political laws . . . Law No 25/1999 on fiscal decentralization Law No 26/1999 to revoke the 1963 anti-subversive activities law Law No 28/1999 on Clean Government Law No 29/1999 the convention on abolition of all forms of racial discriminations Law No 35/1999 put the administration of the whole legal system under the Supreme Court Law No 39/1998 on Human Rights Law No 40/1999 freedom of the pressDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 121
  • 122.  IT WAS APPARENT AND INCREASINGLY ACKNOWLEDGED  THAT IT WAS DURING HABIBIE’S ERA THAT THE  COUNTRY HAD RAPIDLY MOVED TOWARDS DEMOCRACY.  SUCH A RAPID BURST OF LIBERALIZATION WOULD HAVE  BEEN HIGHLY UNLIKELY WERE THERE WAS NO CRISIS  AND SUHARTO STILL WAS PRESIDENT.  THESE REFORMS HAVE COME FROM THE TOP, WHICH IS  NOT TO SAY THAT THERE HAS BEEN NO YEARNING  FROM THE BOTTOM.  YET MANY WOULD AGREE THAT INDONESIANS CIVIL  SOCIETY ENGAGED IN DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN  RIGHTS ACTIVISM HAVE ONLY VERY RECENTLY BECOME  SUFFICIENTLY ORGANIZED ENOUGH TO HAVE  SIGNIFICANT INFLUENCE AT THE LEVEL OF POLICY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 122
  • 123.  IT WAS DURING HABIBIE’S ADMINISTRATION THAT  MOST OF THE INITIATIVES THAT SIGNIFICANTLY  ACCELERATED INDONESIA’S DEMOCRATIZATION WERE  INITIATED.  THE PROCESS OF DEMOCRATIZATION HAD BEEN IN  CONJUNCTION WITH THE PROCESS OF ECONOMIC  RECOVERY, ONE REINFORCING THE OTHER ON THE WAY  UP, IN CONTRAST WITH THE SITUATION WHEN THE  CONFLUENCE OF ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL CRISES  HAD BROUGHT THE COUNTRY DOWN DEEPER INTO THE  ABYSS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 123
  • 124. IRONICALLYHABIBIE, WHO INITIATED MOST OF THE BASIC ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL REFORMS, FAILED TO GET REELECTED IN THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 124
  • 125. THE PITFALLS THE EAST TIMOR ISSUE  THE BANK BALI AFFAIR  THE IMF DECIDED THAT FURTHER REVIEW OF ITS  PROGRAM SHOULD ONLY BE DONE AFTER THE  PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONGSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 125
  • 126. EAST TIMOR AFTER TAKING OFFICE HABIBIE DECIDED TO BREAK THE  EAST TIMOR LOGJAM: THE SOLUTION OF THE EAST  TIMOR QUESTION HAD BECOME ONE OF THE  GOVERNMENT’S PRIORITIES.  EVENTUALLY A CONSENSUS EMERGED WITHIN THE  GOVERNMENT TO ALLOW THE EAST TIMORESE TO HOLD  A REFERENDUM, OR IN THE POLITICAL JARGON AT THE  TIME, A “POPULAR CONSULTATION,” TO CHOOSE BETWEEN A GREATER AUTONOMY WITH INDONESIA OR  OUTRIGHT INDEPENDENCE. THE REFERENDUM WAS TO BE ADMINISTERED BY THE UNITED NATIONS.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 126
  • 127.  OMINOUSLY, BEFORE THE POPULAR CONSULTATION  THERE HAD BEEN CLASHES BETWEEN THE PRO‐ INTEGRATION AND ANTI‐INTEGRATION GROUPS.  THESE ARMED CLASHES HAD AFFECTED THE  CIVILIAN COMMUNITY AND RESULTED IN PEOPLE  BEING DISPLACED FROM THEIR HOMES, WHICH  CREATED A REFUGEE SITUATION.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 127
  • 128.  THE REFERENDUM WAS HELD ON 30 AUGUST. THE  PEOPLE OF EAST TIMOR OVERWHELMINGLY CHOSE  INDEPENDENCE, WITH 78.5% OF THE VOTERS  CHOOSING INDEPENDENCE.  ON 4 SEPTEMBER 1999, EAST TIMOR WAS HANDED  OVER TO THE UN AUTHORITIES, WHICH WOULD HELP  THE TERRITORY ORGANIZE ITSELF AS A SOVEREIGN AND  INDEPENDENT STATE. THE RESULT OF THE REFERENDUM  SHOCKED THE NATION AND INFURIATED MANY IN THE  MILITARY.  AFTER ALL THE SACRIFICES AND SO MANY LIVES LOST, IT  WAS NOT EASY TO ACCEPT THAT EAST TIMOR SHOULD  BE RELEASED FROM THE FOLD OF THE REPUBLIC.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 128
  • 129.  THE REFERENDUM RESULTED IN AN INFLUX OF  REFUGEES WHO SUPPORTED THE INTEGRATION WITH INDONESIA AND WERE AFRAID OF THEIR FATE IN THE  NEW INDEPENDENT COUNTRY DOMINATED BY THEIR FORMER ENEMIES TO THE WESTERN PART OF THE  ISLAND OF TIMOR. TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, IN AN APPARENT CAMPAIGN TO GET EVEN WITH THOSE WHO  CHOSE TO SECEDE, THE LOCAL MILITARY UNIT AND PARAMILITARY FORCES ENGAGED THEMSELVES IN A  DESTRUCTIVE RAMPAGE, DRAWING CONCERN AND CRITICISM FROM THE WORLD.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 129
  • 130.  ON ONE HAND, HABIBIE WAS PRAISED FOR HIS  COURAGEOUS DECISION TO GRANT THE EAST TIMORESE  THE RIGHT TO DECIDE THEIR OWN FATE AND  HONORING HIS COMMITMENT TO RESPECT THE RESULT OF THE REFERENDUM. ON THE OTHER HAND, HIS  GOVERNMENT WAS CONDEMNED BECAUSE OF THE  POST‐REFERENDUM CARNAGE. ALTHOUGH THE  COUNTRY WOULD BE FREED OF A LONG‐STANDING  SOURCE OF DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL  AND ECONOMIC BURDEN, DOMESTICALLY HIS DECISION  HAD BEEN USED BY HIS POLITICAL ENEMIES TO RALLY  MORE OPPOSITION AND TO STOP HIM FROM GETTING  REELECTED.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 130
  • 131.  IN THE ASIA PACIFIC ECONOMIC CONFERENCE (APEC) MEETING  IN NEW ZEALAND IN EARLY SEPTEMBER 1999, AROUND THE TIME  OF THE CARNAGE IN EAST TIMOR FOLLOWING THE REFERENDUM,  US PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON TOLD THE COORDINATING MINISTER  OF THE ECONOMY, WHO WAS REPRESENTING INDONESIA IN THE  SUMMIT MEETING AS HABIBIE COULD NOT LEAVE THE COUNTRY  BECAUSE OF THE TENSE SITUATION IN EAST TIMOR, OF HIS  CONCERN FOR THE SITUATION IN EAST TIMOR IN THE  AFTERMATH OF THE REFERENDUM AND ADVISED THE  INDONESIAN MILITARY TO REFRAIN FROM USING FORCE AND TO  ACCEPT INTERNATIONAL PEACE KEEPING FORCE. THE SAME CONCERN FOR THE SITUATION IN EAST TIMOR WAS  ALSO CONVEYED TO HIM BY OTHER WORLD LEADERS WHO WERE  PRESENT, INCLUDING CHINA’S PRESIDENT JIANG CHEMIN,  JAPANESE PRIME MINISTER KEIZO OBUCHI, AND AUSTRALIAN  PRIME MINISTER JOHN HOWARD.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 131
  • 132. BANK BALI CASE ANOTHER BLOW CAME IN THE FORM OF WHAT WAS TO  BE KNOWN AS THE BANK BALI AFFAIR. IT INVOLVED THE  TRANSFER OF FUNDS OUT OF A BANK CONSIDERED TO  BE ONE OF THE POTENTIAL BANKS THAT WOULD  SURVIVE THE CRISIS, BANK BALI.  PRESIDENT HABIBIE’S CLOSE CIRCLE WAS  ALLEGED TO  BE INVOLVED IN THE CASE.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 132
  • 133.  THE EAST TIMOR POST‐REFERENDUM CARNAGE AND THE  BANK BALI AFFAIR SOURED RELATIONS BETWEEN HABIBIE,  THE IMF AND THE DONORS, CREATING CIRCUMSTANCES  THAT WERE REMINISCENT OF THE SITUATION DURING OF  SUHARTO’S FINAL WEEKS. THE TWO ISSUES HAD FROZEN  FURTHER DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE INDONESIAN  GOVERNMENT AND THE IMF. THE IMF DECIDED THAT  FURTHER REVIEW SHOULD ONLY BE DONE AFTER THE  PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. IT WAS CLEAR IN CONVERSATIONS  BETWEEN THE COORDINATING MINISTER FOR THE  ECONOMY AND US SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY LARRY  SUMMERS THAT THE US ADMINISTRATION WAS BEHIND THE  DECISION.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 133
  • 134. THE END OF THE BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 1999 THE DEMOCRATICALLY ELECTED MPR  STARTED ITS SESSION BY THE TIME THE MPR BEGAN ITS FIRST SESSION THE  CONTEST FOR PRESIDENCY WAS BETWEEN HABIBIE AND  MEGAWATI, WHO REPRESENTED THE TWO PARTIES WITH  THE BIGGEST ELECTORAL VOTE. HABIBIE HAD BEEN NOMINATED BY GOLKAR TO BE ITS  PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE.  HOWEVER, AS THE ELECTION TIME DREW CLOSER, A  DIFFERENT POLITICAL CONFIGURATION EMERGED. GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 134
  • 135.  FOR SOME TIME LEADERS FROM VARIOUS MUSLIM  ORGANIZATIONS HAD BEEN WAGING CAMPAIGNS  AGAINST MEGAWATI AND HER PARTY.  BUT THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST MEGAWATI HERSELF  WAS PARTICULARLY FIERCE. IT FOCUSED ON THE  FACT THAT SHE WAS A WOMAN, AND IN THEIR  VIEW ISLAM DID NOT ALLOW A WOMAN TO LEAD A  NATION.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 135
  • 136.  ANOTHER ISSUE WAS HER RELIGIOSITY. PICTURES WERE  DISTRIBUTED SHOWING HER “PRAYING” IN A HINDU TEMPLE.  SOME OF MEGAWATI’S EARLY SUPPORTERS DESERTED HER,  MOST NOTABLY ABDURRAHMAN WAHID, THE HEAD OF THE  POWERFUL MUSLIM ORGANIZATION NAHDATHUL ULAMA  (NU) AND FOUNDER OF THE PARTY PKB, WHO SAW AN  OPPORTUNITY BECOME A CANDIDATE HIMSELF.  AMIDST THE CONTROVERSY SURROUNDING MEGAWATI AND  THE WIDESPREAD OPPOSITION TO HABIBIE AMONG THE  POPULACE AS WELL AS AMONG THE ORIGINAL REFORM  MOVEMENT, LEADERS OF THE MUSLIM PARTIES JOINED  FORCES IN AN ISLAMIC COALITION.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 136
  • 137.  THE COALITION WAS CALLED POROS TENGAH OR  CENTRAL AXIS. THEIR MAIN OBJECTIVE WAS PREVENTING  MEGAWATI FROM BECOMING PRESIDENT, AS AT  THAT TIME MOST OF THE LEADERS OF THE CENTRAL  AXIS WERE SYMPATHETIC TO HABIBIE. HOWEVER THEY ALSO CONSIDERED THE POSSIBILITY  OF A THIRD ALTERNATIVEGSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 137
  • 138.  ON 14 OCTOBER HABIBIE DELIVERED HIS  ACCOUNTABILITY SPEECH. HE REPORTED ON THE  CHALLENGES THAT HE HAD TO FACE WHEN HE TOOK  OVER THE GOVERNMENT AND THE PROGRESS THAT THE  COUNTRY HAD MADE DURING HIS STEWARDSHIP.  HE ALSO REPORTED HIS DECISION TO ALLOW A  REFERENDUM IN EAST TIMOR AND ITS RESULTS, AND  RECOMMENDED THAT THE MPR REVOKE THE 1968  DECISION ON THE INTEGRATION OF EAST TIMOR AND  INDONESIA. GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 138
  • 139.  HE ALSO REPORTED THAT THE INVESTIGATIONS OF  FORMER PRESIDENT SUHARTO BY THE ATTORNEY  GENERAL ABOUT ALLEGED ABUSES OF POWER DID NOT  FIND ANY INDICATION OF CRIMINAL WRONG DOING,  AND HENCE WERE STOPPED. ON THE 19TH  THE MPR VOTED ON HABIBIE’S  ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT.  WITH A VOTE OF 355, MORE THAN HALF OF THE  MEMBERS OF MPR, HABIBIE’S ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT  WAS REJECTED (AGAINST 322 WHO ACCEPTED IT). HABIBIE EFFECTIVELY WAS EXCLUDED FROM THE  PRESIDENTIAL RACEGSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 139
  • 140.  ON THE 20TH  THE MPR TOOK THE VOTE FOR  PRESIDENT BETWEEN TWO CANDIDATES: MEGAWATI  AND ABDURRAHMAN WAHID.  THE RESULT OF THE VOTE: WAHID RECEIVED 373 VOTES  AGAINST MEGAWATI’S 313 VOTES.  ALTHOUGH MANY DOUBTED WAHID’S ABILITY TO LEAD  THE COUNTRY BECAUSE OF HIS PHYSICAL CONDITION,  THE VOTE WAS A REFLECTION OF A NUMBER OF  FACTORS. GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 140
  • 141.  THE JOINED FORCES OF THE ISLAMIC PARTIES AND THE  ISLAMIC FACTIONS WITHIN GOLKAR AND THE  SUPPORTERS OF HABIBIE HAD DEFEATED THE  NATIONALIST COALITION OF PDI‐P AND NATIONALIST  FACTION WITHIN GOLKAR. THE REACTION AMONG PDI‐P RANK AND FILE TO THE  DEFEAT OF MEGAWATI WAS FEROCIOUS. RIOTS BROKE  OUT IN VARIOUS STRONGHOLDS OF PDI‐P, ESPECIALLY IN  JAKARTA, SOLO, BALI AND BATAM. THE WORST RIOTS  WERE IN BALI AND SOLO.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 141
  • 142.  AFTER THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION THE MPR WAS TO  DECIDED WHO WOULD BE THE VICE PRESIDENT. BECAUSE OF HER DISAPPOINTMENT AT RESULT OF THE  PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION, MEGAWATI AT FIRST DECLINED TO  BE NOMINATED AS VICE PRESIDENT.  SHE WAS FURIOUS ABOUT HER DEFEAT AND SUSPECTED  THAT THE SAME COALITION WOULD DEFEAT HER AGAIN, AS  BY THE MORNING OF THE DAY OF THE VICE PRESIDENTIAL  ELECTION THE CENTRAL AXIS HAD COME OUT WITH THEIR  CANDIDATE, HAMZAH HAZ FROM PPP.  AFTER INTENSIVE PERSUASION MEGAWATI FINALLY AGREED  TO RUN. MEGAWATI WON THE ELECTION, GARNERING 396  VOTES AGAINST HAMZAH HAZ’S 284 VOTES.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 142
  • 143.  WHEN THE MPR SESSIONS ENDED THE COUNTRY NEW  LEADERS HAD BEEN ELECTED DEMOCRATICALLY. THE  FIRST TIME IN INDONESIA’S HISTORY. DEMOCRACY HAD  TAKEN ITS HOLD.  THE NEXT CHALLENGE WAS TO CONSOLIDATE THE GAIN,  TO MAKE IT ENDURE AND BRING TANGIBLE BENEFIT TO  THE LIVES OF THE PEOPLE.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 143
  • 144. ABDURRAHMAN WAHID GOVERNMENT
  • 145.  THE ELECTION OF ABDURRAHMAN WAHID TO THE  PRESIDENCY ITSELF CREATED ANOTHER LEGITIMACY  PROBLEM BECAUSE OF HIS PARTY’S LACK OF SUPPORT  SHOWN IN THE NUMBER OF ELECTORAL VOTES WON  AND THE FRAGILITY OF THE COALITION THAT PUT HIM  IN THE PRESIDENCY.  THE COALITION WAS NOT BASED ON A “POSITIVE”  CONSENSUS OF HAVING LAUNCHED THE BEST  CANDIDATE FOR THE JOB, BUT ON A “NEGATIVE”  COMMON PLATFORM TO STOP MEGAWATI FROM  BECOMING PRESIDENT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 145
  • 146.  DIFFERENT ELEMENTS OF THE COALITION ACTED THIS  WAY FOR DIFFERENT REASONS. IT WAS A FRAGILE  COALITION THAT COULD EASILY BREAK WHEN THE  COMMON INTEREST WAS NO LONGER MAINTAINED. MEGAWATI’S ELECTION TO THE VICE PRESIDENCY  PARTIALLY SOLVED THE PROBLEM OF LEGITIMACY.  HAVING MEGAWATI, WHOSE PARTY HAD THE LARGEST  VOTE IN THE PARLIAMENT, AS HIS VICE PRESIDENT  PROVIDED ABDURRAHMAN WAHID’S PRESIDENCY WITH  THE NEEDED POLITICAL LEGITIMACY.  FROM THE VERY BEGINNING IT WAS CLEAR THAT WAHID  OWED AND WOULD DEPEND A LOT ON MEGAWATI’S  SUPPORT TO BE ABLE TO EFFECTIVELY RULE IN A  DEMOCRATIC POLITICAL SETTING.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 146
