by       Ginandjar KartasasmitaNational Graduate Institute for Policy Studies              Tokyo, Japan                   ...
THE INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO •     a country of 240 million (as of 2010), •     an archipelago strung 5000 kilometers along ...
Release of Political                                            Prisoners                                                 ...
Active Formal  Opposition                   Externally                    Induced                                         ...
CONTENTSA HISTORICAL OVERVIEW  –   THE PRE‐COLONIAL KINGDOMS   –   DUTCH COLONIALISM   –   RISE OF INDONESIA’S NATIONALIS...
CONTENTSINDONESIA UNDER THE NEW ORDER –   POLITICAL SYSTEM UNDER THE NEW ORDER  –   TO WHAT EXTENT WAS INDONESIA A DEMOCR...
CONTENTS ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY   HABIBIE GOVERNMENT     –   INAUSPICIOUS BEGINNING      –   THE LEGITIMACY DILEMMA   ...
CONTENTSABDURRAHMAN WAHID GOVERNMENT   –   DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION   –   THE EUPHORIA   –   POLITICAL LIMBO   –   DISHONORI...
CONTENTSCONSTITUTIONAL REFORM   –   THE CONSTITUTION: A SACRED DOCUMENT?    –   THE WEAKNESSES OF THE ORIGINAL UUD ‘45   ...
CONTENTS PRACTICING DEMOCRACY: The 2004 General   Elections: Significant Beginnings       –   CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM      ...
A HISTORICAL OVERVIEW                        11
THE PRE‐COLONIAL KINGDOMS RULED BY SEVERAL HINDU/BUDDHIST   KINGDOMS. ESTABLISHED CONTACTS AND RELATIONS WITH   OTHER PO...
DUTCH COLONIALISM  FIRST CAME TO INDONESIA AT THE END OF THE   16TH CENTURY AS TRADERS, AND LATER AS   COLONIZERS. THE C...
RISE OF INDONESIA’S NATIONALISM  MAY 20, 1908 THE BIRTH OF AN INTELLECTUAL   ORGANIZATION BUDI UTOMO, COMMEMORATED   AS T...
CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE  THE DEFEAT OF THE DUTCH AT THE HANDS OF AN   ASIAN POWER FUELED THE RISE OF INDIGENOUS   RE...
 THE FOUNDING FATHERS OF INDONESIA’S   INDEPENDENCE AGREED ON PANCASILA AS THE   STATE PHILOSOPHY. PANCASILA: 1) BELIEF ...
 THE JAKARTA CHARTER:   BELIEF IN ONE AND ONLY GOD AND ENSURING   THE FREEDOM OF WORSHIP, WITH AN   ADDITIONAL STIPULATIO...
BIRTH OF A NATION  ALL THE NECESSARY ELEMENTS FOR AN INDEPENDENT   NATION HAD ALREADY EXISTED WHEN THE JAPANESE   SURREND...
WAR OF INDEPENDENCE                        1945 ‐ 1949  THE DUTCH REFUSED TO RECOGNIZE THE    INDEPENDENCE OF THEIR FORME...
RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE IN DECEMBER 1949, THE DUTCH FINALLY RECOGNIZED   THE INDEPENDENCE OF INDONESIA IN THE FORM OF...
AN ATTEMPT AT LIBERAL DEMOCRACY  IN 1955 A FREE AND FAIR MULTIPARTY ELECTION IN THE FIRST   GENERAL ELECTION, TO ELECT TH...
THE TURBULENT YEARS CENTRAL AUTHORITY BEING CHALLENGED BY SEPARATIST   MOVEMENTS IN THE REGIONS. THE DARUL ISLAM CONTINU...
GUIDED DEMOCRACY  SUKARNO PROCLAIMED “GUIDED DEMOCRACY” AS THE   SUITABLE SYSTEM FOR INDONESIA. THE PROVISIONAL MPR CONF...
THE CONFRONTATION AGAINST THE WEST PRESIDENT SUKARNO WAS OPPOSED TO THE   ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW MALAYSIAN STATE, AND   A...
SUKARNO: THE ROMANTIC REVOLUTIONARY THE ORDINARY INDONESIAN PEOPLE LOVED   SUKARNO HE WAS A MAN OF VISION, AN ARDENT   N...
 INDONESIA UNDER SUKARNO TOOK A LEADING   ROLE IN ASIAN AFRICAN COUNTRIES SOLIDARITY   AND FIGHT AGAINST COLONIALISM SUK...
THE END OF GUIDED DEMOCRACY AND         THE RISE OF THE NEW ORDER ON SEPTEMBER 30TH 1965, AN ABORTED COUP   D’ETAT WAS AL...
 ON MAY 11TH 1966 PRESIDENT SUKARNO, UNDER   PRESSURE FROM THE MILITARY AND THE PUBLIC,   ISSUED A LETTER OF INSTRUCTION ...
INDONESIA UNDER THE NEW ORDER                   29
MPR is manifestation of the                                                                  people sovereignty has the   ...
POLITICAL SYSTEM UNDER                        THE NEW ORDER THE NEW ORDER REGIME RELIED HEAVILY ON A SET   OF STRUCTURES ...
     IN THE “PANCASILA DEMOCRACY” SYSTEM, THE       WESTERN IDEA OF OPPOSITION WAS REJECTED.      THE SUHARTO REGIME WEN...
TO WHAT EXTENT WAS INDONESIA A DEMOCRACY ?       GOLKAR, THE RULING ‘PARTY’, WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1964        ORIGINALLY AS...
“FUSION” OF POLITICAL PARTY (1973)                             GOLKAR                   PPP:                     PDI:     ...
DEMOCRATIC OR NON‐DEMOCRATIC?      THE WAY THE SYSTEM WORKED DURING THE NEW ORDER        OBVIOUSLY DID NOT MEET THE BASIC...
WHAT KEPT THE REGIME IN POWER SO LONG? IF INDONESIA WAS NOT A TRUE DEMOCRATIC SYSTEM OF   GOVERNMENT, WHAT KEPT THE SYSTE...
 HUNTINGTON ARGUES THAT MANY AUTHORITARIAN REGIMES   INITIALLY JUSTIFY THEMSELVES BY WHAT HE CALLS A   “NEGATIVE LEGITIMA...
     AT ITS INCEPTION THE NEW ORDER CONSIDERED ITSELF TO       BE A REFORMIST GOVERNMENT SUPPORTED BY POPULAR       MOVEM...
DEVELOPMENT TRILOGY                              Stability                    Growth                       EquityDay2_GRIP...
POLITICAL STABILITY     THE POLITICAL SYSTEM HAD PRODUCED THE       INTENDED RESULT: POLITICAL STABILITY THAT HAD       E...
ECONOMIC GROWTH AND EQUITY     POLITICAL STABILITY ASSURED, AND WITH       UNIFORMITY OF PURPOSE AND METHOD THE NEW      ...
     LIFE EXPECTANCY ROSE AND INFANT MORTALITY       DECLINED DRAMATICALLY.      EIGHT OUT OF TEN OF THE POPULATION HAD ...
WHAT WENT WRONG?     HUNTINGTON (1991: 54‐55) MAKES THE POINT       THAT THE LEGITIMACY OF AN AUTHORITARIAN       REGIME ...
 HE CITES THE FAMOUS—ALBEIT MUCH CONTESTED‐‐  LIPSET HYPOTHESIS CONCERNING THE RELATIONSHIP   OF WEALTH AND DEMOCRACY: TH...
     HE MAINTAINS THAT A SOCIAL SCIENTIST WHO       WISHED TO PREDICT FUTURE DEMOCRATIZATION       “WOULD HAVE DONE REASO...
     IN HIS ACCOUNTABILITY SPEECH TO THE MPR ON       MARCH 1, 1998, PRESIDENT SUHARTO (1998: 16)       REPORTED THAT IN1...
     THREE DECADES OF DEVELOPMENT HAD       SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASED THE LEVEL AND REACH       OF EDUCATION ACROSS THE NAT...
 INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE BROUGHT ABOUT THE   OPENING UP NOT OF ONLY THE INDONESIAN MARKET TO   FOREIGN GOODS BUT ALSO THE ...
 THE SUPPOSED ULTIMATE VICTORY OF DEMOCRACY AGAINST   ALL OTHER SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT (SEE FUKUYAMA,   1992) HAS CHANGED ...
     THE BREAKDOWN OF BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION,       THE MAIN FORCE BEHIND GLOBALIZATION AND THE       DRIVE TOWARD A H...
     WHEN THE GOVERNMENT CLOSED DOWN THE       POPULAR INDONESIA MAGAZINE, TEMPO, BECAUSE       OF IT CRITICAL TONE, IT S...
     AT THE HEIGHT OF THE PRAISE FOR THE NEW       ORDER ACHIEVEMENT, MANY INDONESIAN       SCHOLARS AND CRITICS NOTED TH...
     AN INDONESIAN SOCIAL SCIENTIST, PABOTTINGI,       NOTED THAT NEW ORDER ECONOMIC POLICIES AND       PRACTICES THAT HA...
     WHILE ECONOMICALLY THE GOVERNMENT WAS       COMMITTED TO AND INTENTLY PURSUING OPEN       POLICIES, POLITICALLY THE ...
     THE EMERGING ROLE OF ISLAM AS A FORCE OF       CHANGE SHOULD ALSO NOT BE UNDERESTIMATED.      UHLIN (1997:82) AGUES...
     AMONG THE SOCIAL FORCES THAT WERE POISED       AGAINST THE NEW ORDER, THE MOST CONSISTENT       AND MILITANT WERE TH...
     THERE IS NO MAJOR POLITICAL CHANGE IN       INDONESIA THAT DID NOT INVOLVE THE YOUTH       AND STUDENTS.     BY THE...
     IN 1978 THERE WAS AGAIN A WAVE OF STUDENT       PROTESTS.      STUDENT ACTIVISM CONTINUED INTO THE 1980S       AND ...
     ALTHOUGH THE STUDENT MOVEMENTS MOST OF       THE TIME WERE WIDELY SCATTERED, UNFOCUSED       AND UN‐COORDINATED AND ...
 WITH ALL THE CHANGING SOCIAL STRUCTURES AND   NORMS, AND THE FORCES ARRAYED AGAINST THE NEW   ORDER, FROM OUTSIDE AND WI...
 EVENTS LEADING TO THE FALL OF THE NEW ORDER HAD   SHOWN THE SYMPTOMS OBSERVED BY HAGGARD AND   KAUFMAN (1999: 76) THAT E...
 HOWEVER, IT WAS NOT THE FIRST TIME THAT THE NEW   ORDER WAS FACED WITH SERIOUS CRISES.  ALTHOUGH ARGUABLY THE 1997/98 C...
 MANY OF THE OPPOSING FORCES IDENTIFIED ABOVE   WERE LONG PRESENT, LATENT IN THE   UNDERCURRENT OF INDONESIAN POLITICS FO...
     BUT THE NEW ORDER DID FALL.      MANY STUDIES HAVE BEEN UNDERTAKEN       THEREAFTER, ATTEMPTING TO FIND THE ANSWER ...
     DURING THE 1997/98 CRISIS PRESIDENT SUHARTO       WAS DELIBERATING BETWEEN POLICY ACTIONS,       AND HIS INDECISIVEN...
     OBVIOUSLY THERE WAS AN INTERNATIONAL       DIMENSION TO THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC       CRISIS OCCURRING IN INDONES...
 SOME ANALYSTS, HOWEVER WOULD NOT DISCOUNT   THE ROLE THE US PLAY IN THE DOWNFALL OF   SUHARTO.  ALTHOUGH FOR MANY YEARS...
 MOUNTING CRITICISM ON THE WAY INDONESIA   HANDLED THE EAST TIMOR QUESTION AND THE   ALLEGATIONS OF HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES H...
 HOWEVER IN THE ABSENCE OF THE NECESSARY   CATALYST THOSE ELEMENTS WERE INERT, AND EVEN IF   CHANGE SHOULD HAPPEN IT COUL...
A RENEWED MANDATE:        WASTED OPPORTUNITY FOR CHANGE     REFLECTED IN THE GENERAL ELECTION OF 1997, SUHARTO       STIL...
     THE TIME HAD COME FOR POLITICAL REFORMS, BUT       CHANGING THE LEADERSHIP AT THE TIME OF CRISIS       WAS NOT REGAR...
THE FLASH POINT     WHILE THE ECONOMY SHOWED SAME IMPROVEMENT, IN       THE POLITICAL FRONT, THE SITUATION DETERIORATED....
     DURING THE CONFRONTATION BETWEEN THE SECURITY       APPARATUS AND THE STUDENT ON MAY 12, FOUR       STUDENTS WERE SH...
THE FINAL CURTAIN  MAY 17TH 1998 THE STUDENTS HAD PRACTICALLY   OCCUPIED THE PARLIAMENT BUILDING TO PRESSURE   PARLIAMENT...
 ON MAY 19TH AFTER MEETING WITH THE MODERATE    MUSLIM LEADERS PRESIDENT SUHARTO TOLD A PRESS    CONFERENCE ABOUT CALLING...
 SOME MINISTERS REALIZED THAT THE STATUS QUO         COULD NOT BE MAINTAINED ANY LONGER.       MAY 20TH 1998 THE ECONOMI...
 SUHARTO ALSO FAILED TO GET THE SUPPORT FROM     PARLIAMENT LEADERS ON ESTABLISHING THE REFORM     COMMITTEE.   LOSING T...
CONCLUSION WHILE THE ECONOMIC CRISIS UNDOUBTEDLY WAS THE   IMMEDIATE CAUSE OF THE POLITICAL UNREST THAT   ENDED SUHARTO’S...
     WHETHER SUHARTO COULD HAVE WEATHERED THE       ECONOMIC CRISIS IF THE NEW ORDER REGIME HAD       EVOLVED INTO A MORE...
     THE CRACKS IN THE RANKS OF THE NEW ORDER       HAD COME TO THE SURFACE, AS THE NEW ORDER       SUPPORTERS WITHIN AND...
     IT IS EVIDENT THAT THE INABILITY OF PRESIDENT       SUHARTO TO BRING INDONESIA OUT OF THE CRISIS,       COMBINED WIT...
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY               82
HABIBIE GOVERNMENT
     THE OBJECTIVES:         AS THE COUNTRY WAS DEEP IN CRISIS, A CONTINUATION          OF POLICIES, ESPECIALLY IN THE E...
     THE AGENDA:          FOREMOST IN THE POLITICAL AGENDA WAS THE            REPEAL OF THE MUCH‐REVILED POLITICAL LAWS ...
INAUSPICIOUS BEGINNING     HABIBIE STARTED HIS PRESIDENCY AMIDST       WIDESPREAD MISGIVINGS.      THE COUNTRY WAS IN DE...
     HIS BIOGRAPHER, BILVEER SINGH (2000),       ACKNOWLEDGES THAT HABIBIE BROUGHT WITH HIM       MANY NEGATIVE IMAGES OF...
THE LEGITIMACY DILEMMA HABIBIE’S PRESIDENCY FROM THE BEGINNING WAS   PLAGUED BY DOUBTERS OF ITS LEGITIMACY. ONE ARGUMENT...
 IN LINE WITH THE MESSAGE OF THE CONSTITUTION   THE PRESIDENT RECEIVED HIS MANDATE FROM THE   MPR, AND THEREFORE IF HE RE...
 ON THE OTHER HAND HABIBIES’ SUPORTERS ARGUED   THAT THE CONSTITUTION STIPULATED THAT SHOULD   THE PRESIDENT DIE OR RESIG...
 WITHIN THE GOVERNMENT, AMONG THE CABINET   MINISTERS, THERE WERE ALSO SOME DOUBTS AS TO   WHETHER THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD ...
 TO MANY OF HIS CRITICS IT WAS DIFFICULT TO   SEPARATE THE FIGURE OF HABIBIE AND SUHARTO, AND   THE ASCENSION OF HABIBIE ...
 AFTER AN INTENSIVE BEHIND‐THE‐SCREEN POLITICAL   CONSULTATION, A CONSENSUS WITHIN THE   GOVERNMENT EMERGED THAT AN EARLY...
MPR SESSION     ACCORDING TO THE CONSTITUTION, THE MPR MEETS       IN:        GENERAL SESSION        SPECIAL SESSION  ...
