DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PEOPLE:  Equity and Poverty
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PEOPLE: Equity and Poverty

on

  • 2,518 views

Young Leaders Program: National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies Tokyo-Japan, February 2012

Young Leaders Program: National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies Tokyo-Japan, February 2012

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,518
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
1,609
Embed Views
909

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
93
Comments
0

2 Embeds 909

http://unjobs.org 907
http://users.unjobs.org 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PEOPLE:  Equity and Poverty DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PEOPLE: Equity and Poverty Presentation Transcript

    • Lecturer : Prof. Dr. Ginandjar Kartasasmita jgkar@cbn.net.id, www.ginandjar.comAssistant : Dr. Dadang Solihin, SE, MA Professor dadangsol@yahoo.com
    • CONTENTS INTRODUCTION What is Poverty? Evolving Strategy for Poverty Reduction The UN Millennium Development Goals Poverty Definitions And Measures POVERTY IN INDONESIA Poor Village Development Program THE CRISIS MAJOR POST‐CRISIS POVERTY REDUCTION  PROGRAMSGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 2
    • CONTENTS EQUITY: A Continuous Challenge The Ever Present Problem of Inequality Regional Disparity Attempts at Equitable Development Persistent Disparity Amidst Economic Growth Unemployment Human Development Index THE ROLE OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IN POVERTY  REDUCTION AND EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT LESSONS TO BE LEARNED On Poverty On Equitable DevelopmentGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 3
    • 1998 CRISIS 4
    • WHAT IS POVERTY? POVERTY IS PRONOUNCED DEPRIVATION IN WELL‐BEING. TO BE POOR IS TO BE HUNGRY, TO LACK SHELTER AND CLOTHING, TO BE SICK AND NOT CARED FOR, TO BE  ILLITERATE AND NOT SCHOOLED.  BUT FOR POOR PEOPLE, LIVING IN POVERTY IS MORE  THAN THIS. POOR PEOPLE ARE PARTICULARLY  VULNERABLE TO ADVERSE EVENTS OUTSIDE THEIR  CONTROL.  THEY ARE OFTEN TREATED BADLY BY THE INSTITUTIONS  OF STATE AND SOCIETY AND EXCLUDED FROM VOICE  AND POWER IN THOSE INSTITUTIONS.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 5
    •  THE PRESENT VIEW OF POVERTY IS ENCOMPASSING NOT  ONLY MATERIAL DEPRIVATION (MEASURED BY AN  APPROPRIATE CONCEPT OF INCOME OR CONSUMPTION) BUT ALSO LOW ACHIEVEMENTS IN EDUCATION AND HEALTH.  LOW LEVELS OF EDUCATION AND HEALTH ARE OF  CONCERN IN THEIR OWN RIGHT, BUT THEY MERIT  SPECIAL ATTENTION WHEN THEY ACCOMPANY  MATERIAL DEPRIVATION.  THE NOTION OF POVERTY INCLUDES VULNERABILITY AND EXPOSURE TO RISK—AND VOICELESSNESS AND POWERLESSNESS.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 6
    •  ANOTHER IMPORTANT REASON FOR CONSIDERING A  BROADER RANGE OF DIMENSIONS—AND HENCE A  BROADER RANGE OF POLICIES—IS THAT THE DIFFERENT  ASPECTS OF POVERTY INTERACT AND REINFORCE ONE  ANOTHER IN IMPORTANT WAYS.  THIS MEANS THAT POLICIES DO MORE THAN SIMPLY ADD UP. IMPROVING HEALTH OUTCOMES NOT ONLY  IMPROVES WELL‐BEING BUT ALSO INCREASES INCOME‐ EARNING POTENTIAL.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 7
    •  INCREASING EDUCATION NOT ONLY IMPROVES WELL‐ BEING—IT ALSO LEADS TO BETTER HEALTH OUTCOMES  AND TO HIGHER INCOMES. PROVIDING PROTECTION  FOR POOR PEOPLE (REDUCING VULNERABILITY IN  DEALING WITH RISK) NOT ONLY MAKES THEM FEEL LESS  VULNERABLE—IT ALSO ALLOWS THEM TO TAKE  ADVANTAGE OF HIGHER‐RISK, HIGHER‐RETURN  OPPORTUNITIES. INCREASING POOR PEOPLE’S VOICE AND PARTICIPATION NOT ONLY ADDRESSES THEIR SENSE OF EXCLUSION—IT ALSO LEADS TO BETTER TARGETING OF HEALTH AND  EDUCATION SERVICES TO THEIR NEEDS.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 8
    • EVOLVING STRATEGY FOR POVERTY  REDUCTION THE APPROACH TO REDUCING POVERTY HAS EVOLVED  OVER THE PAST 50 YEARS IN RESPONSE TO DEEPENING  UNDERSTANDING OF THE COMPLEXITY OF DEVELOPMENT.  IN THE 1950S AND 1960S MANY VIEWED LARGE  INVESTMENTS IN PHYSICAL CAPITAL AND INFRASTRUCTURE AS THE PRIMARY MEANS OF DEVELOPMENT. HENCE THE  TRICKLING DOWN EFFECT IDEA. IN THE 1970S AWARENESS GREW THAT PHYSICAL CAPITAL  WAS NOT ENOUGH, AND THAT AT LEAST AS IMPORTANT  WERE HEALTH AND EDUCATION. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 9
    •  THE 1980S SAW ANOTHER SHIFT OF EMPHASIS  FOLLOWING THE DEBT CRISIS AND GLOBAL RECESSION  AND THE CONTRASTING EXPERIENCES OF EAST ASIA  AND LATIN AMERICA, SOUTH ASIA, AND SUB‐SAHARAN  AFRICA.  IN THE 1990S GOVERNANCE AND INSTITUTIONS MOVED  TOWARD CENTER STAGE—AS DID ISSUES OF  VULNERABILITY AT THE LOCAL AND NATIONAL LEVELS. THE 20TH CENTURY SAW GREAT PROGRESS IN  REDUCING POVERTY AND IMPROVING WELL‐BEING.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 10
    •  IN THE LAST FOUR DECADES OF THE LAST CENTURY LIFE EXPECTANCY IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD IN‐CREASED  20 YEARS ON AVERAGE, THE INFANT MORTALITY RATE  FELL MORE THAN HALF, AND FERTILITY RATES DECLINED  BY ALMOST HALF IN THE PAST TWO DECADES NET  PRIMARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT IN DEVELOPING  COUNTRIES INCREASED BY 13 PERCENT.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 11
    •  HOWEVER THESE BROAD TRENDS CONCEAL  EXTRAORDINARY DIVERSITY IN EXPERIENCE IN  DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE WORLD‐AND LARGE  VARIATIONS AMONG REGIONS, WITH SOME SEEING  ADVANCES, AND OTHERS SETBACKS, IN CRUCIAL NON  INCOME MEASURES OF POVERTY.  WIDENING GLOBAL DISPARITIES HAVE INCREASED THE  SENSE OF DEPRIVATION AND INJUSTICE FOR MANY. AND  SOCIAL MOBILITY AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY REMAIN  ALIEN CONCEPTS FOR FAR TOO MANY PEOPLEGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 12
