0
by     Ginandjar KartasasmitaNational Graduate Institute for Policy Studies              Tokyo, Japan                   2012
CONTENTS   THE ARGUMENT FOR CENTRALIZED     GOVERNMENT   DECENTRALIZATION: THE CONCEPTS   HOW DECENTRALIZATION WORKS IN...
THE ARGUMENT FORCENTRALIZED GOVERNMENT
 THE INDONESIAN PEOPLE HAVE ALWAYS CHERISHED UNITY   ABOVE ANYTHING ELSE. ALTHOUGH IT IS COMPOSED OF   MANY ETHNIC GROUPS...
 IT IS EMBODIED IN PANCASILA, THE NATION’S GUIDING   PRINCIPLES THAT FORM THE BASIC PHILOSOPHY OF ITS   CONSTITUTION WHEN...
 HENCE THE BIRTH OF THE SHORT LIVED UNITED STATES OF     INDONESIA (RIS), AS  THE OUTCOME OF PEACE     NEGOTIATION WITH T...
 HOWEVER, THE FACT THAT INDONESIA IS A MULTIETHNIC   AND MULTICULTURAL COUNTRY MAKES THE TASK OF  KEEPING IT FROM FALLING...
 IN THE 1950S, AFTER INDONESIA RETURNED TO A UNIFIED    STATE, THERE WERE REBELLIONS AGAINST THE CENTRAL    GOVERNMENT IN...
 EVEN TODAY IN SOME PARTS OF THE COUNTRY THERE ARE   ACTIVE SEPARATIST MOVEMENTS. ACEH FOR A LONG TIME   HAD BEEN A TROUB...
 THE COST OF APPLYING FORCE TO KEEP THE COUNTRY   UNITED IS VERY EXPENSIVE IN SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND   ECONOMIC TERMS. ALT...
 BECAUSE OF THIS, LOCAL HUMAN RESOURCES CANNOT   MEET THE DEMAND FOR HIGH SKILLED LABOR REQUIRED BY   DEVELOPMENT ENTERPR...
 THE RESULT WAS WIDENING INCOME DISPARITIES THAT   LED TO A GROWING FEELING OF INJUSTICE AND SOCIAL   TENSION THAT WAS JU...
 ANOTHER FACTOR WAS THEN ADDED TO THE   GRIEVANCES: VIOLATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS. DURING   THE NEW ORDER, AS ECONOMIC GROWTH...
 AFTER THE FALL OF THE NEW ORDER, THERE WAS AN     OPPORTUNITY ADDRESS THE PROBLEM. ALTHOUGH     INCOME AND REGIONAL DISP...
 IT WAS DECIDED THAT DEVOLVEMENT OF CENTRAL   AUTHORITY SHOULD BE THE FIRST STEP TOWARD   ADDRESSING THE PROBLEM. AS PART...
DECENTRALIZATION  THE CONCEPTS
 FEW ISSUES HAVE CREATED AS MUCH CONTROVERSY   OVER THE PAST HALF CENTURY AS HOW GOVERNMENTS   AND POLITICAL SYSTEMS SHOU...
WHY DECENTRALIZE? A MAJOR OBSTACLE TO THE EFFECTIVE PERFORMANCE OF   PUBLIC BUREAUCRACIES IN MOST DEVELOPING   COUNTRIES ...
 THE POPULAR REMEDY FOR SUCH CENTRALIZATION     IS DECENTRALIZATION, A TERM WHICH IS IMBUED     WITH POSITIVE CONNOTATION...
SOME IMPORTANT DEFINITIONS   DECENTRALIZATION IS THE TRANSFER OF AUTHORITY     AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR PUBLIC FUNCTIONS FR...
DECENTRALIZATION IS THE EXPANSION OF     LOCAL AUTONOMY THROUGH THE TRANSFER     OF POWERS AND RESPONSIBILITIES AWAY     F...
 DECENTRALIZATION IS NOT MERELY POLITICALLY   EXPEDIENT FOR DEALING WITH REBELLIOUS REGIONS. IT   HAS MORE BASIC VALUE TO...
IMPORTANT OBJECTIVES OF DECENTRALIZATION:     1. BETTER MATCH BETWEEN SERVICE PROVISION        AND LOCAL VOTER PREFERENCES...
TYPES OF DECENTRALIZATION                    1. POLITICAL                   2. ADMINISTRATIVE                   3. FISCAL ...
POLITICAL DECENTRALIZATION        POLITICAL DECENTRALIZATION AIMS TO GIVE        CITIZENS OR THEIR ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES...
FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION INVOLVES SHIFTING SOME   RESPONSIBILITIES FOR EXPENDITURES AND/OR   REVEN...
ADMINISTRATIVE DECENTRALIZATION  ADMINISTRATIVE DECENTRALIZATION SEEKS TO  REDISTRIBUTE AUTHORITY, RESPONSIBILITY AND  FIN...
ECONOMIC OR MARKET DECENTRALIZATION ECONOMIC OR MARKET DECENTRALIZATION WILL INCLUDE PRIVATIZATION AND DEREGULATION. THEY ...
FORMS OF DECENTRALIZATION  FORMS OF DECENTRALIZATION INCLUDE:      1.     DECONCENTRATION      2.     DELEGATION TO SEMI‐A...
DECENTRALIZATION                           TRANSFER OF AUTHORITY                            CLOSER TO THE PUBLIC TO       ...
Forms of decentralizationNature of Delegation                                      Basic for Delegation                   ...
AUTONOMOUS LOCAL GOVERNMENT    LOCAL GOVERNMENT CAN BE SAID TO BE      AUTONOMOUS IF THEY ENJOY A SUBSTANTIAL      DEGREE...
DECENTRALIZATION IS NOT TOTAL               DEVOLUTION IT MUST BE NOTED THAT THE DECENTRALIZATION DOES   NOT IMPLY THAT A...
 ALL SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT INVOLVE A COMBINATION   OF CENTRALIZED AND DECENTRALIZED AUTHORITY.   HOWEVER, FINDING A COMBI...
EITHER       CENTRALIZED                        DECENTRALIZED                         ORCENTRALIZED                       ...
Day3_GRIPS 2012    www.ginandjar.com   36
FEDERALISM AND                    DECENTRALIZATION THERE IS NO BROAD‐BASED GENERALIZATION THAT   CAN BE MADE ABOUT THE CO...
TWO APPROACHES ON SEQUENCING       DECENTRALIZATION     A NORMATIVE APPROACH:         GRADUAL/INCREMENTAL PROCESS       ...
HOW DECENTRALIZATION WORKS IN INDONESIA
 INDONESIA FOLLOWED THE “BIG BANG” APPROACH      TO DECENTRALIZATION.     IT STARTED IN 1999, BUT MUCH OF THE      RESPO...
 BY THE END OF THE OLD REGIME, AT THE ONSET OF THE   DEMOCRATIZATION PROCESS AND POLITICAL REFORMS   IN 1999, THERE WERE ...
 THE PROCESS WAS BASED ON THREE BASIC LAWS 1)   REGIONAL AUTONOMY; 2) FISCAL RELATIONS; AND 3)   REGIONAL GOVERNMENT TAXE...
 A SECOND PHASE OF DECENTRALIZATION IN 2006   INCREASED FINANCIAL TRANSFERS TO THE REGIONS BY   50 PERCENT, FOLLOWED BY A...