MPR SPECIAL SESSION     THE MPR CONVENED A SPECIAL SESSION ON       NOVEMBER 10‐13, 1998     THE MPR ISSUED DECREES ON: ...
6. LIMITING THE PRESIDENTIAL TERMS OF OFFICE—IN THE           UNAMENDED CONSTITUTION THERE WAS NO           LIMITATION—TO ...
     THE MPR DECISIONS SERVE AS CONSTITUTIONAL         BASIS THAT WOULD CONSTITUTE THE FOUNDATION         FOR DEMOCRATIZA...
OPPOSITION AGAINST HABIBIE THE SPECIAL SESSION OF THE MPR MET AMIDST A   TENSE POLITICAL ATMOSPHERE, AS STUDENTS,   ENCOU...
 UNAVOIDABLY THESE GROUPS OF VIGILANTES WOULD   CLASH WITH STUDENTS IN VARIOUS PARTS OF THE   CITY, MAKING THE SITUATION ...
 IN THE CONFRONTATIONS THAT TOOK PLACE IN THE   AFTERNOON OF NOVEMBER 13, SHOTS WERE FIRED   AND AT THE END OF THE DAY 13...
 THE INCIDENT, WHICH CAME TO BE KNOWN AS THE   SEMANGGI TRAGEDY, LEFT ANOTHER SCAR ON THE   NATIONAL PSYCHE ALONGSIDE THE...
HABIBIE’S POLITICAL PILLARS HABIBIE RELIED ON THE SUPPORT OF THREE   POLITICAL FORCES: THE MILITARY, GOLKAR, AND   POLITI...
 POLITICAL ISLAM WAS BASICALLY SYMPATHETIC TO   HABIBIE, REGARDED AS A PERSON WHO HAD BEEN   ABLE TO TURN THE TIDE OF LON...
 THE OPPOSITION TO HABIBIE MOUNTED BY STUDENTS   BASED IN THE CAMPUS OF A CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY   ALSO HAD DRIVEN MANY MUS...
COMMUNAL STRIFE     IN THE MEANTIME, THE SECURITY APPARATUS HAD       TO DEAL WITH COMMUNAL STRIFE IN SEVERAL       REGIO...
ACEH ANOTHER TROUBLE SPOT FLARED UP IN ACEH, THE   WESTERNMOST PROVINCE OF INDONESIA.  ACEH HAD BEEN LONG SIMMERING IN C...
 AT THE END OF THE NEW ORDER, THE SITUATION HAD   BEEN PUT UNDER CONTROL AND THE REBEL   MOVEMENT HAD BECOME MORE OR LESS...
     THE MILITARY MOUNTED AN OPERATION TO        RESPOND TO THE ATTACKS AND THE SITUATION        FURTHER ESCALATED.     ...
     IN MARCH 1999, HABIBIE, ACCOMPANIED BY SENIOR       MEMBERS OF HIS CABINET AND THE COMMANDER OF THE       ARMED FORC...
     POLITICAL PRISONERS WOULD BE RELEASED AND      FUNDS FOR DEVELOPMENT IN THE PROVINCE       WOULD BE INCREASED INCLUD...
     IN SEPTEMBER A LAW WAS PASSED THAT GAVE        ACEH A SPECIAL STATUS (LAW NO 44/1999).      THE NEW LAW ON FISCAL D...
 THUS TWO OF THE MAIN GRIEVANCES, THE DEMAND   FOR SYARIAH LAW AND EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION OF   RESOURCES, HAD BEEN BASICA...
PAPUA IRIAN JAYA (PAPUA) WAS ANOTHER HOT SPOT. THE   PROVINCE HAD BEEN PLAGUED BY SEPARATIST   MOVEMENTS DEMANDING INDEPE...
 A LAW WAS LATER PASSED TO ALLOW FOR A SPECIAL   STATUS FOR THE PROVINCE OF PAPUA, INCLUDING   ECONOMIC PRIVILEGES (LAW N...
LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY     THE RECOGNITION OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLE OF THE       SEPARATION OF POWERS OF THE E...
     THE DUAL FUNCTION OF THE MILITARY WAS REVOKED     THE POLICE WERE SEPARATED FROM THE MILITARY.     BASIC HUMAN RIG...
     IN JULY 1999 A MULTIPARTY ELECTION WAS HELD. THE       ELECTION WAS  SUPERVISED BY AN ELECTORAL       COMMITTEE OF T...
POLITICAL PARTIES AND GENERAL ELECTION 1999          No                Parties                  Seats            Vote (%) ...
   DURING HABIBIE’S PRESIDENCY THE GOVERNMENT WORKED     TOGETHER WITH PARLIAMENT TO PRODUCE 67 LAWS THAT     FORMED THE ...
SOME OF THE IMPORTANT POLITICAL LAWSLaw No 2/1999      on political partiesLaw No 3/1999      on general electionLaw No 4/...
Some of the important political laws . . . Law No 25/1999 on fiscal decentralization Law No 26/1999 to revoke the 1963 ant...
   IT WAS APPARENT AND INCREASINGLY ACKNOWLEDGED     THAT IT WAS DURING HABIBIE’S ERA THAT THE     COUNTRY HAD RAPIDLY MO...
     IT WAS DURING HABIBIE’S ADMINISTRATION THAT       MOST OF THE INITIATIVES THAT SIGNIFICANTLY       ACCELERATED INDON...
IRONICALLYHABIBIE, WHO INITIATED MOST OF THE BASIC ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL REFORMS, FAILED TO GET REELECTED IN THE PRESIDEN...
THE PITFALLS     THE EAST TIMOR ISSUE      THE BANK BALI AFFAIR      THE IMF DECIDED THAT FURTHER REVIEW OF ITS       P...
EAST TIMOR   AFTER TAKING OFFICE HABIBIE DECIDED TO BREAK THE     EAST TIMOR LOGJAM: THE SOLUTION OF THE EAST     TIMOR Q...
   OMINOUSLY, BEFORE THE POPULAR CONSULTATION     THERE HAD BEEN CLASHES BETWEEN THE PRO‐    INTEGRATION AND ANTI‐INTEGRA...
     THE REFERENDUM WAS HELD ON 30 AUGUST. THE       PEOPLE OF EAST TIMOR OVERWHELMINGLY CHOSE       INDEPENDENCE, WITH 7...
    THE REFERENDUM RESULTED IN AN INFLUX OF      REFUGEES WHO SUPPORTED THE INTEGRATION WITH     INDONESIA AND WERE AFRAI...
     ON ONE HAND, HABIBIE WAS PRAISED FOR HIS       COURAGEOUS DECISION TO GRANT THE EAST TIMORESE       THE RIGHT TO DEC...
    IN THE ASIA PACIFIC ECONOMIC CONFERENCE (APEC) MEETING      IN NEW ZEALAND IN EARLY SEPTEMBER 1999, AROUND THE TIME  ...
BANK BALI CASE     ANOTHER BLOW CAME IN THE FORM OF WHAT WAS TO       BE KNOWN AS THE BANK BALI AFFAIR. IT INVOLVED THE  ...
    THE EAST TIMOR POST‐REFERENDUM CARNAGE AND THE      BANK BALI AFFAIR SOURED RELATIONS BETWEEN HABIBIE,      THE IMF A...
THE END OF THE BEGINNING     OCTOBER 1, 1999 THE DEMOCRATICALLY ELECTED MPR       STARTED ITS SESSION     BY THE TIME TH...
     FOR SOME TIME LEADERS FROM VARIOUS MUSLIM       ORGANIZATIONS HAD BEEN WAGING CAMPAIGNS       AGAINST MEGAWATI AND H...
     ANOTHER ISSUE WAS HER RELIGIOSITY. PICTURES WERE       DISTRIBUTED SHOWING HER “PRAYING” IN A HINDU TEMPLE.      SO...
     THE COALITION WAS CALLED POROS TENGAH OR       CENTRAL AXIS.     THEIR MAIN OBJECTIVE WAS PREVENTING       MEGAWATI...
    ON 14 OCTOBER HABIBIE DELIVERED HIS      ACCOUNTABILITY SPEECH. HE REPORTED ON THE      CHALLENGES THAT HE HAD TO FAC...
     HE ALSO REPORTED THAT THE INVESTIGATIONS OF       FORMER PRESIDENT SUHARTO BY THE ATTORNEY       GENERAL ABOUT ALLEG...
     ON THE 20TH  THE MPR TOOK THE VOTE FOR       PRESIDENT BETWEEN TWO CANDIDATES: MEGAWATI       AND ABDURRAHMAN WAHID....
    THE JOINED FORCES OF THE ISLAMIC PARTIES AND THE      ISLAMIC FACTIONS WITHIN GOLKAR AND THE      SUPPORTERS OF HABIB...
    AFTER THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION THE MPR WAS TO      DECIDED WHO WOULD BE THE VICE PRESIDENT.    BECAUSE OF HER DISAP...
     WHEN THE MPR SESSIONS ENDED THE COUNTRY NEW       LEADERS HAD BEEN ELECTED DEMOCRATICALLY. THE       FIRST TIME IN I...
ABDURRAHMAN WAHID GOVERNMENT
 THE ELECTION OF ABDURRAHMAN WAHID TO THE   PRESIDENCY ITSELF CREATED ANOTHER LEGITIMACY   PROBLEM BECAUSE OF HIS PARTY’S...
 DIFFERENT ELEMENTS OF THE COALITION ACTED THIS   WAY FOR DIFFERENT REASONS. IT WAS A FRAGILE   COALITION THAT COULD EASI...
DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION THE END OF THE HABIBIE GOVERNMENT AND THE   ELECTION OF THE NEW GOVERNMENT BY DEMOCRATIC   MEANS CO...
THE EUPHORIA THE EMERGENCE OF THE WAHID‐MEGAWATI   GOVERNMENT WAS WELL RECEIVED DOMESTICALLY   AS WELL AS INTERNATIONALLY...
 THERE WAS HIGH HOPE FOR DEMOCRACY AND   CONFIDENCE IN THE COURSE THAT THE COUNTRY   WAS TAKING. IN CONTRAST TO HABIBIE, ...
 THIS RECOGNITION WAS REFLECTED IN THE WAY HE   FORMED HIS FIRST CABINET.  SOME COMMENTATORS WERE CRITICAL OF THE   CABI...
 HIS EFFORT TO PUT THE MILITARY UNDER CIVILIAN   CONTROL ALSO WON HIM ACCOLADES, ESPECIALLY   AMONG INTERNATIONAL OBSERVE...
 HIS IDEA FOR A SOLUTION TO THE ACEH PROBLEM   WAS TO AGREE TO THE REFERENDUM THAT WAS   DEMANDED BY THE GAM (INDEPENDENT...
 HE ALSO MADE A STATEMENT ALLOWING THE   RAISING OF THE REBEL’S FLAG ON THE ANNIVERSARY   OF THE FOUNDING OF GAM ON 4 DEC...
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION

1,391

Published on

Young Leaders Program -National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies Tokyo, Japan 2012

Published in: Education, News & Politics
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,391
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
73
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY: TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION

  1. 1. by Ginandjar KartasasmitaNational Graduate Institute for Policy Studies Tokyo, Japan 2012
  2. 2. THE INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO • a country of 240 million (as of 2010), • an archipelago strung 5000 kilometers along the equator. • more than 13,000 islands, 5,000 are inhabited. • more than 200 ethnic groups and 350 languages and dialects. • 85 to 90% are Muslims.  Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 2
  3. 3. Release of Political  Prisoners International  Multi Party Acknowledgement Freedom  of  Speech • Strong Parliament • Constitutional Political Human Rights Court Gus Dur Rule of Law • Robust Civil   Habibie Society Good Governance • Free Press Decentralization Megawati SBY Early Stage of  Economic Recovery Fall of  Reversed New Order Economic  Constitutional Return of  Reform 1999 2004 Democratic Downturn Election Amendments Election Government Economic Stability Early Stage of  Return of Growth Economic  Recovery Return of Poverty  Reduction Foundation for  Sustainable  Economic Growth Fight Against  Corruption Independence of  Economic Monetary  Regional  Authority Autonomy Dismantling  Monopolies Peace in Free and Fair  •Aceh Competition •Papua Good Corporate  Governance Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 3
  4. 4. Active Formal  Opposition Externally Induced SBY vs MEGAWATI Economic  Dynamic Response Economic & 2008 2010 SBY Political Crisis Election Reelected Condition Political  Response Dissatisfied  PublicNostalgia forOriginal  1945 Constitution Call for 5th AmendmentDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 4
  5. 5. CONTENTSA HISTORICAL OVERVIEW – THE PRE‐COLONIAL KINGDOMS  – DUTCH COLONIALISM  – RISE OF INDONESIA’S NATIONALISM  – CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE  – BIRTH OF A NATION  – WAR OF INDEPENDENCE 1945 ‐ 1949  – RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE  – AN ATTEMPT AT LIBERAL DEMOCRACY  – THE TURBULENT YEARS  – GUIDED DEMOCRACY  – THE CONFRONTATION AGAINST THE WEST  – SUKARNO: THE ROMANTIC REVOLUTIONARY  – THE END OF GUIDED DEMOCRACY AND THE RISE OF THE NEW  ORDER  5
  6. 6. CONTENTSINDONESIA UNDER THE NEW ORDER – POLITICAL SYSTEM UNDER THE NEW ORDER  – TO WHAT EXTENT WAS INDONESIA A DEMOCRACY ?  – “FUSION” OF POLITICAL PARTY (1973)  – DEMOCRATIC OR NON‐DEMOCRATIC?  – WHAT KEPT THE REGIME IN POWER SO LONG?  – DEVELOPMENT TRILOGY  – POLITICAL STABILITY  – ECONOMIC GROWTH AND EQUITY  – WHAT WENT WRONG?  – A RENEWED MANDATE: WASTED OPPORTUNITY FOR CHANGE – THE FLASH POINT – THE FINAL CURTAIN  – CONCLUSION 6
  7. 7. CONTENTS ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY  HABIBIE GOVERNMENT – INAUSPICIOUS BEGINNING  – THE LEGITIMACY DILEMMA  – MPR SESSION  – MPR SPECIAL SESSION  – OPPOSITION AGAINST HABIBIE  – HABIBIE’S POLITICAL PILLARS  – COMMUNAL STRIFE  – LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY  – POLITICAL PARTIES AND GENERAL ELECTION 1999  – SOME OF THE IMPORTANT POLITICAL LAWS  – IRONICALLY  – THE PITFALLS  – EAST TIMOR  – BANK BALI CASE  – THE END OF THE BEGINNING 7
  8. 8. CONTENTSABDURRAHMAN WAHID GOVERNMENT  – DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION  – THE EUPHORIA  – POLITICAL LIMBO  – DISHONORING THE DEAL  – ECONOMIC SLIPPAGE  – DEJA VU?  – CORRUPTION SCANDALS  – DEMOCRATIC REVERSAL  – IMPEACHMENT MEGAWATI GOVERNMENT – THE DOWNSIDE  – AUTHORITARIAN NOSTALGIA  8
  9. 9. CONTENTSCONSTITUTIONAL REFORM – THE CONSTITUTION: A SACRED DOCUMENT?  – THE WEAKNESSES OF THE ORIGINAL UUD ‘45  – THE EVOLVING POLITICAL SYSTEM  – GOALS OF REFORM  – THE METHODOLOGICAL MODEL OF CONSTITUTIONAL  REFORM  – THE MECHANICS OF REFORM AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION  – THE AMENDMENT PROCESS  – THE FIRST AMENDMENT 1999  – THE SECOND AMENDMENT 2000  – THE THIRD AMENDMENT 2001  – THE FOURTH AMENDMENT 2002  – STRONG FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY  9