    • THE UN MILLENNIUM  DEVELOPMENT GOALSMDGs: NEW INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT IDEOLOGY “WE WILL SPARE NO EFFORTS TO FREE OUR FELLOW MEN,  WOMAN AND CHILDREN FROM THE OBJECT AND  DEHUMANIZING CONDITIONS OF EXTREME POVERTY, TO  WHICH MORE THAN A BILLION OF THEM ARE CURRENTLY  SUBJECTED. WE ARE COMMITTED TO MAKING THE RIGHT  TO DEVELOPMENT A REALITY FOR EVERYONE  AND TO  FREEING THE ENTIRE HUMAN RACE FROM WANT.”  (MILLENIUM DECLARATION, 2000)  GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 13
    •  THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS (MDG)  WERE DERIVED FROM THE UNITED NATIONS  MILLENNIUM DECLARATION, ADOPTED BY 189  NATIONS IN 2000. MOST OF THE GOALS AND TARGETS  WERE SET TO BE ACHIEVED BY THE YEAR 2015 ON THE  BASIS OF THE GLOBAL SITUATION DURING THE 1990s.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 14
    • GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 15
    • POVERTY DEFINITIONS AND MEASURESPoverty headcount index (Po): This is the share of the population whose consumption is below the poverty line. The headcount index, sometimes referred to as the ‘poverty incidence’, is the most popular poverty measure. However, this measure fails to differentiate between sub-groups of the poor and does not indicate the extent of poverty. It remains unchanged even if a poor person becomes poorer or better off, provided that they remain below the poverty line. Therefore, in order to develop a comprehensive understanding of poverty, it is important to complement the headcount index with the other two poverty measures of Foster, Green and Thorbecke (FGT).Poverty gap index (P1): The mean aggregate consumption shortfall relative to the poverty line across the whole population, with a zero value assigned to those above the poverty line. The poverty gap can provide an indication of how many resources would be needed to alleviate poverty through cash transfers perfectly targeted to the poor. This index better describes the depth of the poverty but does not indicate the severity of poverty. However, it does not change if a transfer is made from a poor person to someone who is even poorer.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 16
    • Poverty severity index (P2): This measure gives more weight to the very poor by taking the square of the distance from poverty line. It is calculated by squaring the relative shortfall of per capita consumption to the poverty line and then averaging across population while assigning zero values to those above the poverty line. When a transfer is made from a poor person to someone who is poorer, this registers a decrease in aggregate poverty.US$1 and US$2 PPP per day poverty measures: To compare poverty across countries, the World Bank uses estimates of consumption converted into US dollars using purchasing power parity (PPP) rates rather than exchange rates. The PPP exchange rate shows the numbers of units of a country’s currency needed to buy in that country the same amount of goods and services that US$1 would buy in the US. These exchange rates are computed based on prices and quantities for each country collected in benchmark surveys, which are usually undertaken every five years. Chen and Ravallion (2001) present an update on world poverty using a US$1-a-day poverty line. According to their calculations, in 1993 the US$1-a-day PPP poverty line was equivalent to Rp 20,811-a-month (US$2). The PPP poverty lines are adjusted over time by relative rates of inflation, using consumer price index (CPI) data. So in 2006, the US$1 PPP poverty line is equivalent to Rp 97,218 per person per month while the US$2 PPP poverty line is equivalent to Rp 194,439 per person per month.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 17
    • 1998 CRISIS 18
    •  DURING THE PREVIOUS THREE DECADES, THE INCIDENCE  OF POVERTY IN INDONESIA HAD DECLINED SIGNIFICANTLY  AS RESULT OF A RAPID ECONOMIC GROWTH COUPLED  WITH INVESTMENT IN SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE SUCH AS  HEALTH AND EDUCATION, PROMOTION OF AGRICULTURAL  DEVELOPMENT, AND RURAL INFRASTRUCTURES. IN 1970S, SPECIAL MEASURES TO TARGETING TO THE  ECONOMIC POOR WERE DIFFICULT DUE TO THE VERY HIGH  PROPORTION OF PEOPLE LIVING BELOW THE POVERTY  LINE.  IN THE ABSENCE OF GOVERNMENT INITIATED SOCIAL  PROTECTION, THE POOR LEAN MOSTLY ON TRADITIONAL  RISK POOLING MECHANISM.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 19
    •  IN THE YEARS  PRIOR TO 1997/98 ASIAN CRISIS,  INDONESIA HAD ADOPTED A LONG‐TERM POVERTY  ALLEVIATION STRATEGY VIA MASSIVE INVESTMENT IN  PUBLIC EDUCATION AND HEALTH, AGRICULTURE AND  PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE.  AMONG OTHERS, THIS APPROACH HAS CONTRIBUTED  TO THE IMPROVEMENT OF HUMAN CAPITAL  ACCUMULATION, CREATION OF NEWLY EDUCATED  MIDDLE‐CLASS AND OPENING ISOLATED AREAS TO  WIDER ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 20
    •  GOVERNMENT PROGRAM SUCH RICE SELF‐SUFFICIENCY  AND FAMILY PLANNING HAD TREMENDOUS EFFECT OF  POVERTY REDUCTION. WITH THE CONSTRUCTION OF IRRIGATION, INLAND ROADS,  ELECTRICITY THAT HAD COVERED AROUND 70 TO 80% OF  THE POPULATION, AND NATION WIDE SCHOOLS AND  HEALTH SERVICES, THE RURAL AS WELL THE URBAN AREAS  WERE BOTH AFFECTED BY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. THE HIGH ECONOMIC GROWTH WAS ACCOMPANIED BY  IMPROVEMENTS IN VARIOUS SOCIAL INDICATORS.  GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 21
    •  DURING THE PERIOD, LIFE EXPECTANCY INCREASED,  INFANT MORTALITY RATES FELL, AND SCHOOL  ENROLLMENT RATES ROSE.  IN ADDITION, THE PROVISION OF BASIC  INFRASTRUCTURE – WATER SUPPLIES, ROADS,  ELECTRICITY, SCHOOLS, AND HEALTH FACILITIES ‐ ALSO  ROSE SUBSTANTIALLY.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 22