 THE BASIC DECENTRALIZATION LAWS PROVIDE THAT MORE   NATURAL RESOURCE REVENUES ARE TO BE RETAINED IN THE   REGIONS WHERE ...
INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATION IN INDONESIA  Period             Main Issues           Legal Framework       Intergovernmental ...
Intergovernmental Period             Main Issues        Legal Framework                                                   ...
DISTRIBUTION OF AUTHORITIES AND FUNCTIONS            Central                            Local Government                  ...
LOCAL FINANCE IN INDONESIA                                 SOURCES       LOCAL REVENUES          EQUITY FUND        OTHERS...
REVENUES SHARING BETWEEN CENTRAL AND LOCAL                                                 Before                         ...
 SUBSTANTIAL AMOUNT OF GOVERNMENT BUDGET HAS BEEN   TRANSFERRED TO THE REGIONS.  FOR 2012, ALMOST ONE THIRD [32.8%] OR $...
DECENTRALIZATION 1999                                                                    % INCREASE                      B...
THE OUTCOMES
 DECENTRALIZATION IN INDONESIA IS STILL IN THE   EARLY STAGES OF IMPLEMENTATION; THE RESULTS   SO FAR ARE MIXED. TO A CER...
 DECENTRALIZATION BRINGS DECISION‐MAKING   CLOSER TO THE PEOPLE AND THEREFORE YIELDS   PROGRAMMES AND SERVICES THAT BETTE...
 COMPREHENSIVE SURVEYS OF PERCEPTIONS INDICATE,   HOWEVER, THAT SATISFACTION WITH SERVICE DELIVERY IS   IMPROVING. WHEN A...
THE DOWNSIDE DECENTRALIZATION IS EXPECTED, ASIDE FROM KEEPING   THE COUNTRY TOGETHER, TO IMPROVE GOVERNANCE.   HOWEVER TH...
 DECENTRALIZATION ALSO HAS GENERATED A NEW VOGUE IN   THE REGIONS. MANY REGIONS OR ETHNICS ARE   DEMANDING TO HAVE THEIR ...
 THE MAIN PROBLEM, LIES IN THE POLITICAL SYSTEM. HEADS   OF REGIONAL GOVERNMENT—PROVINCIAL AS  WELL AS   DISTRICT/MUNICIP...
 ALONG THE WAY, MORE OFTEN THAN NOT THEY ARE   CONFLICTING WITH OTHER, BECAUSE COACH HAS HIS/HER   POLITICAL  PARTY (PART...
 ANOTHER CONSEQUENCE OF THE SYSTEM IS THAT   LOCAL GOVERNMENT BUREAUCRACY HAVE BEEN   POLITIZED, THE SITUATION.  WHICH WO...
 AS ALSO POINTED BY THE WORLD BANK, (2001) THE   RISKS OF AN INCREASE IN CORRUPTION FOLLOWING   DECENTRALIZATION ARE HIGH...
 SOME ANALYSTS COMMENT THAT DECENTRALIZATION   HAS STRENGTHENED THE POSITION OF THE LOCAL   ELITES AND THEIR CLIENTELISTI...
 ON FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION MANY STUDIES   HAVE SHOWN THAT MANY NEW AUTONOMOUS   REGIONS ECONOMICALLY ARE NOT VIABLE. THE...
 BY ANY CRITERIA, REGIONS, EVEN THE POOREST, HAVE   RECEIVED LARGE INCREASES IN TRANSFERS IN RECENT   YEARS—SOME NOW HAVE...
 THE CHALLENGE IS HOW TO STRENGTHEN THE   EQUALIZING IMPACT BETWEEN OWN‐SOURCE AND   NATURAL RESOURCE REVENUES AND EMPOWE...
 IN CONCLUSION CAPACITY PROBLEMS AT THE LOCAL LEVEL   REMAIN ACCUTE. REGIONAL GOVERNMENTS HAVE HAD   DIFFICULTY SPENDING ...
 IN ADDITION TO ADDRESSING ADMINISTRATIVE AND   REGULATORY ISSUES, IMPROVING DECENTRALIZATION   OUTCOMES REQUIRES INCREAS...
 IN PARTICULAR AN IMPROVED SYSTEM FOR   MONITORING OF SUB‐NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS   WOULD PROVIDE INCENTIVES FOR GOOD PERFOR...
GROWTH OF GENERAL ALOCATION FUND (GAF)     VS AVERAGE FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENT                    TOTAL GROWTH         AVERAGE...
AVERAGE GAF/SUB‐PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT* AT 2000 CONSTANT PRICESOURCE: MOF, 2011Day3_GRIPS 2012            www.ginandjar.com...
TRENDS OF SPECIAL ALLOCATION FUNDSOURCE: MOF, 2011Day3_GRIPS 2012       www.ginandjar.com      71
GROWTH OF GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEESSOURCE: MOF, 2011Day3_GRIPS 2012     www.ginandjar.com    72
LESSONS TO BE LEARNED
GOOD THEORY                   POOR PRACTICEDay3_GRIPS 2012       www.ginandjar.com                   74
GOOD THEORY                           POOR PRACTICE  •Basic Human Rights                   •       Disunity  •Democracy   ...
GOOD THEORY                           POOR PRACTICE  •Debureaucratization  •Efficiency                           •       W...
GOOD THEORY                                          POOR PRACTICE• Efficiency                                         •  ...
GOOD THEORY                                  POOR PRACTICE• Efficiency in Delivery of  i. Education                       ...
GOOD THEORY                            POOR PRACTICE  • Plurality                            • Primordialism  • Diversity ...
 MORE NEEDS TO BE LEARNED FROM INDIVIDUAL   EXPERIENCES AND  THESE LESSONS NEED TO BE   TRANSLATED INTO PRACTICAL ACTIONS...
 DECENTRALISED GOVERNANCE, IF PROPERLY PLANNED AND  IMPLEMENTED, OFFERS IMPORTANT OPPORTUNITIES FOR   ENHANCED HUMAN DEVE...
 THE CONCEPTS OF DECENTRALIZATION HAVE CHANGED   RAPIDLY OVER THE SECOND HALF OF THE LAST  CENTURY   IN TANDEM WITH THE E...
 FROM THIS BROADER PERSPECTIVE ON GOVERNANCE NEW   CONCEPTS OF DECENTRALIZATION EMERGED AS WELL. AS   THE CONCEPT OF GOVE...