  • 147. DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION THE END OF THE HABIBIE GOVERNMENT AND THE  ELECTION OF THE NEW GOVERNMENT BY DEMOCRATIC  MEANS COMPLETED THE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY. DURING HIS PRESIDENCY THE PROCESS OF  DISMANTLING THE AUTHORITARIAN SYSTEM AND THE  ESTABLISHMENT OF RULES AND PROCEDURES FOR THE  INSTALLATION OF A DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENT WAS  COMPLETED.  IT MET WITH LINZ AND STEPAN’S STANDARD DEFINITION  OF WHEN A DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION IS COMPLETE. THE COUNTRY WAS ON THE WAY TO STRENGTHEN AND  CONSOLIDATE ITS DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 147
  • 148. THE EUPHORIA THE EMERGENCE OF THE WAHID‐MEGAWATI  GOVERNMENT WAS WELL RECEIVED DOMESTICALLY  AS WELL AS INTERNATIONALLY.  EVEN THOSE WHO AT THE OUTSET WERE OPPOSED TO  ABDURRAHMAN WAHID’S ELECTION ACCEPTED THE  RESULT OF THE ELECTION AS THE BEST AS IT COULD  BE UNDER THE CIRCUMSTANCES. THE COUNTRY CAME BACK TO NORMAL,  DEMONSTRATIONS STOPPED, STUDENTS RETURNED  TO SCHOOLS, THE WARRING FACTIONS LAY DOWN  THEIR ARMS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 148
  • 149.  THERE WAS HIGH HOPE FOR DEMOCRACY AND  CONFIDENCE IN THE COURSE THAT THE COUNTRY  WAS TAKING. IN CONTRAST TO HABIBIE, WAHID WAS  ENDOWED WITH SIGNIFICANT POLITICAL CAPITAL AT  THE ONSET OF HIS PRESIDENCY. ABDURRAHMAN WAHID HAD MARGINAL POLITICAL  SUPPORT IN PARLIAMENT AND WITH THE POLITY AS  THE ELECTION RESULTS SHOWED.  HE NEEDED THE SUPPORT OF THE LARGER PARTIES  THAT HAD LARGER POLITICAL CONSTITUENTS THAN  HE HAD. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 149
  • 150.  THIS RECOGNITION WAS REFLECTED IN THE WAY HE  FORMED HIS FIRST CABINET.  SOME COMMENTATORS WERE CRITICAL OF THE  CABINET COMPOSITION, CLAIMING THAT IT DIDN’T  REFLECT PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE. ALTHOUGH HE HIMSELF HAD BEEN THE CHAIRMAN  OF THE NU, THE LARGEST MUSLIM ORGANIZATION,  HIS SUPPORT WAS PARTICULARLY STRONG AMONG  SECULAR AND NON‐ISLAMIC CIVIL SOCIETY THAT HAD  LONG BEEN HIS POLITICAL HABITAT.  HE WAS ALSO REVERED BY INTERNATIONAL NGOS FOR  HIS UNORTHODOX POLITICAL VIEWS, SUCH AS HIS  MODERATE (FOR SOME HIS PRO) VIEW ON ISRAEL.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 150
  • 151.  HIS EFFORT TO PUT THE MILITARY UNDER CIVILIAN  CONTROL ALSO WON HIM ACCOLADES, ESPECIALLY  AMONG INTERNATIONAL OBSERVERS.  HE APPOINTED A CIVILIAN TO BECOME THE MINISTER  OF DEFENSE, THE FIRST AFTER SO MANY YEARS. IT WAS ALSO A FIRST WHEN HE APPOINTED THE NAVY  CHIEF AS THE COMMANDER OF THE ARMED FORCES,  THE TOP MILITARY POST THAT TRADITIONALLY HAD  BEEN RESERVED FOR THE ARMY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 151
  • 152.  HIS IDEA FOR A SOLUTION TO THE ACEH PROBLEM  WAS TO AGREE TO THE REFERENDUM THAT WAS  DEMANDED BY THE GAM (INDEPENDENT ACEH  MOVEMENT).  ALTHOUGH IT WAS NOT FOLLOWED UP BY ACTUAL  MEASURES DUE TO STRONG OPPOSITION FROM THE  MILITARY AND MOST OF INDONESIA’S PUBLIC AS  WELL MANY ACEHNESE THEMSELVES, HIS STATEMENT  ON THE REFERENDUM STRENGTHENED HIS IMAGE,  ESPECIALLY AMONG THE INTERNATIONAL MEDIA AND  OBSERVERS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 152
  • 153.  HE ALSO MADE A STATEMENT ALLOWING THE  RAISING OF THE REBEL’S FLAG ON THE ANNIVERSARY  OF THE FOUNDING OF GAM ON 4 DECEMBER AS PART  OF THE FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION. FURTHERMORE HE  INITIATED THE NEGOTIATION WITH GAM BROKERED  BY AN INTERNATIONAL NGO WITH A BASE IN GENEVA. HE HAD SHOWN LENIENCE TOWARD THE  INDEPENDENCE MOVEMENT IN IRIAN JAYA BY  AGREEING TO THE USE OF NAME PAPUA INSTEAD OF  IRIAN JAYA AND, AS IN ACEH, ALLOWING THE FLYING  OF THE PAPUAN FLAG THE BINTANG KEJORA (THE  MORNING STAR).Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 153
  • 154.  WAHID ALSO ALLOWED THE ETHNIC CHINESE TO  CELEBRATE THEIR HOLIDAYS OPENLY, AS PART OF THE  COUNTRY’S HOLIDAYS.  IN A DARING MOVE HE STATED THAT THE BAN ON THE  COMMUNIST PARTY AND COMMUNIST TEACHINGS  SHOULD BE LIFTED.  THIS ENDEARED HIM EVEN MORE TO HIS ADMIRERS,  ESPECIALLY AMONG WESTERN OBSERVERS AND  NGO’S.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 154
  • 155.  ALTHOUGH HE WAS THE HEAD OF THE LARGEST  MUSLIM ORGANIZATION AND WAS AN ESTABLISHED  AND KNOWLEDGEABLE MUSLIM SCHOLAR, HE SET  AN EXAMPLE OF TOLERANCE IN RELIGIOUS  PRACTICE AND BEHAVIOR, INCLUDING THE BASIC  ONES SUCH AS THE FIVE‐TIME DAILY PRAYING AND  FIDELITY, AND RELIGIOUS SYNCRETISM. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 155
  • 156. POLITICAL LIMBO HOWEVER GOOD HIS INTENTIONS, WAHID’S  UNORTHODOX APPROACH TO GOVERNANCE  WOULD BRING HIM AND THE COUNTRY A LOT OF  TROUBLE.  HIS DARING DEPARTURE FROM ACCEPTED  POLITICAL NORMS ENDEARED HIM TO SOME ELITES  AND FOREIGN ADMIRERS, BUT IT ALSO ERODED HIS  POLITICAL SUPPORT, WHICH, WITHOUT MEGAWATI,  WAS ON THIN ICE ANY WAY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 156
  • 157.  ONE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC ROWS WAS OVER THE  ISSUE OF OPENING TRADE AND CULTURAL RELATIONS  WITH ISRAEL.  ALTHOUGH THE RATIONALE GIVEN WAS APPEASING  THE JEWISH LOBBY THAT WAS DOMINANT IN WALL  STREET TO GET THEM TO HELP THE INDONESIAN  ECONOMY, IT ENCOUNTERED STRONG REACTION  FROM AMONG POLITICAL ISLAM AND THE MUSLIM  COMMUNITY IN GENERAL.  STUDENTS FROM VARIOUS ORGANIZATIONS STAGED  DEMONSTRATION ALL OVER THE COUNTRY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 157
  • 158.  THEY WERE JOINED BY ULAMA AND POLITICAL  LEADERS FROM THE CENTRAL AXIS WHO WERE HIS  ALLIES IN THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION.  THERE WERE OTHER ISSUES CONCERNING HIS  CONDUCT THAT HAD DAMAGED HIS CREDIBILITY  AMONG MANY MUSLIMS. IF THE ABOVE ISSUES HAD DISILLUSIONED THE  POLITICAL ISLAM AND THE MUSLIM COMMUNITY  OUTSIDE HIS OWN CLOSE CIRCLE, HIS STATEMENTS ON  THE REFERENDUM IN ACEH, AND ALLOWING THE  RAISING OF THE REBEL FLAG HAD ERODED HIS  CREDIBILITY AMONG THE NATIONALISTS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 158
  • 159.  HIS VIEWS IN REGARD TO SIMILAR ISSUES IN IRIAN  JAYA HAD FURTHER DISTANCED HIM FROM THE  MAINSTREAM NATIONALISTS WHO REGARDED  KEEPING THE COUNTRY TOGETHER AS THE UTMOST  PRIORITY.  BUT WHEN HE DISCLOSED THAT HE WANTED TO LIFT  THE BAN ON THE COMMUNIST PARTY AND THE  PROPAGATION OF COMMUNIST TEACHING HE MADE  ENEMIES OUT OF BOTH MUSLIMS AND NATIONALISTS.  HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE MILITARY HAD ALSO  BEEN DETERIORATING. HIS PUBLIC STANCE ON ACEH  AND IRIAN JAYA HAD HURT HIS STANDING WITH THE  MILITARY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 159
  • 160.  HIS CONSTANT ACCUSATIONS OF IMPENDING COUPS,  OF GENERALS CONSPIRING TO BRING HIS  GOVERNMENT DOWN AND HIS HABIT OF BLAMING  THE MILITARY FOR THE DISTURBANCES THAT  HAPPENED DURING HIS PRESIDENCY HAD DISTANCED  HIM FROM THE ARMED FORCES. HIS HANDS‐OFF ATTITUDE ON MATTERS OF  IMPORTANCE TO THE STATE EXASPERATED MANY  PEOPLE.  THE LACK OF LEADERSHIP HAD LEFT THE  GOVERNMENT AND THE POLITICAL SITUATION IN  LIMBO. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 160
  • 161.  THERE WAS A WIDESPREAD FEELING THAT HE WAS  THRILLED BY THE TRAPPINGS OF THE PRESIDENCY,  AND SEEMED TO BE MORE INTERESTED IN  ENJOYING IT THAN IN DISCHARGING THE  RESPONSIBILITY THAT CAME WITH IT.  WAHID WAS SEEN BY MANY AS MORE CONCERNED  ABOUT HIS IMAGE ABROAD THAN ABOUT  ADDRESSING THE PROBLEMS AT HOME. HIS PENCHANT FOR CONSPIRACY THEORY AND  CREATING SCAPEGOATS BASED ON HERESY AND THE  ABSENCE OF SUFFICIENT PROOF CREATED  CONFUSION NOT ONLY IN THE PUBLIC BUT ALSO  AMONG HIS MINISTERS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 161
  • 162.  HE ACCUSED HIS MINISTERS OF CORRUPTION  WITHOUT GIVING ANY PROOF.  HE EVENTUALLY FIRED THEM FROM HIS CABINET,  BUT DID NOT FOLLOW IT UP WITH PROSECUTION,  AS HE SHOULD HAVE IF INDEED HE HAD PROOF OF  THEIR CORRUPTION. HE ALSO SPOKE DEROGATORILY OF HIS VICE  PRESIDENT.  HE COMPLETELY IGNORED MEGAWATI IN HER  CAPACITY AS HIS VICE PRESIDENT AND  DISREGARDED HER SUGGESTIONSDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 162
  • 163.  HIS TREATMENT TOWARD PEOPLE WHO WERE  SUPPOSED TO WORK WITH HIM AND SUPPORT  HIM—HIS VICE PRESIDENT, HIS MINISTERS, HIS  POLITICAL ALLIES AND THE MILITARY—WOULD  SOON THROW HIS GOVERNMENT INTO DISARRAY.  CRACKS IN THE GOVERNMENT SOON APPEARED. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 163
  • 164.  THE RANDOM FIRING OF MINISTERS WITHOUT  CLEAR EXPLANATION, MANY OF THEM POLITICAL  LEADERS, ANTAGONIZED THE POLITY.  IT TRIGGERED A SUMMONS FROM PARLIAMENT,  WHICH ASKED THE PRESIDENT TO EXPLAIN HIS  ACTIONS.  THE PARLIAMENT DID NOT QUESTION HIS RIGHT TO  CHANGE HIS CABINET. WHAT THEY DEMANDED THE  PRESIDENT ANSWER FOR WAS WHY HE PUBLICLY  SAID THAT THEY WERE INVOLVED IN CORRUPTION.  THE PARLIAMENT DEMANDED PROOF OF THIS  ACCUSATION. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 164
  • 165.  AS EXPECTED, WAHID COULD NOT SUBSTANTIATE  HIS ACCUSATION AGAINST THEM.  ALTHOUGH THE PARLIAMENT DID NOT TAKE ANY  ACTION AGAINST HIM ON THIS MATTER, BY THE  END OF DECEMBER THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN  WAHID AND THE PARLIAMENT SUFFERED BECAUSE  OF IT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 165
  • 166.  IT BECAME WORSE WHEN HE MADE A COMMENT  THAT WOULD BE TAKEN AS AN INSULT TO THE  INTELLECTUAL INTEGRITY OF THE MEMBERS OF  PARLIAMENT, COMPARING THEM TO  “KINDERGARTEN.” THE GOVERNMENT WAS ACCUSED OF DISUNITY, OF  BEING RIDDLED WITH INTERNAL STRIFE, AND  ACCORDING TO SOME OBSERVERS, “OF HAVING  TOO MANY UNPROFESSIONAL MINISTERS WHO  WERE INCAPABLE OF PERFORMING THEIR TASKS  PROPERLY AND WHO LACKED LEADERSHIP”. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 166
  • 167.  THE CONFUSION, UNCERTAINTY AND  INCONSISTENCY WERE NOTABLE NOT ONLY  BECAUSE OF THE LACK OR ABSENCE OF DECISIONS  WHEN DECISIONS HAD TO BE MADE, BUT ALSO  BECAUSE THEY WERE COUPLED WITH RETRACTIONS  AND REVOCATIONS OF DECISIONS WHEN THEY  WERE MADE. BY THE END OF DECEMBER 2000, BARELY SIX  MONTHS INTO HIS PRESIDENCY, WAHID WAS  LOSING POLITICAL GROUND.  THERE WERE VOICES IN THE PUBLIC DEMANDING  THAT THE NEXT MPR ANNUAL SESSION SHOULD  DECIDE ON THE PRESIDENT’S POLITICAL FUTURE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 167
  • 168.  THE MPR MET ANNUALLY IN THE MONTH OF  AUGUST AND THE 2000 SESSION WAS SCHEDULED  TO MEET ON 7 AUGUST. PRIOR TO THE SESSION THE PDI‐P, GOLKAR AND THE  PARTIES BELONGING TO THE CENTRAL AXIS WERE  MANEUVERING TO HAVE WAHID REPLACED BY  MEGAWATI.  BY THIS TIME, THE OPPOSITION FROM THE ISLAMIC  PARTIES TO MEGAWATI AS A PRESIDENTIAL  CANDIDATE HAD SUBSIDED. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 168
  • 169.  HOWEVER MEGAWATI WAS RELUCTANT TO TAKE  THE FINAL STEP, AGREEING INSTEAD ON A  COMPROMISE SOLUTION THAT WOULD ALLOW  WAHID TO CONTINUE TO BE PRESIDENT BUT FOR  THE DAY‐TO‐DAY AFFAIRS OF THE GOVERNMENT TO  BE HANDED OVER TO THE VICE PRESIDENT.  UNDERSTANDING THAT IT WAS THE ONLY WAY  FROM BEING OUSTED BY THE MPR, WAHID IN HIS  STATEMENT INDICATED HIS ACCEPTANCE OF THE  COMPROMISE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 169
  • 170. DISHONORING THE DEAL HOWEVER, WITHIN DAYS WAHID INDICATED THAT HE  HAD NO INTENTION OF CARRYING OUT HIS PART OF THE  DEAL.  HE ANNOUNCED THAT HE WOULD GIVE MEGAWATI  ADDITIONAL TASKS AND NOT ADDITIONAL POWER.  HE DID GIVE THE VICE PRESIDENT SOME MINOR TASKS  WITH LIMITED FREEDOM OF ACTION. HE DISMISSED PDI‐P, GOLKAR AND CENTRAL AXIS  MINISTERS, SOME OF WHOM HELD IMPORTANT  PORTFOLIOS, AND REPLACED THEM WITH PEOPLE OF  QUESTIONABLE COMPETENCE AND BACKGROUND  EXCEPT FOR THE FACT THAT THEY HAD CLOSE PERSONAL  RELATIONSHIPS WITH ABDURRAHMAN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 170
  • 171. ECONOMIC SLIPPAGE IT WAS EXPECTED THAT THE ECONOMY WOULD  FURTHER IMPROVE UNDER WAHID GOVERNMENT.  ACCORDING TO A WORLD BANK REPORT INSTEAD OF  IMPROVING THE ECONOMY WAS DETERIORATING.  EARLY SLIPPAGES IN REFORMS AND AN INCREASINGLY  UNCERTAIN POLITICAL CLIMATE RAISED RISK PREMIUMS  AND CONTRIBUTED TO RENEWED DOWNWARD  PRESSURE ON THE RUPIAH (WORLD BANK, NOVEMBER,  2001). THE RUPIAH CONTINUED TO WEAKEN PASSING THE  10,000 LINE TO A DOLLAR. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 171
  • 172.  CONFLICTING STATEMENTS FROM THE PRESIDENT  AND HIS MINISTERS HAD CREATED CONFUSION AND  UNCERTAINTY, MIRRORING THE ECONOMIC LIMBO  DURING THE LAST MONTHS OF SUHARTOS  GOVERNMENT. WAHID’S FORAYS INTO ECONOMIC POLICIES WERE ILL‐ ADVISED AND IRRESPONSIBLE.  THEY WERE NOT BASED ON CAREFUL CONSIDERATION  AND CONSULTATION WITH THE EXPERTS, BUT WERE  INTENDED MAINLY TO ADVANCE HIS POLITICAL  POPULARITY AT THE COST OF THE ECONOMY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 172
  • 173.  HIS STATEMENT THAT THE GOVERNMENT WOULD  INCREASE SUBSTANTIALLY THE SALARY OF CIVIL  SERVANTS, ADMITTEDLY NECESSARY, WAS NOT  SUPPORTED BY THE FINANCIAL CAPACITY OF THE  GOVERNMENT AT THE TIME.  HIS ENCOURAGEMENT FOR PEOPLE LIVING AROUND  THE PLANTATION‐ESTATES TO JUST TAKE 40% OF THE  LAND SCARED INVESTORS AWAY, AS THE RESPECT FOR  LAW AND OF PROPERTY HAD BEEN VIOLATED.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 173