    •  HOWEVER ALTHOUGH ALL STRATA OF INDONESIA’S  SOCIETY ENJOYED THE BENEFIT OF DEVELOPMENT,  THOSE AT THE TOP DISPROPORTIONABLY ENJOYED THE  MOST, THEREBY WIDENING THE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC  GAP BETWEEN THE RICH AND THE POOR. BY 1990’S AT THE HEIGHT OF INDONESIA’S ECONOMIC  RISE—BEING ONE OF THE ASIAN ECONOMIC TIGERS— THERE WAS A GROWING CONCERNED AMONG  DEVELOPMENT PLANNERS THAT A MORE TARGETED  AND SPECIAL POLICIES SHOULD BE ADOPTED TO  ACCELERATE POVERTY ERADICATION.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 23
    •  IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT DURING THE PRE‐CRISIS HIGH  GROWTH PERIOD, THE GOVERNMENT OF INDONESIA (GOI)  UNDER SUHARTO HAD ACTUALLY CARRIED ON A NUMBER OF  POVERTY  REDUCTION PROGRAMS.  IN THE EARLY NEW ORDER ERA FOR EXAMPLE, SEVERAL  DEPARTMENTS INCLUDING  THE DEPARTMENT OF HOME  AFFAIRS RUN AN EXPERIMENTAL SAVINGS AND LOANS  PROJECTS; THE  DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AFFAIRS  CONDUCTED PROJECTS FOCUSED ON INCREASING THE  WELFARE OF THE POOR AND NEEDY; AND THE DEPARTMENT  OF AGRICULTURE MANAGED PROGRAMS AIMING TO  INCREASE THE INCOME LEVEL OF SMALL FARMERS (LEITH  ET.AL, 2003). GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 24
    •  BESIDES THERE WERE ALSO A MULTITUDE OF  PRESIDENTIAL INSTRUCTIONS (INPRES) ALLOCATING  FUNDS FOR EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND BLOCK  GRANTS TO THE PROVINCES AND DISTRICS. THEY ALL CONTRIBUTED TO THE FAST DROP IN  POVERTY ALL OVER THE COUNTRY.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 25
    •  PRIOR TO THE 1997/1998 CRISIS, THE GOVERNMENT  TOOK  IMPORTANT STEPS ON WHAT LATER WAS THE INSPIRATION OF  POST‐CRISIS POVERTY REDUCTION PROGRAM.  THE POVERTY REDUCTION INITIATIVES IN THE LATE NEW  ORDER ERA INCLUDES:  I. PRESIDENTIAL INSTRUCTION ON DISADVANTAGED VILLAGES (IDT);  II. DISADVANTAGED VILLAGE INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT  PROGRAM (P3DT);  III. URBAN POVERTY REDUCTION PROGRAMME (P2KP);  IV. MICRO CREDIT (TAKESRA/KUKESRA);  V. SMALL FARMERS/FISHERMAN INCOME EXPANSION PROJECT (P4K);  AND  VI. SUB‐DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (PPK/KDP). (LEITH ET.AL, 2003)  GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 26
    • 27
    •  DESPITE THE FACT THAT POVERTY ALLEVIATION IN  INDONESIA ACHIEVED A GREAT SUCCESS IN THE PERIOD OF  1970S UNTIL MID 1990S, THE TERM POVERTY HAD NOT  PLACED IN THE TOP PRIORITY OF THE COUNTRYS  DEVELOPMENT AGENDA UNTIL THE EARLY 1990S.  THERE WAS NO SPECIFIC CHAPTER ON POVERTY  ALLEVIATION IN THE FIRST FIVE OF FIVE YEARS  DEVELOPMENT PLAN (REPELITA), THE NATIONAL MEDIUM‐ TERM DEVELOPMENT PLAN IN THE NEW ORDER ERA.  THE DEVELOPMENT IDEOLOGY AT THAT TIME FOLLOWING  THE ADVICE OF EXPERTS  FROM THE WORLD BANK AN  WESTERN COUNTRIES WERE GROWTH DRIVEN  DEVELOPMENT COUNTING ON THE TRICKLE DOWN BENEFIT  OF GROWTH TO THE POOR POPULATION.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 28
    •  THE SIXTH REPELITA 1994/1995 ‐ 1998/1999 WAS THE  FIRST DOCUMENT THAT MENTIONED POVERTY  ALLEVIATION AND EQUITY OF DEVELOPMENT. THESE  TWO ISSUES WERE ALSO INTEGRATED IN OTHER  CHAPTERS OF THE PLAN.   A NEW APPROACH ON POVERTY ERADICATION WAS  LAUNCHED IN 1993, UNDER THE SIXTH FIVE YEARS  DEVELOPMENT PLAN (REPELITA VI).  THE IDT (INPRES DESA TERTINGGAL, OR PROGRAM FOR  ASSISTANCE TO BACKWARD VILLAGES). EVEN THEN THE  USA OF THE WORD “POOR” WAS STILL AVOIDED.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 29
    •  IDT HAD THREE GOALS:  1) TO GALVANIZE A NATIONAL MOVEMENT FOR POVERTY ERADICATION AND ENSURE THAT IT  BECOMES A MASS (PEOPLE’S) MOVEMENT;  2) TO ACCELERATE REDUCTION IN INEQUALITIES OF INCOME AND WEALTH; AND  3) TO DEVELOP THE PEOPLE’S ECONOMY.   THE BASIC IDEA WAS EMPOWERING PEOPLE TO  MAKE THEM CAPABLE  TO LIFT THEMSELVES OUT OF  POVERTY.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 30
    •  POOR GROUPS ARE IDENTIFIED ACCORDING TO  CATEGORIES REFLECTIVE OF LOCAL VILLAGE STANDARDS.  EACH VILLAGES WAS PROVIDED FUNDS RP.20 MILLION PER  VILLAGE (ABOUT US$10.000). IT WAS A GRANT, BUT WAS  EXPECTED TO REVOLVE AMONG THE LOCAL COMMUNITY  AS A SEED. THE USES OF THE FUNDS WERE ENTIRELY AT  DISCRETION OF THE COMMUNITY THEMSELVES. IN ONE VILLAGE THERE COULD BE MORE THAN ONE  GROUP.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 31
    •  WOMEN’S PARTICIPATION WAS SIGNIFICANT AND IN MANY PLACES POKMAS MEMBERS WERE  PREDOMINANTLY OR ALL WOMEN. MOST OF THEM DREW  ON IDT FUNDS FOR INCOME‐GENERATING ACTIVITIES  SUCH AS SMALL TRADING ACTIVITIES, ANIMAL  HUSBANDRY SUCH AS RAISING GOATS, CHICKENS AND  DUCKS, FISH FARMS, HOME INDUSTRIES, OR IN ONE CASE  OPERATING A NEWLY PURCHASED FISHING BOAT WITH  THEIR HUSBAND.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 32
    •  BY 1996, THE PROGRAM HAD COVERED 28,000 OF THE  LEAST‐DEVELOPED VILLAGES, OR 43 PERCENT OF ALL  VILLAGES IN THE COUNTRY. BENEFICIARIES WERE 136,000 SELF‐HELP GROUPS (KELOMPOK MASYARAKAT OR  POKMAS), COMPRISING OF 3.4 MILLION POOR  HOUSEHOLDS. SUPPORTING THE IDT, IN 1996 A RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE  PROGRAM WAS LAUCHED.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 33
    •  OTHER PROGRAMS RELATED TO POVERTY REDUCTION  HAD ALSO BEEN UNDERTAKEN, FOCUSING ON  VULNERABLE GROUPS: THE POOREST, ISOLATED INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES, THE DISABLED, ELDERLY,  DESTITUTE CHILDREN, POOR WOMEN, AND SLUM DWELLERS. STILL OTHERS INVOLVE SUPPLEMENTARY  FEEDING FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN AND  INCOME GENERATING PROGRAMS.  THE RESULT WAS AN ACCELERATED  REDUCTION IN  POVERTY BETWEEN 1993‐1996.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 34