 THOSE ARE THE CHALLENGES THAT NEED TO BE CONSIDERED    AND ADDRESSED PROPERLY IF DECENTRALIZATION AND   DEVOLUTION OF CE...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

MAKING GOVERNMENT WORK: DECENTRALIZATION AND REGIONAL AUTONOMY

3,412

Published on

Young Leaders Program -National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies
Tokyo, Japan 2012

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,412
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
143
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "MAKING GOVERNMENT WORK: DECENTRALIZATION AND REGIONAL AUTONOMY "

  1. 1. by Ginandjar KartasasmitaNational Graduate Institute for Policy Studies Tokyo, Japan 2012
  2. 2. CONTENTS  THE ARGUMENT FOR CENTRALIZED  GOVERNMENT  DECENTRALIZATION: THE CONCEPTS  HOW DECENTRALIZATION WORKS IN  INDONESIA  THE OUTCOMES  LESSONS TO BE LEARNEDDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 2
  3. 3. THE ARGUMENT FORCENTRALIZED GOVERNMENT
  4. 4.  THE INDONESIAN PEOPLE HAVE ALWAYS CHERISHED UNITY  ABOVE ANYTHING ELSE. ALTHOUGH IT IS COMPOSED OF  MANY ETHNIC GROUPS, THE SENSE OF BEING ONE NATION  HAS ALWAYS BEEN STRONG. BHINNEKA TUNGGAL IKA, UNITY IN DIVERSITY, THE  NATIONAL CREED AS ENCAPSULATED IN THE COUNTRY’S COAT OF ARMS, CONSTITUTES THE CORE FOUNDATION OF  ITS NATIONALISM OR “STATENESS.” IT IS THE MOST VALUABLE HERITAGE OF THE INDEPENDENCE  MOVEMENT, WHICH, WHEN IT BEGAN ALMOST SEVEN  DECADES AGO, USED AS ITS RALLYING CRY FOR  INDEPENDENCE: ONE COUNTRY, ONE NATION, ONE  LANGUAGE: INDONESIA.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 4
  5. 5.  IT IS EMBODIED IN PANCASILA, THE NATION’S GUIDING  PRINCIPLES THAT FORM THE BASIC PHILOSOPHY OF ITS  CONSTITUTION WHEN IT WAS FIRST FORMULATED AND  REMAINS TODAY, EVEN AFTER THE CONSTITUTION HAS BEEN  AMENDED. THIS CONCEPT HOWEVER, HAS NOT BEEN FREE FROM  CHALLENGES IN THE HISTORY OF THE NATION. FROM THE  BEGINNING, WHEN THE DUTCH RETURNED TO THEIR  FORMER COLONY ONLY TO FIND THAT THEY HAD LOST IT,  THEY TRIED TO WIN IT BACK, IF NOT WHOLLY AT LEAST  PARTIALLY, IF NOT DIRECTLY, AT LEAST INDIRECTLY, THROUGH  PUPPET STATES.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 5
  6. 6.  HENCE THE BIRTH OF THE SHORT LIVED UNITED STATES OF  INDONESIA (RIS), AS  THE OUTCOME OF PEACE  NEGOTIATION WITH THE DUTCH TO RECOGNIZE  INDONESIAS INDEPENDENCE, IN ROUND TABLE  CONFERENCE IN THE HAGUE, DECEMBER 1949.  IN LESS THAN A YEAR, THE FEDERAL STATE WAS ABOLISHED  AND INDONESIA RETURNED TO UNITARIAN STATE.     Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 6
  7. 7.  HOWEVER, THE FACT THAT INDONESIA IS A MULTIETHNIC  AND MULTICULTURAL COUNTRY MAKES THE TASK OF KEEPING IT FROM FALLING APART A CONTINUOUS EFFORT IN  NEED OF CONTINUOUS VIGILANCE. EVEN THOUGH THE  DUTCH FAILED TO DIVIDE THE COUNTRY INDONESIA FACES A  CONSTANT THREAT OF SEPARATISM. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 7
  8. 8.  IN THE 1950S, AFTER INDONESIA RETURNED TO A UNIFIED  STATE, THERE WERE REBELLIONS AGAINST THE CENTRAL  GOVERNMENT IN MANY AREAS. SOME WENT AS FAST AS  DECLARING THEIR REGION’S INDEPENDENCE OR THEIR OWN  GOVERNMENTS—SUCH AS THE RMS IN MALUKU, PRRI IN  CENTRAL SUMATERA AND PERMESTA IN NORTH SULAWESI  THE GOVERNMENT —AT THAT TIME STILL WEAK AFTER LONG  WARS OF INDEPENDENT, WAS CONFRONTING THE DUTCH  ON WEST IRIAN, AND CHALLENGED BY MUSLIM INSURGENCIES IN VARIOUS PARTS OF THE COUNTRY—WAS  DETERMINED KEEP THE COUNTRY TOGETHER AND HAD  DEALT WITH THE SECESSIONIST MOVEMENTS WITH FORCE.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 8
  9. 9.  EVEN TODAY IN SOME PARTS OF THE COUNTRY THERE ARE  ACTIVE SEPARATIST MOVEMENTS. ACEH FOR A LONG TIME  HAD BEEN A TROUBLE SPOT AND PAPUA WITH ITS  ORGANIZATION OF INDEPENDENT PAPUA (OPM ) IS STILL  SIMMERING.  APART FROM ITS OWN HISTORY, THE EXPERIENCES OF OTHER MULTIETHNIC AND MULTICULTURAL COUNTRIES THAT HAVE  DISINTEGRATED ALONG ETHNIC AND CULTURAL FAULT LINES  IN THE PAST TWO DECADES, INCLUDING THE SOVIET UNION,  YUGOSLAVIA, SRI LANKA AND CZECHOSLOVAKIA HAVE  TAUGHT INDONESIA A LESSON THAT UNITY IS NOT  SOMETHING THAT CAN BE TAKEN FOR GRANTED.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 9
  10. 10.  THE COST OF APPLYING FORCE TO KEEP THE COUNTRY  UNITED IS VERY EXPENSIVE IN SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND  ECONOMIC TERMS. ALTHOUGH SOME ELEMENTS OF THE  INSURGENCIES ARE MOTIVATED BY POLITICAL  OPPORTUNISM, THE MAJORITY ARE DRIVEN BY GENUINE  FEELING OF INJUSTICE, ECONOMIC INJUSTICE IN  PARTICULAR.  THE REGIONS THAT HAVE BRED THE SEPARATIST  MOVEMENTS ARE GENERALLY RICHLY ENDOWED WITH  NATURAL RESOURCES BUT THE PEOPLE HAVE NOT  BENEFITED MUCH FROM THE EXPLOITATION. IRONICALLY, IT  IS PRECISELY THE RESOURCE‐RICH REGIONS THAT ARE  AMONG THE MOST BACKWARD OF THE PROVINCES. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 10
  11. 11.  BECAUSE OF THIS, LOCAL HUMAN RESOURCES CANNOT  MEET THE DEMAND FOR HIGH SKILLED LABOR REQUIRED BY  DEVELOPMENT ENTERPRISES SUCH AS MINING, LOGGING,  MODERN FARMING, CROP CULTURE OR DEEP‐SEA FISHING.  AS A RESULT THE DEMAND FOR TRAINED MANPOWER WAS MET BY AN INFLUX OF PEOPLE FROM OTHER REGIONS.  THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE OF THE REGIONS REMAINED POOR  OR WERE EVEN DISPLACED—OR UPROOTED—FROM THEIR  ANCESTRAL LANDS TO MAKE WAY FOR INDUSTRIAL AND  URBAN SETTLEMENT OR LARGE‐SCALE DEVELOPMENT  PROJECTS.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 11
  12. 12.  THE RESULT WAS WIDENING INCOME DISPARITIES THAT  LED TO A GROWING FEELING OF INJUSTICE AND SOCIAL  TENSION THAT WAS JUST WAITING FOR A SPARK TO  FLARE INTO LARGE‐SCALE COMMUNAL HOSTILITIES.  MORE OFTEN THAN NOT, THE GOVERNMENT WOULD  REACT REPRESSIVELY TO ANY PERCEIVED THREAT TO  NATIONAL UNITY AND STABILITY, AND IN THE PROCESS  CAUSE WHAT WAS TERMED AS COLLATERAL DAMAGE  BUT IN REALITY, WERE VICTIMS OF THE INDISCRIMINATE  USE OF FORCE. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 12