  10. 10. CONTENTS PRACTICING DEMOCRACY: The 2004 General  Elections: Significant Beginnings   – CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM  – STATE INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE AMENDED CONSTITUTION  – REMAKING THE POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS  – LEGISLATIVE ELECTION  – LEGISLATIVE ELECTION  – PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION  – THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE 2004 ELECTION  – DIRECT REGIONAL ELECTIONS  2009 GENERAL ELECTION DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION: An Unfinished  Business LESSONS TO BE LEARNED POST‐SCRIPT 10
  11. 11. A HISTORICAL OVERVIEW 11
  12. 12. THE PRE‐COLONIAL KINGDOMS RULED BY SEVERAL HINDU/BUDDHIST  KINGDOMS. ESTABLISHED CONTACTS AND RELATIONS WITH  OTHER POWERS IN ASIA SUCH AS CHINA, INDIA,  AND CONTINENTAL SOUTH EAST ASIA . IN THE ISLAMIC ERA MOSTLY MUSLIM  KINGDOMS SPREAD THROUGHOUT THE  ARCHIPELAGO.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 12
  13. 13. DUTCH COLONIALISM  FIRST CAME TO INDONESIA AT THE END OF THE  16TH CENTURY AS TRADERS, AND LATER AS  COLONIZERS. THE COLONIAL RULE WAS ESTABLISHED GRADUALLY,  ISLAND‐BY‐ISLAND, AFTER CONQUERING OR  TRICKING THE VARIOUS KINGDOMS TO  SUBSERVIENCE. BY PLAYING OFF INDIGENOUS KINGDOMS AGAINST  EACH OTHER AND EXPLOITING DIVISIONS AND  SCRAMBLES FOR POWER WITHIN THE ROYAL  HOUSEHOLDS. THE DUTCH RULED THE INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO  FOR AROUND THREE AND A HALF CENTURIES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 13
  14. 14. RISE OF INDONESIA’S NATIONALISM  MAY 20, 1908 THE BIRTH OF AN INTELLECTUAL  ORGANIZATION BUDI UTOMO, COMMEMORATED  AS THE  “NATIONAL AWAKENING DAY.”  OCTOBER 28, 1928 DECLARATION OF THE YOUTH  OATH: ONE COUNTRY, ONE NATION, ONE  LANGUAGE: INDONESIA. IN WORLD WAR II, THE JAPANESE MILITARY DROVE  OUT THE DUTCH AND OCCUPIED INDONESIA AS THE  NEW COLONIAL RULER.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 14
  15. 15. CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE  THE DEFEAT OF THE DUTCH AT THE HANDS OF AN  ASIAN POWER FUELED THE RISE OF INDIGENOUS  RESISTANCES. THE JAPANESE ALLOWED A COMMITTEE TO BE  ESTABLISHED TO “INVESTIGATE THE PREPARATION  OF INDEPENDENCE.” WHAT PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATION THE  INDEPENDENT INDONESIA STATE SHOULD BE BUILT?Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 15
  16. 16.  THE FOUNDING FATHERS OF INDONESIA’S  INDEPENDENCE AGREED ON PANCASILA AS THE  STATE PHILOSOPHY. PANCASILA: 1) BELIEF IN THE ONE AND ONLY  GOD; 2) JUST AND CIVILIZED HUMANITY; 3) THE  UNITY OF INDONESIA; 4) DEMOCRACY; 5) SOCIAL  JUSTICE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 16
  17. 17.  THE JAKARTA CHARTER:  BELIEF IN ONE AND ONLY GOD AND ENSURING  THE FREEDOM OF WORSHIP, WITH AN  ADDITIONAL STIPULATION THAT THE ISLAMIC  SYARIAH (OR LAWS) SHOULD BE PRACTICED BY  ITS ADHERENTS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 17
  18. 18. BIRTH OF A NATION  ALL THE NECESSARY ELEMENTS FOR AN INDEPENDENT  NATION HAD ALREADY EXISTED WHEN THE JAPANESE  SURRENDERED TO THE ALLIED POWERS. AUGUST 17 1945, SUKARNO AND HATTA ON BEHALF  OF THE PEOPLE, PROCLAIMED THE INDEPENDENCE OF  INDONESIA. AUGUST 18, 1945: THE PROMULGATION OF THE 1945  CONSTITUTION, AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF  GOVERNMENT WITH SUKARNO AS PRESIDENT AND  HATTA AS VICE PRESIDENT. INDONESIA UNDER THE 1945 CONSTITUTION: A  NATIONALIST, NON‐SECTARIAN, UNITARIAN REPUBLIC  WITH A PRESIDENTIAL SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 18
  19. 19. WAR OF INDEPENDENCE 1945 ‐ 1949  THE DUTCH REFUSED TO RECOGNIZE THE  INDEPENDENCE OF THEIR FORMER COLONY.  ASSISTED BY THEIR ALLIES PUT AN ATTEMPT TO  REESTABLISH CONTROL.  THE FLEDGLING NATION HAD ALSO TO FACE  DOMESTIC CHALLENGES: MUSLIM EXTREMISTS  AND COMMUNIST REVOLT IN 1948.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 19
  20. 20. RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE IN DECEMBER 1949, THE DUTCH FINALLY RECOGNIZED  THE INDEPENDENCE OF INDONESIA IN THE FORM OF  A FEDERATED REPUBLIC. AUGUST L950 THE FEDERAL STATE WAS ABOLISHED  AND THE UNITARIAN REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA  REESTABLISHED. PROVISIONAL CONSTITUTION OF 1950: A  PARLIAMENTARY SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT HEADED  BY A PRIME MINISTER RESPONSIBLE TO A PARLIAMENT,  WHILE THE PRESIDENT WAS ONLY THE HEAD OF STATE  AND HAD ALMOST NO POLITICAL POWER.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 20
  21. 21. AN ATTEMPT AT LIBERAL DEMOCRACY  IN 1955 A FREE AND FAIR MULTIPARTY ELECTION IN THE FIRST  GENERAL ELECTION, TO ELECT THE PARLIAMENT AND THE  CONSTITUTIONAL ASSEMBLY (KONSTITUANTE). THE WEAK SHORT‐LIVED GOVERNMENTS CREATED A  LEADERSHIP VACUUM AND INDECISIVENESS AT TIME WHEN  STRONG LEADERSHIP WAS NEEDED. IN 1957 THE GOVERNMENT DECLARED A STATE OF EMERGENCY THE KONSTITUANTE FAILED TO REACH THE NECESSARY  MAJORITY TO GET AN AGREEMENT ON A NEW CONSTITUTION. ON JULY 5TH, L959, THE PRESIDENT SUKARNO DISSOLVED THE  PARLIAMENT AND KONSTITUANTE WITH A PRESIDENTIAL  DECREE AND RESTORED THE 1945 CONSTITUTION. SUKARNO DECLARED THAT LIBERAL DEMOCRACY, HAD FAILED  IN INDONESIA AND HAD BROUGHT ONLY DISUNITY AND MISERY  TO THE PEOPLE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 21
  22. 22. THE TURBULENT YEARS CENTRAL AUTHORITY BEING CHALLENGED BY SEPARATIST  MOVEMENTS IN THE REGIONS. THE DARUL ISLAM CONTINUED TO POSE SECURITY  PROBLEMS. CONFLICT WITH THE FORMER COLONIAL MASTER HAD  RESUMED, AS THE DUTCH KEPT THEIR HOLD ON WEST  IRIAN. SINCE MOST WESTERN COUNTRIES SUPPORTED THE  DUTCH POSITION ON THE WEST IRIAN ISSUE, INDONESIA  TURNED TO THE EASTERN BLOC TO PROCURE THE  MILITARY EQUIPMENT. THE RISE OF THE MILITARY ROLE IN POLITICS: THE DUAL  FUNCTIONS OF MILITARY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 22
  23. 23. GUIDED DEMOCRACY  SUKARNO PROCLAIMED “GUIDED DEMOCRACY” AS THE  SUITABLE SYSTEM FOR INDONESIA. THE PROVISIONAL MPR CONFERRED UPON SUKARNO  THE TITLE OF THE GREAT LEADER OF THE REVOLUTION,  WHICH IN EFFECT CARRIED MORE POWER THAN WHAT  THE MERE TITLE MAY SUGGEST. SUKARNO ENDED INDONESIA’S FIRST ATTEMPT AT  DEMOCRACY. INDONESIA NOW JOINED THE GROUP OF  COUNTRIES TO REVERSE FROM DEMOCRACY TO  AUTHORITARIANISM. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 23
  24. 24. THE CONFRONTATION AGAINST THE WEST PRESIDENT SUKARNO WAS OPPOSED TO THE  ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW MALAYSIAN STATE, AND  ACCUSED IT AS NO MORE THAN A WESTERN  NEOCOLONIAL PLOY. TO UNDERTAKE MILITARY CONFRONTATION, INDONESIA  BECAME MORE DEPENDENT ON ECONOMIC AND MILITARY  AID FROM THE SOVIET BLOC. SUKARNO DEVELOPED THE IDEA OF FORMING THE NEW  EMERGING FORCE AS A COUNTERWEIGHT TO WESTERN‐ DOMINATED INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. ISOLATION FROM THE REST OF THE WORLD REACHED ITS  PEAK WHEN SUKARNO ANNOUNCED INDONESIA’S  WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNITED NATIONS IN JANUARY  1965.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 24
  25. 25. SUKARNO: THE ROMANTIC REVOLUTIONARY THE ORDINARY INDONESIAN PEOPLE LOVED  SUKARNO HE WAS A MAN OF VISION, AN ARDENT  NATIONALIST ALBEIT A ROMANTIC IDEALIST.  HE IMBUED AMONG THE PEOPLE THE PRIDE OF  BEING INDONESIAN AND SPENT ALL HIS ADULT LIFE  PROJECTING THE DIGNITY OF A NATION WITH LONG  HISTORY, CULTURE, AND TRADITION. HE WAS REGARDED IN MANY PARTS OF THE WORLD  AS A GREAT LEADER AND A WORLD STATESMANDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 25
  26. 26.  INDONESIA UNDER SUKARNO TOOK A LEADING  ROLE IN ASIAN AFRICAN COUNTRIES SOLIDARITY  AND FIGHT AGAINST COLONIALISM SUKARNO TOGETHER WITH THIRD WORLD LEADERS  INITIATED THE NON‐ALIGNED MOVEMENT, WHICH  UNTIL TODAY STILL EXISTS BUT HIS MISGUIDED ECONOMIC POLICIES BASED ON  THE NOTION OF A “GUIDED ECONOMY” BROUGHT  CHAOS TO THE ECONOMY AND INCREASED  SUFFERING FOR THE COMMON PEOPLEDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 26
  27. 27. THE END OF GUIDED DEMOCRACY AND  THE RISE OF THE NEW ORDER ON SEPTEMBER 30TH 1965, AN ABORTED COUP  D’ETAT WAS ALLEGEDLY STAGED BY THE  COMMUNIST PARTY TWO MILITARY FIGURES ESCAPED FROM THE  ASSASSINATION ATTEMPT, GENERAL NASUTION AND  MAYOR GENERAL SUHARTO PROCEEDED TO MOBILIZE THE LOYAL MILITARY  FORCES, AND NEUTRALIZED THE UNITS THAT WERE  INVOLVED IN THE MUTINY.  THE RIFT OF PRESIDENT SUKARNO AND THE  MILITARY CAME INTO THE OPEN. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 27
  28. 28.  ON MAY 11TH 1966 PRESIDENT SUKARNO, UNDER  PRESSURE FROM THE MILITARY AND THE PUBLIC,  ISSUED A LETTER OF INSTRUCTION TO ACCEDE  AUTHORITY OF DAY‐TO‐DAY GOVERNMENT TO  GENERAL SUHARTO IN THE 1968 THE PROVISIONAL MPR DISMISSED  SUKARNO AS PRESIDENT AND APPOINTED GENERAL  SUHARTO AS HIS SUCCESSOR, HENCE RISE OF THE  NEW ORDERDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 28
  29. 29. INDONESIA UNDER THE NEW ORDER 29
  30. 30. MPR is manifestation of the  people sovereignty has the  People’s Consultative Assembly  authority to: (MPR)  Amend the Constitution.   Elect the President and/or Vice  President.   Impeach the President and/or  Vice‐President. Parliament  Regional  Functional   Determine the State Policy  (DPR) Representatives Group Guidelines. Elected directly  Elected by  Appointed:  by the people Regional  Representative of mass  Assembly organization and Civil  SocietyDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 30
  31. 31. POLITICAL SYSTEM UNDER  THE NEW ORDER THE NEW ORDER REGIME RELIED HEAVILY ON A SET  OF STRUCTURES OF IDEAS BASED ON INDONESIAN  CULTURES, ESPECIALLY JAVANESE CULTURE. THE NEW ORDER CARRIED OVER THE “GUIDED  DEMOCRACY” PRINCIPLES OF THE PRECEDING REGIME,  THROUGH A MORE REFINED AND SUBTLE METHOD. THE COMMUNISTS AND THEIR IDEOLOGY BECAME   “PUBLIC ENEMY NUMBER ONE”; ISLAMIC EXTREMISM  RANKED SECOND THE NEW ORDER TRIED TO DEFINE ITS POLITICAL  IDEOLOGY BETWEEN “WESTERN” INDIVIDUALISM AND  “EASTERN” COLLECTIVISM.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 31
  32. 32.  IN THE “PANCASILA DEMOCRACY” SYSTEM, THE  WESTERN IDEA OF OPPOSITION WAS REJECTED.  THE SUHARTO REGIME WENT TO GREAT LENGTHS  TO ESTABLISH DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTIONS SUCH AS  POLITICAL PARTIES, GENERAL ELECTIONS, AND  ELECTED PARLIAMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 32
  33. 33. TO WHAT EXTENT WAS INDONESIA A DEMOCRACY ?   GOLKAR, THE RULING ‘PARTY’, WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1964  ORIGINALLY AS AN EXTENDED ARM OF THE MILITARY TO  COMBAT THE COMMUNIST PARTY (PKI) THROUGH  POLITICAL MEANS.  THE FIRST ELECTION UNDER THE NEW ORDER WAS HELD IN  1971 PARTICIPATED BY NINE POLITICAL PARTIES AND  GOLKAR.  IN 1973 THE “FUSION” WAS COMPLETED, IN WHICH THE  ISLAMIC PARTIES MERGED INTO PPP, AND THE NATIONALIST  AND CHRISTIAN PARTIES “FUSED” INTO PDI.  IN EVERY GENERAL ELECTION FROM 1977 TO 1997 WAS  CONTESTED BY THESE THREE PARTIES.  GOLKAR UNFAILINGLY WINNING EVERY ELECTION,  GARNERING AT LEAST TWO THIRD OF THE VOTES. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 33
  34. 34. “FUSION” OF POLITICAL PARTY (1973) GOLKAR PPP: PDI: NU PNI Parkindo Parmusi Katolik PSII IPKI Perti MurbaDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 34
  35. 35. DEMOCRATIC OR NON‐DEMOCRATIC? THE WAY THE SYSTEM WORKED DURING THE NEW ORDER  OBVIOUSLY DID NOT MEET THE BASIC PRINCIPLES REQUIRED  IN A DEMOCRACY IN TERMS OF POLITICAL PARTIES,  ELECTIONS AND REPRESENTATION AS ARGUED BY MOST  SCHOLARLY LITERATURE.  THE EXISTENCE OF CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS AND INTEREST  GROUPS WAS HIGHLY REGULATED, AND ONLY THE ONES  THAT WERE ESTABLISHED OR RECOGNIZED BY THE  GOVERNMENT WERE ALLOWED TO EXIST, THESE INCLUDING  THE BUSINESS, LABOR, JOURNALIST, YOUTH, AND WOMEN  ORGANIZATIONS.  THE ABSENCE OF EFFECTIVE OPPOSITION IS ONE OF THE  ESSENTIAL ARGUMENTS REFUTING THE NEW ORDER’S  CLAIM TO DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 35