    • PRE‐CRISIS POVERTY INCIDENCE AND NUMBER OF POOR Percent 50,0% Millions 60 54,2 45,0% 47,2 50 40,0% 40,1% 42,3 40,6 35,0% 40 33,3% 35 30,0% 28,6% 30 25,0% 26,9% 27,2 30 25,9 20,0% 22,5 21,6% 20 15,0% 17,4% 15,1% 13,7% 10,0% 11,3% 10 5,0% 0,0% 0Source: BAPPENAS, 1999 1976 1978 1980 1981 1984 1987 1990 1993 1996 GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 35
    •  NOTE: THE POVERTY LINES EQUAL TO 2100 CALORIE PER  CAPITA PER DAY FOR THE FOOD COMPONENT  (52  COMMODITIES) PLUS BASIC NON FOOD CONSUMPTION  I.E. HOUSING, APPAREL, HEALTH, EDUCATION, UTILITIES  AND TRANSPORTATION (47‐51 COMMODITIES).   THE AVERAGE COMPOSITION IS 74% FOR FOOD  CONSUMPTION AND 26% FOR NON‐FOOD  CONSUMPTION;   IN URBAN AREA 70% VS. 30% AND IN RURAL AREA 80%  VS. 20%. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 36
    • 1998 CRISIS 37
    •  IN JULY 1997 INDONESIA WAS STRUCK BY A  CURRENCY CRISIS, WHICH BY THE FIRST HALF OF  1998 HAD ALREADY DEVELOPED INTO A FULL  BLOWN ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL CRISIS,  EXACERBATED BY A  NATURAL DISASTER (EL NINO  DROUGHT). GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 38
    •  DURING THIS CRISIS PERIOD, THE INDONESIAN PEOPLE SAW:  THE FALL OF THE  VALUE OF RUPIAH TO AS LOW AS 15  PERCENT OF ITS PRE‐CRISIS VALUE IN LESS THAN ONE YEAR,   ECONOMIC CONTRACTION BY AN UNPRECEDENTED  MAGNITUDE OF 13.7 PERCENT IN 1998,   SKYROCKETING  DOMESTIC PRICES (THE GENERAL INFLATION  RATE WAS 78 PERCENT IN 1998) AND PARTICULARLY THOSE OF  FOOD  (INFLATION RATE OF FOOD WAS 118 PERCENT IN 1998),   MASS RIOTING IN THE CAPITAL JAKARTA AND A FEW OTHER  CITIES,  CULMINATING IN THE FALL OF THE NEW ORDER  GOVERNMENT ‐ WHICH HAD BEEN IN POWER SINCE MID  1960S TO MAY 1998. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 39
    •  THE SOCIAL IMPACT OF THE CRISIS, IN PARTICULAR ON  POVERTY, WAS SUBSTANTIAL.  DURING THE PERIOD, THE NUMBER OF URBAN POOR  DOUBLED, WHILE THE RURAL POOR INCREASED BY 75  PERCENT.  A STUDY (BY SURYAHADI, SUMARTO, AND PRITCHETT, 2003) WHICH TRACKS DOWN POVERTY RATE OVER THE  COURSE OF THE CRISIS SHOWS THAT THE POVERTY RATE  INCREASED BY 164 PERCENT FROM THE ONSET OF THE  CRISIS IN MID 1997 TO THE PEAK OF THE CRISIS AROUND  THE END OF 1998. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 40
    •  TO REDUCE THE ADVERSE SOCIAL IMPACT OF THE CRISIS, IN  1998 THE GOVERNMENT INTRODUCED A SOCIAL SAFETY NET  (JARING PENGAMAN SOSIAL OR JPS) PROGRAM AIMING TO  PREVENT THE POOR FROM FALLING MORE DEEPLY INTO  POVERTY AND REDUCING THE EXPOSURE OF VULNERABLE  HOUSEHOLDS TO RISK. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 41
    •  THE SOCIAL SAFETY NET (SSN) INVOLVED FOUR STRATEGIES:  I. ENSURING THE AVAILABILITY OF AFFORDABLE FOOD,  II. IMPROVING HOUSEHOLD PURCHASING POWER THROUGH  EMPLOYMENT CREATION,  III. PRESERVING ACCESS TO CRITICAL SOCIAL SERVICES,  PARTICULARLY HEALTH AND EDUCATION, INCLUDING  SUPPLEMENTARY FOOD PROGRAM FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN  AND LACTATING WOMAN IN POOR VILLAGES, AND IV. SUSTAINING LOCAL ECONOMIC ACTIVITY THROUGH REGIONAL  BLOCK GRANTS AND THE EXTENSION OF SMALL‐SCALE  CREDITS. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SSN PROGRAMS HAD  SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED THE WORST EFFECTS OF THE CRISIS  (SUMARTO, SURYAHADI, AND WIDYANTI, 2002). GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 42
    •  TO PROTECT FOOD SECURITY, EDUCATION, HEALTH AND  EMPLOYMENT OF THE POOR HOUSEHOLDS IN THE POOR  AREAS, IN JULY 1998, THE GOVERNMENT OF INDONESIA  INITIATED THE FIRST NATION WIDE SOCIAL PROTECTION  SCHEME ON HEALTH AND EDUCATIONAL, IN ADDITION TO  SUBSIDIZED RICE AND CASH‐ FOR‐WORK PROGRAM FOR  POOR HOUSEHOLDS AND AREAS (SPARROW, 2006, 2007;  WORLD BANK, 2006).  WITH SOME MODIFICATIONS, MANY OF THESE INITIATED  SOCIAL SAFETY NETS ARE STILL PRACTICED – SEVERAL OF  WHICH ARE DISCUSSED IN THE CONTEXT OF THE POVERTY  ALLEVIATION STRATEGY IN THE POST‐CRISIS INDONESIA. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 43
    • FOOD SECURITY THE 1997/98 CRISIS WAS SIGNIFIED BY SKYROCKETING PRICE  OF RICE, THE STAPLE FOOD FOR MOST INDONESIANS.  AMONG OTHERS DUE TO CROP FAILURE CAUSED BY SEVERE  DRAUGHT (EL NIÑO) THE POOR, WHOSE RICE CONSUMPTION  MADE UP TO A QUARTER OF TOTAL EXPENDITURES, WERE  THE MOST NEGATIVELY AFFECTED.  THE DROP IN RICE CONSUMPTION WAS ACCOMPANIED BY  AMONG OTHERS DIMINISHING HEALTH STATUS OF UNDER  FIVE‐YEAR CHILDREN (WORLD BANK, 2006), INDICATING BAD  COPING STRATEGY. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 44
    •  DURING THE CRISIS, PER‐CAPITA LEVELS OF HOUSEHOLD  EXPENDITURE, DECLINED SUBSTANTIALLY AND POVERTY RATES  HAVE RISEN BY AT LEAST 25 PERCENT.  IT APPEARED THAT TO SMOOTH CONSUMPTION, HOUSEHOLDS  REDUCED THEIR INVESTMENT IN CHILDREN EDUCATION AND  PUSH EARLY ENTRANCE TO LABOR MARKET.  GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 45
    •  IN  MITIGATING THE HYPERINFLATION, HOUSEHOLDS TRIED  TO MAINTAIN THEIR PHYSICAL AMOUNT OF STAPLE FOOD  CONSUMPTION BY INCREASING THE VALUE AND  PROPORTION OF THEIR FOOD CONSUMPTION AT THE COST  OF HEALTH AND EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURES, HAMPERING  THE SUSTAINABILITY OF LONG‐TERM POVERTY  ALLEVIATION  STRATEGY THROUGH HUMAN CAPITAL ACCUMULATION.  THIS IS TRUE ESPECIALLY AMONG THE POOREST  HOUSEHOLDS (FRANKENBERG, THOMAS, AND BEEGLE,1999). GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 46
    •  THE MOST IMPORTANT BASIC COMMODITY WAS RICE. A  PROGRAM WAS INITIATED IN JULY 1998 TO PROVIDE 10  KG OF RICE AT ABOUT ONE‐HALF OF THE MARKET PRICE  TO LOW‐INCOME FAMILIES FIRST IN THE JAKARTA AREA  AND IN SEPTEMBER EXTENDED TO COVER 7½ MILLION  VERY POOR FAMILIES THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY.  IN DECEMBER THE MONTHLY ALLOCATIONS UNDER THE  SCHEME WAS INCREASED FROM 10 KILOGRAMS TO 20  KILOGRAMS PER FAMILY COVERING 17 MILLION POOR  FAMILIES GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 47