  13. 13.  ANOTHER FACTOR WAS THEN ADDED TO THE  GRIEVANCES: VIOLATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS. DURING  THE NEW ORDER, AS ECONOMIC GROWTH TOOK  PRECEDENT OVER OTHER MATTERS, THE SOCIAL AND  POLITICAL INJUSTICE CAUSED BY RELENTLESS PURSUIT  OF GROWTH AND STABILITY WAS OVERLOOKED AND  THE VOICES AIRING THEM WERE MUTED.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 13
  14. 14.  AFTER THE FALL OF THE NEW ORDER, THERE WAS AN  OPPORTUNITY ADDRESS THE PROBLEM. ALTHOUGH  INCOME AND REGIONAL DISPARITY IS A COMPLEX  PROBLEM AND WOULD TAKE TIME AND EFFORT TO  RESOLVE, IT WAS IMMEDIATELY RECOGNIZED THAT AT  THE HEART OF THE PROBLEM WAS THE OVERLY CENTRALIZED GOVERNMENT STRUCTURE AND  DECISION MAKING PROCESS. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 14
  15. 15.  IT WAS DECIDED THAT DEVOLVEMENT OF CENTRAL  AUTHORITY SHOULD BE THE FIRST STEP TOWARD  ADDRESSING THE PROBLEM. AS PART OF THE  DEMOCRATIZATION PROCESS DURING THE HABIBIE  GOVERNMENT, THE PROCESS OF DECENTRALIZATION  WAS STARTED WITH TWO FAR‐REACHING LAWS, THE  LAWS NO. 22 AND NO. 25 ENACTED IN MAY 1999.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 15
  16. 16. DECENTRALIZATION THE CONCEPTS
  17. 17.  FEW ISSUES HAVE CREATED AS MUCH CONTROVERSY  OVER THE PAST HALF CENTURY AS HOW GOVERNMENTS  AND POLITICAL SYSTEMS SHOULD BE STRUCTURED AND  HOW PUBLIC POLICIES SHOULD BE MADE AND  IMPLEMENTED. IN GEOGRAPHICALLY LARGE AND  DEMOGRAPHICALLY DIVERSE SOCIETIES  THE TREND IS  TOWARD LESS CENTRAL CONTROL AND MORE  DECENTRALIZATION.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 17
  18. 18. WHY DECENTRALIZE? A MAJOR OBSTACLE TO THE EFFECTIVE PERFORMANCE OF  PUBLIC BUREAUCRACIES IN MOST DEVELOPING  COUNTRIES IS THE EXCESSIVE CONCENTRATION OR  DECISION‐MAKING AUTHORITY WITHIN CENTRAL  GOVERNMENT.  PUBLIC SECTOR INSTITUTIONS ARE COMMONLY  PERCEIVED TO BE GEOGRAPHICALLY AND SOCIALLY  REMOTE FROM THE PEOPLE AND TO TAKE DECISIONS  WITHOUT KNOWLEDGE OR CONCERN ABOUT ACTUAL  PROBLEMS AND PREFERENCES. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 18
  19. 19.  THE POPULAR REMEDY FOR SUCH CENTRALIZATION  IS DECENTRALIZATION, A TERM WHICH IS IMBUED  WITH POSITIVE CONNOTATIONS‐PROXIMITY,  RELEVANCE,  AUTONOMY, PARTICIPATION, ACCOUNTABILITY AND EVEN DEMOCRACY.   SO GREAT IS THE APPEAL OF DECENTRALIZATION  THAT IT IS DIFFICULT TO LOCATE A GOVERNMENT  THAT HAS NOT CLAIMED TO PURSUE A POLICY OF  DECENTRALIZATION IN RECENT YEARS.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 19
  20. 20. SOME IMPORTANT DEFINITIONS  DECENTRALIZATION IS THE TRANSFER OF AUTHORITY  AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR PUBLIC FUNCTIONS FROM  THE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT TO SUBORDINATE OR  QUASI‐INDEPENDENT GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATIONS  AND/OR THE PRIVATE SECTOR. (WORLD BANK, 2001)Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 20
  21. 21. DECENTRALIZATION IS THE EXPANSION OF  LOCAL AUTONOMY THROUGH THE TRANSFER  OF POWERS AND RESPONSIBILITIES AWAY  FROM NATIONAL BODY. (HEYWOOD, 2002)Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 21
  22. 22.  DECENTRALIZATION IS NOT MERELY POLITICALLY  EXPEDIENT FOR DEALING WITH REBELLIOUS REGIONS. IT  HAS MORE BASIC VALUE TO DEMOCRACY AND  DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION. MANY SCHOLARS HAVE  PRESENTED THE ARGUMENT THAT DECENTRALIZATION  ENHANCES THE LEGITIMACY, AND HENCE, STABILITY OF  DEMOCRACY.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 22
  23. 23. IMPORTANT OBJECTIVES OF DECENTRALIZATION:  1. BETTER MATCH BETWEEN SERVICE PROVISION  AND LOCAL VOTER PREFERENCES. 2. BETTER ACCOUNTABILITY THROUGH CLOSER  LINKAGES OF BENEFITS WITH COSTS. 3. INCREASED MOBILIZATION OF LOCAL RESOURCES. 4. BETTER PARTICIPATION OF CLIENTS IN SELECTION  OF OUTPUT MIX.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 23
  24. 24. TYPES OF DECENTRALIZATION  1. POLITICAL 2. ADMINISTRATIVE 3. FISCAL 4. MARKETDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 24
  25. 25. POLITICAL DECENTRALIZATION  POLITICAL DECENTRALIZATION AIMS TO GIVE  CITIZENS OR THEIR ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES  MORE POWER IN PUBLIC DECISION‐MAKING. (WORLD BANK, 2001)Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 25
  26. 26. FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION INVOLVES SHIFTING SOME  RESPONSIBILITIES FOR EXPENDITURES AND/OR  REVENUES TO LOWER LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT. THE EXTENT TO WHICH LOCAL ENTITIES ARE GIVEN  AUTONOMY TO DETERMINE THE ALLOCATION OF THEIR  EXPENDITURE. (WORLD BANK, 2001)Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 26
  27. 27. ADMINISTRATIVE DECENTRALIZATION  ADMINISTRATIVE DECENTRALIZATION SEEKS TO  REDISTRIBUTE AUTHORITY, RESPONSIBILITY AND  FINANCIAL RESOURCES FOR PROVIDING PUBLIC  SERVICES AMONG DIFFERENT LEVELS OF  GOVERNMENT. (WORLD BANK, 2001);;Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 27
  28. 28. ECONOMIC OR MARKET DECENTRALIZATION ECONOMIC OR MARKET DECENTRALIZATION WILL INCLUDE PRIVATIZATION AND DEREGULATION. THEY SHIFT RESPONSIBILITY FOR FUNCTIONS FROM THE PUBLIC TO THE PRIVATE SECTOR . (WORLD BANK, 2001)Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 28
  29. 29. FORMS OF DECENTRALIZATION  FORMS OF DECENTRALIZATION INCLUDE: 1. DECONCENTRATION 2. DELEGATION TO SEMI‐AUTONOMOUS AGENCIES 3. DEVOLUTION TO LOCAL GOVERNMENT 4. TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS FROM PUBLIC TO  NONGOVERNMENT INSTITUITION (CHEEMA & RONDINELLI, 1984)Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 29