  36. 36. WHAT KEPT THE REGIME IN POWER SO LONG? IF INDONESIA WAS NOT A TRUE DEMOCRATIC SYSTEM OF  GOVERNMENT, WHAT KEPT THE SYSTEM IN POWER FOR SO  LONG AND WHAT WAS THE SOURCE OF ITS RESILIENCE?   PABOTTINGI (1995: 225) REFLECTING THE VIEW OF MANY  ANALYSTS SUGGESTS THAT “…INCUMBENTS AND  SUPPORTERS OF THE NEW ORDER ARGUE ITS LEGITIMACY  ON TWO KEY GROUNDS: POLITICAL STABILITY AND  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.”   THE ENDLESS POLITICAL STRIFE OF THE PREVIOUS SYSTEM OF  PARLIAMENTARY DEMOCRACY AND GUIDED DEMOCRACY  CREATED ACUTE POLITICAL INSTABILITY THAT RENDERED  DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS IMPOSSIBLE AND EVEN  THREATENED THE SURVIVAL OF THE STATE.  Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 36
  37. 37.  HUNTINGTON ARGUES THAT MANY AUTHORITARIAN REGIMES  INITIALLY JUSTIFY THEMSELVES BY WHAT HE CALLS A  “NEGATIVE LEGITIMACY,” BASING THEIR CLAIM OF LEGITIMACY  ON THE FAILURE OF DEMOCRATIC SYSTEMS AND PROMISING  THAT THE NEW REGIME IS COMBATING INTERNAL SUBVERSION,  REDUCING SOCIAL TURMOIL, REESTABLISHING LAW AND  ORDER, ELIMINATING CORRUPTION AND VENAL CIVILIAN  POLITICIANS, AND ENHANCING NATIONAL VALUES.   THESE WERE THE EXACT RATIONALES THE NEW ORDER PUT  FORWARD WHEN IT EMERGED IN 1966 WITH THE SUPPORT OF  STUDENTS, INTELLECTUALS AND VARIOUS MASS AND  RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS.   AND INDEED THOSE OBSERVATIONS HELP EXPLAIN WHY THE  NEW ORDER GOVERNMENT UNDER SUHARTO HAD BEEN ABLE  TO STAY IN POWER FOR SO LONG: IT DELIVERED!  Day2_GRIPS  www.ginandjar.com 37
  38. 38.  AT ITS INCEPTION THE NEW ORDER CONSIDERED ITSELF TO  BE A REFORMIST GOVERNMENT SUPPORTED BY POPULAR  MOVEMENTS OF STUDENTS AND INTELLECTUALS.  ITS  DRIVE HAD THREE MAIN THRUSTS: A RETURN TO THE 1945  CONSTITUTION; TO CREATE POLITICAL STABILITY; AND TO  AMELIORATE THE PEOPLE’S SUFFERING THROUGH  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.   THE NEW ORDER CREDO OF “THE DEVELOPMENT  TRILOGY,” REFERRED TO POLITICAL STABILITY, ECONOMIC  GROWTH, AND EQUITY.  THIS BECAME THE BATTLE CRY OF  THE NEW ORDER WITH EVERYTHING ELSE SUBORDINATED  TO IT. AND TO A FAIR DEGREE THE NEW ORDER ACHIEVED ITS  GOALS. Day2_GRIPS  www.ginandjar.com 38
  39. 39. DEVELOPMENT TRILOGY Stability Growth EquityDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 39
  40. 40. POLITICAL STABILITY THE POLITICAL SYSTEM HAD PRODUCED THE  INTENDED RESULT: POLITICAL STABILITY THAT HAD  ENDURED FOR THREE DECADES, SUSTAINING  ECONOMIC GROWTH WHICH IN TURN FURTHER  REINFORCED ITS CLAIM TO LEGITIMACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 40
  41. 41. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND EQUITY POLITICAL STABILITY ASSURED, AND WITH  UNIFORMITY OF PURPOSE AND METHOD THE NEW  ORDER EARNESTLY EMBARKED ON ECONOMIC  DEVELOPMENT, WHICH WAS WIDELY CONSIDERED  AS SUCCESSFUL USING VARIOUS STANDARD OF  MEASUREMENTS.  AVERAGE ANNUAL GROWTH IN EXCESS OF 7% LED  TO A MORE THAN 10‐FOLD RISE IN INDONESIANS’  PER CAPITA INCOME AND A DECLINE IN THE  NUMBER OF PEOPLE IN POVERTY FROM AN  ESTIMATED 70% OF THE POPULATION IN THE L960S  TO AROUND 11% BY THE MID‐1990S.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 41
  42. 42.  LIFE EXPECTANCY ROSE AND INFANT MORTALITY  DECLINED DRAMATICALLY.  EIGHT OUT OF TEN OF THE POPULATION HAD  ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE AND TWO OUT OF THREE  TO SAFE DRINKING WATER, SELF‐SUFFICIENCY IN  RICE PRODUCTION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 42
  43. 43. WHAT WENT WRONG? HUNTINGTON (1991: 54‐55) MAKES THE POINT  THAT THE LEGITIMACY OF AN AUTHORITARIAN  REGIME MIGHT BE UNDERMINED EVEN IF IT DOES  DELIVER ON ITS PROMISES.  “BY ACHIEVING ITS PURPOSE, IT LOST ITS PURPOSE.  THIS REDUCED THE REASONS WHY THE PUBLIC  SHOULD SUPPORT THE REGIME, GIVEN OTHER  COSTS (E.G. LACK OF FREEDOM) CONNECTED WITH  THE REGIME”(1991: 55).  HE POSITS THAT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  PROVIDED THE BASIS FOR DEMOCRACY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 43
  44. 44.  HE CITES THE FAMOUS—ALBEIT MUCH CONTESTED‐‐ LIPSET HYPOTHESIS CONCERNING THE RELATIONSHIP  OF WEALTH AND DEMOCRACY: THE WEALTHY  COUNTRIES ARE DEMOCRATIC AND THE MOST  DEMOCRATIC COUNTRIES ARE WEALTHY. HE ARGUES THAT: “IN POOR COUNTRIES  DEMOCRATIZATION IS UNLIKELY; IN RICH COUNTRIES IT  HAS ALREADY OCCURRED.  IN BETWEEN THERE IS A POLITICAL TRANSITION ZONE;  COUNTRIES IN THAT PARTICULAR ECONOMIC STRATUM  ARE MOST LIKELY TO TRANSIT TO DEMOCRACY AND  MOST COUNTRIES THAT TRANSIT TO DEMOCRACY WILL  BE IN THAT STRATUM.” (1991: 60).Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 44
  45. 45.  HE MAINTAINS THAT A SOCIAL SCIENTIST WHO  WISHED TO PREDICT FUTURE DEMOCRATIZATION  “WOULD HAVE DONE REASONABLY WELL IF HE  SIMPLY FINGERED THE NON‐DEMOCRATIC  COUNTRIES IN THE $1,000‐$3,000 (GNP PER CAPITA)  TRANSITION ZONE” (1991: 63). FURTHER STUDIES, IN PARTICULAR AN EXTENSIVE  QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS DONE BY  PRZEWORSKY ET.AL. (2000: 92) HAS LENT SUPPORT  TO HUNTINGTON’S THRESHOLD ARGUMENT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 45
  46. 46.  IN HIS ACCOUNTABILITY SPEECH TO THE MPR ON  MARCH 1, 1998, PRESIDENT SUHARTO (1998: 16)  REPORTED THAT IN1996, THE YEAR BEFORE THE  ECONOMIC CRISIS SWEPT INDONESIA, ITS GNP PER  CAPITA HAD REACHED $1,155.  ACCORDING TO HUNTINGTON’S THEORY, AT THAT  STAGE INDONESIA HAD ENTERED THE TRANSITION  ZONE, WHICH MEANT THAT EVENTUALLY SOONER  OR LATER POLITICAL CHANGE WOULD HAPPEN. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 46
  47. 47.  THREE DECADES OF DEVELOPMENT HAD  SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASED THE LEVEL AND REACH  OF EDUCATION ACROSS THE NATION AND SOCIAL  CLASSES.  WITH EDUCATION CAME ENLIGHTENMENT AND  EMANCIPATION FROM CULTURAL RESTRICTION,  FREEING PEOPLE FROM THE SHACKLES OF OLD  INHIBITIONS AND TRADITIONS.  WITH EDUCATION PEOPLE RECOGNIZED THAT THERE  WERE MORE NEEDS THAN JUST PRIMARY NEEDS OF  FOOD, CLOTHING AND SHELTER. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 47
  48. 48.  INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE BROUGHT ABOUT THE  OPENING UP NOT OF ONLY THE INDONESIAN MARKET TO  FOREIGN GOODS BUT ALSO THE INDONESIAN SOCIETY TO  FOREIGN IDEAS.  WITH GLOBALIZATION CAME NOT ONLY THE INTEGRATION  OF MARKETS BUT ALSO THE INTRODUCTION AND  EVENTUAL INTEGRATION OF IDEAS.  WITH THE IMPROVEMENT OF LIVING STANDARD  RESULTING FROM WIDESPREAD BENEFIT OF ECONOMIC  DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION A STRONG MIDDLE  CLASS HAD BEEN FORMED SOON TO BECOME THE BACK  BONE OF THE FORCES FOR POLITICAL EMANCIPATION AND  REFORM.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 48
  49. 49.  THE SUPPOSED ULTIMATE VICTORY OF DEMOCRACY AGAINST  ALL OTHER SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT (SEE FUKUYAMA,  1992) HAS CHANGED THE PEOPLE’S POLITICAL ATTITUDES,  OR AT LEAST THE ELITE’S PERCEPTION, OF LIBERAL  DEMOCRACY AS AN EVIL SYSTEM.  THOUSANDS OF INDONESIANS WHO STUDIED AT FOREIGN  UNIVERSITIES, MOST OF THEM IN WESTERN COUNTRIES,  LEARNED FIRST HAND THE SOCIO‐CULTURAL VALUES THAT  HAS BEEN THE DRIVING FORCE BEHIND THE SCIENTIFIC AND  TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES THAT RESULTED IN THE  AFFLUENCE OF THE WESTERN SOCIETIES.  THEY RETURNED HOME IMBUED WITH THE SPIRIT OF  FREEDOM, WHICH WAS A POTENT SOURCE OF INSPIRATION  AND MOTIVATION TO CHANGE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 49
  50. 50.  THE BREAKDOWN OF BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION,  THE MAIN FORCE BEHIND GLOBALIZATION AND THE  DRIVE TOWARD A HIGHER DEGREE OF CIVILIZATION,  SWEPT INDONESIA WITH READILY AVAILABLE AND UP TO  DATE INFORMATION.  IT FREED THE INDIVIDUALS FROM THE CONSTRAINTS OF  TIME AND SPACE. CENSORSHIP WAS NO LONGER RELEVANT, BECAUSE ONE  COULD ACCESS INFORMATION THROUGH THE INTERNET,  CNN OR CABLE TV, OR JUST TRAVEL.  THE DIFFUSION OF DEMOCRATIC IDEALS BY THE END OF  THE 20TH CENTURY WAS UNSTOPPABLE. THE INFORMATION BERLIN WALL WAS CRUMBLING  DOWN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 50
  51. 51.  WHEN THE GOVERNMENT CLOSED DOWN THE  POPULAR INDONESIA MAGAZINE, TEMPO, BECAUSE  OF IT CRITICAL TONE, IT SIMPLY RESURFACED AS AN  INTERNET WEBSITE.  PEOPLE CLOSELY FOLLOWED THE FALL OF NON‐ DEMOCRATIC SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT IN THE  FORMER COMMUNIST COUNTRIES, THE PHILIPPINES  AND KOREA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 51
  52. 52.  AT THE HEIGHT OF THE PRAISE FOR THE NEW  ORDER ACHIEVEMENT, MANY INDONESIAN  SCHOLARS AND CRITICS NOTED THE LACK OF  DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE AS ONE OF THE MAJOR  CRITICISM OF THE NEW ORDER. THEY ARGUED THAT THE INDONESIAN ECONOMIC  SUCCESS HAD BENEFITED THE URBAN AND  INDUSTRIAL SECTOR WHILE (RELATIVELY)  MARGINALIZING THE RURAL AND TRADITIONAL  SECTORS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 52
  53. 53.  AN INDONESIAN SOCIAL SCIENTIST, PABOTTINGI,  NOTED THAT NEW ORDER ECONOMIC POLICIES AND  PRACTICES THAT HAD RESULTED IN “INORDINATE  DOMINANCE OF THE NON‐PRIBUMI IN THE  NATIONAL ECONOMY, PARTICULARLY IN THE URBAN  AND MODERN SECTOR”, AND OFFERS A PREDICTION  THAT THE ANTAGONISM BETWEEN THE PRIBUMI  AND THE NON‐PRIBUMI “COULD WELL BE THE  ACHILLES HEEL OF THE NEW ORDER”. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 53
  54. 54.  WHILE ECONOMICALLY THE GOVERNMENT WAS  COMMITTED TO AND INTENTLY PURSUING OPEN  POLICIES, POLITICALLY THE GOVERNMENT KEPT A  TIGHT A GRIP.  THE TIGHTENING CONTROL OVER POLICIES AND  DECISION MAKING PROCESSES IN THE HANDS OF  THE PRESIDENT HAD NOT ONLY STRENGTHENED  THE FORCES OF CHANGE WITHIN SOCIETY BUT ALSO  DISILLUSIONED HIS ORIGINAL AND TRADITIONAL  SUPPORTERS, EVEN THOSE WITHIN THE  GOVERNMENT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 54
  55. 55.  THE EMERGING ROLE OF ISLAM AS A FORCE OF  CHANGE SHOULD ALSO NOT BE UNDERESTIMATED.  UHLIN (1997:82) AGUES THAT MANY INDONESIAN  PRO‐DEMOCRACY ACTIVISTS ARE MORE THAN  NOMINALLY MUSLIM AND THEY OFTEN USE ISLAMIC  DISCOURSES TO MOTIVATE THE STRUGGLE FOR  DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 55
  56. 56.  AMONG THE SOCIAL FORCES THAT WERE POISED  AGAINST THE NEW ORDER, THE MOST CONSISTENT  AND MILITANT WERE THE STUDENTS.  IN THE HISTORY OF THE NATION, EVEN BEFORE  INDEPENDENCE, THE INDONESIAN YOUTH AND  STUDENTS PLAYED PIVOTAL ROLE.  THEY PARTICIPATED IN EVERY IMPORTANT EVENT IN  THE NATION COURSE OF HISTORY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 56
  57. 57.  THERE IS NO MAJOR POLITICAL CHANGE IN  INDONESIA THAT DID NOT INVOLVE THE YOUTH  AND STUDENTS. BY THE 1970S, STUDENT ACTIVISM HAD BEEN  DIRECTED AGAINST THE NEW ORDER GOVERNMENT.  IN 1974 STUDENTS STAGED HUGE  DEMONSTRATIONS, AGAINST CORRUPTION AND  AGAINST JAPANESE FOREIGN INVESTMENT; MANY  OF THE LEADERS OF THE INCIDENT KNOWN AS  MALARI WERE TRIED AND JAILED.  Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 57
  58. 58.  IN 1978 THERE WAS AGAIN A WAVE OF STUDENT  PROTESTS.  STUDENT ACTIVISM CONTINUED INTO THE 1980S  AND 1990S SOME TAKING UP NATIONAL ISSUES LIKE  CORRUPTION, HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY,  OTHERS LOCAL ISSUES, SUCH AS EVICTION OF  PEOPLE FROM AREAS DESIGNATED FOR  DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS, AND ENVIRONMENTAL  AND LABOR ISSUES RELATED TO THEIR AREA. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 58