    • IMPROVING PURCHASING POWER TO IMPROVE PURCHASING POWER IN RURAL AND  URBAN AREAS, THE GOVERNMENT HAD SET UP  PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS THROUGHOUT THE  COUNTRY TO BOOST INCOMES OF THE POOR FOR THE UNEMPLOYED AND THE UNDEREMPLOYED.  TO SUPPLEMENT THESE EFFORTS, CASH‐FOR‐WORK  PROGRAMS ARE BEING IMPLEMENTED IN  DROUGHT‐STRICKEN AREAS OF THE COUNTRY.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 48
    • SOCIAL SERVICES PRESERVING ACCESS TO CRITICAL SOCIAL SERVICES  FOR THE POOR CONSTITUTED AN IMPORTANT  ASPECT OF THE SOCIAL SAFETY NET. IN WHAT WAS CONSIDERED BY THE WORLD BANK  AS THE MOST SUCCESSFUL INTERVENTION, AMONG  THE SOCIAL SAFETY NETS HAD BEEN THE  SCHOLARSHIP AND GRANT PROGRAM DESIGNED TO  MAINTAIN ENROLMENTS AND QUALITY OF  SCHOOLING AT PRE‐CRISIS LEVEL AND THE  INTENSIFIED HEALTH  CARE SERVICES.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 49
    • EDUCATION AMONG THE IMMEDIATE IMPACT OF THE ASIAN CRISIS WAS  AN INCREASE IN DROP OUT RATES ESPECIALLY AMONG THE  SCHOOL AGED GIRLS FROM POOR RURAL AREA, POTENTIALLY  TRANSMITTING POVERTY TO NEXT GENERATION.  IN 1998, THE FIRST PRO‐POOR TARGETED SSN ON  EDUCATIONAL WAS INTRODUCED TOGETHER WITH THE SSNON  HEALTH.  THE SSN COMPOSED OF TWO PARTS: SCHOLARSHIP AND  SCHOOL SUBSIDY PROGRAM.  BY FEBRUARY 1999, 5 PERCENT OF CHILDREN AGES 10 TO 18  (APPROXIMATELY 2.1 MILLION CHILDREN) HAD RECEIVED A  SCHOLARSHIP (SPARROW, 2006).  GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 50
    •  FROM 1999‐2002 DATA, SPARROW FOUND THAT  PARTICIPATION IN THE SCHOLARSHIPS INCREASED THE  PROBABLY OF ATTENDING SCHOOL IN THE PREVIOUS WEEK  FOR 1.5 PERCENTAGE POINTS HIGHER THAN THE NON‐ PARTICIPANTS.  AT THE SAME TIME, THE SCHOLARSHIPS REDUCED THE  INCIDENCE OF CHILD TO WORK FROM 14.0% TO 10.2%. THE  EFFECT ON LABOR WAS HIGHER FOR STUDENTS FROM POOR  HOUSEHOLDS IN RURAL AREAS, AND FOR THE BOYS.  THE CASH TRANSFER THROUGH THE SCHOLARSHIPS HAD  HELPED THE POOR HOUSEHOLDS, TO CERTAIN EXTENT, TO  PROTECT THEIR CHILDREN ENROLMENT IN ELEMENTARY AND  JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL AND AT THE SAME TIME PREVENT  PREMATURE ENTRANCE TO LABOR MARKET. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 51
    •  THE PROGRAM EXTENDED TO THE POOREST 6 PERCENT  OF STUDENTS ENROLLED IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS, 17  PERCENT IN JUNIOR SECONDARY AND 10 PERCENT IN  SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS.  IT ALSO PROVIDED GRANTS TO THE 60 PERCENT OF THE  POOREST IN EACH CATEGORY (SEE WORLD BANK, 1999).   THE PROGRAM HAD REACHED 4 MILLION STUDENTS. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 52
    • HEALTH IN HEALTH SERVICES, THE PRIORITY WAS GIVEN TO THE  POOR TO HAVE ACCESS TO BASIC HEALTH SERVICES AND  ESSENTIAL MEDICINES, AND PREVENTED  MALNUTRITION AND MICRONUTRIENT DEFICIENCIES.  THE GOVERNMENT MADE AVAILABLE SUPPLEMENTARY  FOOD FOR YOUNG CHILDREN THROUGH THE SCHOOL  SYSTEM AND PREGNANT AND LACTATING WOMEN IN  POOR VILLAGES. THIS PROGRAM HAD REACHED 8.1  MILLION PUPILS IN 52.5 THOUSAND SCHOOLS  NATIONWIDE. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 53
    •  AMONG THE FIRST SOCIAL HEALTH PROGRAM TARGETED TO  POOR HOUSEHOLDS WAS STARTED IN 1994 WITH THE  PROGRAM HEALTH CARD (KARTU SEHAT) AND FULLY  NSTITUTIONALIZED IN 1998 THROUGH HEALTH SOCIAL  SAFETY NET (JARING PENGAMAN SOSIAL JPS ‐ KESEHATAN).  IT WAS FUNDED BY ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK AND RUN  FROM 1998 TO 2001.  THE SSN WAS LATER REPLACED BY A FUEL PRICE  COMPENSATION SCHEME WHICH USED THE SSN PROGRAM  MANAGEMENT (PKPS‐BBM 2001‐2005). GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 54
    •  IN SSN SCHEME, ELIGIBLE HOUSEHOLD CAN APPLY  FOR A HEALTH CARD (KARTU SEHAT) WHICH CAN BE  USED TO WAIVE MEDICAL EXPENSES FOR OUTPATIENT  AND INPATIENT CARE AT SUB‐DISTRICT HEALTH  CENTERS AND THIRD CLASS PUBLIC HOSPITAL WARDS.  BY FEBRUARY 1999, 11 PERCENT OF INDONESIANS OR  APPROXIMATELY 22 MILLION PEOPLE LIVED IN A  HOUSEHOLD WITH A HEALTH CARD. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 55
    • MAJOR POST‐CRISIS POVERTY REDUCTION  PROGRAMS SINCE THE ASIAN ECONOMIC CRISIS IN 1997‐98, EFFORTS ON  PROTECTING THE POOR THROUGH TARGETED SOCIAL SAFETY  NET ON HEALTH, EDUCATION AND RICE CONSUMPTION AS  WELL AS THE NEWLY INTRODUCED COMMUNITY  EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMS AND MICRO‐ENTERPRISE  EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMS HAVE SIGNIFIED INDONESIAS  DEVELOPMENT POLICY AGENDA. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 56
    •  FROM 1998 TO 2010, THE GOVERNMENT HAS SHIFTED ITS  DEVELOPMENT AGENDA, NOT ONLY RELYING HEAVILY ON  ECONOMIC GROWTH BUT ALSO CREATING POVERTY  REDUCTION EFFORTS TO ENSURE THE ACHIEVEMENT OF  DEVELOPMENT GOALS.  SSN, THAT WAS COMMENCED AS AN EFFORT TO MITIGATE  THE IMPACT OF FINANCIAL CRISIS THAT SEVERELY HIT THE  POOR A DECADE AGO, HAS NOW EVOLVED INTO WIDER  POVERTY REDUCTION EFFORTS. TODAY, POVERTY  REDUCTION HAS BECOME ONE SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE THAT  IS FORMALLY STATED IN THE NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT  PLANNING DOCUMENTS.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 57
    •  IN POST‐CRISIS ERA, WHAT WAS STARTED AS A RESPONSE TO  THE ASIAN ECONOMIC CRISIS THAT SWEPT THE COUNTRY A  DECADE AGO, A SET OF SOCIAL SAFETY NET (JARING  PENGAMAN SOSIAL, JPS) PROGRAMS HAVE NOW BECOME  INSTITUTIONALIZED IN THE POVERTY REDUCTION  PROGRAMS IN INDONESIA.  FROM THE ONSET OF THE CRISIS, THE GOVERNMENT  EMPLOYED A SOCIAL PROTECTION SYSTEM THAT WAS A  MIXTURE OF UNIVERSAL SUBSIDIES AND TARGETED SAFETY  NET PROGRAMS.  THE AIM OF THIS INITIATIVE IS TO PREVENT THE CHRONIC  POOR FROM FALLING MORE DEEPLY INTO POVERTY AND  REDUCING THE EXPOSURE OF VULNERABLE HOUSEHOLDS TO  RISKS. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 58