  30. 30. DECENTRALIZATION TRANSFER OF AUTHORITY  CLOSER TO THE PUBLIC TO  BE SERVED  TERRITORIAL FUNCTIONALDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 30
  31. 31. Forms of decentralizationNature of Delegation Basic for Delegation Territorial FunctionalWithin formal political structures Devolution (political Interest group decentralization, local representation government, democratic decentralization)Within public administrative or Deconcentration Establisment of parastatalsparastatal structures (administrative decentralization, field administration}From state sector to private sector Privatization of developed Privatization of national function (deregulation, functions (divestiture, contracting out, voucher deregulation, economic schemes) liberalization) (TURNER AND HULME, 1997)Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 31
  32. 32. AUTONOMOUS LOCAL GOVERNMENT  LOCAL GOVERNMENT CAN BE SAID TO BE  AUTONOMOUS IF THEY ENJOY A SUBSTANTIAL  DEGREE OF INDEPENDENCE, ALTHOUGH AUTONOMY  IN THIS CONNECTION IS SOMETIMES TAKEN TO IMPLY  A HIGH MEASURE OF SELF‐GOVERNMENT, RATHER   THAN SOVEREIGN INDEPENDENCE. (ADAPTED FROM HEYWOOD, 2002)Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 32
  33. 33. DECENTRALIZATION IS NOT TOTAL  DEVOLUTION IT MUST BE NOTED THAT THE DECENTRALIZATION DOES  NOT IMPLY THAT ALL AUTHORITY SHOULD BE DELEGATED.  THE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT MUST RETAIN A CORE OF  FUNCTIONS OVER ESSENTIAL NATIONAL MATTERS AND  ULTIMATELY HAS THE AUTHORITV TO REDESIGN THE  SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT AND TO DISCIPLINE OR  SUSPEND DECENTRALIZED UNITS THAT ARE NOT  PERFORMING EFFECTIVELY. HOW EXTENSIVE THIS CORE OF CENTRAL GOVERNMENT  FUNCTIONS SHOULD BE REMAINS A MAJOR IDEOLOGICAL  AND INTELLECTUAL DEBATE OF THE LATE TWENTIETH  CENTURY.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 33
  34. 34.  ALL SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT INVOLVE A COMBINATION  OF CENTRALIZED AND DECENTRALIZED AUTHORITY.  HOWEVER, FINDING A COMBINATION OF CENTRAL  CONTROL AND LOCAL AUTONOMY THAT SATISFIES  REGIME NEEDS AND POPULAR DEMANDS IS A PERSISTENT  DILEMMA FOR GOVERNMENTS.  CENTRALIZATION AND DECENTRALIZATION ARE NOT  ATTRIBUTES THAT CAN BE DICHOTOMIZED; RATHER THEY  REPRESENT HYPOTHETICAL POLES ON A CONTINUUM  THAT CAN BE CALIBRATED BY MANY DIFFERENT INDICES. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 34
  35. 35. EITHER  CENTRALIZED DECENTRALIZED ORCENTRALIZED DECENTRALIZED CONTINUUMDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 35
  36. 36. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 36
  37. 37. FEDERALISM AND  DECENTRALIZATION THERE IS NO BROAD‐BASED GENERALIZATION THAT  CAN BE MADE ABOUT THE CORRELATION OF  FEDERAL/UNITARY STATES AND DECENTRALIZATION. SOME FEDERAL STATES ARE HIGHLY CENTRALISED ‐ SUCH AS MALAYSIA, WHILE SOME UNITARY STATES  HAVE A HIGH DEGREE OF DECENTRALIZATION SUCH  AS CHINA.  Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 37
  38. 38. TWO APPROACHES ON SEQUENCING  DECENTRALIZATION     A NORMATIVE APPROACH:   GRADUAL/INCREMENTAL PROCESS  SYSTEMATIC PREPARATION  NORMAL CONDITION IN TERMS OF POLITIC, SOCIAL  AND ECONOMY  A BIG‐BANG APPROACH:  ONCE FOR ALL  LEARNING BY DOING  TRANSITION CONDITION IN TERMS POLITIC, SOCIAL  AND ECONOMY Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 38
  39. 39. HOW DECENTRALIZATION WORKS IN INDONESIA
  40. 40.  INDONESIA FOLLOWED THE “BIG BANG” APPROACH  TO DECENTRALIZATION.   IT STARTED IN 1999, BUT MUCH OF THE  RESPONSIBILITY FOR PUBLIC SERVICES WAS  DECENTRALIZED IN 2001 AFTER THE SECOND  AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION IN 2000. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 40
  41. 41.  BY THE END OF THE OLD REGIME, AT THE ONSET OF THE  DEMOCRATIZATION PROCESS AND POLITICAL REFORMS  IN 1999, THERE WERE 26 PROVICES [NOT INCLUDING  EAST TIMOR], 234 DISTRICTS OR KABUPATEN AND 59  CITIES OR KOTA, IN TOTAL 319 AUTONOMOUS REGIONS.  IN 2010, THERE ARE 33 PROVINCES, 398 DISTRICTS AND  93 CITIES, IN TOTAL 524 AUTONOMOUS REGIONS,  INCREASING IN TEN YEARS BY 205 AUTONOMOUS  REGIONS OR BY ALMOST TWO THIRD.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 41
  42. 42.  THE PROCESS WAS BASED ON THREE BASIC LAWS 1)  REGIONAL AUTONOMY; 2) FISCAL RELATIONS; AND 3)  REGIONAL GOVERNMENT TAXES AND FEES PASSED  BETWEEN 1999 AND 2000. THE PROCESS HAS BEEN A  WORK IN PROGRESS AND BOTH THE REGIONAL  AUTONOMY AND FISCAL RELATIONS LAWS WERE  AMENDED IN 2004 TO PROVIDE MORE CLARITY. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 42
  43. 43.  A SECOND PHASE OF DECENTRALIZATION IN 2006  INCREASED FINANCIAL TRANSFERS TO THE REGIONS BY  50 PERCENT, FOLLOWED BY A FURTHER 15 PERCENT IN  2007.  INDONESIA’S 524 LOCAL GOVERNMENTS NOW  UNDERTAKE 34 PERCENT OF THE NATIONAL BUDGET  WITH MOST SERVICES PROVIDED BY KABUPATEN/KOTA  [DISTRICT/CITY] GOVERNMENTS WHO ARE RESPONSIBLE  OF APPROXIMATELY 75 PERCENT OF THE TOTAL  REGIONAL SPENDING.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 43
  44. 44.  THE BASIC DECENTRALIZATION LAWS PROVIDE THAT MORE  NATURAL RESOURCE REVENUES ARE TO BE RETAINED IN THE  REGIONS WHERE THE RESOURCES ARE EXTRACTED.  AS RESOURCES [ESPECIALLY OIL AND GAS] ARE  CONCENTRATED IN ONLY A FEW REGIONS, THE PROCESS OF  DECENTRALIZATION HAS INCREASED REGIONAL INEQUALITY  AND, WITH RISING ENERGY PRICES, THE INEQUITY IS MORE  PRONOUNCED.  FISCAL BALANCE FUNDS HAVE BEEN DESIGNED TO  COMPENSATE FOR THIS AND THE EVIDENCE IS THAT THE IT IS  ASSISTING TO EQUALIZE FINANCIAL CAPACITIES. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 44