  • 174. DEJA VU? THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC LIMBO TOOK A TOLL ON  THE EVERYDAY LIFE OF THE PEOPLE.  THE ECONOMIC, POLITICAL AND SECURITY CONDITIONS  WERE DETERIORATING.  THERE WERE DEMONSTRATIONS AGAINST WAHID  EVERYWHERE.  HE RESPONDED BY MOBILIZING HIS SUPPORTERS, AND  HIS FOLLOWERS ATTACKED A NEWSPAPER OFFICE IN  SURABAYA, WHEN IT CRITICIZED HIM.  TO SHOW THEIR ANGER AT WAHIDS OPPONENTS HIS  FOLLOWERS IN EAST JAVA HAD CUT TREES ALL OVER  EAST JAVA, BRINGING A COMMENT FROM WAHID THAT  IT WAS BETTER TO CUT THREES THAN HEADS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 174
  • 175.  WAHID HAD ALSO SHOWN A PREPONDERANCE  TOWARD NEPOTISM.  AS DISCUSSED ABOVE HE HAD DISMISSED MINISTERS  WHO WERE NOT READILY WILLING TO ACCEPT HIS  WISHES OR REPRESENTED PARTIES THAT WERE  CRITICAL TO HIM, REPLACING THEM WITH  SYCOPHANT MINISTERS, SOME PREVIOUSLY INVOLVED  IN SCANDALS OR QUESTIONABLE ACTIVITIES.  WAHID ALSO HAD HIS BROTHER APPOINTED TO A TOP  POSITION IN IBRA/BPPPN ALTHOUGH HE HAD NO  BACKGROUND IN FINANCE OR BANKING. A PATTERN OF NEPOTISM RE‐EMERGED, CAUSING  MANY TO BE REMINDED OF THE NEPOTISM CHARGES  AGAINST SUHARTO. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 175
  • 176.  THE FEELING OF DEJA VU WAS NOT ONLY CONFINED  TO THE POLITICAL CONFUSION AND THE RESULTING  STAGNATION OF THE ECONOMY.  RUMORS FLEW ABOUT CORRUPTION IN HIGH PLACES,  SOME FINDING WAY INTO THE MEDIA.  ABUSE OF POWER FOR PERSONAL GAINS RE‐ EMERGED INTO THE SPOTLIGHT: APPOINTMENT TO  HIGH POSITION IN GOVERNMENT WAS REPORTEDLY  TRADED FOR MONEY.  IN PARTICULAR, THE HIGH LEVEL JOBS IN THE PUBLIC  ENTERPRISES WERE SUBJECT TO NEGOTIATION. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 176
  • 177.  A LUCRATIVE BUSINESS HAD DEVELOPED IN  DEALING WITH BUSINESSMEN WHO HAD TO  ACCOUNT TO THE AUTHORITIES THEIR BAD LOANS  AND OTHER PAST BUSINESS MISCONDUCT. KWIK KIAN GIE, AFTER HIS DISMISSAL AS THE  COORDINATING MINISTER FOR THE ECONOMY,  REVEALED THAT DURING A CABINET MEETING  WAHID, INSISTED THAT CERTAIN “BLACK  CONGLOMERATES” SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO  CONTINUE UNDISTURBED AS ENTREPRENEURS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 177
  • 178. CORRUPTION SCANDALS  THE FINAL BLOW TO THE CREDIBILITY OF THE  ABDURRAHMAN WAHID GOVERNMENT AND ITS  AVOWED AGENDA TO FIGHT CORRUPTION WERE TWO  SCANDALS INVOLVING THE PRESIDENT HIMSELF KNOWN  AS BULOGGATE AND BRUNEIGATE.  THE PARLIAMENT  FOUND THAT PRESIDENT WAHID HAD  MISUSED HIS OFFICE AND SUMMONED THE PRESIDENT  TO ANSWER THE ALLEGATION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 178
  • 179. DEMOCRATIC REVERSAL THE INDIRECTLY RELATED SCANDALS CREATED SUCH  PUBLIC FUROR THAT THE PARLIAMENT WAS DRAWN  TO ACT.  THE PARLIAMENT CREATED A SPECIAL COMMISSION TO  INVESTIGATE BOTH CASES.  ON 28 JANUARY 2001, THE SPECIAL COMMISSION  REPORTED ITS FINDINGS TO THE PLENARY SESSION OF  THE PARLIAMENT.  ON BULOGGATE, THE COMMISSION FOUND THAT  THERE WAS STRONG INDICATION THAT PRESIDENT  ABDURRAHMAN WAHID “HAD A ROLE IN THE RELEASE  AND THE USE OF FUNDS BELONGING TO THE WELFARE  FOUNDATION OF BULOG EMPLOYEES.” Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 179
  • 180.  ON THE CONTRIBUTION FROM THE SULTAN OF  BRUNEI, THE COMMISSION FOUND, “THERE WAS  INCONSISTENCY IN PRESIDENT ABDURRAHMAN  WAHID STATEMENT PERTAINING TO THE QUESTION  OF THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE SULTAN OF BRUNEI  INDICATING THAT THE PRESIDENT HAS GIVEN FALSE  STATEMENT TO THE PUBLIC".Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 180
  • 181.  THE CONCLUSION OF THE SPECIAL COMMISSION  WAS A SERIOUS MATTER, BECAUSE IF THE  PARLIAMENT ADOPTED IT, THE PARLIAMENT COULD  ISSUE A MEMORANDUM TO THE PRESIDENT  WARNING HIM AND ASKING HIM TO ANSWER TO  THE FINDINGS OF THE SPECIAL COMMISSION. IF THE PRESIDENT DID NOT PROVIDE SATISFACTORY  ANSWERS TO THE MEMORANDUM AFTER THREE  MONTHS, THE PARLIAMENT COULD ISSUE A  SECOND MEMORANDUM. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 181
  • 182.  IF THE PRESIDENT AGAIN FAILED TO RESPOND TO  THE SECOND MEMORANDUM, THAN THE  PARLIAMENT COULD PROPOSE TO THE MPR TO  CONVENE A SPECIAL SESSION TO ASK THE  PRESIDENT TO ACCOUNT FOR HIS CONDUCT.  IF THE MPR COULD NOT ACCEPT THE  ACCOUNTABILITY, IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE  CONSTITUTION, THE MPR COULD IMPEACH THE  PRESIDENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 182
  • 183.  INSTEAD OF FOLLOWING THE CONSTITUTIONAL  PROCEDURE TO DEFEND HIS PRESIDENCY, WAHID  CHOSE TO BE BELLIGERENT.  ONE DAY AFTER THE SPECIAL COMMISSION  SUBMITTED ITS REPORT TO THE PLENARY SESSION OF  THE PARLIAMENT, ABDURRAHMAN MADE A  STATEMENT IN A MEETING WITH INDONESIAS  ISLAMIC UNIVERSITY PRESIDENTS THREATENING TO  ISSUE A PRESIDENTIAL DECREE TO DECLARE A STATE  OF EMERGENCY AND DISSOLVE THE PARLIAMENT IF  PARLIAMENT PERSISTED WITH THE MEMORANDA  PROCESS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 183
  • 184.  SINCE THE CONSTITUTION HAD CLEARLY  STIPULATED THAT THE PRESIDENT COULD NOT  DISSOLVE THE PARLIAMENT IN ANY SITUATION AND  FOR ANY REASON, IT WAS SEEN AS AN  UNCONSTITUTIONAL AND DICTATORIAL RESPONSE  TO A DEMOCRATIC PROCESS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 184
  • 185.  ON 1 FEBRUARY, THE PLENARY SESSION OF PARLIAMENT  ADOPTED THE REPORT AND THE CONCLUSION OF THE  COMMISSION AND ISSUED THE FIRST MEMORANDUM.  THE MEMORANDUM STATED THAT WAHID HAD  SERIOUSLY VIOLATED THE CONSTITUTION AND HIS OATH  OF OFFICE, AND THE 1998 MPR DECREE ON GOOD  GOVERNANCE FREE FROM CORRUPTION, COLLUSION  AND NEPOTISM.  THE PARLIAMENT GAVE WAHID THREE MONTHS TO  RESPOND TO THE MEMORANDUM.  WHEN THE TIME HAD PASSED AND HE DID NOT  RESPOND, ON 30 APRIL THE PARLIAMENT ISSUED THE  SECOND MEMORANDUM, AND GAVE WAHID ONE  MONTH TO RESPOND TO IT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 185
  • 186.  FINALLY, WHEN BY 30 MAY WAHID STILL DID NOT  GIVE A RESPONSE, THE PARLIAMENT DECIDED TO  ASK THE MPR TO CALL A SPECIAL SESSION TO CALL  THE PRESIDENT TO ACCOUNT ON THE TWO CASES.  UPON RECEIVING THE MEMORANDUM, THE  LEADERSHIP OF THE MPR DECIDED TO CONVENE AN  EXTRAORDINARY SESSION ON 1 AUGUST 2001.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 186
  • 187.  WAHID UNDERSTOOD THAT THE DECREE TO IMPOSE A  STATE OF EMERGENCY AND TO DISSOLVE THE  PARLIAMENT WOULD HAVE A MEANING ONLY IF HE HAD  THE POWER EXECUTE IT AND FOR THAT HE NEEDED THE  SUPPORT OF THE ARMY.  HOWEVER, THE CHIEF OF STAFF OF THE ARMY, HAD  OPENLY CRITICIZED THE IDEA OF THE DECREE AND  ISSUED A STATEMENT THAT THE ARMY WOULD NOT  SUPPORT THE IMPOSITION OF STATE OF EMERGENCY  AND THE DISSOLUTION OF THE DEMOCRATICALLY  ELECTED PARLIAMENT.  THE COMMANDER OF THE ARMED FORCES, AND CHIEF  OF POLICE ALSO REFUSED TO SUPPORT THE DECREE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 187
  • 188.  ON 20 MAY, WAHID SUMMONED THE MILITARY  LEADERSHIP AND SERVED THEM AN ULTIMATUM: IF  THEY STILL DID NOT SUPPORT THE DECREE BY THE  END (MIDNIGHT) OF THE DAY, THEY WOULD BE  REPLACED.  THE MILITARY BRASS REFUSED TO ACCEDE TO  WAHIDS DEMAND TO SUPPORT THE DECREE.  THEY ALSO REJECTED ANY CHANGE IN THE MILITARY  LEADERSHIP FOR THE MOMENT.  THOSE WHO HAD BEEN OFFERED THE JOB OF  COMMANDER OF THE ARMED FORCES AND CHIEF OF  THE MILITARY SERVICES BY WAHID REFUSED THE  OFFER OF PROMOTION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 188
  • 189.  WITH THE MILITARY SOLIDLY REFUSING TO GIVE IN TO  HIS DEMAND, WAHID TURNED TO THE POLICE.  AS THE CHIEF OF POLICE HAD ALSO MADE CLEAR HIS  POSITION OPPOSING THE DECREE, ABDURRAHMAN  MANEUVERED TO REPLACE HIM WITH SOMEBODY  WHO WOULD SUPPORT HIM IN HIS PLAN TO DISSOLVE  THE PARLIAMENT.  AFTER HE FOUND AN ASPIRING CANDIDATE AMONG  THE HIGH RANKING POLICE OFFICERS, HE ASKED THE  POLICE CHIEF TO RESIGN, PROMISING HIM AN  AMBASSADORIAL JOB.  THE POLICE CHIEF REFUSED TO RESIGN, CITING THAT  THE APPOINTMENT AND DISMISSAL OF THE CHIEF OF  POLICE HAD TO HAVE THE APPROVAL OF THE  PARLIAMENT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 189
  • 190.  AS IN THE CASE OF THE ARMY, THE MAJORITY OF  HIGH‐RANKING POLICE OFFICERS JOINTLY ISSUED A  STATEMENT SUPPORTING THE CHIEF OF POLICE AND  URGING HIM NOT TO RESIGN.  THEY INSISTED THAT THE POLICE WAS A STATE  INSTITUTION AND SHOULD NOT BE POLITICIZED.  ALL FORMER CHIEFS OF POLICE ALSO MADE  STATEMENTS SUPPORTING THE POSITION OF THE  SERVING OFFICERS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 190
  • 191.  WAHID SUSPENDED THE CHIEF OF POLICE WITHOUT  FIRING HIM OUTRIGHT, DESIGNATING THE NEWLY  APPOINTED VICE CHIEF OF POLICE AS THE ACTING  CHIEF OF POLICE.  THE MANEUVER WAS DESIGNED TO CIRCUMVENT THE  REQUIREMENT TO GO TO THE PARLIAMENT.  THE MAJORITY OF THE FACTIONS IN THE PARLIAMENT,  INCLUDING THOSE REPRESENTING THE MILITARY AND  POLICE, REGARDED IT AS A SERIOUS CONSTITUTIONAL  BREACH. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 191
  • 192.  WITHIN THE POLICE, THE MAJORITY OF THE SENIOR  OFFICERS REFUSED TO RECOGNIZE THE AUTHORITY OF  THE ACTING CHIEF OF POLICE. TO PREVENT FURTHER DETERIORATION OF THE  POLITICAL AND SECURITY SITUATION, ON THAT SAME  DAY, 20 JULY 2000, THE LEADERSHIP OF MPR DECIDED  TO ACCELERATE THE SPECIAL SESSION THAT WAS  SCHEDULED TO BEGIN ON 1 AUGUST 2001 TO  DELIBERATE ON THE MEMORANDUM SENT BY THE  PARLIAMENT TO 21 JULY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 192
  • 193.  WAHID WAS SUMMONED TO APPEAR IN FRONT OF THE  MPR ON 23 JULY TO ANSWER TO THE CHARGES OF THE  PARLIAMENT AGAINST HIM. AT 01:10, MONDAY 23 JULY 2001 WITH WAHID AT HIS  SIDE, A PRESIDENT’S SPOKESMAN APPEARED IN FRONT  OF A TELEVISED PRESS CONFERENCE TO READ A  PRESIDENTIAL DECREE IN WHICH THE PRESIDENT  DECREED THE DISSOLUTION OF THE MPR, THE  PARLIAMENT, AND THE GOLKAR PARTY AND CALLED FOR  THE HOLDING OF A NEW ELECTION WITHIN ONE YEAR. IT WAS THE ULTIMATE OF THE REVERSE‐ DEMOCRATIZATION PROCESS THAT HAD BEEN GOING  ON FOR THE PAST YEAR.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 193
  • 194.  FROM THE THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVE, AS DIAMOND  (1999) HAS ARGUED, DEFENDING THE CONSTITUTION  ENTAILS MORE THAN DEFENSE AGAINST BLATANT  OVERTHROW; IT MEANS DEFENDING CONSTITUTIONAL  NORMS, LIMITS AND PROCEDURES AGAINST  SUBVERSION OR ENCROACHMENT.  DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION INVOLVES NOT ONLY  AGREEMENT ON THE RULES FOR COMPETING FOR  POWER BUT ALSO FUNDAMENTAL AND SELF‐ ENFORCING RESTRAINTS ON THE EXERCISE OF POWER.  FOR DEMOCRACY TO BE CONSOLIDATED THERE MOST  BE A BROAD NORMATIVE AND BEHAVIORAL CONSENSUS  ON THE LEGITIMACY OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL SYSTEM,  HOWEVER POOR OR UNSATISFYING ITS PERFORMANCE  MAY BE AT ANY POINT OF TIME.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 194
  • 195. IMPEACHMENT ON THE SAME DAY AFTER CONFERRING WITH THE  LEADERSHIP OF THE MPR, THE SPEAKER OF THE  PARLIAMENT SENT A LETTER TO THE CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE  SUPREME COURT ASKING FOR A LEGAL GUIDANCE ON THE  CONSTITUTIONALITY OF THE PRESIDENT’S DECREE. THE SUPREME COURT GAVE ITS OPINION THAT THE  PRESIDENTIAL DECREE WAS UNCONSTITUTIONAL; THAT  THE CONSTITUTION EXPLICITLY STIPULATED THAT THE  PRESIDENT COULD NOT DISSOLVE THE PARLIAMENT; AND  THAT ACCORDING TO THE CONSTITUTION THE PRESIDENT  WAS ELECTED BY AND ACCOUNTABLE TO THE MPR.  AS FOR HOLDING A NEW ELECTION, THE NEXT ROUND OF  ELECTION HAD ALREADY BEEN DECIDED BY THE MPR AND  ONLY THE MPR COULD CHANGE ITS DECISION. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 195
  • 196.  ON THE QUESTION OF THE GOLKAR PARTY,  ACCORDING TO THE NEW POLITICAL LAW, ONLY THE  SUPREME COURT HAD THE AUTHORITY TO DISSOLVE A  POLITICAL PARTY AND ONLY IF IT WAS FOUND GUILTY  TO BE VIOLATING THE ELECTORAL LAW. THUS, THE  SUPREME COURT OPINED, THE PRESIDENT HAD NO  AUTHORITY TO DISSOLVE A POLITICAL PARTY. AFTER HEARING THE OPINION OF THE SUPREME  COURT, THE VOTE WAS TAKEN, AND THE MPR  UNANIMOUSLY REJECTED THE DECREE AND DECLARED  IT AS ILLEGAL.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 196
  • 197.  THE NEXT AGENDA WAS THE PRESIDENTIAL  ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT SCHEDULED FOR THAT DAY.  SINCE WAHID WAS NOT PRESENT AT THE PRE‐ DETERMINED TIME, A VOTE WAS TAKEN TO DECIDE:   THAT THE PRESIDENT HAD VIOLATED THE STATE GUIDELINE  BY HIS ABSENCE AND REFUSAL TO GIVE AN ACCOUNTABILITY  REPORT IN THE SPECIAL SESSION OF THE MPR AS  DETERMINED BY THE CONSTITUTION, AND   TO REMOVE ABDURRAHMAN WAHID AS PRESIDENT.  TO BE SURE THAT THERE WOULD NOT BE A VACUUM  IN GOVERNMENT, AT THE SAME TIME THE MPR ALSO  DECIDED THAT VICE PRESIDENT MEGAWATI BECOME  THE PRESIDENT SUCCEEDING ABDURRAHMAN WAHID.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 197
  • 198.  THE NEXT ORDER OF BUSINESS WAS TO ELECT THE  VICE PRESIDENT. THE ELECTION FOR VICE PRESIDENT  WAS HELD ON 25 AUGUST.  THERE WERE FIVE DECLARED CANDIDATES WHO WERE  RUNNING IN THE FIRST BALLOT.  HAMZAH HAZ, THE CHAIRMAN OF A MOSLEM PARTY  (PPP), WHO WAS SUPPORTED BY THE COALITION OF  THE CENTRAL AXIS AND PDIP, AFTER A THIRD BALLOT  WON THE ELECTION. THE PROCEEDING WAS WIDELY COVERED BY BOTH  DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MEDIA. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 198