    •  IN THE FOLLOWING YEARS, SUCCESSIVE  ADMINISTRATIONS HAS TAKEN A POLITICALLY  DIFFICULT BUT ECONOMICALLY RATIONAL AND PRO‐ POOR STEP IN ALLOCATING RESOURCES MORE  EFFECTIVELY IN SECTORS THAT MATTER TO THE  SOCIAL WELFARE. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 59
    •  THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT, ON FEBRUARY 2010  THE  GOVERNMENT ISSUED THE PERPRES NO. 15/2010AB OUT POVERTY REDUCTION ACCELERATION. BASED  ON  THIS PERPRES, THE POVERTY REDUCTION BODY CHANGE ITS NAME BECOMES THE NATIONAL TEAM FOR POVERTY  REDUCTION ACCELERATION (TNP2K). TNP2K HAS THREE MAIN TASKS, I.E. FORMULATE THE  POVERTY REDUCTION POLICY AND PROGRAM, MAKE THE POVERTY REDUCTION ACTIVITIES MORE SYNERGIC BETWEEN MINISTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS, AND PERFORM THE MONITORING AND EVALUATION FUNCTION. THIS NEW REGULATION ALSO HIGHLIGHTS A CHANGE IN ORGANIZATION AS THE VICE PRESIDENT WAS DESIGNATED   TO LEAD THIS TEAM.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 60
    • NATIONAL TEAM FOR POVERTY REDUCTION ACCELERATIONThe Organization Chart based on Perpres No. 15/2010GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 61
    • DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY (Four‐Track Strategy)• Pro‐Growth: Strategy to increase and accelerate economic growth through promoting  investment, exports, and businesses including the improvement of investment  climate.• Pro‐Job: Strategy to create employment opportunities including the establishment of  a flexible labor market and creation of conducive industrial relations.• Pro‐Poor: Strategy to reduce poverty and to revitalize agriculture sector, forestry,  maritime, rural economy. In the medium and long‐term period the poverty alleviation  strategy  is also aimed at increasing the participation (including the capacity and  quality of the people at community level) to local development and providing access  for the poor to basic services including education, health, sanitation/clean water, as  well as rural infrastructure.• Pro‐Environment: Strategy to protect and maintain the environment through  sustainable development.  Resources are optimally used while preserving the  environment to meet present human needs and generations to come.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 62
    • SOCIAL PROTECTION IN INDONESIA Social Welfare Development (Indicators) Improvement on  Social Welfare • Growth: 6,3‐6,8% • Inflation: 4‐6% • Open Unemply : 5‐6% (2014) • Poverty Rate: 8‐10% (2014) Pro Poor Pro Job • Social development • Decent work • Cluster 1,2, dan 3 • Social Security Programs (Social • Labor Competency Assistance Programs) Pro Growth • Migrant Workers • Social Protection • Macro strategy • Sector strategy • Micro strategy (SME) GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 63
    • DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY ON SOCIAL WELFARE• Fiscal and Moneter Policy Job • Accelerate  Opportunity  infrastructure  Creation development (PRO‐JOB)• Improvement of  Investment climate• Policy on Energy  Growth & Social  Welfare sector Economics • Policy on small and  stabilization Improvement  medium enterprises (PRO‐POOR  (GROWTH with• Policy  on Industrial  GROWTH) EQUITY) sector• Policy on Trade Poverty • Price stabilization  basic needs Reduction• National Social  (PRO‐POOR) Security System Family Based Small and Medium  Community Social  Enterprises Empowerment Assistance Empowerment Programs Programs Programs Conditional Cash Transfer (Program Keluarga Harapan/PKH),  PNPM Mandiri  Credits for the poor, Access to  Subsidized Rice for Poor Families (RASKIN), Scholarship for  Core and  productive  Resources, Training student from poor family, Health assistance Support 64
    • POVERTY ALLEVIATION STRATEGY Quality growth (pro‐poor and pro‐job),  Inflation control, Price stabilization for  basic needs, Subsidy policy, Social  Availability of Health  assistance services, Education, Clean  Empowerment of poor  water, Legal protection,  community, Improvement  and other types of  of community  infrastructure participation  Improvement in  Purchasing Power Productivity/  Improvement in  Capacity  Access to Basic  Reduction in the   Improvement Services Number of Poor and  Poverty Rate  Market information  availability, Access to  Family Planning  productive resources  programs  (capital, credit),  Improvement in  Empowerment of micro  Population Control Access to Market & small scale enterprisesGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 65
    • FOUR CLUSTERS PRO‐PEOPLE PROGRAM MACRO‐ECONOMIC POLICY 1ST CLUSTER 2nd CLUSTER 3rd CLUSTER NEAR  POOR 1. RICE SUBSIDY, 1. Block grants for  • Improved Welfare 1. Micro credits  2. CASH 6,408 sub‐districts  • Expansion and provision (< Rp 5  TRANSFERS, (rural, urban, dis‐ million) through  POOR 3. HEALTH advantaged regions,  banks,  Increasing  INSURANCE, regional & village  4. SCHOLARSHIPS infrastructures) 2. Other types of  Employment  2. PNPM Mandiri financial assistance Opportunities VERY POOR NEAR  4th CLUSTER POOR 1. VERY CHEAP HOUSE PROGRAM 2. CHEAP PUBLIC TRANSPORT VEHICLE PROGRAM Poverty  3. CLEAN WATER PROGRAM FOR PEOPLE Reduction POOR *) 4. CHEAP & SAVE ELECTRICITY PROGRAM 5. Fishermens Life Improvement Program*) 6. Urban Poor Community Life Improvement Program*) VERY POOR *)*) Fishermens Life Improvement Program and Urban Poor Community Life Improvement Program are targeted for  60% poorest GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 66