  59. 59.  ALTHOUGH THE STUDENT MOVEMENTS MOST OF  THE TIME WERE WIDELY SCATTERED, UNFOCUSED  AND UN‐COORDINATED AND WERE ISOLATED FROM  BROAD POPULAR SUPPORT, THEY WERE  SUCCESSFUL IN GALVANIZING THE SILENT MAJORITY  TO BE CONCERNED ABOUT CURRENT POLITICAL  ISSUES CONFRONTING THE NATION.  UHLIN NOTES THAT THE STUDENT ACTIVISM OF THE  LATE 1980S AND EARLY 1990S HAS CONTRIBUTED  TO A RADICALIZATION OF THE DEMOCRATIC  OPPOSITION IN INDONESIA. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 59
  60. 60.  WITH ALL THE CHANGING SOCIAL STRUCTURES AND  NORMS, AND THE FORCES ARRAYED AGAINST THE NEW  ORDER, FROM OUTSIDE AND WITHIN ITS OWN RANK, IT  WAS ONLY A MATTER OF TIME BEFORE HUNTINGTON’S  PREDICTION WOULD BE REALIZED.  IT WOULD, HOWEVER, STILL NEED A CATALYST TO  QUICKEN THE PACE OF CHANGE.  THE ECONOMIC CRISIS WAS THE TRIGGER THAT WOULD  SET THE CHAIN OF EVENTS THAT EVENTUALLY LEAD TO  THE POLITICAL CHANGE.  EMPIRICAL OBSERVATIONS LED HUNTINGTON (1991: 59)  TO BELIEVE THAT CRISES PRODUCED BY EITHER RAPID  GROWTH OR ECONOMIC RECESSION WEAKENED  AUTHORITARIANISM. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 60
  61. 61.  EVENTS LEADING TO THE FALL OF THE NEW ORDER HAD  SHOWN THE SYMPTOMS OBSERVED BY HAGGARD AND  KAUFMAN (1999: 76) THAT ECONOMIC CRISES  UNDERMINE THE ‘AUTHORITARIAN BARGAINS’ FORGED  BETWEEN RULERS AND KEY SOCIOPOLITICAL  CONSTITUENTS.  THE FAILURE OF PRESIDENT SUHARTO TO SALVAGE HIS  GOVERNMENT AND TO WITHDRAW VOLUNTARILY  FOLLOWED THEIR GENERAL OBSERVATION THAT “THE  RESULTING ISOLATION (OF AN ECONOMIC CRISIS) TENDS  TO FRAGMENT THE RULING ELITE FURTHER AND  REDUCE ITS CAPACITY TO NEGOTIATE FAVORABLE  TERMS OF EXIT” (IBID.). Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 61
  62. 62.  HOWEVER, IT WAS NOT THE FIRST TIME THAT THE NEW  ORDER WAS FACED WITH SERIOUS CRISES.  ALTHOUGH ARGUABLY THE 1997/98 CRISIS WAS THE  SEVEREST AND THE MOST DEVASTATING IN TERMS OF  ITS IMPACT ON THE GENERAL POPULACE‐‐ THE  NEGATIVE GROWTH OF ALMOST –15% RESULTING IN  THE REDUCTION OF REAL INCOME AND INCREASE IN  POVERTY AND UNEMPLOYMENT‐‐ STILL OTHER NON‐ DEMOCRATIC (BY WESTERN LIBERAL DEMOCRACY  STANDARDS) REGIMES IN THE SAME GEOGRAPHICAL  REGION SUCH AS MALAYSIA AND SINGAPORE COULD  WEATHER THE CRISIS AND THEIR REGIMES SURVIVED  AND OUTLASTED THE CRISIS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 62
  63. 63.  MANY OF THE OPPOSING FORCES IDENTIFIED ABOVE  WERE LONG PRESENT, LATENT IN THE  UNDERCURRENT OF INDONESIAN POLITICS FOR  YEARS.  BY THEMSELVES HOWEVER, THEY DID NOT PRESENT A  SUFFICIENT CHALLENGE CAPABLE OF ENDING  SUHARTO’S RULE. THE NEW ORDER’S CENTRALIZED POWER STRUCTURE  AND CAREFUL CONTROL OF POLITICAL COMPETITION  WOULD HAVE ENSURED THE SECURITY OF THE  PRESIDENT POSITION.  THE SOCIAL CONTRACT, IN THIS VIEW, HAS CERTAIN  INERTIA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 63
  64. 64.  BUT THE NEW ORDER DID FALL.  MANY STUDIES HAVE BEEN UNDERTAKEN  THEREAFTER, ATTEMPTING TO FIND THE ANSWER  TO THE QUESTION OF WHY PRESIDENT SUHARTO  FAILED TO OVERCOME THIS PARTICULAR CRISIS.  MANY OBSERVERS AGREE THAT FOR PRESIDENT  SUHARTO, WHO RESTED HIS CLAIM TO RULE ON HIS  ABILITY TO DELIVER ECONOMIC GROWTH, THE  ECONOMIC CRISIS DEEPLY UNDERMINED HIS  LEGITIMACY AND LEFT HIM AFTER SO MANY YEARS  IN POWER, AT LAST, VULNERABLE TO CREDIBLE  CHALLENGE FOR POWER. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 64
  65. 65.  DURING THE 1997/98 CRISIS PRESIDENT SUHARTO  WAS DELIBERATING BETWEEN POLICY ACTIONS,  AND HIS INDECISIVENESS HAD CAUSED THE CRISIS  TO DEEPEN AND EVENTUALLY LED TO HIS FALL.   IT WAS IN CONTRAST WITH THE DECISIVENESS  SHOWN BY MALAYSIA’S MAHATHIR AND THE  LEADERS OF SINGAPORE IN DEALING WITH THE  FINANCIAL CRISIS IN THEIR RESPECTIVE COUNTRIES.  BRESNAN (1999) FOR ONE REMARKS THAT THE  PRESIDENT, “WHO HAD MADE MANY HARD  DECISIONS OVER THE PREVIOUS THREE DECADES,  WAS UNABLE TO DO SO IN 1998.”Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 65
  66. 66.  OBVIOUSLY THERE WAS AN INTERNATIONAL  DIMENSION TO THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC  CRISIS OCCURRING IN INDONESIA IN 1998.  THE US AND IMF HAD OFTEN BEEN BLAME FOR THE  PROLONGED CRISIS THAT EVENTUALLY LED TO THE  FALL OF PRESIDENT SUHARTO.  MANY OBSERVERS HAVE ARGUED THAT THE WEST  HAD DONE THEIR BEST IN ASSISTING THE  INDONESIAN GOVERNMENT IN FIGHTING THE  CRISIS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 66
  67. 67.  SOME ANALYSTS, HOWEVER WOULD NOT DISCOUNT  THE ROLE THE US PLAY IN THE DOWNFALL OF  SUHARTO.  ALTHOUGH FOR MANY YEARS INDONESIA ‐‐AS A  STAUNCH ANTI COMMUNIST NATION‐‐ HAD ALWAYS  BEEN ABLE TO COUNT ON THE SUPPORT OF THE  WEST, BY THE MID 90’S INDONESIA’S RELATIONS WITH  THE WEST HAD SOMEWHAT SOURED.  AFTER THE COLD WAR ENDED, WITHOUT A  COMMUNIST THREAT WESTERN DONOR COUNTRIES  WERE INCREASINGLY LESS CONCERNED ABOUT  BAILING OUT IN INEFFICIENT FOREIGN ECONOMIES  ESPECIALLY THAT ARE FACING SOCIAL AND POLITICAL  PROBLEMS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 67
  68. 68.  MOUNTING CRITICISM ON THE WAY INDONESIA  HANDLED THE EAST TIMOR QUESTION AND THE  ALLEGATIONS OF HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES HAD  PRECIPITATED STRINGENT CALLS IN THE US CONGRESS  TO LINK AID AND ASSISTANCE TO HUMAN RIGHTS  RECORDS.  BEFORE THE CRISIS THERE WERE ALREADY FORCES, IN  FAVOR OF POLITICAL CHANGE, ARRAYED AGAINST THE  NEW ORDER REGIME. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 68
  69. 69.  HOWEVER IN THE ABSENCE OF THE NECESSARY  CATALYST THOSE ELEMENTS WERE INERT, AND EVEN IF  CHANGE SHOULD HAPPEN IT COULD TAKE A LONG  WHILE, SUCH AS WHEN SUHARTO PASS AWAY OR  SUHARTO BECAME PHYSICALLY INCAPABLE TO LEAD.  THE FINANCIAL CRISIS PROVIDED THE CATALYST THAT  SET OFF A PROCESS OF CHANGE.   THE HALVING OF PER CAPITA INCOME TRANSLATED  INTO SOCIAL MISERY: UNEMPLOYMENT, HUNGER,  RIOTS, AND DEATH. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 69
  70. 70. A RENEWED MANDATE:  WASTED OPPORTUNITY FOR CHANGE REFLECTED IN THE GENERAL ELECTION OF 1997, SUHARTO  STILL HELD A STRONG GRIP ON THE POLITICAL SYSTEM HE WAS READY TO STEP DOWN AND SPENT THE REST OF  HIS LIFE IN RELIGIOUS PURSUIT IF THE PEOPLE REALLY DID  NOT WANT HIM ANYMORE MARCH 11TH, 1998 SUHARTO WAS INDEED RE‐ELECTED  FOR ANOTHER FIVE‐YEAR TERM BY THE MPR PAST PERFORMANCES OF DEVELOPMENT WAS NO  LONGER SEEN AS A PANACEA, WHILE A GROWING  NUMBER, INCLUDING MANY WHO WERE IN THE  GOVERNMENT, WERE ALREADY LOOKING FOR AN  ALTERNATIVE TO THE EXISTING SYSTEM Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 70
  71. 71.  THE TIME HAD COME FOR POLITICAL REFORMS, BUT  CHANGING THE LEADERSHIP AT THE TIME OF CRISIS  WAS NOT REGARDED AS A GOOD IDEA SUHARTO’S CHOICE OF HABIBIE AS HIS VICE  PRESIDENT, APPOINTMENT OF HIS DAUGHTER AND  SOME CRONIES TO THE CABINET WAS MET WITH  WIDE SPREAD CRITICISM AND ACCUSATION OF  NEPOTISM AN OPPORTUNITY FOR A RENEWED START TO  REBUILD THE CONFIDENCE OF THE PEOPLE AND  ENGAGED IN CONCERTED EFFORTS TO REGAIN  CONTROL OF THE ECONOMY WAS WASTED Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 71
  72. 72. THE FLASH POINT WHILE THE ECONOMY SHOWED SAME IMPROVEMENT, IN  THE POLITICAL FRONT, THE SITUATION DETERIORATED. SUHARTO HAD NO INTENTION TO UNDERTAKE REFORMS  AS THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC SITUATION DEMANDED. HOWEVER, THE ELITES AND LEADERS OF THE VARIOUS  REFORM MOVEMENTS WERE STILL WARY OF SUHARTO’S  POWER.  THE HIKE IN FUEL PRICES CHANGED EVERYTHING. THE CULMINATION OF POLITICAL CONFRONTATION WAS  REACHED WHEN IN EARLY MAY 1998 UNDER STRONG  PRESSURE FROM THE IMF, THE GOVERNMENT  ANNOUNCED A RISE IN FUEL PRICES, WITH THE  ACCOMPANYING CONSEQUENCES OF A RISE IN PUBLIC  TRANSPORTATION FARES.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 72
  73. 73.  DURING THE CONFRONTATION BETWEEN THE SECURITY  APPARATUS AND THE STUDENT ON MAY 12, FOUR  STUDENTS WERE SHOT TO DEAD (TRISAKTI INCIDENT). THE FLASH POINT WAS REACHED ON MAY 14TH 1998, IN  WHAT WAS THEN KNOWN AS THE MAY RIOTS.  THE MAY 1998 RIOT HAD A PARTICULAR SIGNIFICANCE  ASIDE FROM THE INTENSITY OF THE VIOLENCE. THE RIOTS HAD DEVASTATING EFFECTS ON THE  SUHARTO GOVERNMENT. IT SET THE STAGE FOR THE ENDGAME OF THE POLITICAL  DRAMA. Day2_GRIPS 2012 V www.ginandjar.com 73
  74. 74. THE FINAL CURTAIN  MAY 17TH 1998 THE STUDENTS HAD PRACTICALLY  OCCUPIED THE PARLIAMENT BUILDING TO PRESSURE  PARLIAMENT TO ACT. THE CALL FOR REFORM AND FOR THE RESIGNATION OF  THE PRESIDENT GREW LOUDER AND WAS JOINED BY A  WIDER CIRCLE. THE SUPPORT FROM THE MILITARY, WHICH UP TO NOW  HAD BEEN THE FOUNDATION OF PRESIDENT SUHARTO’S  POLITICAL POWER, HAD ALSO BEGUN TO CRACK. MAY 18TH1998 THE LEADERSHIP OF THE PARLIAMENT  ANNOUNCED THEIR COLLECTIVE OPINION THAT  SUHARTO HAD TO RESIGN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 74
  75. 75.  ON MAY 19TH AFTER MEETING WITH THE MODERATE  MUSLIM LEADERS PRESIDENT SUHARTO TOLD A PRESS  CONFERENCE ABOUT CALLING AN EARLIER GENERAL  ELECTION THAT WOULD FACILITATE HIS EARLIER  RESIGNATION, OF REPEALING THE POLITICAL LAWS THAT  HAD BEEN THE TARGET OF MANY OF THE REFORMERS’  DEMANDS AND THE CREATION OF A REFORM  COMMITTEE.   HE ALSO STATED HIS INTENTION TO RESHUFFLE THE  CABINET AND FORM A REFORM CABINET.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 75
  76. 76.  SOME MINISTERS REALIZED THAT THE STATUS QUO  COULD NOT BE MAINTAINED ANY LONGER.  MAY 20TH 1998 THE ECONOMIC MINISTRIES MET:  TO REVIEW THE ECONOMIC SITUATION AND THE  POLITICAL COMPLICATIONS, AND DECIDED THAT  THE PRESIDENT SHOULD BE MADE AWARE OF THE  GRAVE SITUATION  IF A POLITICAL SOLUTION COULD NOT BE REACHED  WITHIN A WEEK THE ECONOMY WOULD COLLAPSE  FORMING A NEW CABINET WOULD NOT SOLVE THE  PROBLEM  THEY WOULD UNANIMOUSLY DECLINE TO JOIN IN THE  NEW (REFORM) CABINET.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 76
  77. 77.  SUHARTO ALSO FAILED TO GET THE SUPPORT FROM  PARLIAMENT LEADERS ON ESTABLISHING THE REFORM  COMMITTEE.  LOSING THE SUPPORT OF THE MILITARY, THE CABINET,  THE PARLIAMENT, AND THE FAILURE TO ESTABLISH THE  REFORM COMMITTEE, ON MAY 21ST 1998 PRESIDENT  SUHARTO RESIGNED HIS PRESIDENCY.  VICE PRESIDENT BJ HABIBIE ASSUMED THE PRESIDENCY.  THUS ENDED THE ERA OF THE NEW ORDER.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 77
  78. 78. CONCLUSION WHILE THE ECONOMIC CRISIS UNDOUBTEDLY WAS THE  IMMEDIATE CAUSE OF THE POLITICAL UNREST THAT  ENDED SUHARTO’S LONG REIGN, THE FAILURE OF THE  NEW ORDER GOVERNMENT TO DEAL WITH THE  POLITICAL WEAKNESSES OF THE SOCIETY CONTRIBUTED  TO ITS DEMISE.   SUHARTO, WHO HAD SHOWN CONSIDERABLE  FLEXIBILITY IN AGREEING TO NUMEROUS ECONOMIC  REFORMS, ALTHOUGH ADMITTEDLY NOT ALL WERE  FULLY IMPLEMENTED, SHOWED LITTLE INCLINATION TO  FOLLOW THROUGH ON A PARALLEL REBUILDING OF THE  POLITICAL SYSTEM. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 78
  79. 79.  WHETHER SUHARTO COULD HAVE WEATHERED THE  ECONOMIC CRISIS IF THE NEW ORDER REGIME HAD  EVOLVED INTO A MORE REPRESENTATIVE AND OPEN  POLITICAL SYSTEM WILL NEVER BE KNOWN.   BUT THERE IS LITTLE DOUBT THAT THE FAILURE TO  CREATE CHANNELS FOR POLITICAL DISSENT LAID  THE GROUNDWORK FOR THE DESIRE TO SEE THE  NEW ORDER REGIME END, EVEN IF THAT ENTAILED  A RISK OF OPEN CONFLICT BETWEEN CIVIL SOCIETY  AND THE ARMED FORCES. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 79
  80. 80.  THE CRACKS IN THE RANKS OF THE NEW ORDER  HAD COME TO THE SURFACE, AS THE NEW ORDER  SUPPORTERS WITHIN AND OUTSIDE THE  GOVERNMENT, INCLUDING THOSE IN THE MILITARY  HAD GROWN ALIENATED BY THE WAY HE HANDLED  THE CRISIS, AND BY HIS INABILITY TO RECOGNIZE  THE WEAKNESSES IN THE GOVERNMENT’S POLICIES  AND INSTITUTIONS AND THE URGENT NEED TO  EMBARK ON REFORMS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 80