  • 199.  THE NATION ONCE AGAIN WATCHED DEMOCRACY IN  FUNCTION AS THEIR NATIONAL LEADERS WERE  CHOSEN BY DEMOCRATIC MEANS.  THE YOUNG DEMOCRACY HAD PASSED A SEVERE TEST  AND PROVEN ITS RESILIENCE BY PROTECTING THE  INTEREST OF THE COUNTRY AND THE PEOPLE FROM A  FLOUNDERING AND INCOMPETENT LEADER. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 199
  • 200.  THE ABDURRAHMAN WAHID EPISODE IN INDONESIA’S  POLITICAL HISTORY HAD DEMONSTRATED HUNTINGTON’S  FORESIGHT THAT NEW LEADERS OF DEMOCRACY MIGHT  EMERGE AS, “ARROGANT, INCOMPETENT, OR CORRUPT,  OR SOME COMBINATION OF ALL THREE.”  IN THAT SENSE THEY WOULD COME TO BE VIEWED AS NO  DIFFERENT THAN THEIR AUTHORITARIAN PREDECESSORS,  AND MAY EVEN BE CONSIDERED AS WORSE, AS THEY HAVE  NOT PRODUCED TANGIBLE PERFORMANCE IN  COMPARISON WITH AUTHORITARIAN REGIMES WHOSE  LEGITIMACY WERE BASED ON PERFORMANCE, ON  SUCCESSES IN PRODUCING POLITICAL STABILITY OR  ECONOMIC BENEFIT OR BOTH.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 200
  • 201.  HUNTINGTON ALSO ARGUES THAT,  “DEMOCRACY DOES NOT MEAN THAT PROBLEM WILL  BE SOLVED; IT DOES MEAN THAT RULERS CAN BE  REMOVED; AND THE ESSENCE OF DEMOCRATIC  BEHAVIOR IS DOING THE LATTER BECAUSE IT IS  IMPOSSIBLE TO DO THE FORMER.” AFTER BACKTRACKING ONE OR TWO STEPS,  INDONESIA WAS MOVING FORWARD AGAIN IN  CONSOLIDATING ITS NEW DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 201
  • 202. MEGAWATI GOVERNMENT
  • 203.  WITH MEGAWATI SUKARNOPUTRI BECOMING ITS  FOURTH PRESIDENT, THE POLITICAL CYCLE HAD ALSO  COME FULL CIRCLE, BECAUSE AS THE WINNER OF THE  ELECTION, IT WAS EXPECTED THAT SHE BE GIVEN THE  FIRST CHANCE TO GOVERN AND THAT SHE HAD BEEN  CHEATED OF HER RIGHT.  HER ASCENDANCY TO THE PRESIDENCY WAS RECEIVED  WITH A SIGH OF RELIEF. FOR MANY IT HAD ALSO  STRENGTHENED FAITH IN DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 203
  • 204.  MEGAWATI FORMED HER CABINET BY TAKING INTO  CONSIDERATION THE POLITICAL EQUATION.  ALTHOUGH HER PARTY WAS THE BIGGEST IN THE PARLIAMENT,  IT WAS FAR SHORT OF THE MAJORITY, WHICH MEANT THAT  SHE NEEDED TO FORGE A COALITION.  BUT, AS SHE ALSO LEARNED FROM THE EXPERIENCE OF WAHID  GOVERNMENT, POLITICAL ALLIANCE ALONE WOULD NOT  SUFFICE TO LIFT THE COUNTRY OUT OF ITS CRISIS.  SHE NEEDED PROFESSIONALS UNBOUND BY PARTY POLITICS.  THEREFORE, IN FORMING HER CABINET SHE INCLUDED THE  REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE POLITICAL PARTIES BUT  RESERVED SOME OF THE MAJOR ECONOMIC POSTS FOR NON‐ PARTISAN PROFESSIONALS.  MANY OF THE MINISTERS WHO WERE FIRED BY  ABDURRAHMAN WERE REAPPOINTED BY MEGAWATI.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 204
  • 205.  WITH THE RETURN OF POLITICAL STABILITY AFTER THE  CHANGE OF GOVERNMENT ON THE MACRO LEVEL  THE ECONOMY HAD BEGUN IMPROVING.  THE WORLD BANK REPORT IN THE JANUARY 2003,  CITED THAT POLITICAL STABILITY, MACROECONOMIC  POLICIES AND CONTINUED FISCAL CONSOLIDATION  SUPPORTED THE MARKET AND MACRO‐ECONOMIC  STABILITY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 205
  • 206.  THERE WAS A TEMPORARY DISRUPTION TO THE  ECONOMIC IMPROVEMENT CAUSED BY THE FIRST  BALI BOMBING, BUT SINCE THEN THE ECONOMY HAS  CONTINUED TO IMPROVE.  BANKS ARE CONTINUING TO RECOVER AND  CORPORATE DEBT RESTRUCTURING IS PROGRESSING,  ALBEIT AT A SLOW PACE.  POLITICAL STABILITY HAS CALMED THE MARKET,  SUPPORTED THE FINANCIAL MARKET SENTIMENTS  AND RESTORED CONFIDENCE TO CONSUMERS.  INFLATION HAS BEEN CONTROLLED AND THE  EXCHANGE RATE OF THE RUPIAH HAS BEEN MORE OR  LESS STABLE, BETWEEN 8,000 AND 9,000 PER DOLLAR. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 206
  • 207.  THERE WERE ENCOURAGING SIGNS THAT THE NEW  GOVERNMENT HAS RENEWED THE COMMITMENT TO  REFORMS.  ON THE MATTER OF STRUCTURAL REFORMS, THE  WORLD BANK REPORT WRITES,  “THE IMF SUPPORTED PROGRAM, WHICH HAD  SLIPPED DURING THE LAST YEAR OF THE GUS DUR  GOVERNMENT, WAS QUICKLY BROUGHT BACK ON  TRACK, AND HAS, BY AND LARGE, REMAINED THAT  WAY.”Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 207
  • 208.  ANOTHER CHALLENGE TO THE GOVERNMENT WAS HOW TO  DEAL WITH THE POLITICAL DECISION TO END THE  DEPENDENCE ON IMF.  IN ITS 2003 ANNUAL SESSION THE MPR DECIDED TO  TERMINATE THE IMF PROGRAM.  MEGAWATI’S GOVERNMENT, WITH THE ASSISTANCE FROM  THE IMF AND THE WORLD BANK, HAS DESIGNED AN EXIT  STRATEGY TO COPE WITH THE POST‐IMF CHALLENGES.  IT HAS OPTED TO ENTER INTO A POST‐PROGRAM  MONITORING SCHEME WITH THE IMF THAT ALLOWS  INDONESIA TO MAINTAIN A CLOSE DIALOGUE WITH THE  INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY, THEREBY KEEPING THE  MARKET’S CONFIDENCE ON THE INDONESIAN ECONOMY  WITHOUT HAVING TO ASK FOR FURTHER FINANCIAL  ASSISTANCE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 208
  • 209.  MEGAWATI’S GOVERNMENT HAS ALSO SUCCEEDED  IN DEFUSING THE COMMUNAL STRIFE IN MALUKU  AND SOUTH SULAWESI BY BRINGING ALL THE  CONFLICTING PARTIES TOGETHER AND EXACTING  COMMITMENTS TO CEASE THE VIOLENCE.  THE VOLUNTEERS WHO WERE AIDING THE MUSLIM  SIDES IN BOTH AREAS HAVE BEEN RETURNED. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 209
  • 210.  MEGAWATI HAS ALSO SHOWN HER RESOLUTENESS  IN DEALING WITH THE TERRORISM.  SHE RESPONDED DECISIVELY ON BALI BOMBING.  WITHIN A RELATIVELY SHORT PERIOD OF TIME THE  AUTHORITIES HAVE BEEN ABLE TO CATCH THE  PERPETRATORS OF THE BOMBING AND BROUGHT  THEM TO THE COURT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 210
  • 211. THE DOWNSIDE UNFORTUNATELY, THE PICTURE IS NOT ALL ROSY. IN THE FIRST  MONTHS THE NEW GOVERNMENT DISPLAYED INERTIA IN  MAKING POLICY. THE MINISTERS SOON SHOWED THEMSELVES TO BE  FRAGMENTED. THE CONFLICTING OPINIONS CAME INTO THE  OPEN. THE ECONOMIC MINISTERS ESPECIALLY HAD NOT BEEN  ABLE TO ACT AS A TEAM; COORDINATION WAS VERY WEAK. PREDICTABLY, THE RIFT IN THE CABINET INFLUENCED THE  PERCEPTION OF THE MARKET ON THE CABINET. THIS TOO HAD  ITS TOLL ON THE INVESTMENT CLIMATE.  DESPITE THE OPTIMISM DESCRIBED ABOVE, THE WORLD BANK  IN THE SAME REPORT ALSO POINTED OUT THAT,  “INDONESIA’S INVESTMENT CLIMATE IS SEEN TO BE  DETERIORATING, AND NOW RANKS AMONG THE WORSE IN  THE WORLD.” Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 211
  • 212.  IT CONTINUED TO REPORT THAT INDONESIA IS FACING  FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEMS IN ITS INVESTMENT  CLIMATE,  “RANGING FROM INCREASED VIOLENCE AND CRIME,  TO CORRUPTION AND BUREAUCRATIC DELAY AND  INEFFICIENCY, UNCERTAINTY IN LABOR RELATIONS,  AND EXCESSIVE TAXATION BY SOME LOCAL  GOVERNMENTS.” THE ECONOMY ALTHOUGH HAS POSTED A MODEST  GROWTH AT A RATE OF AROUND 3.5%, IT IS STILL  CONSUMER DRIVEN. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 212
  • 213.  THE DISSATISFACTION OF THE PUBLIC WITH THE  PERFORMANCE OF THE DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENT HAS  BEEN MANIFESTED IN MANY POLLS.  ONE OF THE RECENT POLLS, DONE BY THE LEMBAGA  SURVEY INDONESIA (INDONESIAN SURVEY INSTITUTE),  WITH FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM THE JAPANESE  GOVERNMENT THROUGH JICA, FOUND THAT AROUND  51.6% OF RESPONDENTS WERE DISSATISFIED WITH THE  DEMOCRATIC PROCESS IN THE COUNTRY. 56% EXPRESSED THEIR PREFERENCE FOR THE NEW ORDER  BECAUSE THEY FELT IT WAS BETTER THAN THE CURRENT  DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 213
  • 214.  ALTHOUGH ACCORDING TO THE SURVEY MEGAWATI  WAS STILL THE FRONT RUNNER AMONG THE  CANDIDATES FOR THE NEXT PRESIDENTIAL  ELECTION, IF THE ELECTION WERE HELD  IMMEDIATELY, GOLKAR WOULD HAVE WON THE  PARLIAMENTARY ELECTION WITH 25.9% OF THE  VOTE, TRAILED BY PDIP WITH 17.6%—A  SIGNIFICANT DECLINE FROM THE NUMBER ONE  POSITION IN THE 1999 ELECTION, WITH 33% OF THE  VOTES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 214
  • 215. AUTHORITARIAN NOSTALGIA THE REVERSAL IN PUBLIC OPINION ACTUALLY HAD  BEEN FORETOLD BY HUNTINGTON, BASED ON  EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM THE THIRD WAVE OF  DEMOCRATIZATION.  HE OBSERVES THAT THE INTRACTABILITY OF  PROBLEMS AND THE DISILLUSIONMENT OF THE  PUBLIC WERE PERVASIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE  NEW DEMOCRACIES.  WHAT HE CALLS “AUTHORITARIAN NOSTALGIA” WAS  AN EXPECTED RESPONSE TO DEMOCRACY AT THAT  STAGE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 215
  • 216.  DIAMOND ARGUES THAT THERE IS A RECIPROCAL  RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LEGITIMACY AND PERFORMANCE.  HE MAINTAINS THAT THE BETTER THE PERFORMANCE OF A  DEMOCRATIC REGIME IN PRODUCING AND BROADLY  DISTRIBUTING IMPROVEMENTS IN LIVING STANDARDS, THE  MORE LIKELY IT IS TO ENDURE.  AT THE SAME TIME, HE ALSO ADMITS THAT THERE ARE  COUNTRIES THAT ACHIEVE CONSOLIDATION EVEN IF THEIR  PERFORMANCE CANNOT BE REGARDED AS SATISFACTORY.  HAVING SAID THAT, HE MAINTAINS THAT MOST OF THE  THIRD WAVE DEMOCRACIES ARE STILL FAR FROM  CONSOLIDATION AND ARE UNLIKELY TO ACHIEVE IT UNLESS  THEY GENERATE THE KIND OF SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC  GROWTH THAT BROADLY IMPROVES INCOMES AND REDUCES  HIGH RATES OF POVERTY AND UNEMPLOYMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 216
  • 217.  HAGGARD AND KAUFMAN MAKE A COMPELLING ARGUMENT  THAT ECONOMIC FAILURE CAN HAVE DEVASTATING  CONSEQUENCES FOR THE CONSOLIDATION OF DEMOCRACY.  SUSTAINED POOR PERFORMANCE OR ECONOMIC  DETERIORATION LEADS TO AN INCREASE IN CRIME, STRIKES,  RIOTS AND CIVIL VIOLENCE, WHILE RAPID SOCIAL CHANGES  AND DOWNWARD MOBILITY FOR MEMBERS OF THE MIDDLE  AND WORKING CLASSES INCREASE THE APPEAL OF POLITICAL  MOVEMENTS ON THE EXTREME LEFT AND RIGHT.  THEREFORE, ALTHOUGH THE ROLE OF VARIOUS NON‐ ECONOMIC FACTORS IS IMPORTANT FOR DEMOCRATIC  CONSOLIDATION, SUCH AS ETHNICITY, GENDER AND POLITICAL  INSTITUTIONS, ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE IS IMPORTANT FOR  LONG‐TERM DEMOCRATIC STABILITY AND CONSOLIDATION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 217
  • 218.  HAGGARD AND KAUFMAN ALSO WARN THAT THE  EROSION OF SUPPORT FOR DEMOCRATIC  INSTITUTIONS COULD LEAD TO THE ELECTION OF  LEADERS OR PARTIES WITH AUTHORITARIAN  AMBITIONS.  MORE SERIOUSLY, THE DETERIORATION OF SOCIAL  ORDER AND INCREASING SOCIAL POLARIZATION  MIGHT PROVIDE THE JUSTIFICATION FOR MILITARY  INTERVENTION. THE ABOVE DISCUSSIONS DRAW US TO CONCLUDE  THAT ALTHOUGH THE TRANSITION HAS BEEN  COMPLETED, CONSOLIDATION IS STILL UNFINISHED IN  INDONESIA’S DEMOCRACY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 218
  • 219.  ALTHOUGH A DEMOCRATIC CONSTITUTION BY ITSELF  DOES NOT GUARANTEE THE SURVIVAL OF A  DEMOCRACY, THE MERE EXISTENCE OF THE  CONSTITUTION MAY INHIBIT ANY ATTEMPT TO  REVERSE THE DEMOCRATIZATION PROCESS, TO  IMPOSE AN ALTERNATIVE SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT  OR TO STRAY FROM DEMOCRATIC NORMS OF  GOVERNANCE.  IN THAT LIGHT, WE WILL DISCUSS THE AMENDMENTS  TO THE CONSTITUTION THAT HAVE JUST BEEN  COMPLETED IN INDONESIA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 219
  • 220. CONSTITUTIONALREFORM 220
  • 221.  IN PREVIOUS DISCUSSIONS, IT WAS HIGHLIGHTED  THAT ELECTORAL PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES ARE  BASIC ELEMENTS IN A DEMOCRACY AND THE  INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF DEMOCRATIC NORMS IS  AN IMPORTANT TASK OF DEMOCRATIC  CONSOLIDATION.  IN A CONSTITUTIONAL DEMOCRACY, THE  CONSTITUTION IS HOW THE DEMOCRATIC NORMS,  PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES ARE TO BE INSTITUTED. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 221
  • 222. THE CONSTITUTION: A SACRED DOCUMENT? THE REFORMASI (REFORM MOVEMENT) SPURRED  WIDESPREAD INTROSPECTION ON THE FAILINGS OF THE  NEW ORDER, SPECIFICALLY OF THE INDONESIAN  DEMOCRACY.  MANY INTELLECTUAL CIRCLES LAID PART OF THE BLAME ON  THE 1945 CONSTITUTION.  ACADEMICIANS, UNIVERSITY STUDENTS, POLITICAL PARTIES,  NGOS AND THE PRESS WERE QUICK TO POINT OUT  WEAKNESSES IN THE CONSTITUTION THAT CONTRIBUTED  HEAVILY TO THE LACK OF LAW AND ORDER, SHALLOW  CITIZEN REPRESENTATION, OPACITY OF GOVERNANCE, AND  THE HIGH INCIDENCE OF HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES, ALL  ANTITHETICAL TO THE SHARED TENETS OF REFORM.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 222
  • 223.  DUE TO COMMON REGARD OF THE 1945 CONSTITUTION  AS A SACRED DOCUMENT, SUGGESTIONS TO CHANGE OR  EVEN QUESTION ANY OF ITS PROVISIONS HAD ALWAYS  BEEN SEEN AS BETRAYING THE IDEALS OF THE FOUNDING  OF THE REPUBLIC.  THOSE WHO DARED TO SUGGEST A REVIEW OF THE  CONSTITUTION WERE REGARDED AS SUBVERSIVE  ELEMENTS OR WORSE, COULD BE ACCUSED AS ENEMIES  OF THE STATE.  THE MPR RESOLUTION IN1998 HAD REMOVED THE  REQUIREMENT OF NATIONAL REFERENDUM FOR AN  AMENDMENT TO THE 1945 CONSTITUTION.  REFORMASI IN POST‐SUHARTO INDONESIA CREATED  MORE OF THE RIGHT CONDITIONS FOR CHANGE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 223
  • 224. THE WEAKNESSES  OF THE ORIGINAL UUD ‘45 THE CONSTITUTION WAS WRITTEN IN A VERY BROAD AND  GENERAL WAY. IT HAS ONLY 37 ARTICLES AND 6  TRANSITORY PROVISIONS.  THERE IS STRENGTH TO THE WAY IT WAS WRITTEN THAT  MAKES THE CONSTITUTION FLEXIBLE AND EASILY  ADAPTABLE.  THE WEAKNESS IS THAT IT IS SO BROAD, GENERAL AND  FLEXIBLE, THAT IT CAN BE—AND HAS BEEN—INTERPRETED  IN DIFFERENT WAYS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 224