    • Clusters of Poverty Alleviation Programs 3rd CLUSTER [Assist to have fish‐rod & boat] 2nd CLUSTER [Facilitate with fish rod] Micro‐ & Small‐scale Enterprise  1ST CLUSTER Empowerment [Provide fish] Community  Empowerment Programs Micro credits provision (< Rp  Assistance & 5 million) through banks, &  Social Protection Programs Block grants for 6,408 sub‐ other types of financial  Target: 17.5 mil. poor HH:  districts (rural, urban, dis‐ assistance advantaged regions, regional &  rice subsidy, cash transfers,  village infrastructures) PNPM  health insurance, &  Mandiri scholarships Target: SMEs Target: poor communities of  subdistricts Target: the poorest, poor &  4th Cluster near poor Households 6 Pro‐Poor Programs  and 3 additional  programs GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 67
    • SOCIAL PROTECTION AND ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS  (CLUSTER I)  GOVERNMENT SOCIAL ASSISTANCE IN PROTECTING RICE  CONSUMPTION, EDUCATION AND HEALTH OF POOR  HOUSEHOLDS.   THERE ARE FIVE PROGRAMS I.E. RASKIN SUBSIDIZED RICE,  SOCIAL HEALTH INSURANCE (JAMKESMAS), POOR  STUDENT  SCHOLARSHIP (BKM/BSM) , SCHOOL  OPERATIONAL SUPPORT FUND (BOS), CONDITIONAL CASH  TRANSFER FOR HOUSEHOLDS (PKH).  GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 68
    •  IN ADDITION TO THESE FIVE PROGRAMS, THE PNPM  GENERASI CONDITIONAL CASH TRANSFER FOR COMMUNITY  IS INCLUDED SINCE, ALTHOUGH IT IS CATEGORIZED AS PART  OF CLUSTER 2 ON COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT, IN  PRACTICE IT PROVIDED DIRECT PROVISION OF TRANSPORT  INCENTIVES, BOOKS, UMBRELLAS, AND SHOES FOR POOR  STUDENTS AS WELL AS TRANSPORT INCENTIVES FOR  PREGNANT‐MOTHER TO VISIT THE MIDWIVES AT POSYANDU  (FEBRIANY, TOYAMAH AND SODO, 2010). GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 69
    • CURRENT GOVERNMENT SCHEME ON PROTECTING RICE CONSUMPTION, EDUCATION, AND HEALTH OF POOR HOUSEHOLDS GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 70
    • COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT (CLUSTER 2)  THE GOVERNMENT DECIDES TO INTEGRATE  EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMS SCATTERED IN DIFFERENT  MINISTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE UMBRELLA OF  THE PROGRAM NASIONAL PEMBERDAYAAN MASRYARAKAT (PNPM) , A NATIONAL PROGRAM FOR COMMUNITY  EMPOWERMENT (NPCE) IN POOR DISTRICTS AND SUB‐ DISTRICTS. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 71
    •  PREVIOUSLY THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SUCH PROGRAMS  HAD RESULTED IN INEFFICIENCY AND INEFFECTIVENESS,  THERE IS AN OVERLAPPING PROGRAMS IN VARIOUS  SECTOR IN DIFFERENT REGIONS AS WELL AS EXCLUDED  PROGRAMS IN OTHER SECTORS AND OTHER REGIONS.  IN 2006 A NEW POLICY WAS LAUNCHED TO ACCELERATE  THE POVERTY ALLEVIATION EFFORTS AND TO EXTEND  EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE POOR BY  CONSOLIDATING  VARIOUS EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMS  UNDER THE PNPM (NPCE). GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 72
    •  AS MENTIONED, THE COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT  PROGRAM IS NOT A NEW APPROACH IN THE  DEVELOPMENT  APPROACH IN INDONESIA. THERE WERE INPRES DESA  TERTINGGAL (IDT) AND VILLAGE INFRASTRUCTURES  PROGRAM (P3DT) BEFORE CRISIS.  AFTER THE CRISIS, THIS KIND OF EMPOWERMENT PROGRAM  HAS EXTENDED INTO VARIOUS PROGRAMS, SUCH AS  EMPOWERMENT OF THE REGIONS TO OVERCOME THE  IMPACT OF THE ECONOMIC CRISIS (PDM‐DKE), KECAMATAN  DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (PPK), URBAN POVERTY  PROGRAM (P2KP), FARMER AND FISHERS INCREASING  INCOME PROJECT (P4K), AND ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT  FOR COASTAL COMMUNITY (PEMP). GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 73
    •  THE PNPM ITSELF ADOPTS THE SCHEME AND  MECHANISM OF THE PPK. THE PPK ACTUALLY IS  INITIATED BEFORE THE CRISIS AS A REVISION FROM IDT  AND P3DT. THE FIRST PHASE OF PPK (PPK I) STARTED IN  FINANCIAL YEAR 1998/1999 UNTIL 2002, PPK II HAD  BEEN IMPLEMENTED IN THE PERIOD 2003‐2006, WHILE  PPK III HAD BEEN EMPLOYED IN 2006‐2007.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 74
    •  COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT AIMS AT CREATING AND  ENHANCING COMMUNITY CAPACITY TO EFFECTIVELY  OVERCOME VARIOUS DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS  FACED BY THE COMMUNITIES.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 75
    • COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT A BASE FOR NATION BUILDING Building community capacity as social capital Providing economic capital Enhancing social through community block entrepreneurship at community grants level through facilitators/ community leadersGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 76
    • POVERTY REDUCTION THROUGH COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT RESPONSIVE GOVERNMENT/EMPOWERED  COMMUNITIES   Strengthening bottom‐up planning and budgeting;  Improving local government representation and  responsiveness;  Improving social service delivery to the poor;  Pro‐poor planning and budgeting Market linkages Social Protection  Non-bank and  Women’s participation microfinance  Justice for the poor  SADI (smallholder dvpt)  Helping marginal groups  Information technology  Budget transparency  Renewable energy BLOCK GRANT  Community trust funds TRANSFER TO  Sustainability THE POORGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 77
    • MAIN ACTIVITIES TRAIN THE COMMUNITIES IN IDENTIFICATION, ANALYSIS AND  DECISION MAKING PROCESS TO TACKLE THEIR POVERTY  PROBLEMS CREATE/EXPAND SMALL SCALE INFRASTRUCTURES AND  COMMUNITY ECONOMIC PRODUCTIVITIES. INCREASE COMMUNITY CAPABILITY AND SELF‐HELP TO  ACHIEVE BETTER STANDARD OF LIVINGGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 78