  81. 81.  IT IS EVIDENT THAT THE INABILITY OF PRESIDENT  SUHARTO TO BRING INDONESIA OUT OF THE CRISIS,  COMBINED WITH THE GROWING DOMESTIC AND  INTERNATIONAL AWARENESS THAT HIS RESPONSE  TO THE CRISIS—ECONOMIC AS WELL POLITICAL‐‐ WAS DIGGING THE COUNTRY INTO A DEEPER ABYSS,  DESTROYED THE HOBBESIAN COMPACT THAT HAD  KEPT THE COUNTRY UNITED AND POLITICALLY  STABLE ON THE PATH OF DEVELOPMENT. THE CONCLUSION: CRISIS FORCED A REWRITING OF  THE SOCIAL CONTRACT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 81
  82. 82. ON THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY 82
  83. 83. HABIBIE GOVERNMENT
  84. 84.  THE OBJECTIVES:   AS THE COUNTRY WAS DEEP IN CRISIS, A CONTINUATION  OF POLICIES, ESPECIALLY IN THE ECONOMY, SHOULD BE  MAINTAINED;   IT HAD TO BE RID OF THE CHARACTERS WHOM PEOPLE  SAW AS THE PERSONIFICATION OF NEPOTISM;   IT SHOULD REFLECT THE SPIRIT OF REFORM, AND   BE BROADLY REPRESENTATIVE OF INDONESIA’S VARIOUS  SHADES OF INTERESTS AND POLITICAL ASPIRATIONS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 84
  85. 85.  THE AGENDA:  FOREMOST IN THE POLITICAL AGENDA WAS THE  REPEAL OF THE MUCH‐REVILED POLITICAL LAWS THAT  WERE THE FOUNDATION OF THE NEW ORDER  POLITICAL SYSTEM—THE LAWS ON POLITICAL PARTIES,  ELECTIONS, AND THE REPRESENTATIVE ASSEMBLIES.   ON THE ECONOMY, THE PRIORITY WAS TO ALLEVIATE  THE IMPACT OF THE CRISIS ON THE POPULACE,  ESPECIALLY THOSE WHO WERE ECONOMICALLY WEAK,  AND TO GET THE ECONOMY ON ITS FEET AND MOVING  AGAIN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 85
  86. 86. INAUSPICIOUS BEGINNING HABIBIE STARTED HIS PRESIDENCY AMIDST  WIDESPREAD MISGIVINGS.  THE COUNTRY WAS IN DEEP POLITICAL TURMOIL.  HIS CLAIM TO PRESIDENCY WAS QUESTIONED.  THE RESIGNATION OF SUHARTO HAD NOT HALTED  THE DEMONSTRATIONS AND PROTESTS.  MANY OPPONENTS OF THE NEW ORDER SHIFTED  THEIR ATTACKS TO TARGET HABIBIE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 86
  87. 87.  HIS BIOGRAPHER, BILVEER SINGH (2000),  ACKNOWLEDGES THAT HABIBIE BROUGHT WITH HIM  MANY NEGATIVE IMAGES OF A NEGATIVE RECORD,  “INCLUDING HIS PENCHANT FOR ’WASTEFUL MEGA‐ PROJECTS’, HIS POOR OR LACK OF UNDERSTANDING  ABOUT THE WORKINGS OF THE ECONOMY, HIS LACK  OF ACCEPTANCE BY ABRI (THE INDONESIAN MILITARY),  OF BEING A FRONT OR TOOL FOR ISLAMIC  FUNDAMENTALISM, AND PROBABLY WORST OF ALL,  OF BEING NOTHING MORE THAN A PAWN AND  PUPPET OF SUHARTO.”Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 87
  88. 88. THE LEGITIMACY DILEMMA HABIBIE’S PRESIDENCY FROM THE BEGINNING WAS  PLAGUED BY DOUBTERS OF ITS LEGITIMACY. ONE ARGUMENT AGAINST HABIBIE’S LEGITIMACY  WAS BASED ON A TECHNICALITY: THE WAY BY WHICH  THE TRANSFER OF THE PRESIDENCY WAS PERFORMED. OTHER MORE SERIOUS ARGUMENTS AGAINST  HABIBIE TAKING OVER THE PRESIDENCY WERE BASED  ON LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL GROUNDS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 88
  89. 89.  IN LINE WITH THE MESSAGE OF THE CONSTITUTION  THE PRESIDENT RECEIVED HIS MANDATE FROM THE  MPR, AND THEREFORE IF HE RESIGNED, HE HAD TO  RETURN THE MANDATE TO THE SAME INSTITUTION— THE MPR, WHICH WOULD THEN WITHDRAW THE  MANDATE AND GAVE IT TO A NEW PRESIDENT.  OTHERS ARGUED THAT SUHARTO AND HABIBIE WAS A  “PACKAGE” ELECTED BY THE MPR—AND HABIBIE WAS  SUHARTO’S CHOICE FOR VICE PRESIDENT— WHEN  SUHARTO RESIGNED, HABIBIE SHOULD ALSO GO, AND  THE MPR SHOULD APPOINT A NEW PRESIDENT (AND  VICE PRESIDENT).Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 89
  90. 90.  ON THE OTHER HAND HABIBIES’ SUPORTERS ARGUED  THAT THE CONSTITUTION STIPULATED THAT SHOULD  THE PRESIDENT DIE OR RESIGN, BE REMOVED OR  DISABLED FROM EXECUTING THE DUTY OF THE  PRESIDENCY, THE VICE PRESIDENT SHOULD REPLACE  HIM UNTIL THE EXPIRY OF HIS TERM.  THAT SHOULD MEAN THAT HABIBIE HAD THE  CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT TO HOLD THE PRESIDENCY  UNTIL 2003.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 90
  91. 91.  WITHIN THE GOVERNMENT, AMONG THE CABINET  MINISTERS, THERE WERE ALSO SOME DOUBTS AS TO  WHETHER THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD CONTINUE  UNTIL THE FORMER PRESIDENT’S TERM ENDED.  THEY WERE OF THE OPINION THAT THE PRESENT  GOVERNMENT WAS ONLY “TRANSITIONAL” AND A  FRESH GENERAL ELECTION SHOULD BE UNDERTAKEN  TO ESTABLISH A NEW MANDATE FROM THE PEOPLE.  IT WAS BASED NOT ON THE QUESTION OF  CONSTITUTIONAL LEGITIMACY BECAUSE THE  MESSAGE OF THE CONSTITUTION WAS VERY CLEAR,  BUT MORE ON POLITICAL AND MORAL GROUNDS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 91
  92. 92.  TO MANY OF HIS CRITICS IT WAS DIFFICULT TO  SEPARATE THE FIGURE OF HABIBIE AND SUHARTO, AND  THE ASCENSION OF HABIBIE TO PRESIDENCY COULD  ONLY HAPPEN BECAUSE OF THAT PARTICULAR  RELATIONSHIP.  FOR HABIBIE TO BE ABLE TO CLAIM POLITICAL AND  MORAL LEGITIMACY, HE HAD TO GET THE MANDATE  FOR HIMSELF.  MANY SAW THE EXISTING MPR AS LACKING THE  LEGITIMACY TO DECIDE ON WHO SHOULD BE THE NEXT  PRESIDENT, AS IT WAS THE SAME MPR THAT ELECTED  SUHARTO UNANIMOUSLY LESS THEN THREE MONTHS  BEFORE.  THEREFORE, THEY ARGUED, A NEW ELECTION SHOULD  BE HELD AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 92
  93. 93.  AFTER AN INTENSIVE BEHIND‐THE‐SCREEN POLITICAL  CONSULTATION, A CONSENSUS WITHIN THE  GOVERNMENT EMERGED THAT AN EARLY GENERAL  ELECTION SHOULD BE CALLED.  THE DECISION TO CALL FOR AN EARLY ELECTION  HOWEVER HAD TO OVERCOME A LEGAL HURDLE.  THE MPR HAD DECREED IN THE MARCH 1998  GENERAL SESSION THAT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE  FIVE‐YEAR PRESIDENTIAL TERM, A GENERAL ELECTION  SHOULD BE HELD IN 2002 TO ELECT A NEW  PRESIDENT IN 2003. AND ONLY THE MPR COULD REVOKE AND AMEND AN  MPR DECREE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 93
  94. 94. MPR SESSION ACCORDING TO THE CONSTITUTION, THE MPR MEETS  IN:  GENERAL SESSION  SPECIAL SESSION  DURING THE NEW ORDER, MPR MET ONLY ONCE IN  FIVE YEAR IN GENERAL SESSION TO ELECT THE  PRESIDENT. WITH REFORM, MPR MEETS EVERY YEAR IN ANNUAL  SESSION TO RECEIVE REPORTS FROM THE EXECUTIVE,  THE PARLIAMENT, THE SUPREME COURT, THE  SUPREME AUDIT BOARD, AND THE SUPREME  ADVISORY BOARD.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 94
  95. 95. MPR SPECIAL SESSION THE MPR CONVENED A SPECIAL SESSION ON  NOVEMBER 10‐13, 1998 THE MPR ISSUED DECREES ON: 1. THE RESCHEDULING OF THE ELECTIONS 2. TO REVOKE THE 1983 MPR DECREE, REQUIRING A  NATIONAL REFERENDUM TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION. 3. WITHDRAWING THE EXTRAORDINARY POWERS GIVEN TO  THE PRESIDENT, 4. ON HUMAN RIGHTS, ON CORRUPTION, COLLUSION AND  NEPOTISM —IN WHICH THE FORMER PRESIDENT WAS  SINGLED OUT— 5. REVOKING THE GUIDANCE FOR THE PROPAGATION AND  IMPLEMENTATION OF PANCASILA OR P4.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 95
  96. 96. 6. LIMITING THE PRESIDENTIAL TERMS OF OFFICE—IN THE  UNAMENDED CONSTITUTION THERE WAS NO  LIMITATION—TO A MAXIMUM OF TWO TERMS. ON THE  ECONOMY, THE MPR ISSUED A NEW GUIDELINE ON  ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY. 7. AN IMPORTANT DECREE THAT WOULD HAVE SIGNIFICANT  AND LONG‐TERM EFFECT ON THE COUNTRY’S  GOVERNANCE WAS A GUIDELINE ON REGIONAL  AUTONOMY AND DECENTRALIZATION, INCLUDING FISCAL  DECENTRALIZATION.  8. ON THE ROLE OF THE MILITARY, TO HAVE GRADUAL  WITHDRAWAL OF THE MILITARY FROM POLITICS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 96
  97. 97.  THE MPR DECISIONS SERVE AS CONSTITUTIONAL  BASIS THAT WOULD CONSTITUTE THE FOUNDATION  FOR DEMOCRATIZATION, IMPROVEMENT OF  GOVERNANCE, AND PROTECTION OF HUMAN  RIGHTS, INITIATED OR ENACTED BY THE HABIBIE  GOVERNMENT.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 97
  98. 98. OPPOSITION AGAINST HABIBIE THE SPECIAL SESSION OF THE MPR MET AMIDST A  TENSE POLITICAL ATMOSPHERE, AS STUDENTS,  ENCOURAGED BY DIE‐HARD OPPONENTS OF HABIBIE  AMONG THE POLITICAL ELITE, WERE DEMANDING THAT  HABIBIE SHOULD BE BROUGHT DOWN. IN THE DAYS LEADING TO THE SPECIAL SESSION THE  CAPITAL WAS TRANSFORMED INTO A MILITARY  COMPLEX, WITH SECURITY APPARATUS MANNING  STRATEGIC SECTIONS OF THE CITY.  TO SUPPORT THE MILITARY EFFORTS THE COMMANDER  OF THE ARMED FORCE, WIRANTO DECIDED TO RECRUIT  CIVILIANS AS VOLUNTEERS (PAMSWAKARSA). Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 98
  99. 99.  UNAVOIDABLY THESE GROUPS OF VIGILANTES WOULD  CLASH WITH STUDENTS IN VARIOUS PARTS OF THE  CITY, MAKING THE SITUATION EVEN TENSER. ON THE FINAL DAY OF THE MPR SESSION THINGS  CAME TO A HEAD.  THE CARNAGE OCCURRED IN THE SEMANGGI AREA, IN  FRONT OF ATMAJAYA UNIVERSITY, A PRIVATE  CATHOLIC INSTITUTION, WHICH HAD BEEN A HOTBED  OF ANTI‐HABIBIE STUDENTS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 99
  100. 100.  IN THE CONFRONTATIONS THAT TOOK PLACE IN THE  AFTERNOON OF NOVEMBER 13, SHOTS WERE FIRED  AND AT THE END OF THE DAY 13 HAD DIED, AMONG  THEM WERE FOUR STUDENTS AND ONE MILITARY  PERSONNEL.  HUNDREDS WERE INJURED, MANY NEEDING  HOSPITALIZATION. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 100
  101. 101.  THE INCIDENT, WHICH CAME TO BE KNOWN AS THE  SEMANGGI TRAGEDY, LEFT ANOTHER SCAR ON THE  NATIONAL PSYCHE ALONGSIDE THE TRISAKTI TRAGEDY.  ELSEWHERE A NUMBER OF MEMBERS OF  PAMSWAKRSA WERE LYNCHED BY ANGRY MOBS,  MANY IN A GRUESOME MANNER. AFTER THE MPR SESSION ENDED THE OPPOSITION  AGAINST HABIBIE HAD REDIRECTED ITS FOCUS TO THE  ELECTION THE FOLLOWING YEAR.  THE UNSEATING OF HABIBIE HAD BECOME THE  AGENDA OF MANY POLITICIANS FROM VARIOUS  POLITICAL SPECTRA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 101
  102. 102. HABIBIE’S POLITICAL PILLARS HABIBIE RELIED ON THE SUPPORT OF THREE  POLITICAL FORCES: THE MILITARY, GOLKAR, AND  POLITICAL ISLAM. THE MILITARY UNDER GEN. WIRANTO (A FORMER ADC  TO PRESIDENT SUHARTO) WAS SUPPORTIVE OF  HABIBIE.  BOTH OF THEM, BEING VERY CLOSE TO THE FORMER  PRESIDENT, NEEDED AND SUPPORTED EACH OTHER IN  THE ENSUING POLITICAL GAME.  AT THE ONSET OF HIS PRESIDENCY HABIBIE HAD  VETOED THE OPPOSITION FROM HIS ADVISERS AND  SENIOR MILITARY FIGURES TO HAVING WIRANTO  CONTINUED IN THE TOP MILITARY POSITION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 102
  103. 103.  POLITICAL ISLAM WAS BASICALLY SYMPATHETIC TO  HABIBIE, REGARDED AS A PERSON WHO HAD BEEN  ABLE TO TURN THE TIDE OF LONG‐TIME PREJUDICE  AGAINST ISLAM IN INDONESIAN POLITICS.  HIS POSITION AS THE CHAIRMAN OF ICMI HAD  HELPED IMPROVE THE STATURE OF MANY  PROFESSIONALS AND POLITICIANS WITH ISLAMIC  CREDENTIALS.  AS ICMI GATHERED MUSLIM INTELLECTUALS FROM  VARIOUS BACKGROUNDS, HABIBIE’S SUPPORT  AMONG POLITICAL ISLAM HAD BECOME MORE  WIDESPREAD. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 103
  104. 104.  THE OPPOSITION TO HABIBIE MOUNTED BY STUDENTS  BASED IN THE CAMPUS OF A CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY  ALSO HAD DRIVEN MANY MUSLIM STUDENTS TO  SUPPORT HABIBIE, OR AT LEAST CHOOSE NOT  PARTICIPATE IN THE MOVEMENT DIRECTED AGAINST  HABIBIE.  UNLIKE THE UNITED FRONT AGAINST SUHARTO  SHOWN BY THE STUDENTS IN MAY 1998, THE  STUDENTS WERE NO LONGER AS UNITED WITH  REGARD TO HABIBIE.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 104
  105. 105. COMMUNAL STRIFE IN THE MEANTIME, THE SECURITY APPARATUS HAD  TO DEAL WITH COMMUNAL STRIFE IN SEVERAL  REGIONS OF THE COUNTRY: IN EAST JAVA  (BANYUWANGI), MALUKU (AMBON), SOUTH  SULAWESI, AND WEST KALIMANTAN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 105
  106. 106. ACEH ANOTHER TROUBLE SPOT FLARED UP IN ACEH, THE  WESTERNMOST PROVINCE OF INDONESIA.  ACEH HAD BEEN LONG SIMMERING IN CONFLICTS  BETWEEN SEPARATIST ELEMENTS OF THE  POPULATION AND THE GOVERNMENT FORCES.  DURING THE NEW ORDER THE SEPARATIST  MOVEMENT WAS HARSHLY DEALT WITH THROUGH  MILITARY ACTION. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 106