  • 225.  IT GIVES A LOT OF ROOM TO THE INCUMBENT PRESIDENT  TO MANEUVER AND CONCENTRATE POWER IN HIS OR HER  HANDS, AS HISTORY HAS SHOWN WITH INDONESIA’S FIRST  AND SECOND PRESIDENTS. DESPITE THE ALLOWANCE OF THE TENDENCY FOR THE  PRESIDENCY TO HIJACK THE LEGISLATURE, MANY STILL  FELT THAT THE MPR ITSELF WAS ALWAYS ENDOWED WITH  TOO MUCH POWER BY THE ORIGINAL CONSTITUTION.  SUCH AN INSTITUTIONAL IMBALANCE LED TO THE FAILURE  OF CHECKS AND BALANCES AND TO A DISCONNECT  BETWEEN THE WISHES OF THE PEOPLE AND THE MPR.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 225
  • 226. THE EVOLVING POLITICAL SYSTEM Period Constitution System of General Situation Government1945-1949 1945 Unitarian/ • The system of Presidential government was parliamentary • War for Independence • Rebellion: Communist (1948), Islamic Extremist 1950 Federal Federal/ ParliamentaryDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 226
  • 227. The Evolving Political System . . . Period Constitution System of General Situation Government 1950-1959 Provisional Unitarian/ • Functioning parliamentary Parliamentary democracy (1955 general election) • Political Instability • Rebellion: Regional, Islamic Extremist 1959-1966 1945 Unitarian/ • Guided Democracy Presidential • Campaign to win back Irian Jaya • Confrontation with Malaysia and its allies • Deterioratering economy • Coup attempt 1965Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 227
  • 228. The Evolving Political System . . . Period Constitution System of General Situation Government1966-1998 1945 Unitarian/ • New Order Presidential • Stability • Economic progress • Restrained democracy • Concentration of power • Dominant role of military in politics and governance1998-Now 1945 Unitarian/ • Political reforms (amended) Presidential • DemocratizationDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 228
  • 229. Political Institutions: 1945 Constitution People’s Consultative Assembly (MPR) Supreme Supreme Court  Advisory Board (MA) (DPA) President House of Supreme Audit  Representatives Board (BPK) (DPR)Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 229
  • 230. Political Institutions: 1945 Constitution The People People Consultative Assembly (MPR) President House of Representatives  (DPR) Cabinet Provincial House of  Governor Representatives (DPRD I) District House of Representatives  District Chief (Bupati) (DPRD II)Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 230
  • 231. Political Institutions: 1959‐1966 President Supreme Supreme Court  Advisory Board (MA) (DPA) MPR House of Supreme Audit  Representatives Board (BPK) (DPR)Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 231
  • 232. People’s Consultative Assembly (MPR) 2 x DPR Members (920) 1/3 AppointedPolitical Institutions (1966‐1999) House of Representatives (DPR) Additional Members 360 Elective Members 100 Appointed Regional Functional Group ABRI and Non Political Golongan Representatives ABRI Party Karya 4 - 7 x Provinces Representatives Governors included Non ABRI ABRI DPRD I DPRD II 40 s.d 75 20 s.d 40 20% Appointed 20% Appointed Golongan Golongan Karya Politik Golongan Karya Golongan Politik ABRI Non ABRI Non ABRI ABRI General Election The People www.ginandjar.com 232 Source: Law No. 19/1969
  • 233. Political Institutions: 1999‐2004 People’s Consultative Assembly (MPR) Supreme Supreme Court  Advisory Board (MA) (DPA) President House of Supreme Audit  Representatives Board (BPK) (DPR)Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 233
  • 234. GOALS OF REFORM CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM ON A PRACTICAL LEVEL MEANT  CREATING MECHANISMS THAT ENSURED BETTER  GOVERNANCE. REFORMING THE VAUNTED UUD ’45 REFLECTED NEW  NATIONAL ASPIRATIONS WHICH INCLUDED:  THE ENDING OF THE MILITARY “DUAL FUNCTIONS”,   THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE SUPREMACY OF LAW,  HUMAN RIGHTS, GOOD GOVERNANCE,    THE INCREASE IN REGIONAL AND LOCAL AUTONOMY  (DECENTRALIZATION), AND  THE CREATION OF A FREE PRESS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 234
  • 235.  ON THE LEVEL OF GOVERNMENTAL INSTITUTIONS, THIS  MEANT:   CHECKS AND BALANCES BETWEEN THE BRANCHES OF  GOVERNMENT,  ADDRESSING THE TENDENCY FOR “EXECUTIVE  HEAVINESS”.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 235
  • 236.  THERE WAS A CONSENSUS IN THE POLITY NOT TO  CHANGE THE PREAMBLE OF THE CONSTITUTION  WHICH CONTAINS PANCASILA AND OTHER BASIC  VALUES LAID DOWN BY THE FOUNDING FATHERS.   IT WAS ALSO A CONSENSUS ESTABLISHED AT THE  ONSET OF THE AMENDMENT PROCESS NOT TO  CHANGE THE PRESIDENTIAL SYSTEM OF  GOVERNMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 236
  • 237. THE METHODOLOGICAL MODEL  OF CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM THE MODEL OF REFORM THAT ULTIMATELY SETTLED  UPON WAS INTENDED TO MINIMIZE CONFLICT AND  GARNER THE MOST COOPERATION FROM DISPARATE  INTERESTS, FROM ARDENT REFORMERS TO THE MOST  RELUCTANT CONSERVATIVES.  TWO FEATURES STOOD OUT: THE INCREMENTAL  AMENDMENT PROCESS, WHICH WAS INSPIRED MORE BY  THE AMERICAN SYSTEM RATHER THAN A REWRITING  THAT WOULD MIRROR THE FRENCH STYLE OF  CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM, AND TO AVOID SETTLING  CONFLICT OVER THE MOST CRUCIAL CLAUSES AND  LANGUAGE BY VOTING AS FAR AS POSSIBLE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 237
  • 238.  REFORM BY ADDENDUM ALLOWED ESPECIALLY THE  MORE CONSERVATIVE AND NATIONALIST LEGISLATORS  TO FEEL THAT A PART OF RESISTANCE‐ERA HISTORY HAD  BEEN HONORED AND PRESERVED FOR FUTURE  GENERATIONS  INCREMENTAL REFORM ON AN EXISTING CONSTITUTION  WOULD ALSO MEAN THAT FUTURE GENERATIONS  COULD MORE EASILY TRACE ITS EVOLUTION CHANGE WOULD BE SLOW BUT GRADUAL, AND  CAREFULLY AND COLLECTIVELY CONSIDERED AND  IMPLEMENTEDDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 238
  • 239. THE MECHANICS OF REFORM  AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION Public Participation Public TV and Media Comparative Studies Regional Visits • Germany,  • England,  MPR Working Group • the United States,  Public Meetings • Sweden,  Amendment Process • Denmark,  • China,  • Japan,  Seminars • Russia, and  Constitutional Commissions • Malaysia • Thailand,  NGOs • South Korea, • Germany, and  • the United States (NGO’s) Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 239
  • 240. THE AMENDMENT PROCESS  THE 1ST AMENDMENT 1999  THE 2ND AMENDMENT 2000  THE 3RD AMENDMENT 2001  THE 4TH AMENDMENT 2002Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 240
  • 241. THE FIRST AMENDMENT 1999 A TERM LIMIT OF TWO CONSECUTIVE FIVE‐YEAR  TERMS  RETURNED THE POWER OF LEGISLATION TO  PARLIAMENT AMBASSADORS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES AND FROM  FOREIGN COUNTRIES TO BE CONFIRMED BY THE  PARLIAMENT AND NOT SIMPLY APPOINTED BY THE  PRESIDENTDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 241
  • 242. THE SECOND AMENDMENT 2000 ENHANCED DECENTRALIZATION AND REGIONAL  AUTONOMY.  MEMBERS OF THE PARLIAMENT WOULD HAVE TO BE  ELECTED THROUGH PUBLIC ELECTIONS. THIS  PROVISION SENDS THE MESSAGE THAT THERE  SHOULD BE NO MORE APPOINTED MEMBERS TO THE  PARLIAMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 242
  • 243.  ENSHRINING THE SEPARATION OF THE POLICE FROM  THE MILITARY.  THROUGH A SEPARATE DECREE THAT IS NOT PART OF  THE CONSTITUTION, THE APPOINTMENT OF THE  COMMANDER OF THE ARMED FORCES AND THE CHIEF  OF POLICE HAVE TO BE CONFIRMED BY THE  PARLIAMENT. THIS PROVISION SENT A CLEAR SIGNAL  THAT THE MILITARY IS SUBORDINATE TO CIVILIAN  AUTHORITY.  A NEW SECTION ON HUMAN RIGHTS WAS  CONSTITUTED THAT INCORPORATED STATEMENTS  FROM THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN  RIGHTS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 243
  • 244. THE THIRD AMENDMENT 2001 PROVIDES FOR DIRECT ELECTION BY THE PEOPLE OF  THE PRESIDENT AND THE VICE PRESIDENT AS A TICKET,  WHICH MAY BE PUT FORWARD BY ONE POLITICAL  PARTY OR A GROUP OF PARTIES.  TO BE ELECTED, THE CANDIDATE WILL HAVE TO GET  MORE THAN 50% OF THE POPULAR VOTE WITH AT  LEAST 20% OF THE VOTE IN AT LEAST HALF OF ALL THE  PROVINCES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 244
  • 245.  SETS OUT RULES AND PROCEDURES FOR THE  IMPEACHMENT OF THE PRESIDENT. THE PRESIDENT CAN  BE IMPEACHED BY THE ASSEMBLY (MPR) AT THE  RECOMMENDATION OF PARLIAMENT, IF HE IS PROVEN  GUILTY OF CRIME OR IS FOUND NO LONGER SUITABLE  TO HOLD THE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENCY.  THE PARLIAMENT CAN ONLY PROPOSE THAT THE  PRESIDENT BE IMPEACHED AFTER REQUESTING THAT  THE CONSTITUTIONAL COURT EXAMINE THE CHARGES  AGAINST THE PRESIDENT AND AFTER RECEIVING FROM  THE COURT A FINDING THAT THE PRESIDENT IS GUILTY  AS CHARGED.  THIS MECHANISM IS INTENDED TO PREVENT ABUSE OF  IMPEACHMENT PROCEEDINGS BY THE LEGISLATURE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 245
  • 246.  AFFIRMS THAT JUDICIAL POWER LIES WITH THE  SUPREME COURT AND THE COURTS BENEATH IT, AS  WELL AS THE NEWLY CONSTITUTED CONSTITUTIONAL  COURT.   THE CONSTITUTIONAL COURT HAS THE AUTHORITY:   TO PRESIDE OVER CHARGES AGAINST THE PRESIDENT IN AN  IMPEACHMENT PROCESS;   TO RESOLVE THE DISPUTES BETWEEN THE VARIOUS  BRANCHES OF THE STATE;   TO ORDER THE DISSOLUTION OF POLITICAL PARTIES AND TO  RESOLVE DISPUTES CONCERNING THE RESULTS OF AN  ELECTION.   TO REVIEW THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF LAWS, WHILE THE  SUPREME COURT TESTS THE LEGALITY OF GOVERNMENTAL  RULES AND DECREES TO EXISTING LAWS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 246
  • 247.  ESTABLISHED THAT APPOINTMENTS OF THE MEMBERS  OF THE SUPREME COURT BY THE PRESIDENT HAVE TO  BE PROPOSED BY A NEWLY CONSTITUTED INDEPENDENT  JUDICIAL COMMISSION, AND APPROVED BY THE  PARLIAMENT.  THE JUDICIAL COMMISSION IS A JUDICIAL WATCHDOG  ESTABLISHED BY THE CONSTITUTION TO UPHOLD AND  SAFEGUARD THE HONOR, INTEGRITY AND CONDUCT OF  JUDGES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 247
  • 248.  IN A MAJOR STRUCTURAL CHANGE TO THE LEGISLATIVE  BODY, ALTHOUGH INDONESIA REMAINS A UNITARIAN  STATE, THE THIRD AMENDMENT CONSTITUTED A  BICAMERAL SYSTEM OF REPRESENTATION.  IT ESTABLISHED THE HOUSE OF REGIONAL  REPRESENTATIVES (DEWAN PERWAKILAN DAERAH‐DPD),  REPRESENTING EACH OF THE PROVINCES EQUALLY,  SIMILAR TO THE US SENATE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 248
  • 249.  ESTABLISHED THE RULE ON GENERAL ELECTION.  GENERAL ELECTION IS TO BE HELD ONCE EVERY FIVE  YEARS.  IT PROVIDES THAT THE PARTICIPANTS IN THE ELECTION  FOR MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT ARE POLITICAL PARTIES,  WHILE FOR THE REGIONAL COUNCIL THEY ARE  INDIVIDUALS.  THE ELECTIONS ARE CARRIED OUT BY AN INDEPENDENT  GENERAL ELECTION COMMISSION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 249
  • 250. THE FOURTH AMENDMENT 2002  DEFINES THAT THE MPR CONSISTS OF THE PARLIAMENT  (HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OR DPR) AND THE HOUSE OF  REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES (DPD).  THIS PROVISION ALSO PERMANENTLY BARRED NON‐ ELECTED MEMBERS OF MPR, SUCH AS THOSE  REPRESENTING THE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS INCLUDING THE  MILITARY OF PAST YEARS.  THE MPR AS THE JOIN SESSION OF DPR AND DPD,  ALTHOUGH NO LONGER POSSESSES THE ABSOLUTE POWER  IT HAD HAD BEFORE THE AMENDMENT, SILL RETAINS THE  AUTHORITY TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION AND IMPEACH  THE PRESIDENT AND ELECT PRESIDENT WHEN BOTH THE  PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT ARE SIMULTANEOUSLY  PERMANENTLY INCAPACITATED.  Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 250
  • 251.  SPECIFIES THAT IN A PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION, IF  NO TICKET CAN ACHIEVE THE 50‐20% THRESHOLD,  THE TWO TICKETS WITH THE MOST VOTES WILL  RUN IN ANOTHER DIRECT ELECTION BY THE  PEOPLE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 251
  • 252.  INCORPORATION OF CLAUSES RELATING TO SOCIAL  JUSTICE. GUARANTEEING UNIVERSAL GOVERNMENT‐ SPONSORED PRIMARY EDUCATION, MINIMUM  AGGREGATE EDUCATION SPENDING OF 20% FROM  THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT AND REGIONAL  GOVERNMENT’S BUDGET. STRENGTHENED LANGUAGE ON SOCIAL JUSTICE  AND ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLINESS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 252
  • 253. Political Institutions (2003‐Now) MPR DPR DPD 550 4 x Number of Provinces DPRD Province 35 s.d 100 DPRD Kab/Kota 20 s.d 45 Political Parties General Election The People Source: Law No. 22/2003Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 253
  • 254. Political Institutions (2003‐Now) People’s Consultative Assembly (MPR) House of Regional Representatives Representatives  (DPR) Council (DPD) The People General Election PresidentDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 254