  45. 45. INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATION IN INDONESIA  Period Main Issues Legal Framework Intergovernmental Relation Economic Crisis Law No. 22/1948 Decentralized Law No. 44/1950 Federalized Separatism1946-1966 Law No. 1/1957 Decentralized Social Unrest Presidential Decree No. Centralized 6/1959 Political turmoil Law No.18/1965 Decentralized High and stable Law No. 5/1974 Centralized1966-1998 economic growth Government Regulation Pilot Program on Authoritarian Regime No.8/1995 Decentralization Law No. 22/1999 Economic Crisis Law No. 25/1999 Transition into Separatism 1999 Democracy and Social Unrest Law No. 18/1999 Decentralization Political turmoil Law No. 34/1999 Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 45
  46. 46. Intergovernmental Period Main Issues Legal Framework Relation Foundation for Democracy Second Constitutional Enhanced Amendment 2000 Decentralization and1999-2000 Regional Autonomy Economic Recovery Law No. 18/2001 Big Bang of Law No. 21/2001 Decentralization Democracy Implementation Law No.2001-2004 Decentralized Economic Recovery 22/1999 and No. 25/1999 Implementation Law No. 2004- Democracy Decentralized 32/2004 and No. 33/2004 Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 46
  47. 47. DISTRIBUTION OF AUTHORITIES AND FUNCTIONS   Central Local Government Obligatory Function Optional1. Foreign Affairs 1. Planning and Monitoring 1. Mining2. Defense 2. Spatial Planning 2. Fishery3. Security 3. Social order and security 3. Agriculture4. Religion 4. Public infrastructure services 4. Farm5. Judicial 5. Health Services 5. Forestry6. Monetary and Fiscal 6. Educational Services 6. Tourism 7. Others 7. Social 8. Labor 9. SME’s and Cooperatives 10. Environment 11. Land (?) 12. Civil administration 13. Government Administration 14. Investment Administration 15. Other services 16. Other obligatory function Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 47
  48. 48. LOCAL FINANCE IN INDONESIA SOURCES LOCAL REVENUES EQUITY FUND OTHERS LOCAL TAXES SHARING GRANT REVENUES RETRIBUTIONS EMERGENCY GENERAL FUND REVENUES FROM ALLOCATED FUND LOCAL ASSETS LOAN SPECIAL ALLOCATED OTHERS FUNDDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 48
  49. 49. REVENUES SHARING BETWEEN CENTRAL AND LOCAL   Before After Central Province District/ Central Province District/ Share to Shared-Revenues City City Other District/ City1. Property Tax 10% 16.2% 64.8% 16.2% 64.8%2. Property Title Transfer Tax 20% 16% 64% 16% 64%3. Levy on Forestry Right to 55% 30% 15% 20% 16% 64% operate4. Commission on Forestry 55% 30% 15% 20% 16% 32% 32% Resource5. Land Rent on Mining Sector 20% 16% 64% 20% 16% 64%6. Royalties from Mining Sector 20% 16% 64% 20% 16% 32% 32%7. Tax on Fisheries Operation 100% 20% 80%8. Tax on Fisheries Output 100% 20% 80%9. Oil Revenues 100% 85% 3% 6% 6%10. Natural gas Revenues 100% 70% 6% 12% 12%11. Personal Income Tax 100% 80% 8% 12%Source: Government Regulation No. 104/2000 and Law No. 17/2003 Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 49
  50. 50.  SUBSTANTIAL AMOUNT OF GOVERNMENT BUDGET HAS BEEN  TRANSFERRED TO THE REGIONS.  FOR 2012, ALMOST ONE THIRD [32.8%] OR $52 BILLION IS  DIRECT TRANSFER TO THE AUTONOMOUS REGIONS’ BUDGET,  IN THE FORM OF NATURAL RESOURCES SHARING FUND FOR  $11 BILLION, GENERAL ALLOCATION FUND FOR $30 BILLION,  SPECIAL ALLOCATION FUND FOR $3 BILLION AND SPECIAL  AUTONOMY FUND FOR THE TWO PAPUA PROVINCES AND  ACEH, $1.3 BILLION, AND ADJUSTMENT FUND [FOR  INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT] FOR $6.5 BILLION.  BUT OVERALL GOVERNMENT BUDGET THAT GOES TO THE  REGIONS THROUGH VARIOUS SCHEMES IS MUCH HIGHER,  CLOSE TO TWO THIRD [62%].Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 50
  51. 51. DECENTRALIZATION 1999  % INCREASE BEFORE AFTERRURAL VILLAGE 59.834 68.442 8.608 (14,4%)URBAN VILLAGE 5. 935  8.068 2.133                 (35,0%)SUB‐DISTRICT 5.480 6.519 1.039                 (18,9%)DISTRICT 234 398 164                  (70,0%)MUNICIPAL 59 93 34                 (57,6%)PROVINCE 27 33 6                 (22,2%) Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 51
  52. 52. THE OUTCOMES
  53. 53.  DECENTRALIZATION IN INDONESIA IS STILL IN THE  EARLY STAGES OF IMPLEMENTATION; THE RESULTS  SO FAR ARE MIXED. TO A CERTAIN EXTENT IT HAS  DEFUSED THE POLITICAL PRESSURE ON THE  GOVERNMENT COMING FROM UNHAPPY REGIONS.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 53
  54. 54.  DECENTRALIZATION BRINGS DECISION‐MAKING  CLOSER TO THE PEOPLE AND THEREFORE YIELDS  PROGRAMMES AND SERVICES THAT BETTER ADDRESS  LOCAL NEEDS. BRINGING STAKEHOLDERS TOGETHER TO DEFINE  PRIORITIES FOR PROJECTS AND PROGRAMMES  INCREASES INTEREST AND SENSE OF OWNERSHIP,  WHICH IN TURN PROMOTES SUSTAINABILITY.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 54
  55. 55.  COMPREHENSIVE SURVEYS OF PERCEPTIONS INDICATE,  HOWEVER, THAT SATISFACTION WITH SERVICE DELIVERY IS  IMPROVING. WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHETHER THINGS HAVE  IMPROVED IN THE LAST TWO YEARS, OVER 70 PERCENT OF  PUBLIC SERVICE USERS INDICATE THAT THEY BELIEVE THAT  THERE HAVE BEEN IMPROVEMENTS IN HEALTH AND  EDUCATION SERVICES, 56 PERCENT IN ADMINISTRATIVE  SERVICES AND 45 PERCENT IN POLICE (NOT DECENTRALIZED).  THIS MATCHES EARLIER SURVEY THAT HAD A SIMILAR  OUTCOME.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 55
  56. 56. THE DOWNSIDE DECENTRALIZATION IS EXPECTED, ASIDE FROM KEEPING  THE COUNTRY TOGETHER, TO IMPROVE GOVERNANCE.  HOWEVER THERE IS IN GENERAL YET LITTLE EVIDENCE  THAT THIS HAS HAPPENED.   INDEED THERE IS EVIDENCE THAT THE MULTIPLE LAYERS  OF BUREAUCRACY HAVE RAISED THE COST OF DOING  BUSINESS IN THE PROVINCES, BOTH FOR INDONESIAN  INVESTORS AS WELL AS FOR FOREIGN INVESTORS. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 56