  107. 107.  AT THE END OF THE NEW ORDER, THE SITUATION HAD  BEEN PUT UNDER CONTROL AND THE REBEL  MOVEMENT HAD BECOME MORE OR LESS DORMANT,  ALTHOUGH THERE WERE STILL REMNANTS OF REBELS  UNDER THE NAME OF FREE ACEH MOVEMENT  (GERAKAN ACEH MERDEKA OR GAM).  IN EARLY 1999, HOWEVER, THE SITUATION BEGAN TO  HEAT UP AGAIN. THE IMMEDIATE CAUSE OF THE UPSURGE OF  HOSTILITIES WAS A SERIES OF KIDNAPPINGS AND  KILLINGS OF SOLDIERS, SOME OF WHOM WERE ON  LEAVE. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 107
  108. 108.  THE MILITARY MOUNTED AN OPERATION TO  RESPOND TO THE ATTACKS AND THE SITUATION  FURTHER ESCALATED.   IN THE PROCESS MANY CIVILIANS BECAME  VICTIMS OF THE ENSUING VIOLENCE, PROVOKING  OUTCRIES OF BRUTALITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS  ABUSES BY THE MILITARY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 108
  109. 109.  IN MARCH 1999, HABIBIE, ACCOMPANIED BY SENIOR  MEMBERS OF HIS CABINET AND THE COMMANDER OF THE  ARMED FORCES, VISITED THE PROVINCE AND INITIATED A  DIALOGUE WITH REPRESENTATIVES OF THE LOCAL  COMMUNITY AT THE GRAND MOSQUE OF THE CAPITAL OF  THE PROVINCE, BANDA ACEH.  STUDENTS DEMANDED TO BE ALLOWED TO JOIN THE  DIALOGUE AND WERE PERMITTED. IN THE COURSE OF THE  HEATED DIALOGUE HABIBIE APOLOGIZED FOR THE EXCESSES  COMMITTED BY THE MILITARY IN THE PAST AND PROMISED  THAT SUCH THINGS WOULD NOT HAPPEN AGAIN. HE  PROMISED TO PROSECUTE ANY MEMBER OF THE SECURITY  FORCES THAT WAS INVOLVED IN HUMAN RIGHTS  VIOLATIONS. HE PLEDGED THAT THE GOVERNMENT WOULD  PAY FOR THE REBURIAL OF THE VICTIMS OF THE MILITARY OPERATIONS WHO HAD BEEN BURIED IN MASS GRAVES. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 109
  110. 110.  POLITICAL PRISONERS WOULD BE RELEASED AND FUNDS FOR DEVELOPMENT IN THE PROVINCE  WOULD BE INCREASED INCLUDING FUNDING  FOR FINANCIAL AID FOR VICTIMS OF PAST  MILITARY OPERATIONS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 110
  111. 111.  IN SEPTEMBER A LAW WAS PASSED THAT GAVE  ACEH A SPECIAL STATUS (LAW NO 44/1999).  THE NEW LAW ON FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION  (LAW NO 25/1999) PROVIDED THE PROVINCE  WITH A CERTAIN DEGREE OF AUTHORITY OVER,  AND SUBSTANTIAL RETURNS FROM, THEIR  NATURAL WEALTH, PARTICULARLY FROM THE GAS  FIELDS IN ARUN.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 111
  112. 112.  THUS TWO OF THE MAIN GRIEVANCES, THE DEMAND  FOR SYARIAH LAW AND EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION OF  RESOURCES, HAD BEEN BASICALLY ADDRESSED.  HOWEVER THE RELAXATION OF THE SECURITY  SITUATION WAS EXPLOITED BY GAM AS A WAY TO  EXPAND THEIR CONTROL OF THE TERRITORY AND  POPULATION.  AT THE TIME HABIBIE LEFT OFFICE IN OCTOBER 1999,  THE CONFLICT IN ACEH HAD BEEN NOT RESOLVED. (THE ACEH CONFLICT WOULD ONLY BE RESOLVED AFTER  THE GOVERNMENT WAS READY TO NEGOTIATE AND  REACH AN AGREEMENT WITH GAM; THE HELSINKI  AGREEMENT SIGNED ON AUGUST 15, 2005 IN HELSINKI,  FINLAND)Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 112
  113. 113. PAPUA IRIAN JAYA (PAPUA) WAS ANOTHER HOT SPOT. THE  PROVINCE HAD BEEN PLAGUED BY SEPARATIST  MOVEMENTS DEMANDING INDEPENDENCE FOR  YEARS.  AS IN ACEH, THIS SEPARATIST MOVEMENT WAS  TRIGGERED BY FEELINGS OF INJUSTICE SUFFERED BY  THE PEOPLE OF WEST IRIAN (PAPUANS), WHICH,  THOUGH WAS ONE OF THE NATURALLY RICHEST  PROVINCES OF INDONESIA, REMAINED THE MOST  BACKWARD IN THE WHOLE NATION.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 113
  114. 114.  A LAW WAS LATER PASSED TO ALLOW FOR A SPECIAL  STATUS FOR THE PROVINCE OF PAPUA, INCLUDING  ECONOMIC PRIVILEGES (LAW NO. 21/2001). ON JULY 17, 2006 PAPUA WAS DIVIDED INTO 2  PROVINCES: PAPUA AND WESTERN IRIAN JAYA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 114
  115. 115. LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY THE RECOGNITION OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLE OF THE  SEPARATION OF POWERS OF THE EXECUTIVE,  LEGISLATIVE AND JUDICIAL BRANCHES OF  GOVERNMENT REVOKING THE MUCH HATED NEW ORDER POLITICAL  LAWS, AND ESTABLISH NEW LAW ON MULTIPARTY  POLITICAL SYSTEM, AND FREE GENERAL ELECTIONS. FREEING THE PRESS FROM GOVERNMENT CONTROL  AND CENSORSHIP.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 115
  116. 116.  THE DUAL FUNCTION OF THE MILITARY WAS REVOKED THE POLICE WERE SEPARATED FROM THE MILITARY. BASIC HUMAN RIGHTS WERE GIVEN STRONG LEGAL  PROTECTION. “POLITICAL PRISONERS” WERE RELEASED FROM  DETENTION. EAST TIMORESE WERE GRANTED A REFERENDUM TO  DETERMINE THEIR OWN DESTINY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 116
  117. 117.  IN JULY 1999 A MULTIPARTY ELECTION WAS HELD. THE  ELECTION WAS  SUPERVISED BY AN ELECTORAL  COMMITTEE OF THE PARTICIPATING POLITICAL PARTIES  AND WATCHED  BY THOUSANDS OF FOREIGN  OBSERVERS.   IT WAS UNIVERSALLY AGREED THAT THE ELECTION WAS  OPEN, FAIR AND CLEAN. THE RESULT REFLECTED THE  WILL OF THE PEOPLE AND THUS HERALDED THE RE‐ BIRTH OF DEMOCRACY IN INDONESIA.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 117
  118. 118. POLITICAL PARTIES AND GENERAL ELECTION 1999 No Parties Seats Vote (%) 1 PDIP 153 34 2 GOLKAR 120 22 3 PPP 58 13 4 PKB 51 11 5 PAN 34 7 6 PBB 13 2 7 PK 7 1 8 Others 26 10 9 ABRI 38 Total 462 Note: From 48 political parties participating, 21 parties representedDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 118
  119. 119.  DURING HABIBIE’S PRESIDENCY THE GOVERNMENT WORKED  TOGETHER WITH PARLIAMENT TO PRODUCE 67 LAWS THAT  FORMED THE LEGAL FOUNDATION FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT  OF THE STRONG POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS  THAT ARE ESSENTIAL TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A  DEMOCRATIC NATION WITH A MARKET ECONOMY.  OF THE 67 LAWS 16 ARE ON THE ECONOMY, 32 ARE  POLITICAL LAWS AND 19 CONCERN HUMAN RIGHTS.  FIVE OF THE LAWS ORIGINATED FROM THE PARLIAMENT, IN  ITSELF A SIGNIFICANT DEPARTURE FROM POLITICAL  PRACTICES UNDER THE NEW ORDER, WHEN THE  PARLIAMENT PLAYED SECOND FIDDLE AND WAS REGARDED  AS MERE RUBBER‐STAMP TO THE GOVERNMENT.  IT SHOWED THAT THE PARLIAMENT HAS BEGUN TO  ESTABLISH ITSELF AS THE LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY IN THE  COUNTRY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 119
  120. 120. SOME OF THE IMPORTANT POLITICAL LAWSLaw No 2/1999 on political partiesLaw No 3/1999 on general electionLaw No 4/1999 on the composition and status of the People’s Consultative Assembly MPR, the parliament DPR, and the regional representative councilsLaw No 5/1998 the convention against torture and crueltyLaw No 9/1999 the right to freely speak, demonstrate or strikeLaw No 22/1999 on the decentralization of government down to the district levelDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 120
  121. 121. Some of the important political laws . . . Law No 25/1999 on fiscal decentralization Law No 26/1999 to revoke the 1963 anti-subversive activities law Law No 28/1999 on Clean Government Law No 29/1999 the convention on abolition of all forms of racial discriminations Law No 35/1999 put the administration of the whole legal system under the Supreme Court Law No 39/1998 on Human Rights Law No 40/1999 freedom of the pressDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 121
  122. 122.  IT WAS APPARENT AND INCREASINGLY ACKNOWLEDGED  THAT IT WAS DURING HABIBIE’S ERA THAT THE  COUNTRY HAD RAPIDLY MOVED TOWARDS DEMOCRACY.  SUCH A RAPID BURST OF LIBERALIZATION WOULD HAVE  BEEN HIGHLY UNLIKELY WERE THERE WAS NO CRISIS  AND SUHARTO STILL WAS PRESIDENT.  THESE REFORMS HAVE COME FROM THE TOP, WHICH IS  NOT TO SAY THAT THERE HAS BEEN NO YEARNING  FROM THE BOTTOM.  YET MANY WOULD AGREE THAT INDONESIANS CIVIL  SOCIETY ENGAGED IN DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN  RIGHTS ACTIVISM HAVE ONLY VERY RECENTLY BECOME  SUFFICIENTLY ORGANIZED ENOUGH TO HAVE  SIGNIFICANT INFLUENCE AT THE LEVEL OF POLICY. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 122
  123. 123.  IT WAS DURING HABIBIE’S ADMINISTRATION THAT  MOST OF THE INITIATIVES THAT SIGNIFICANTLY  ACCELERATED INDONESIA’S DEMOCRATIZATION WERE  INITIATED.  THE PROCESS OF DEMOCRATIZATION HAD BEEN IN  CONJUNCTION WITH THE PROCESS OF ECONOMIC  RECOVERY, ONE REINFORCING THE OTHER ON THE WAY  UP, IN CONTRAST WITH THE SITUATION WHEN THE  CONFLUENCE OF ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL CRISES  HAD BROUGHT THE COUNTRY DOWN DEEPER INTO THE  ABYSS.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 123
  124. 124. IRONICALLYHABIBIE, WHO INITIATED MOST OF THE BASIC ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL REFORMS, FAILED TO GET REELECTED IN THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONDay2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 124
  125. 125. THE PITFALLS THE EAST TIMOR ISSUE  THE BANK BALI AFFAIR  THE IMF DECIDED THAT FURTHER REVIEW OF ITS  PROGRAM SHOULD ONLY BE DONE AFTER THE  PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONGSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 125
  126. 126. EAST TIMOR AFTER TAKING OFFICE HABIBIE DECIDED TO BREAK THE  EAST TIMOR LOGJAM: THE SOLUTION OF THE EAST  TIMOR QUESTION HAD BECOME ONE OF THE  GOVERNMENT’S PRIORITIES.  EVENTUALLY A CONSENSUS EMERGED WITHIN THE  GOVERNMENT TO ALLOW THE EAST TIMORESE TO HOLD  A REFERENDUM, OR IN THE POLITICAL JARGON AT THE  TIME, A “POPULAR CONSULTATION,” TO CHOOSE BETWEEN A GREATER AUTONOMY WITH INDONESIA OR  OUTRIGHT INDEPENDENCE. THE REFERENDUM WAS TO BE ADMINISTERED BY THE UNITED NATIONS.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 126
  127. 127.  OMINOUSLY, BEFORE THE POPULAR CONSULTATION  THERE HAD BEEN CLASHES BETWEEN THE PRO‐ INTEGRATION AND ANTI‐INTEGRATION GROUPS.  THESE ARMED CLASHES HAD AFFECTED THE  CIVILIAN COMMUNITY AND RESULTED IN PEOPLE  BEING DISPLACED FROM THEIR HOMES, WHICH  CREATED A REFUGEE SITUATION.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 127
  128. 128.  THE REFERENDUM WAS HELD ON 30 AUGUST. THE  PEOPLE OF EAST TIMOR OVERWHELMINGLY CHOSE  INDEPENDENCE, WITH 78.5% OF THE VOTERS  CHOOSING INDEPENDENCE.  ON 4 SEPTEMBER 1999, EAST TIMOR WAS HANDED  OVER TO THE UN AUTHORITIES, WHICH WOULD HELP  THE TERRITORY ORGANIZE ITSELF AS A SOVEREIGN AND  INDEPENDENT STATE. THE RESULT OF THE REFERENDUM  SHOCKED THE NATION AND INFURIATED MANY IN THE  MILITARY.  AFTER ALL THE SACRIFICES AND SO MANY LIVES LOST, IT  WAS NOT EASY TO ACCEPT THAT EAST TIMOR SHOULD  BE RELEASED FROM THE FOLD OF THE REPUBLIC.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 128
  129. 129.  THE REFERENDUM RESULTED IN AN INFLUX OF  REFUGEES WHO SUPPORTED THE INTEGRATION WITH INDONESIA AND WERE AFRAID OF THEIR FATE IN THE  NEW INDEPENDENT COUNTRY DOMINATED BY THEIR FORMER ENEMIES TO THE WESTERN PART OF THE  ISLAND OF TIMOR. TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, IN AN APPARENT CAMPAIGN TO GET EVEN WITH THOSE WHO  CHOSE TO SECEDE, THE LOCAL MILITARY UNIT AND PARAMILITARY FORCES ENGAGED THEMSELVES IN A  DESTRUCTIVE RAMPAGE, DRAWING CONCERN AND CRITICISM FROM THE WORLD.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 129
  130. 130.  ON ONE HAND, HABIBIE WAS PRAISED FOR HIS  COURAGEOUS DECISION TO GRANT THE EAST TIMORESE  THE RIGHT TO DECIDE THEIR OWN FATE AND  HONORING HIS COMMITMENT TO RESPECT THE RESULT OF THE REFERENDUM. ON THE OTHER HAND, HIS  GOVERNMENT WAS CONDEMNED BECAUSE OF THE  POST‐REFERENDUM CARNAGE. ALTHOUGH THE  COUNTRY WOULD BE FREED OF A LONG‐STANDING  SOURCE OF DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL  AND ECONOMIC BURDEN, DOMESTICALLY HIS DECISION  HAD BEEN USED BY HIS POLITICAL ENEMIES TO RALLY  MORE OPPOSITION AND TO STOP HIM FROM GETTING  REELECTED.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 130