  • 255. STRONG FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY THE MAIN IDEA BEHIND THE REFORMS BEGUN IN 1999  WAS TO ENSURE THAT A NEWLY REVISED CONSTITUTION  ESTABLISHED AN EFFECTIVE SYSTEM OF CHECKS AND  BALANCES BETWEEN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF THE  STATE, PRIMARILY BY LIMITING THE POWER OF THE  EXECUTIVE BRANCH. INDONESIA IS NOW THE THIRD LARGEST DEMOCRACY IN  THE WORLD.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 255
  • 256.  AT THE SAME TIME THE REFORMS SOUGHT TO  ENSURE THAT THE SOVEREIGNTY OF THE PEOPLE  WAS REFLECTED IN THE WAY THE GOVERNMENT  WAS ORGANIZED THE FOUR AMENDMENTS HAVE SUCCESSFULLY  BEEN ABLE TO CONCLUDE AND REACHED THOSE  OBJECTIVES THUS LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR  DEMOCRACY TO DEVELOP IN INDONESIA, AS THE  THIRD LARGEST DEMOCRACY IN THE WORLDDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 256
  • 257. PRACTICING DEMOCRACYThe 2004 General Elections: Significant Beginnings 257
  • 258. CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM  AMONG THE AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION  TWO STAND OUT AS MOST SIGNIFICANT:   THE DIRECT ELECTION OF THE PRESIDENT (AND  VICE‐PRESIDENT),   THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A BICAMERAL SYSTEM OF  THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH OF GOVERNMENT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 258
  • 259. STATE INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE AMENDED CONSTITUTION Legislative Executive Judiciary MPR DPD DPR BPK President MA MK KPU KPK KY MPR : Majelis Permusyawaratan Rakyat People’s Consultative Assembly DPR : Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat Lower House DPD : Dewan Perwakilan Daerah Upper House BPK : Badan Pemeriksa Keuangan Supreme Audit Board MA : Mahkamah Agung Supreme Court MK : Mahkamah Konstitusi Constitutional Court KPU : Komisi Pemilihan Umum General Election Commission KPK : Komisi Pemberantasan Korupsi Corruption Eradication Commission KY : Komisi Yudisial Judicial CommissionDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 259
  • 260. REMAKING THE POLITICAL  INSTITUTIONS  THE NEW LAWS FOR THE 2004 ELECTIONS OF THE DPR, DPD,  DPRD, AND THE PRESIDENT AND VICE‐PRESIDENT.  THE NEW ELECTION LAWS STRENGTHEN THE ROLE OF  POLITICAL PARTIES AS THE MAIN DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTIONS  AND LOWERS BARRIERS TO ENTRY.   THE PARLIAMENTARY ELECTIONS (DPR AND DPRD) ARE  BASED ON THE PROPORTIONAL SYSTEM WITH OPEN LISTS OF  CANDIDATES SUBMITTED BY THE PARTICIPATING POLITICAL  PARTIES.  A CANDIDATE HAS TO BE A CERTIFIED MEMBER OF THE  PARTICIPATING POLITICAL PARTY AND AT LEAST 30 PERCENT  OF THE CANDIDATES FROM EACH POLITICAL PARTY MUST BE  WOMEN. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 260
  • 261.  THE CANDIDATES IN THE ELECTION OF DPD ARE  INDIVIDUALS.   TO BECOME A CANDIDATE ONE HAS TO COLLECT THE  SIGNATURES OF A MINIMUM NUMBER OF ELIGIBLE  VOTERS, THE NUMBER DEPENDING ON THE NUMBER OF  VOTERS IN EACH PROVINCE.   A CANDIDATE FOR THE DPD MAY NOT HAVE SERVED AS  BOARD MEMBER OF ANY POLITICAL PARTY FOR FOUR  YEARS PRIOR TO BECOMING A CANDIDATE.   MEMBERS OF THE CIVIL SERVICE, THE MILITARY (TNI)  AND THE POLICE CANNOT RUN FOR A SEAT IN DPD AND  ANYONE FROM THOSE SERVICES WISHING TO RUN FOR  A SEAT IN THE DPD HAS TO RESIGN BEFORE BECOMING  A CANDIDATE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 261
  • 262.  THE NUMBER OF MEMBERS OF DPR IS 550 (AN INCREASE  OF 50 FROM ITS PREVIOUS SIZE) DISTRIBUTED AMONG  THE PROVINCES IN PROPORTION TO THE POPULATION.   ALL MEMBERS OF DPR ARE ELECTED, ELIMINATING THE  PREVIOUSLY RESERVED PLACES FOR MILITARY AND POLICE.  THE NUMBER OF MEMBERS OF THE DPD SHOULD NOT  EXCEED ONE‐THIRD OF THE NUMBER OF MEMBERS OF  DPR.  THE CONSTITUTION DOES NOT GIVE THE DPD LEGISLATIVE  POWER.   IRONICALLY, THOUGH THEY HAVE LESS POWER, IT IS MUCH  MORE DIFFICULT TO BE ELECTED A MEMBER OF DPD THAN  TO BECOME A MEMBER OF THE PARLIAMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 262
  • 263.  THE PRESIDENT AND VICE‐PRESIDENT ARE DIRECTLY  ELECTED ON ONE TICKET.  ONLY A PARTY OR A COALITION OF PARTIES THAT HOLDS  AT LEAST 15 PERCENT OF THE SEATS IN DPR OR RECEIVES  20 PERCENT OF POPULAR VOTES IN THE ELECTION OF DPR  CAN NOMINATE CANDIDATES FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE‐ PRESIDENT.  FOR THE 2004 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION THE THRESHOLD IS  LOWERED TO 3 PERCENT OF THE SEATS IN DPR OR 5  PERCENT OF POPULAR VOTES.  THE ELECTION IS IMPLEMENTED AND SUPERVISED BY THE  COMMISSION FOR GENERAL ELECTION. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 263
  • 264. LEGISLATIVE ELECTION  ELECTORAL PROCESS   24 POLITICAL PARTIES PARTICIPATED IN THE LEGISLATIVE  ELECTION FOR THE DPR AND DPRD ON APRIL 5, 2004  THE DPD ELECTION FEATURED CANDIDATES WHO  CONTESTED FOR SEATS TO REPRESENT THEIR RESPECTIVE  PROVINCE IN THEIR INDIVIDUAL CAPACITIES.  IN GENERAL, THE ENTIRE ELECTORAL PROCESS  PROCEEDED IN A SMOOTH, ORDERLY, SECURE, AND  DEMOCRATIC MANNER, AS WITNESSED BY NATIONAL  AND FOREIGN ELECTION MONITORING AGENCIES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 264
  • 265. LEGISLATIVE ELECTION  DPR ELECTION   THE RESULTS OF THE LEGISLATIVE ELECTION FOR MEMBERS OF  BOTH THE DPR AND DPRDS WERE UNFORESEEN AND  CHANGED SIGNIFICANTLY THE CONFIGURATION OF THE  POLITICAL MAP.   THE GOLKAR PARTY REGAINED A PLURALITY WITH A 24.5  MILLION VOTES (21.6%), WITH PDI‐P AS THE FIRST RUNNER‐UP  WITH APPROXIMATELY 21 MILLION VOTES (18.5%).   PKB, WHICH CAME IN THIRD, GAINED CLOSE TO 12 MILLION  VOTES (10.6%).   OTHER PARTIES WITH SIGNIFICANT SUPPORT INCLUDED THE  PROSPEROUS JUSTICE PARTY (PKS), WHICH DREW AROUND 8  MILLION VOTES (7.3%), AND THE NEWLY FOUNDED  DEMOCRATIC PARTY, WHICH SECURED ALMOST 8.5 MILLION  VOTES (7.4%). Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 265
  • 266.  DPR ELECTION  ONLY 17 PARTIES WON SEATS IN THE NATIONAL  PARLIAMENT.  INDONESIAN LAW PERMITS ALL PARTICIPATING POLITICAL  PARTIES TO FILE COURT CHALLENGES WITH THE  CONSTITUTIONAL COURT (MAHKAMAH KONSTITUSI), IF  THEY CAN PROVIDE EVIDENCE OF MATERIAL ERRORS IN  THE BALLOT COUNTING PROCESS.   OUT OF THE 24 PARTICIPATING PARTIES, 23 FILED  LAWSUITS WITH THE COURT, CONTESTED THE VOTE  COUNT.  FOLLOWING A SERIES OF BRIEF COURT HEARINGS, THE  COURT REACHED A FINAL VERDICT ON THE ELECTION  RESULTS.   THE VERDICT ALTERED THE KPU’S ALLOCATION OF  PARLIAMENTARY SEATS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 266
  • 267.  DPR ELECTION  THE LEGISLATIVE ELECTION RESULTS CHANGED THE  CONFIGURATION OF POLITICAL POWER WITHIN THE DPR.   ACCORDING TO THE PREVAILING DPR RULES AND  REGULATIONS, ALL MEMBERS OF THE DPR ARE OBLIGED  TO REGISTER AS FACTION MEMBERS. A FACTION MUST  CONSIST OF AT LEAST 13 MEMBERS.  FACTIONS WITHIN DPR MAY BE FORMED BY A SINGLE  POLITICAL PARTY. THIS IS THE MODEL USED BY THE  GOLKAR PARTY FACTION AND THE PDI‐P FACTION.   FACTIONS CAN ALSO BE ESTABLISHED BY A COALITION OF  TWO OR MORE POLITICAL PARTIES.  SUCH COALITIONS  ARE GENERALLY FORMED WHEN A PARTY FAILS TO MEET  THE 13‐SEAT REQUIREMENT TO ESTABLISH AN  INDEPENDENT FACTION. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 267
  • 268.  DPR ELECTION  THE COALITION FACTIONS: THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY  FACTION, WHICH INCLUDES THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY AND  THE INDONESIA UNITED AND JUSTICE PARTY (PKPI); AND  THE DEMOCRATIC PIONEER FACTION, WHICH MERGES  THE CRESCENT AND STAR PARTY (PBB), THE NATIONALIST  UNITED DEMOCRATIC PARTY (PDK), THE PIONEER PARTY  (PP), THE INDONESIA DEMOCRATIC SUPREMACY PARTY  (PPDI), AND PNI MARHAENISME.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 268
  • 269.  DPR ELECTION  DPR MEMBERSHIP IS DIVIDED INTO THE FOLLOWING FACTIONS: No Faction Seats % 1. The Golkar Party 127 23.22 2. PDI-P 109 19.93 3. The United Development Party (PPP) 57 10.42 4. The Democratic Party (PD) 57 10.42 5. The National Mandate Party (PAN) 53 9.69 6. The National Awakening Party (PKB) 52 9.51 7. The Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) 45 8.23 8. The Democratic Pioneer Star (BPD) 20 3.66 9. The Reform Star Party (PBR) 14 2.56 10. The Prosperous Peace Party (PDS) 13 2.38 547Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 269
  • 270.  DPD ELECTION  THE LEGISLATIVE ELECTION ALSO ALLOWED  INDONESIANS TO VOTE FOR THEIR REPRESENTATIVES IN  THE HOUSE OF REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES (DPD).   FOR THE FIRST TIME IN INDONESIAN POLITICAL HISTORY,  VOTERS HELD THE RIGHT TO DIRECTLY ELECT MEMBERS  OF A NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE BODY.   THE DPD CONSISTS OF 128 MEMBERS REPRESENTING 32  PROVINCES. EACH PROVINCE, IRRESPECTIVE OF THE SIZE,  IS REPRESENTED BY FOUR MEMBERS, I.E. INDIVIDUALS  WHO ARE RESTRICTED FROM HOLDING POSITIONS IN A  POLITICAL PARTY STRUCTURE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 270
  • 271.  DPD ELECTION  THE DPD’S MEMBERSHIP FEATURES A BLEND OF  PROMINENT PUBLIC FIGURES ORIGINATING FROM  VARIOUS BACKGROUNDS, SOME BEST KNOWN FOR  THEIR ROLES IN RELIGIOUS, CULTURAL, OR  EDUCATIONAL DOMAINS.    OTHER DPD MEMBERS ARE FORMER GOVERNMENT  OFFICIALS, INCLUDING FORMER MINISTERS AND  GOVERNORS , LAWYERS AND BUSINESSMEN, RELIGIOUS  SCHOLARS AND LEADERS, AND PROMINENT NGO  ACTIVISTS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 271
  • 272. PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION  NOMINATION OF THE CANDIDATES  THE LEGISLATIVE ELECTION MARKED THE BEGINNING OF  A NEW CHAPTER IN INDONESIAN POLITICS, AS THE  COUNTRY ENTERED A HISTORIC NEW PHASE OF  DEMOCRACY.   FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER IN MODERN INDONESIAN  POLITICS, THE PRESIDENT AND VICE‐PRESIDENT WERE  DIRECTLY ELECTED BY THE PEOPLE.   THIS DEVELOPMENT REFLECTED THE MATURING OF  INDONESIA’S CITIZENRY AND CIVIL SOCIETY.   THE DIRECT PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION WAS ALSO  CONSIDERED AS A SIGNIFICANT DEMOCRATIC REFORM.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 272
  • 273.  NOMINATION OF THE CANDIDATES  THE RESULTS OF THE LEGISLATIVE ELECTION, COMBINED  WITH A THRESHOLD REQUIREMENT ESTABLISHED BY THE  RELEVANT ELECTION LAW, LEFT ONLY SEVEN PARTIES  ELIGIBLE TO INDEPENDENTLY NOMINATE A TICKET WITH  PRESIDENTIAL AND VICE‐PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES.    THESE PARTIES WERE: THE GOLKAR PARTY (21.58%), PDI‐ P (18.53%), PKB (10.57%), PPP (8.15%), THE DEMOCRATIC  PARTY (7.45%), PKS (7.34%) AND PAN (6.44%).Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 273
  • 274.  NOMINATION OF THE CANDIDATES  IN THE RUN‐UP TO THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION, SIX  TICKETS OF PRESIDENTIAL AND VICE‐PRESIDENTIAL  CANDIDATES EMERGED:  1. MEGAWATI – HASYIM MUZADI, NOMINATED BY PDI‐P. 2. WIRANTO – SALAHUDDIN WAHID, PROPOSED BY THE GOLKAR  PARTY. 3. AMIEN RAIS – SISWONO YUDHO HUSODO, BACKED BY PAN. 4. SUSILO BAMBANG YUDHOYONO – M. JUSUF KALLA,  REPRESENTING THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 5. HAMZAH HAZ – AGUM GUMELAR, PROPOSED BY PPP. 6. ABDURRAHMAN WAHID – MARWAH DAUD, NOMINATED BY  PKB.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 274
  • 275.  NOMINATION OF THE CANDIDATES  FIVE OF THESE SIX TICKETS WERE DETERMINED  THROUGH THE POLITICAL PARTIES’ INTERNAL DECISION.   ONLY THE GOLKAR PARTY CONDUCTED AN OPEN  ELECTION TO SELECT ITS PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE  THROUGH A CONVENTION, WHICH INVOLVED THE  PARTY’S ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE FROM THE  GRASSROOTS LEVEL UP TO THE PROVINCIAL AND  NATIONAL LEVEL.   FOR INDONESIA, THIS WAS A FIRST. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 275
  • 276.  FIRST ROUND PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION  FOLLOWING A SERIES OF VERIFICATION PROCEDURES, KPU  OFFICIALLY CONFIRMED FIVE OUT OF THE SIX TICKETS  MENTIONED ABOVE WERE ELIGIBLE FOR THE PRESIDENTIAL  AND VICE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION.   THE FIVE TICKETS COMPRISED THE OFFICIAL CANDIDATES FOR  THE JULY 5, 2004 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION.   ABDURRAHMAN WAHID AND MARWAH DAUD IBRAHIM FELL  SHORT IN THE KPU’S VERIFICATION PROCESS DUE TO HEALTH  REQUIREMENTS WHICH DISQUALIFIED PKB PRESIDENTIAL  CANDIDATE ABDURRAHMAN WAHID, IN ACCORDANCE TO THE  PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION RULES AND REGULATIONS.    THE KPU LATER CONFIRMED THAT THIS DECISION WAS BASED  ON HEALTH TEST RESULTS APPROVED BY THE APPOINTED  MEDICAL TEAM FROM THE INDONESIAN DOCTORS  ASSOCIATION (IDI). Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 276
  • 277.  FIRST ROUND PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION  THE FIRST ROUND OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION TOOK PLACE ON  JULY 5, 2004.   SUSILO BAMBANG YUDHOYONO AND JUSUF KALLA RECEIVED A  PLURALITY OF THE VOTE. THE OFFICIAL RESULTS ARE AS FOLLOWS:  1. SUSILO BAMBANG YUDHOYONO‐JUSUF KALLA GAINED 39,838,184  VOTES (33.574%),  2. MEGAWATI SOEKARNOPUTRI‐HASYIM MUZADI OBTAINED 31,569,104  VOTES (26.605%),  3. WIRANTO‐SALAHUDDIN WAHID GAINED 26,286,788 VOTES  (22.154%),  4. AMIEN RAIS‐ SISWONO YUDO HUSODO RECEIVED 17,392,931 VOTES  (14.658%),  5. HAMZAH HAZ‐AGUM GUMELAR WON 3,569,861 VOTES (3.009%).  FROM THE ABOVE VOTE TALLY, NONE OF THE TICKETS SURPASSED THE  DESIGNATED THRESHOLD OF FIFTY PERCENT OF THE TOTAL VOTES.   THE TWO TOP‐PRESIDENTIAL AND VICE PRESIDENTIAL TICKETS  PROCEEDED TO THE RUNOFF ELECTION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 277