  57. 57.  DECENTRALIZATION ALSO HAS GENERATED A NEW VOGUE IN  THE REGIONS. MANY REGIONS OR ETHNICS ARE  DEMANDING TO HAVE THEIR OWN PROVINCES. WITHIN THE  PROVINCE THERE ARE ALREADY PROLIFERATION OF NEW  “KABUPATENS” OR AUTONOMOUS DISTRICTS.  SOME ARE GENUINELY CONCERNED WITH DEVELOPING  LOCAL DEMOCRACY, AND THE NEED TO ESTABLISHED A  SEPARATE ADMINISTRARIVE ENTITIES OUT OF EXISTING  ONES, FROM SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC POINT OF VIEW. BUT  NOT A FEW ARE JUST THE IDEAS OF LOCAL ELITES TO CREATE  NEW POLITICAL JOBS.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 57
  58. 58.  THE MAIN PROBLEM, LIES IN THE POLITICAL SYSTEM. HEADS  OF REGIONAL GOVERNMENT—PROVINCIAL AS  WELL AS  DISTRICT/MUNICIPAL—ARE DIRECTLY ELECTED.  BY LAW THEY  HAVE TO BE NOMINATED BY A POLITICAL PARTY OR A GROUP  OF POLITICAL PARTIES. AS THEY HAVE TO WORK WITH LOCAL COUNCILS   (PARLIAMENTS) THEY HAVE TO SOLICITE SUPPORT FROM  OTHER POLITICAL PARTY (PARTIES) USUALLY BY AGREEING TO  RUN ON A  TICKET FOR VICE GOVERNOR (VICE HEAD OF  DICTRICT/MUNICIPALITIES) FROM THE COALITION  PARTY(PARTIES).Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 58
  59. 59.  ALONG THE WAY, MORE OFTEN THAN NOT THEY ARE  CONFLICTING WITH OTHER, BECAUSE COACH HAS HIS/HER  POLITICAL  PARTY (PARTIES) INTEREST. IT IS CONCEIVABLE  THAT THE PRESENT JUNIOR PARTNER IS ALSO ENJOY  PREPAIRING TO BECOME THE CHIEF HIMSELF/HERSELF IN  FUTURE ELECTION. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 59
  60. 60.  ANOTHER CONSEQUENCE OF THE SYSTEM IS THAT  LOCAL GOVERNMENT BUREAUCRACY HAVE BEEN  POLITIZED, THE SITUATION.  WHICH WORSE THAN IN  THE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT.  IT IS CREATING  JEALOUSLY, CONFLICT, DISCORD. ENMITY IN AMONG THE  LOCAL CIVIL SERVANTS. AND THE WORSE IS THE PRACTICE OF MONEY POLITICS.  TO  GET ELECTED THE CANDIDATES NEED TO SPEND SO  MUCH MONEY THAT ONCE ONLY GET ELECTED USUALLY  THEY MAKE EFFORTS TO RECOUP THE INVESTMENT.   Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 60
  61. 61.  AS ALSO POINTED BY THE WORLD BANK, (2001) THE  RISKS OF AN INCREASE IN CORRUPTION FOLLOWING  DECENTRALIZATION ARE HIGH. IT HAS BEEN WIDELY  OBSERVED THAT SO FAR NOT ONLY POWER AND  REVENUE THAT HAVE BEEN DECENTRALIZED BUT ALSO  CORRUPTION. IN THIS IT SEEMS THAT INDONESIA IS NOT THE ONLY  COUNTRY FACED WITH THIS PROBLEM FOLLOWING  ATTEMPTS TO DECENTRALIZE. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 61
  62. 62.  SOME ANALYSTS COMMENT THAT DECENTRALIZATION  HAS STRENGTHENED THE POSITION OF THE LOCAL  ELITES AND THEIR CLIENTELISTIC NETWORKS IN SOME  LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES (HUBER, RUESCHEMEYER  AND STEPHENS, 1999: 182). FURTHERMORE, MANY REGIONS HAVE INCREASED LOCAL TAXES AND IMPOSED  NEW LEVIES THAT HAVE BECOME A SIGNIFICANT CONCERN FOR INVESTORS.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 62
  63. 63.  ON FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION MANY STUDIES  HAVE SHOWN THAT MANY NEW AUTONOMOUS  REGIONS ECONOMICALLY ARE NOT VIABLE. THEY  CONTINUE TO NEED FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM  THE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT. IN MANY REGIONS, THERE ARE JUST NOT ENOUGH QUALIFIED PEOPLE  TO MAN THE NEWLY ESTABLISHED LOCAL  GOVERNMENTS.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 63
  64. 64.  BY ANY CRITERIA, REGIONS, EVEN THE POOREST, HAVE  RECEIVED LARGE INCREASES IN TRANSFERS IN RECENT  YEARS—SOME NOW HAVE SURPLUSES—AND THE  CHALLENGE HAS MOVED TO SPENDING WISELY.  IT IS IMPORTANT, BECAUSE REGIONAL EXPENDITURES AT  BOTH THE PROVINCE AND REGENCY LEVEL ARE DOMINATED  BY ADMINISTRATIVE SPENDING [USUALLY FOR SALARIES FOR  THE ADMINISTRATION, LOCAL PARLIAMENT, BUILDINGS ETC]  AT CLOSE TO 30 PERCENT OF BUDGETS.  IN SOME SUB‐PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT IT RUNS  MUCH HIGHER AS HIGH AS 70 TO 90%. BY CONTRAST BEST PRACTICE ACCORDING TO THE WORLD  BANK IS USUALLY CLOSER TO 5 PERCENT. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 64
  65. 65.  THE CHALLENGE IS HOW TO STRENGTHEN THE  EQUALIZING IMPACT BETWEEN OWN‐SOURCE AND  NATURAL RESOURCE REVENUES AND EMPOWER  REGIONAL GOVERNMENTS TO FIND THE OPTIMAL  COMBINATION OF INPUTS [SIZE OF WORKFORCE, CAPITAL,  INTERMEDIATE INPUTS AND OUTSOURCING] FOR PUBLIC  SERVICE DELIVERY.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 65
  66. 66.  IN CONCLUSION CAPACITY PROBLEMS AT THE LOCAL LEVEL  REMAIN ACCUTE. REGIONAL GOVERNMENTS HAVE HAD  DIFFICULTY SPENDING INCREASED RESOURCES AND  SURPLUSES HAVE BUILT UP IN MOST SUB‐NATIONAL  GOVERNMENTS. SUB‐NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS HAVE NOT HAD EXPERIENCE  IN DEALING WITH BUSINESSES AND TYPICALLY LACK  UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT IT MAKES TO CREATE A GOOD  BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 66
  67. 67.  IN ADDITION TO ADDRESSING ADMINISTRATIVE AND  REGULATORY ISSUES, IMPROVING DECENTRALIZATION  OUTCOMES REQUIRES INCREASING THE CAPACITY AND  ACCOUNTABILITY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTS. THE  ACCOUNTABILITY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTS TO THEIR  CONSTITUENTS IS CRUCIAL FOR THE SUCCESS OF  REGIONAL AUTONOMY OVER TIME. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 67
  68. 68.  IN PARTICULAR AN IMPROVED SYSTEM FOR  MONITORING OF SUB‐NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS  WOULD PROVIDE INCENTIVES FOR GOOD PERFORMERS  AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR THOSE LAGGING  BEHIND.  A CREDIBLE PERFORMANCE SYSTEM WOULD PROVIDE  TRANSPARENCY, ATTRACT INVESTORS TO STRONG  REGIONS AND PROVIDE A BASIS FOR AN ALLOCATION  SYSTEM BASED ON PERFORMANCE AND NEEDS.  SO A COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT WILL EVOLVE WHICH  IS HEALTHY TO MOTIVATE HARD WORK AND  DETERMINATION.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 68