  131. 131.  IN THE ASIA PACIFIC ECONOMIC CONFERENCE (APEC) MEETING  IN NEW ZEALAND IN EARLY SEPTEMBER 1999, AROUND THE TIME  OF THE CARNAGE IN EAST TIMOR FOLLOWING THE REFERENDUM,  US PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON TOLD THE COORDINATING MINISTER  OF THE ECONOMY, WHO WAS REPRESENTING INDONESIA IN THE  SUMMIT MEETING AS HABIBIE COULD NOT LEAVE THE COUNTRY  BECAUSE OF THE TENSE SITUATION IN EAST TIMOR, OF HIS  CONCERN FOR THE SITUATION IN EAST TIMOR IN THE  AFTERMATH OF THE REFERENDUM AND ADVISED THE  INDONESIAN MILITARY TO REFRAIN FROM USING FORCE AND TO  ACCEPT INTERNATIONAL PEACE KEEPING FORCE. THE SAME CONCERN FOR THE SITUATION IN EAST TIMOR WAS  ALSO CONVEYED TO HIM BY OTHER WORLD LEADERS WHO WERE  PRESENT, INCLUDING CHINA’S PRESIDENT JIANG CHEMIN,  JAPANESE PRIME MINISTER KEIZO OBUCHI, AND AUSTRALIAN  PRIME MINISTER JOHN HOWARD.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 131
  132. 132. BANK BALI CASE ANOTHER BLOW CAME IN THE FORM OF WHAT WAS TO  BE KNOWN AS THE BANK BALI AFFAIR. IT INVOLVED THE  TRANSFER OF FUNDS OUT OF A BANK CONSIDERED TO  BE ONE OF THE POTENTIAL BANKS THAT WOULD  SURVIVE THE CRISIS, BANK BALI.  PRESIDENT HABIBIE’S CLOSE CIRCLE WAS  ALLEGED TO  BE INVOLVED IN THE CASE.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 132
  133. 133.  THE EAST TIMOR POST‐REFERENDUM CARNAGE AND THE  BANK BALI AFFAIR SOURED RELATIONS BETWEEN HABIBIE,  THE IMF AND THE DONORS, CREATING CIRCUMSTANCES  THAT WERE REMINISCENT OF THE SITUATION DURING OF  SUHARTO’S FINAL WEEKS. THE TWO ISSUES HAD FROZEN  FURTHER DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE INDONESIAN  GOVERNMENT AND THE IMF. THE IMF DECIDED THAT  FURTHER REVIEW SHOULD ONLY BE DONE AFTER THE  PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. IT WAS CLEAR IN CONVERSATIONS  BETWEEN THE COORDINATING MINISTER FOR THE  ECONOMY AND US SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY LARRY  SUMMERS THAT THE US ADMINISTRATION WAS BEHIND THE  DECISION.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 133
  134. 134. THE END OF THE BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 1999 THE DEMOCRATICALLY ELECTED MPR  STARTED ITS SESSION BY THE TIME THE MPR BEGAN ITS FIRST SESSION THE  CONTEST FOR PRESIDENCY WAS BETWEEN HABIBIE AND  MEGAWATI, WHO REPRESENTED THE TWO PARTIES WITH  THE BIGGEST ELECTORAL VOTE. HABIBIE HAD BEEN NOMINATED BY GOLKAR TO BE ITS  PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE.  HOWEVER, AS THE ELECTION TIME DREW CLOSER, A  DIFFERENT POLITICAL CONFIGURATION EMERGED. GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 134
  135. 135.  FOR SOME TIME LEADERS FROM VARIOUS MUSLIM  ORGANIZATIONS HAD BEEN WAGING CAMPAIGNS  AGAINST MEGAWATI AND HER PARTY.  BUT THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST MEGAWATI HERSELF  WAS PARTICULARLY FIERCE. IT FOCUSED ON THE  FACT THAT SHE WAS A WOMAN, AND IN THEIR  VIEW ISLAM DID NOT ALLOW A WOMAN TO LEAD A  NATION.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 135
  136. 136.  ANOTHER ISSUE WAS HER RELIGIOSITY. PICTURES WERE  DISTRIBUTED SHOWING HER “PRAYING” IN A HINDU TEMPLE.  SOME OF MEGAWATI’S EARLY SUPPORTERS DESERTED HER,  MOST NOTABLY ABDURRAHMAN WAHID, THE HEAD OF THE  POWERFUL MUSLIM ORGANIZATION NAHDATHUL ULAMA  (NU) AND FOUNDER OF THE PARTY PKB, WHO SAW AN  OPPORTUNITY BECOME A CANDIDATE HIMSELF.  AMIDST THE CONTROVERSY SURROUNDING MEGAWATI AND  THE WIDESPREAD OPPOSITION TO HABIBIE AMONG THE  POPULACE AS WELL AS AMONG THE ORIGINAL REFORM  MOVEMENT, LEADERS OF THE MUSLIM PARTIES JOINED  FORCES IN AN ISLAMIC COALITION.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 136
  137. 137.  THE COALITION WAS CALLED POROS TENGAH OR  CENTRAL AXIS. THEIR MAIN OBJECTIVE WAS PREVENTING  MEGAWATI FROM BECOMING PRESIDENT, AS AT  THAT TIME MOST OF THE LEADERS OF THE CENTRAL  AXIS WERE SYMPATHETIC TO HABIBIE. HOWEVER THEY ALSO CONSIDERED THE POSSIBILITY  OF A THIRD ALTERNATIVEGSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 137
  138. 138.  ON 14 OCTOBER HABIBIE DELIVERED HIS  ACCOUNTABILITY SPEECH. HE REPORTED ON THE  CHALLENGES THAT HE HAD TO FACE WHEN HE TOOK  OVER THE GOVERNMENT AND THE PROGRESS THAT THE  COUNTRY HAD MADE DURING HIS STEWARDSHIP.  HE ALSO REPORTED HIS DECISION TO ALLOW A  REFERENDUM IN EAST TIMOR AND ITS RESULTS, AND  RECOMMENDED THAT THE MPR REVOKE THE 1968  DECISION ON THE INTEGRATION OF EAST TIMOR AND  INDONESIA. GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 138
  139. 139.  HE ALSO REPORTED THAT THE INVESTIGATIONS OF  FORMER PRESIDENT SUHARTO BY THE ATTORNEY  GENERAL ABOUT ALLEGED ABUSES OF POWER DID NOT  FIND ANY INDICATION OF CRIMINAL WRONG DOING,  AND HENCE WERE STOPPED. ON THE 19TH  THE MPR VOTED ON HABIBIE’S  ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT.  WITH A VOTE OF 355, MORE THAN HALF OF THE  MEMBERS OF MPR, HABIBIE’S ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT  WAS REJECTED (AGAINST 322 WHO ACCEPTED IT). HABIBIE EFFECTIVELY WAS EXCLUDED FROM THE  PRESIDENTIAL RACEGSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 139
  140. 140.  ON THE 20TH  THE MPR TOOK THE VOTE FOR  PRESIDENT BETWEEN TWO CANDIDATES: MEGAWATI  AND ABDURRAHMAN WAHID.  THE RESULT OF THE VOTE: WAHID RECEIVED 373 VOTES  AGAINST MEGAWATI’S 313 VOTES.  ALTHOUGH MANY DOUBTED WAHID’S ABILITY TO LEAD  THE COUNTRY BECAUSE OF HIS PHYSICAL CONDITION,  THE VOTE WAS A REFLECTION OF A NUMBER OF  FACTORS. GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 140
  141. 141.  THE JOINED FORCES OF THE ISLAMIC PARTIES AND THE  ISLAMIC FACTIONS WITHIN GOLKAR AND THE  SUPPORTERS OF HABIBIE HAD DEFEATED THE  NATIONALIST COALITION OF PDI‐P AND NATIONALIST  FACTION WITHIN GOLKAR. THE REACTION AMONG PDI‐P RANK AND FILE TO THE  DEFEAT OF MEGAWATI WAS FEROCIOUS. RIOTS BROKE  OUT IN VARIOUS STRONGHOLDS OF PDI‐P, ESPECIALLY IN  JAKARTA, SOLO, BALI AND BATAM. THE WORST RIOTS  WERE IN BALI AND SOLO.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 141
  142. 142.  AFTER THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION THE MPR WAS TO  DECIDED WHO WOULD BE THE VICE PRESIDENT. BECAUSE OF HER DISAPPOINTMENT AT RESULT OF THE  PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION, MEGAWATI AT FIRST DECLINED TO  BE NOMINATED AS VICE PRESIDENT.  SHE WAS FURIOUS ABOUT HER DEFEAT AND SUSPECTED  THAT THE SAME COALITION WOULD DEFEAT HER AGAIN, AS  BY THE MORNING OF THE DAY OF THE VICE PRESIDENTIAL  ELECTION THE CENTRAL AXIS HAD COME OUT WITH THEIR  CANDIDATE, HAMZAH HAZ FROM PPP.  AFTER INTENSIVE PERSUASION MEGAWATI FINALLY AGREED  TO RUN. MEGAWATI WON THE ELECTION, GARNERING 396  VOTES AGAINST HAMZAH HAZ’S 284 VOTES.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 142
  143. 143.  WHEN THE MPR SESSIONS ENDED THE COUNTRY NEW  LEADERS HAD BEEN ELECTED DEMOCRATICALLY. THE  FIRST TIME IN INDONESIA’S HISTORY. DEMOCRACY HAD  TAKEN ITS HOLD.  THE NEXT CHALLENGE WAS TO CONSOLIDATE THE GAIN,  TO MAKE IT ENDURE AND BRING TANGIBLE BENEFIT TO  THE LIVES OF THE PEOPLE.GSAPS‐2006‐Day2 www.ginandjar.com 143
  144. 144. ABDURRAHMAN WAHID GOVERNMENT
  145. 145.  THE ELECTION OF ABDURRAHMAN WAHID TO THE  PRESIDENCY ITSELF CREATED ANOTHER LEGITIMACY  PROBLEM BECAUSE OF HIS PARTY’S LACK OF SUPPORT  SHOWN IN THE NUMBER OF ELECTORAL VOTES WON  AND THE FRAGILITY OF THE COALITION THAT PUT HIM  IN THE PRESIDENCY.  THE COALITION WAS NOT BASED ON A “POSITIVE”  CONSENSUS OF HAVING LAUNCHED THE BEST  CANDIDATE FOR THE JOB, BUT ON A “NEGATIVE”  COMMON PLATFORM TO STOP MEGAWATI FROM  BECOMING PRESIDENT. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 145
  146. 146.  DIFFERENT ELEMENTS OF THE COALITION ACTED THIS  WAY FOR DIFFERENT REASONS. IT WAS A FRAGILE  COALITION THAT COULD EASILY BREAK WHEN THE  COMMON INTEREST WAS NO LONGER MAINTAINED. MEGAWATI’S ELECTION TO THE VICE PRESIDENCY  PARTIALLY SOLVED THE PROBLEM OF LEGITIMACY.  HAVING MEGAWATI, WHOSE PARTY HAD THE LARGEST  VOTE IN THE PARLIAMENT, AS HIS VICE PRESIDENT  PROVIDED ABDURRAHMAN WAHID’S PRESIDENCY WITH  THE NEEDED POLITICAL LEGITIMACY.  FROM THE VERY BEGINNING IT WAS CLEAR THAT WAHID  OWED AND WOULD DEPEND A LOT ON MEGAWATI’S  SUPPORT TO BE ABLE TO EFFECTIVELY RULE IN A  DEMOCRATIC POLITICAL SETTING.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 146
  147. 147. DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION THE END OF THE HABIBIE GOVERNMENT AND THE  ELECTION OF THE NEW GOVERNMENT BY DEMOCRATIC  MEANS COMPLETED THE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY. DURING HIS PRESIDENCY THE PROCESS OF  DISMANTLING THE AUTHORITARIAN SYSTEM AND THE  ESTABLISHMENT OF RULES AND PROCEDURES FOR THE  INSTALLATION OF A DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENT WAS  COMPLETED.  IT MET WITH LINZ AND STEPAN’S STANDARD DEFINITION  OF WHEN A DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION IS COMPLETE. THE COUNTRY WAS ON THE WAY TO STRENGTHEN AND  CONSOLIDATE ITS DEMOCRACY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 147
  148. 148. THE EUPHORIA THE EMERGENCE OF THE WAHID‐MEGAWATI  GOVERNMENT WAS WELL RECEIVED DOMESTICALLY  AS WELL AS INTERNATIONALLY.  EVEN THOSE WHO AT THE OUTSET WERE OPPOSED TO  ABDURRAHMAN WAHID’S ELECTION ACCEPTED THE  RESULT OF THE ELECTION AS THE BEST AS IT COULD  BE UNDER THE CIRCUMSTANCES. THE COUNTRY CAME BACK TO NORMAL,  DEMONSTRATIONS STOPPED, STUDENTS RETURNED  TO SCHOOLS, THE WARRING FACTIONS LAY DOWN  THEIR ARMS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 148
  149. 149.  THERE WAS HIGH HOPE FOR DEMOCRACY AND  CONFIDENCE IN THE COURSE THAT THE COUNTRY  WAS TAKING. IN CONTRAST TO HABIBIE, WAHID WAS  ENDOWED WITH SIGNIFICANT POLITICAL CAPITAL AT  THE ONSET OF HIS PRESIDENCY. ABDURRAHMAN WAHID HAD MARGINAL POLITICAL  SUPPORT IN PARLIAMENT AND WITH THE POLITY AS  THE ELECTION RESULTS SHOWED.  HE NEEDED THE SUPPORT OF THE LARGER PARTIES  THAT HAD LARGER POLITICAL CONSTITUENTS THAN  HE HAD. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 149
  150. 150.  THIS RECOGNITION WAS REFLECTED IN THE WAY HE  FORMED HIS FIRST CABINET.  SOME COMMENTATORS WERE CRITICAL OF THE  CABINET COMPOSITION, CLAIMING THAT IT DIDN’T  REFLECT PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE. ALTHOUGH HE HIMSELF HAD BEEN THE CHAIRMAN  OF THE NU, THE LARGEST MUSLIM ORGANIZATION,  HIS SUPPORT WAS PARTICULARLY STRONG AMONG  SECULAR AND NON‐ISLAMIC CIVIL SOCIETY THAT HAD  LONG BEEN HIS POLITICAL HABITAT.  HE WAS ALSO REVERED BY INTERNATIONAL NGOS FOR  HIS UNORTHODOX POLITICAL VIEWS, SUCH AS HIS  MODERATE (FOR SOME HIS PRO) VIEW ON ISRAEL.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 150
  151. 151.  HIS EFFORT TO PUT THE MILITARY UNDER CIVILIAN  CONTROL ALSO WON HIM ACCOLADES, ESPECIALLY  AMONG INTERNATIONAL OBSERVERS.  HE APPOINTED A CIVILIAN TO BECOME THE MINISTER  OF DEFENSE, THE FIRST AFTER SO MANY YEARS. IT WAS ALSO A FIRST WHEN HE APPOINTED THE NAVY  CHIEF AS THE COMMANDER OF THE ARMED FORCES,  THE TOP MILITARY POST THAT TRADITIONALLY HAD  BEEN RESERVED FOR THE ARMY.Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 151
  152. 152.  HIS IDEA FOR A SOLUTION TO THE ACEH PROBLEM  WAS TO AGREE TO THE REFERENDUM THAT WAS  DEMANDED BY THE GAM (INDEPENDENT ACEH  MOVEMENT).  ALTHOUGH IT WAS NOT FOLLOWED UP BY ACTUAL  MEASURES DUE TO STRONG OPPOSITION FROM THE  MILITARY AND MOST OF INDONESIA’S PUBLIC AS  WELL MANY ACEHNESE THEMSELVES, HIS STATEMENT  ON THE REFERENDUM STRENGTHENED HIS IMAGE,  ESPECIALLY AMONG THE INTERNATIONAL MEDIA AND  OBSERVERS. Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 152
  153. 153.  HE ALSO MADE A STATEMENT ALLOWING THE  RAISING OF THE REBEL’S FLAG ON THE ANNIVERSARY  OF THE FOUNDING OF GAM ON 4 DECEMBER AS PART  OF THE FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION. FURTHERMORE HE  INITIATED THE NEGOTIATION WITH GAM BROKERED  BY AN INTERNATIONAL NGO WITH A BASE IN GENEVA. HE HAD SHOWN LENIENCE TOWARD THE  INDEPENDENCE MOVEMENT IN IRIAN JAYA BY  AGREEING TO THE USE OF NAME PAPUA INSTEAD OF  IRIAN JAYA AND, AS IN ACEH, ALLOWING THE FLYING  OF THE PAPUAN FLAG THE BINTANG KEJORA (THE  MORNING STAR).Day2_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 153
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×