  • 278.  RUNOFF ELECTION  THE SECOND ROUND ELECTION WAS HELD ON  SEPTEMBER 20, 2004. SUSILO BAMBANG YUDHOYONO  AND JUSUF KALLA WON THE ELECTION WITH A FINAL  TALLY OF 69,266,350 VOTES.   THIS FIGURE FAR EXCEEDED MEGAWATI  SOEKARNOPUTRI‐HASYIM MUZADI’S TOTAL OF  44,990,704 VOTES.   THE OFFICIAL KPU TALLY OF 114,257,054 VOTES IN THE  PRESIDENTIAL RUNOFF ELECTION REFLECTED A 60.62%  MAJORITY FOR SUSILO BAMBANG YUDHOYONO AND  JUSUF KALLA, WHILE MEGAWATI SOEKARNOPUTRI‐ HASYIM MUZADI RECEIVED THE SUPPORT OF 39.38% OF  THE ELECTORATE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 278
  • 279.  RUNOFF ELECTION  THE PARTIES THAT BACKED MEGAWATI’S TICKET LATER  FORMED A COALITION UNDER THE NAME OF KOALISI  KEBANGSAAN (THE NATIONAL COALITION).  THE OFFICIAL RESULTS OF THE PRESIDENTIAL AND VICE  PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION WERE ANNOUNCED ON  OCTOBER 4, 2004 BY THE KPU.    SUSILO BAMBANG YUDHOYONO AND JUSUF KALLA (ALSO  KNOWN AS SBY‐JK) WERE OFFICIALLY DECLARED AS  PRESIDENT‐ELECT AND VICE‐PRESIDENT‐ELECT OF THE  REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA FOR THE PERIOD OF 2004‐2009.  THEY WERE OFFICIALLY SWORN IN ON OCTOBER 2004, IN  FRONT OF A SPECIAL PLENARY SESSION OF THE MPR.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 279
  • 280.  SUSILO BAMBANG YUDHOYONO (SBY)  WAS ELECTED  FOR PRESIDENT AFTER A RUNOFF  ELECTION, AS HE  FAILED TO GARNER MAJORITY VOTE IN THE FIRST  ROUND. DEFEATED THE INCUMBET MEGAWATI SUKARNOPUTRI. BOTH SBY AND HIS VICE PRESIDENT JUSUF KALLA, HAD  BOTH BEEN IN MEGAWATI’S CABINET, AS RESPECTIVELY  COORDINATING MINISTER FOR POLITICAL AND  SECURITY AFFAIRS AND COORDINATING MINISTER FOR  PEOPLE’S WELFARE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 280
  • 281. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE 2004 ELECTION  THE 2004 GENERAL ELECTION HAS OPENED A NEW  CHAPTER IN INDONESIA’S MARCH TOWARDS DEMOCRACY.   MANY HAD EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER WHETHER THE  ELECTION COULD TAKE PLACE IN A PEACEFUL MANNER,  CHARACTERIZED BY FAIRNESS AND TRANSPARENCY. MANY  ALSO EXPRESSED CONCERN OVER THE POSSIBILITY OF  CLASHES BETWEEN GROUPS OF POLITICAL PARTY  SUPPORTERS, ESPECIALLY DURING THE PRESIDENTIAL  ELECTION.  THIS CONCERN WAS UNDERSTANDABLE, AS AT ALMOST  THE SAME TIME THAT INDONESIA HELD ITS ELECTION,  INDIA AND THE PHILIPPINES ALSO CARRIED OUT  ELECTIONS, BUT THESE WERE TAINTED BY PHYSICAL  VIOLENCE WHICH RESULTED IN CASUALTIES. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 281
  • 282.  BY CONTRAST, THE INDONESIAN GENERAL ELECTION TOOK  PLACE PEACEFULLY, WITHOUT CONFLICTS OR CASUALTIES.    POLITICAL OBSERVERS –DOMESTIC AS WELL AS FOREIGN– UNANIMOUSLY ACKNOWLEDGED THAT THE 2004  ELECTIONS, BOTH THE LEGISLATIVE AND PRESIDENTIAL  ELECTIONS, HAD BEEN CONDUCTED IN A FAIR AND OPEN  MANNER, WITHOUT MAJOR IRREGULARITIES.   THE ELECTIONS MARKED A SIGNIFICANT AND POSITIVE  STEP TOWARD A DEMOCRATIC FUTURE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 282
  • 283. DIRECT REGIONAL ELECTIONS  FOR DECADES, THE IDEA OF DIRECT REGIONAL ELECTIONS  FOR LOCAL LEADERS WAS UNTHINKABLE. BUT THINGS  CHANGE AND INDONESIA EMBRACED DIRECT REGIONAL  ELECTIONS FOR GOVERNOR AND DISTRICT CHIEF/MAYORS  IN 2005, WHICH PROMISES TO DEEPEN AND  INSTITUTIONALIZE DEMOCRATIC TRADITIONS AT THE  GRASSROOTS LEVEL.  THE VILLAGE CHIEF HOWEVER HAD BEEN DIRECTLY  ELECTED FOR MANY YEARS, THE ONLY DEMOCRATICALLY  ELECTED LEADERS FOR A LONG TIME.  THE ELECTIONS OF  THE VILLAGE CHIEFS, HOWEVER, HAVE BEEN MARKED BY  HORIZONTAL CONFLICTS WHICH SOMETIME ARE QUITE  VIOLENCE THUS CREATING DOUBT WHETHER INDONESIA  WAS READY FOR DIRECT ELECTION FOR ITS POLITICAL  LEADERS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 283
  • 284.  THE REGIONAL ELECTIONS, WHICH HAD THEIR  STARTING POINT IN THE REGIONAL AUTONOMY  THAT WAS INTRODUCED IN 2001, WERE HELD IN  THE HIGH SPIRIT THAT FOLLOWED THE FREE AND  FAIR GENERAL ELECTIONS IN 1999 AND 2004, AND  MARKED A GIANT LEAP OF FAITH TO EMBRACE A  SYSTEM THAT HAD BEEN DISREGARDED FOR OVER  FOUR DECADES. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 284
  • 285.  REGIONAL AUTONOMY ITSELF HAS LONG BEEN CRITICIZED  FOR DOING LITTLE FOR PEOPLE AT THE LOWER LEVELS OF  SOCIETY, SERVING ONLY TO TRANSFER POWER FROM THE  HANDS OF UNSCRUPULOUS POLITICIANS IN THE CENTRAL  GOVERNMENT TO EVEN MORE UNSCRUPULOUS ONES AT  THE LOCAL LEVEL.   THERE IS NOW HOPE THAT THE REGIONAL ELECTIONS WILL  EVENTUALLY BRING A MORE DEMOCRATIC RULE TO THE  LOCAL LEVEL AND LEAD TO THE RISE OF LOCAL LEADERS  WHO ARE MORE ACCOUNTABLE AND QUALIFIED, AND ABLE  TO CARRY OUT THE WISHES OF THE PEOPLE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 285
  • 286. WHAT A DIFFERENCE A DECADE MAKES Issue 1998 2008Presidential selection Selected indirectly by the People’s Directly elected through universal suffrage Consultative Assembly (MPR) every every five years five yearsNational parliament Unicameral legislature 500  Bicameral legislature (DPR and DPD). members, with 20 percent of seats  DPR members (550) elected directly in reserved for the military (reduced to multi-member constituencies through 15 percent in 1995). Dominated by proportional representation. Golkar.  Each province elects four members to the national DPD, for total of 128 members.Political parties Only three parties legally allowed to 24 parties competed in the 2004 general contest elections—Golkar, the election, and five parties put up serious United Development Party (PPP), parties for the presidency. Indonesian Democratic Party (PDI).Presidential-legislative De facto, a rubber stamp body for  The president’s party (the Democratrelations the president’s policy decisions. Party, PD) holds only 56 of 550 seats in DPR.  DPR is now a serious check on presidential authority. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 286
  • 287. WHAT A DIFFERENCE A DECADE MAKES Issue 1998 2008Role of military  Reserved seats at all three levels of No reserved seats in parliament parliament.  About 6,000 military staff seconded to government positions (as of 1995).  Territorial command system enables military self-financing.Provincial and district Appointed by Ministry of Home Affairs (under Directly elected.executives tight supervision of the president).Provincial and district Only three parties legally allowed to contest Directly elected in multi-memberlegislatures elections. 15 percent of seats reserved for constituencies in a proportional the military. Dominated by Golkar. representation system.Civil society Tight restrictions on the press and NGOs. Free press and proliferation of NGOs. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 287
  • 288. 2009 GENERAL ELECTION 288
  • 289. RESULT OF THE POST‐NEW ORDER  DEMOCRATIC ELECTION PARTY SEATS IN PARLIAMENT 2009 2004 1999DEMOCRATIC PARTY (PD) 148 57 ‐FUNCTIONAL GROUP PARTY (GOLKAR) 107 128 120INDONESIAN DEMOCRATIC PARTY – STRUGGLE (PDI‐P) 93 109 153JUSTICE WELFARE PARTY (PKS)* 57 45 7NATIONAL MESSAGE PARTY (PAN) 46 52 34UNITED DEVELOP PARTY (PPP) 38 58 56NATION AWAKENING PARTY (PKB) 28 52 51GREAT INDONESIA MOVEMENT PARTY (GERINDRA) 25 ‐ ‐PEOPLE CONSCIENCE PARTY (HANURA) 18 ‐ ‐OTHER PARTIES ‐ 49 41TOTAL 560 550 462 * In 1999: the party’s name was Partai Keadilan (Justice Party) Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 289
  • 290. 2009 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 290
  • 291. THE 2009 PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES Susilo Bambang  Megawati Jusuf Kalla Yudhoyono Prabowo Boediono WirantoDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 291
  • 292. 2009 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONNO CANDIDATES VOTES PERCENTAGE1 MEGAWATI‐PRABOWO 32.548.105 26.79%2 SBY‐BOEDIONO 73.874.562 60.80%3 JK‐WIRANTO 15.081.814 12.41%TOTAL 121.504.481 100,00%STATISTICSVALID VOTES 121.504.581NOT VALID VOTES 6.479.174TOTAL VOTER 127.983.655TOTAL VOTERS 176.441.434Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 292
  • 293.  THE FIRST SBY ADMINISTRATION HAD TO FACE  SERIOUS SETBACK CAUSED BY THE ACEH AND  NORTH SUMATERA TSUNAMI IN ITS FIRST WEEKS THE SECOND SBY ADMINISTRATION HAD TO FACE   SERIOUS  SCANDALS, ALSO IN ITS FIRST WEEKS  THE GECKO ‐ CROCODILE CASE  THE CENTURY BANK CASE www.ginandjar.com 293
  • 294. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 294
  • 295. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 295
  • 296. REGIME CHANGE IN INDONESIA Sukarno Suharto  August 1945 - March  March 1968 - May 1998 1968  Elected by MPRS  Elected by the PPKI  Resigned under pressure  Impeached by MPRS Abdurrahman Wahid B.J. Habibie  October 1999 – July  May 1998-October 1999 2001  Accountability Speech Rejected  Elected by MPR  Declined to run for  Impeached by MPR President Megawati Susilo Bambang  July 2001 – October Yudhoyono 2004  October 2004 – 2009  Elected by MPR  Directly elected  Lost election to SBY REELECTED 2009-2014Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 296
  • 297. POST REFORM GOVERNMENT INDONESIA IS EMERGING FROM LONG PERIOD OF  AUTHORITARIAN RULE TO CONSOLIDATE ITS STATUS AS ONE  OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST DEMOCRATIC COUNTRY. INDONESIA’S POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  AFTER THE REFORMASI (1998) SEEMS TO BE ON THE RIGHT  TRACK. SOCIO‐POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT : AMENDMENT OF 1945  CONSTITUTION, IMPROVEMENT OF CHECKS AND BALANCES  SYSTEM, DIRECT PRESIDENTIAL AND REGIONAL EXECUTIVES  ELECTIONS, LEGAL REFORM AND DECENTRALIZATION, HUMAN  RIGHTS, FREEDOM OF THE PRESS, BIGGER ROLE OF CIVIL  SOCIETY, PEACE IN ACEH. INTERNATIONAL ROLE: INITIATIVE TO PROMOTE   DEMOCRACY  AND SUPPORT DEMOCRATIZATION PROCESS IN THE WORLD,  AMONG OTHERS THROUGH DEMOCRACY FORUM.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 297
  • 298. DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATIONAN UNFINISHED BUSINESS 298
  • 299.  DEMOCRACY IS CONSOLIDATED IF IT BECOMES “THE ONLY  GAME IN TOWN.” LINZ AND STEPAN BELIEVE THAT FOR A DEMOCRACY TO BE  CONSOLIDATED THERE ARE FIVE INTERCONNECTED AND  MUTUALLY REINFORCING CONDITIONS (“ARENAS”) THAT  MUST EXIST OR BE CRAFTED; THAT  1) ALLOW AND SUPPORT THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FREE AND LIVELY  CIVIL SOCIETY,  2) AN AUTONOMOUS AND VALUED POLITICAL SOCIETY,  3) A RULE OF LAW,  4) AN EFFECTIVE STATE BUREAUCRACY, AND  5) AN INSTITUTIONALIZED ECONOMIC SOCIETY. ONE CAN ADD ALSO THE RESPECT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 299
  • 300.  IN EARLIER WRITING DAHL ADVANCES THE IDEA THAT, “THE  CONSOLIDATION OF DEMOCRACY REQUIRES A STRONG  DEMOCRATIC CULTURE THAT PROVIDES ADEQUATE  EMOTIONAL AND COGNITIVE SUPPORT FOR ADHERING TO  DEMOCRATIC PROCEDURES.” THE IMPLICATION IS THAT A DEMOCRATIZING COUNTRY  WITHOUT A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE ROOTED IN ITS POLITY IS  FRAGILE AND COULD WHITHER OR EVEN COLLAPSE IN THE  FACE OF SEVERE CRISIS SUCH AS ECONOMIC DOWNTURNS,  REGIONAL OR COMMUNAL CONFLICTS OR POLITICAL CRISES  CAUSED BY INEPT OR CORRUPT OR FRACTIOUS LEADERS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 300
  • 301.  HUNTINGTON:  DEMOCRATIC CULTURE MEANS  THAT THE POLITY UNDERSTANDS THAT DEMOCRACY  IS NOT A PANACEA.  HENCE, DEMOCRACIES BECOME CONSOLIDATED  WHEN PEOPLE LEARN THAT DEMOCRACY IS A  SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEM OF TYRANNY BUT NOT  NECESSARILY TO ANYTHING ELSEDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 301
  • 302.  SYSTEMIC PROBLEMS WOULD MOST PROBABLY BE  CONFRONTED BY THE NEW DEMOCRACY AS IT  BECAME MORE CONSOLIDATED AND ACHIEVED A  CERTAIN STABILITY, AND MIGHT INCLUDE POLITICAL  STALEMATE, INABILITY TO REACH DECISIONS,  SUSCEPTIBILITY TO DEMAGOGUERY AND  DOMINATION OF VESTED INTERESTS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 302
  • 303.  THE YEARS AFTER THE FIRST DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENT  HAS COME TO POWER ARE USUALLY CHARACTERIZED BY THE  FRAGMENTATION OF THE DEMOCRATIC COALITION THAT  HAD PRODUCED THE TRANSITION, THE DECLINE IN THE  EFFECTIVENESS OF THE INITIAL LEADERS OF THE  DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENTS AND THE REALIZATIONS THAT  DEMOCRACY IN ITSELF WOULD NOT AND COULD NOT OFFER  SOLUTIONS TO MAJOR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC PROBLEMS  FACING THE COUNTRY.  THE CHALLENGE TO DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION IS HOW  TO OVERCOME AND NOT TO BE SUBDUED BY THOSE  PROBLEMS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 303
  • 304. MAJOR PROBLEMS IN  CONSOLIDATING DEMOCRACY1. INSTITUTIONS : AMBIGUITY BETWEEN PRESIDENTIAL AND  PARLIAMENTARY SYSTEMS; ESTABLISHMENT OF QUASI‐ GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS, AND CONFUSION OF ROLE  AND FUNCTION IN THE JUDICIAL BRANCH OF  GOVERNMENT.2. POLITICAL ETHICS AND BEHAVIOR: INSTITUTIONALIZATION  OF POLITICAL ACTS VERSUS PERSONIFICATION OF POLITICAL  FIGURES; MONEY POLITICS, MANIPULATION OF MASSES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 304