  69. 69. GROWTH OF GENERAL ALOCATION FUND (GAF)   VS AVERAGE FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENT TOTAL GROWTH AVERAGE GROWTHSOURCE: MOF, 2011Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 69
  70. 70. AVERAGE GAF/SUB‐PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT* AT 2000 CONSTANT PRICESOURCE: MOF, 2011Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 70
  71. 71. TRENDS OF SPECIAL ALLOCATION FUNDSOURCE: MOF, 2011Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 71
  72. 72. GROWTH OF GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEESSOURCE: MOF, 2011Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 72
  73. 73. LESSONS TO BE LEARNED
  74. 74. GOOD THEORY POOR PRACTICEDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 74
  75. 75. GOOD THEORY POOR PRACTICE •Basic Human Rights • Disunity •Democracy • Warlordism •Decision Making • Nepotism •Participation :  • Exclusivism i.  Grass Root, ii. Empowerment, • Local Elites iii. Responsiveness •Prevent disintegrationDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 75
  76. 76. GOOD THEORY POOR PRACTICE •Debureaucratization •Efficiency • Weak Institution • Effectiveness • Span of Control • Limited Human Resources • Licence and Permit • Client Interaction • Unclear Responsibility • Representativeness • Populism/Pluralism • Decentralization of corruption • Differentiated Public • Better: i. Planning ii. Execution iii. Supervision iv. MonitoringDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 76
  77. 77. GOOD THEORY POOR PRACTICE• Efficiency • Rich  Region     Richer• Resource Optimization • Poor Region     Poorer• Equity  • i. Resource allocation/distribution Regional Barrier to Commerce ii. Poverty • Environment knows no  iii. Closing disparity Administrative border iv. Opportunity • National vs Local Rules v. Empowerment• Demonopolization • National vs Local Taxes• Entrepreneurship• Environment• Inter‐Regional Cooperation• Inter‐Regional Competition• Ownership of DevelopmentDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 77
  78. 78. GOOD THEORY POOR PRACTICE• Efficiency in Delivery of i. Education • Different Level & Quality of      i. Education ii. Health iii.Other social ii. Health iii. Socialservices. services.• Local Capabilities in Service  • Social Immobility Delivery• Responsive to Local i. Needs ii. Potencialiii. Shortcomings • Social Cohessivenes• Social SolidarityDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 78
  79. 79. GOOD THEORY POOR PRACTICE • Plurality • Primordialism • Diversity • Preservation of local: • Local vs Modern Values i. Language ii. Arts iii. Traditition • Dignity • Self Esteem • Confidence • Local WisdomDay3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 79
  80. 80.  MORE NEEDS TO BE LEARNED FROM INDIVIDUAL  EXPERIENCES AND  THESE LESSONS NEED TO BE  TRANSLATED INTO PRACTICAL ACTIONS.  FURTHER ANALYSIS IS NECESSARY IN ORDER TO BETTER  UNDERSTAND WHICH FORMS AND UNDER WHAT  CIRCUMSTANCES DECENTRALIZATION CAN HAVE A  PRODUCTIVE ROLE IN SUPPORTING  SUSTAINABLE  HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND HOW GOVERNMENTS AND  STAKEHOLDERS SHOULD APPROACH THESE PROCESSES. NEW METHODS OF MONITORING AND EVALUATING  DECENTRALIZATION POLICES NEED TO BE DEVELOPED  AND APPLIED. MORE CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT IS NEEDED AT ALL  LEVELS OF GOVERNANCE.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 80
  81. 81.  DECENTRALISED GOVERNANCE, IF PROPERLY PLANNED AND IMPLEMENTED, OFFERS IMPORTANT OPPORTUNITIES FOR  ENHANCED HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. DEVOLVING SOME POLITICAL, ADMINISTRATIVE AND FISCAL  AUTHORITY TO SUB‐NATIONAL LEVEL GOVERNMENTS  DEVELOPS A SYSTEM OF CO‐RESPONSIBILITY BETWEEN  INSTITUTIONS AT THE CENTRAL AND LOCAL LEVELS, THUS  INCREASING THE OVERALL QUALITY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF  THE SYSTEM OF GOVERNANCE WHILE IMPROVING  AUTHORITY AND CAPACITIES OF SUB‐NATIONAL LEVELS.  DECENTRALIZATION STRENGTHENS BOTH CENTRAL AND  LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, BUT SHOULD ALSO CREATES  PARTNERSHIPS WITH CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS AND  THE PRIVATE SECTOR.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 81
  82. 82.  THE CONCEPTS OF DECENTRALIZATION HAVE CHANGED  RAPIDLY OVER THE SECOND HALF OF THE LAST  CENTURY  IN TANDEM WITH THE EVOLUTION IN THINKING ABOUT  GOVERNANCE.  DISCOURSES OVER THE STRUCTURE, ROLES, AND  FUNCTIONS OF GOVERNMENT QUESTIONS THE  EFFECTIVENESS OF CENTRAL POWER AND AUTHORITY IN  PROMOTING ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL PROGRESS AND ON  THE POTENTIAL ADVANTAGES OF DECENTRALIZING  AUTHORITY TO SUBNATIONAL UNITS OF ADMINISTRATION,  LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, OR OTHER AGENTS OF THE STATE  INCLUDING THE PRIVATE SECTOR AND CIVIL SOCIETY. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 82
  83. 83.  FROM THIS BROADER PERSPECTIVE ON GOVERNANCE NEW  CONCEPTS OF DECENTRALIZATION EMERGED AS WELL. AS  THE CONCEPT OF GOVERNANCE BECAME MORE INCLUSIVE,  DECENTRALIZATION TOOK ON NEW MEANINGS AND NEW  FORMS.  IT GUIDES TRANSFORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF  CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES OF DECENTRALIZATION FROM  THE TRANSFER OF AUTHORITY WITHIN GOVERNMENT TO  THE SHARING OF POWER, AUTHORITY, AND  RESPONSIBILITIES AMONG BROADER GOVERNANCE  INSTITUTIONS.Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 83
  84. 84.  THOSE ARE THE CHALLENGES THAT NEED TO BE CONSIDERED   AND ADDRESSED PROPERLY IF DECENTRALIZATION AND  DEVOLUTION OF CENTRAL AUTHORITY TO THE  AUTONOMOUS LOCAL ENTITIES ARE TO FUNCTION  EFFECTIVELY MAKING PROVISION OF PUBLIC SERVICE  BETTER, THE LOCAL PEOPLE EMPOWERED AND THEIR  WELFARE IMPROVED. Day3_GRIPS 2012  www.ginandjar.com 84
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×