  • 305. 3. MAJOR PROBLEMS IN GOVERNANCE INCLUDES:   REFORM OF THE BUREAUCRACY   QUALITY OF CIVIL SERVANTS  CORRUPTION  INEFFICIENCY  LOW SALARY  IMPACT OF PROBLEMS IN BUREAUCRACY ON SOCIO‐ ECONOMIC DOMAINS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 305
  • 306. 4. NEW PHENOMENA IN POLITICAL LIFE :  INTERNALIZATION OF POLITICAL ISSUES BY  GRASS ROOT   POLITICIANS: WEAKENING OF GOVERNMENT’S POSITION  IN INTERNATIONAL FORUM  ETHNO‐NATIONALISM: AS NEGATIVE IMPACT OF         DECENTRALIZATION POLICY (EUPHORIA: FROM SPECIAL  AUTONOMY TO INDEPENDENCE)Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 306
  • 307.  POLITICAL TRUST AND SOCIAL TRUST: PROBLEM  IN LAW ENFORCEMENT (FREQUENTLY  CONSTRAINED BY ISSUES OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND  FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION).  PLURALISM: NEGATIVE IMPACT OF PLURALISM IN  THE FORM OF HORIZONTAL CONFLICTS BASED ON  RELIGIOUS, ETHNICS, SOCIO‐ECONOMIC, AND  POLITICAL IN‐GROUPNESS FEELINGS)  TERRORISM.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 307
  • 308. WHERE IS INDONESIA NOW NEW  HABIBIE ORDER GUSDUR SBY I SBY II MEGAWATI HIGHAUTORITA‐ DEMOCRATIC QUALITY TRANSITION TOWARDS HIGH DEMOCRACY RIAN CONSOLIDATION  PERFOR‐ MANCE 1966‐1998 1998‐2004 2004‐2005 2009‐2014 2014‐…. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CRISIS + RECOVERY STABILIZATION ACCELERATION TRILOGI POLITICAL Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 308
  • 309. LESSONS TO BE LEARNED 309
  • 310.  INDONESIA HAS TRAVELLED A LONG WAY FROM A  CLOSE TO AN OPEN SOCIETY, FROM AUTHORITARIAN TO  DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE, FROM THE RUIN OF  ECONOMIC DESTRUCTION, TO A BUSTLING ECONOMY  WITH TREMENDOUS OPPORTUNITY. INDONESIA HAS LESSONS TO OFFER FROM ITS OWN  EXPERIENCE. ITS DEMOCRACY IS HOMEGROWN. NO  FOREIGN HAND INTERFERED WITH THE DEMOCRATIZATION PROCESS. ALTHOUGH INDONESIA  HAS NOT BEEN "ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY," FOR  LONG, THERE IS MUCH THAT HAS BEEN ACHIEVED FOR  WHICH ITS CITIZENS MAY BE PROUD OF. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 310
  • 311.  THE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT PROCESS HAVING  BEEN COMPLETED, CITIZENS MAY OBSERVE A  "SOFTWARE UPGRADE" IN THE DIFFICULT SYSTEM THAT  IS THEIR GOVERNMENT.  MANY PROBLEMS REMAIN, HOWEVER. ALTHOUGH THE BASIC TRANSITION FROM  AUTHORITARIAN TO DEMOCRATIC RULES HAS BEEN  COMPLETED, CONSOLIDATION IS STILL UNFINISHED IN  INDONESIA’S DEMOCRACY. THE INSTITUTIONALIZATION  OF DEMOCRATIC NORMS IS AN IMPORTANT TASK OF  DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION.  IN THE SOCIETY, THE NORMS HAVE YET TO BECOME  PART OF CULTURAL VALUES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 311
  • 312.  FOR THAT GOOD, STRONG AND COMMITTED LEADERSHIP  AT ALL LEVELS OF SOCIETY TO BRING ABOUT THOSE  CHANGES. GOOD LEADERSHIP IS NEEDED EVERYWHERE  AND ALWAYS, BUT IT IS ESPECIALLY NEEDED FOR A  COUNTRY GOING THROUGH TRANSITION WITH A HISTORY  LITTERED WITH PROMISES BROKEN BY SELF‐SERVING  LEADERS. AS SUCH, NOT ONLY SHOULD REFORMS INSTALL AN  EFFECTIVE AND TRANSPARENT SET OF RULES‐BASED  INSTITUTIONS, THEY SHOULD ALSO EVOLVE RULES‐BASED  MECHANISMS BY WHICH THE BEST OF EACH GENERATION  IS BROUGHT INTO THE POLITICAL LEADERSHIP.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 312
  • 313.  TO PUT IN SIMPLISTIC TERMS, A GOOD SYSTEM IS  NOTHING WITHOUT GOOD PEOPLE TO RUN IT. IT IS NOT  TO SAY THAT THE SYSTEM IS LESS IMPORTANT THAN THE  PEOPLE WHO RUN IT, ON THE CONTRARY,  DEMOCRATIZATION ENTAILS FIRST AND FOREMOST  ESTABLISHING THE SYSTEM—THE INSTITUTIONS, THE  PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES. THE NEED FOR STRONG CIVIL AND POLITICAL LEADERSHIP  IS UNIVERSAL TO EVERY COUNTRY AND EVERY HUMAN  SOCIETY. INDONESIA’S EXPERIMENT WITH  DEMOCRATIZATION IS ONLY ONE MORE EXAMPLE  ILLUSTRATING ITS CRITICAL IMPORTANCE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 313
  • 314.  IN THE POST‐TRANSITION PERIOD, THE INDONESIAN  POLITY HAS TO GRAPPLE WITH TWO KEY ISSUES IN  CONSOLIDATING ITS NASCENT DEMOCRACY. FIRST, IT IS  THE QUESTION OF HOW BEST TO STRENGTHEN THE  POLITICAL CULTURE, DEEPEN DEMOCRACY AND ENHANCE  POLITICAL INSTITUTIONALIZATION.  A STRONG POLITICAL CULTURE WILL PROVIDE ADEQUATE  EMOTIONAL AND COGNITIVE SUPPORT FOR ADHERING TO  DEMOCRATIC PROCEDURES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 314
  • 315.  THE SECOND KEY ISSUE IS HOW TO IMPROVE THE  PERFORMANCE OF THE NEWLY ESTABLISHED DEMOCRATIC  REGIME. REGIME PERFORMANCE CAN BE SEEN AS BOTH  POLITICAL OUTPUTS AND THE CHARACTER OF THE REGIME  AS WELL AS THE MATERIAL CONDITIONS IT GENERATES.  IN SHORT POLITICAL AS WELL AS ECONOMIC OUTCOMES.  REGIME PERFORMANCE SUGGESTS THAT OVER TIME, THE  DEMOCRATIC REGIME IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE  SUFFICIENTLY POSITIVE OUTCOMES TO BUILD POLITICAL  LEGITIMACY.  THE ABILITY OF THE NEW DEMOCRACY TO DELIVER DECENT,  OPEN AND CLEAN GOVERNMENT AS POLICY OUTCOMES IS  IMPORTANT TO DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 315
  • 316.  MANY PEOPLE HOLD THE OPINION THAT THE PRESENT  SYSTEMS OF MULTIPARTY DEMOCRACY DO NOT REALLY  GUARANTEE THAT THE INTEREST OF THE PEOPLE IS IN  THE FOREFRONT OF POLITICAL ARGUMENTS. THAT  POLICY DECISIONS ONLY SERVE THE INTEREST OF THE  PARTIES AND OF THOSE WHO "OWN" THE PARTIES OR  ARE DOMINANT FIGURES IN THE PARTIES.  AND MANY ALSO SEE THAT FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION  HAS GIVEN RISE TO RELIGIOUS CONFLICTS AND  DEFAMATION OF INDIVIDUALS IN THE PRESS, AND NOT  THE LEAST TO PORNOGRAPHY, THE DESTRUCTIONS OF  MORAL VALUES. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 316
  • 317.  IT IS CONCEIVABLE THAT MANY OF THE ISSUES ONLY  SHOW THE EXASPERATION OF THE PEOPLE OVER  UNMET HIGH EXPECTATION FOR DEMOCRACY TO  PRODUCE STABLE POLITICAL SYSTEM, GOOD  GOVERNANCE AND ECONOMIC WELFARE.  DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE IS, THUS, CHALLENGED TO  ADDRESS THESE GRIEVANCES BY ENACTING BETTER AND  WELL THOUGHT OF POLICIES AND BY LISTENING MORE  TO THE INTEREST OF THE PEOPLE IN GENERAL, NOT  POLITICAL PARTYS NARROW POLITICAL INTERESTS.  CIVIL SOCIETY SHOULD PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE AS A  COUNTERWEIGHT TO THE GOVERNMENT AND  POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 317
  • 318.  AND HERE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IS CALLED UPON TO  PLAY CRUCIAL ROLE. IN FACT SCHOLARS ARGUE THAT ONE  OF THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IS  "DELIVERING DEMOCRACY," WHICH MEANS UPHOLDING  DEMOCRATIC VALUES AND ENSURING THAT CITIZENS CAN  ACCESS THEIR RIGHTS IN KEEPING WITH THE VALUES OF  DEMOCRACY—LIBERTY, JUSTICE, FREEDOM, EQUALITY,  AND EQUITY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 318
  • 319.  DEMOCRACIES CANNOT SURVIVE WITHOUT A STRONG,  TECHNICALLY COMPETENT, EFFECTIVE, EFFICIENT, HONEST  AND RESPONSIVE PUBLIC SERVICE. THE CHALLENGE FOR A  DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY IS THUS TO CREATE THE CONDITIONS  THAT MAKE PUBLIC SERVICE FUNCTIONS WELL AND  HARMONIOUSLY IN A DEMOCRATIC SETTING.  IT IS IMPORTANT TO ENSURE THAT THE PEOPLE WHO ENTER  PUBLIC SERVICE ARE, IN ADDITION TO BEING EXPERTS AND  SKILLED MANAGERS, WELL‐GROUNDED IN DEMOCRATIC  VALUES AND PRINCIPLES. ON THE OTHER HAND, IT IS  INCUMBENT ON THE PART OF ELECTED POLITICIAN NOT TO  INTERFERE AND "POLITIZE" PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND  PUBLIC SERVICE THAT WOULD RESTRAIN THEIR CAPACITY  AND CAPABILITY TO PERFORM THEIR DUTIES EFFECTIVELY  AND EFFICIENTLY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 319
  • 320. POST‐SCRIPT 320
  • 321. THE ROLE OF ISLAM IT IS TRUE THAT FUNDAMENTALIST ISLAMIC GROUPS,  SOME OF THEM MILITANT, DO EXIST IN INDONESIA,  BUT THEY ARE MARGINAL AND HAVE LITTLE POPULAR  SUPPORT.  DESPITE THE RECURRENCE OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING  SOME ISLAMIC EXTREMISTS, FOR MANY YEARS,  INDONESIA, THE COUNTRY WITH THE LARGEST  MUSLIM POPULATION IN THE WORLD, HAS BEEN  WELL KNOWN AS A PLURALISTIC SOCIETY  CHARACTERIZED BY RELIGIOUS MODERATION AND  TOLERANCE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 321
  • 322.  WITH THE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS  COMPLETED, THE DEBATE ON THE INCLUSION OF THE  JAKARTA CHARTER INTO THE CONSTITUTION HAS BEEN  MORE OR LESS BEEN CONCLUDED.  THE VOTES AGAINST IT WERE OVERWHELMING,  CUTTING ACROSS POLITICAL FAULT LINES.  ALTHOUGH THE POSSIBILITY OF FUTURE ATTEMPTS TO  REINTRODUCE THE JAKARTA CHARTER IS EVER PRESENT,  THE POLITICAL SUPPORT FOR SUCH A MOVE WOULD BE  CONFINED TO A SMALL MINORITY.  NOT ONLY ARE THE SECULAR NATIONALIST PARTIES  AGAINST IT, MANY PARTIES WITH ISLAMIC CREDENTIALS  ARE ALSO NOT SUPPORTING IT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 322
  • 323.  EVEN IF THE JAKARTA CHARTER DOES NOT POSE AN IMMEDIATE  THREAT TO THE UNITY OF THE COUNTRY, ADJUSTING TO AND  COPING WITH A DEEPENING RELIGIOUS AWARENESS AND  RELIGIOUS PIETY WITHIN THE MUSLIM POPULATION IS STILL A  CHALLENGE FOR INDONESIA. ALTHOUGH INDONESIA IS A PREDOMINANTLY MUSLIM  COUNTRY, ISLAMIC POLITICAL PARTIES IN INDONESIA HAS  NEVER BEEN ABLE TO ATTAIN MORE THAN 40% OF THE VOTES,  SINCE THE ELECTION OF 1955 UP TO THE LAST ELECTION IN  2004.  THEREFORE, MOST INDONESIAN MUSLIM VOTED FOR  PARTIES NOT BASED IN RELIGION. THE DIFFERENT FROM ONE ELECTION TO ANOTHER IS THE  COMPOSITION OF THE VOTES GARNERED BY THE ISLAMIC  PARTIES, WHICH CONSTANTLY CHANGES REFLECTING THE  POLITICAL MOOD AND ENVIRONMENT OF THE TIME. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 323
  • 324.  IN THE SHORT RUN, HOWEVER, THE REVIVAL OF ISLAMIC  VALUES IN THE MINDS AND LIVES OF THE POPULATION,  MOST IMPORTANTLY AMONG THE INTELLIGENTSIA AND THE  POLITICAL ELITE, AND THE YOUNG, MAY AFFECT ATTITUDES  OR RESPONSES TO POLITICAL ISSUES THAT INVOLVE ISLAM  SUCH AS INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM.  THE SEPTEMBER 11 ACT OF TERRORISM AGAINST THE US  WAS ALMOST UNANIMOUSLY CONDEMNED BY ORGANIZED  MUSLIMS AND BY THE PUBLIC IN GENERAL.  EXCEPT FOR A FEW VERY VOCAL FANATICS, INDONESIA’S  MUSLIMS WERE OUTRAGED BY WITH HAPPENED IN NEW  YORK. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 324
  • 325.  THE FEELING OF OUTRAGE AGAINST TERRORISM THAT HAD  TAKEN THE LIVES OF INNOCENT PEOPLE WAS HEIGHTENED  WHEN INDONESIA ALSO BECAME A VICTIM OF  INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM WITH THE BOMBING IN BALI  ON 12 OCTOBER 2002, THE MORE RECENT MARRIOT  BOMBING IN JAKARTA ON 5 AUGUST 2002, AND THE SECOND  BALI BOMBING IN 2005.  FOR MANY INDONESIAN MUSLIMS, TERRORISM HAD ONLY  SUCCEEDED IN CREATING THE WRONG IMAGE OF ISLAM AND  ISLAMIC VALUES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 325
  • 326. THE NATIONALIST AND ISLAMICS PARTIES BALANCE IN  INDONESIA’S DEMOCRATIC ELECTION (PERCENTAGES OF VALID VOTES) 1955 1999 2004 2005Islamic parties 6 of 29 13 of 48 8 of 42 11 of 38 Parties: 44,01% Parties: 28% Parties: 38,99% Parties: 29,3%Nationalist/non 23 of 29 35 of 48 16 of 24 27 of 38Islamic parties*) Parties: 55,99% Parties: 72% Parties: 61,01% Parties: 70,7%*) THE COMMUNIST PARTY OF INDONESIA (PKI) WAS STILL IN EXISTENCEDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 326
  • 327. THE ROLE OF THE MILITARY OBSERVERS OF INDONESIA HAVE PAID MUCH ATTENTION TO  THE ROLE OF THE MILITARY IN POST‐NEW ORDER POLITICS  AND HOW THE MILITARY PERCEIVE ITS ROLE IN DEMOCRACY.  EVENTS SURROUNDING THE FALL OF SUHARTO SHOWED  THAT THE MILITARY HAD BEEN SUPPORTIVE OF POLITICAL  CHANGE. ITS ROLE WAS CRUCIAL IN THE PEACEFUL  TRANSITION FROM AN AUTHORITARIAN REGIME TO REAL  DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 327
  • 328.  IN THE TRANSITION DURING THE HABIBIE PERIOD, THE  MILITARY LENT ITS POLITICAL WEIGHT TO THE  INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF DEMOCRACY BY SUPPORTING  THE CREATION OF LAWS AND RULES THAT DISMANTLED THE  OLD AUTHORITARIAN STRUCTURES AND REPLACED IT WITH A  DEMOCRATIC SYSTEM.  THE MILITARY HAS SHOWN ITS COMMITMENT TO  DEMOCRACY WHEN IT ACCEPTED THE CONSENSUS OF THE  POLITY THAT IT SHOULD NO LONGER TAKE AN ACTIVE ROLE  IN POLITICS AND THEREFORE NO LONGER HOLD SEATS IN  THE ELECTIVE POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS.  UNDER WAHID, THE MILITARY HAD BEEN STEADFAST IN  REFUSING TO BE USED AS AN INSTRUMENT TO SUBVERT THE  CONSTITUTION AND RESISTED THE PRESSURE TO REVERSE  TO AUTHORITARIANISM. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 328
  • 329.  ALTHOUGH MANY RETIRED SENIOR OFFICERS WERE AGAINST  CHANGING THE CONSTITUTION, THE SERVING MILITARY  ESTABLISHMENT FULLY SUPPORTED THE AMENDMENTS THAT  HAVE BECOME THE FOUNDATION FOR A STRONGER AND  MORE STABLE DEMOCRACY.  THEREFORE IT IS SAFE TO SAY THAT THE MILITARY IS NOT A  THREAT BUT AN ASSET TO INDONESIA’S DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 329