    • EMPOWERMENT PROCESSGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 79
    • WHY NPCE?  THERE HAVE BEEN DIFFERENT KINDS OF POVERTY  ERADICATION ACTIVITIES WITHIN  MINISTRIES/INSTITUTIONS CREATING INEFFICIENCY AND  OVERLAPPING ACTIVITIES, MECHANISMS, COMMUNITYS  INSTITUTIONS NEED HARMONIZATION.  IMPERFECT MARKET, ESPECIALLY IN MEETING PEOPLE’S  NEEDS IN REMOTE AND ISOLATED AREAS.  DIFFICULTIES TO REACH THE POOR.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 80
    • HOW IT WORKS? PNCE‐SECTORAL PROGRAMS  • CONSIST OF SECTORAL  EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMS • COMPONENTS: • SECTORAL BLOCK GRANTS (RURAL  ROADS, IRRIGATION, ETC) • EXTENSION  SERVICES PNCE‐CORE PROGRAMS (IN 2008) • CONSIST OF: • KDP: RURAL‐BASED COMMUNITY  EMPOWERMENT • UPP: URBAN‐BASED COMMUNITY  EMPOWERMENT • RISE: FAST‐GROWTH AREAS  COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT • COMPONENTS: • COMMUNITY BLOCK GRANTS • FACILITATION, TECHNICAL  ASSISTANCE, TRAINING, LOCAL  GOVERNMENT CAPACITYGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 81
    • PREVIOUS CONDITION PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM  PROGRAM  OVERNUMBER IN  MANAGEMENT  MANAGEMENT  MEDIATORS STRUCTURE STRUCTURE FIELD COORDINATION ? MISDELIVERED PROGRAM ??FIELD COORDINATION OVERLAPPING  WITH OTHER  ?? PROGRAMS ?? ?? IGNORED GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 82
    • UNDER NPCE Program Program Program Program Program The aid is directly delivered  to the hand of community  so that they could receive  bigger and integrated  aid All empowering supports  rest under and managed by  “participative community  body” which is formed by  public itself, in each village All programs  run similar  norms/criter ia, standard,  process,  procedure  and  Community through  guidance  empowering groups conduct  Data collection and targeting  NPCE, supported by Sectoral on the poor accurately Empowering Packages (BLM,  facilitator, training etc)GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 83
    • MICRO‐ENTERPRISE EMPOWERMENT (CLUSTER 3)  THIS CLUSTER IS INTENDED TO EMPOWER THE POOR AND  NEAR POOR WHO HAS AN OCCUPATION OR BUSINESS TO  FULFILL THEIR BASIC NEEDS BUT THEY STILL NEED TO  IMPROVE THE WELLBEING.  ALBEIT THE ROLE OF MICRO‐ENTERPRISE IN ERADICATING  POVERTY HAS BEEN WIDELY KNOWN SINCE FEW DECADES  AGO, THE CRISIS 1997/1998 SHOWED HOW SIGNIFICANT THE  EXISTENCE OF MICRO‐ENTERPRISE HELPS THE POOR TO GET  SURVIVED AND RECOVERED FROM THE CRISIS.  IT IS ALSO BEEN KNOWN THAT MOST POOR WORK IN  INFORMAL SECTOR CONSISTS OF SMALL SCALE AND MICRO‐ ENTERPRISE THAT PRODUCING OR DISTRIBUTING GOODS  AND SERVICES. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 84
    •  THESE ENTERPRISES ARE GENERALLY INDEPENDENT, LARGELY  FAMILY OWNED, EMPLOY LOW LEVELS OF SKILLS AND  TECHNOLOGY, AND ARE HIGHLY LABOR INTENSIVE. INDEED,  MICRO‐ENTERPRISES PROVIDE INCOME AND EMPLOYMENT FOR  SIGNIFICANT PROPORTIONS OF WORKERS IN RURAL AND URBAN  AREAS (HARVIE, 2003).  FOR INDONESIA, MICRO‐ENTERPRISES NOW HAS REACHED 43  MILLION UNITS AND SHARED MORE THAN 50% OF NATIONAL GDP.  THE DATA ALSO SHOWS THAT ONE UNIT  MICRO‐ENTERPRISE CAN ABSORB ON AVERAGE 1‐5 WORKERS  (TKPK, 2009). GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 85
    •  HARVIE (2003) ALSO POINTS OUT THAT MICRO‐ENTERPRISE  DEVELOPMENT‐COMPLEMENTED WITH PROPER MICRO‐FINANCE  SUPPORT‐CAN PLAY PART IN THE ACHIEVEMENT OF MAIN SOCIAL  AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES, NAMELY POVERTY  REDUCTION, WOMEN EMPOWERMENT, EMPLOYMENT CREATION,  AND PRIVATE SECTOR ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT.  THOUGH THESE FOUR OBJECTIVES CANNOT BE FULLY SEPARATED,  WE WILL FOCUS ON THE ROLE OF MICRO‐ENTERPRISE  EMPOWERMENT TO REACH THE OBJECTIVES ON POVERTY  ALLEVIATION. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 86
    •  THE PROGRAM OBJECTIVE IS TO INCREASE ACCESS OF  THE POOR TO A CHEAP CAPITAL. FURTHERMORE, THE  SNPK HAS ALSO ELABORATED THE RELATIONSHIP  BETWEEN MICRO‐ENTERPRISES, MICRO FINANCE, AND  MICRO CREDIT IN THE AGENDA OF POVERTY  ALLEVIATION.  THIS PROGRAM IS A CONTINUATION AND INTEGRATION  OF VARIOUS MICRO‐CREDIT PROGRAMS INITIATED BY  PREVIOUS GOVERNMENT.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 87
    • MICRO CREDIT (KUR) SCHEME CLUSTER 3  Source: TKPK, 2009GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 88
    •  THE GOVERNMENT PROVIDES A SUBSIDIZED GUARANTEE  SCHEME AT AMOUNT 70% IN WHICH THE GOVERNMENT  PAYS THE PREMIUM.  THE TARGET OF THIS MICROCREDIT PROGRAM IS THE  MICRO‐ENTERPRISES AND COOPERATIVES WHICH HAVE  FEASIBLE BUSINESS BUT ARE NOT BANKABLE BECAUSE OF  LACK OF COLLATERAL.  MOREOVER, THIS MICROCREDIT ALSO PROVIDES ACCESS TO  COMMUNITY GROUPS WHICH HAVE BEEN EMPOWERED IN  THE PREVIOUS PROGRAM. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 89
    • TARGET AND REALIZATION  2007‐ DECEMBER 2011 29.003 26.474(Rp Billion) 22.236 24.404 20.459 20.000 20.000 18.000 17.229 17.467 18.300 16.000 14.578 16.600 14.000 15.000 12.000 11.475 11.216 13.300 10.000 8.771 11.600 10.000 8.000 6.469 8.300 6.000 4.733 3.828 6.600 4.000 1.856 5.000 2.000 982 3.400 0 1.600 2007 2008 2009 2010 Jan-11 Feb-11 Mar-11 Apr-11 Mei-11 Jun-11 Jul-11 Agust-11 Sep-11 Okt-11 Nop-11 Des-11 Realisasi Realized Target Source: Office of the Economic Coordinating Minister GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 90
    • SOCIAL PROTECTION COVERAGE Social Security Social Assistance Q5 •Pension. Cluster 3 Q4 • Credit  •Old Age Security. Facility to SMEs •Health. Cluster 2 • Skill training for  Q3 Indonesia’s •Work Injury. Cluster 1 National migrant Program on Worker • Scholarship. Community • Other  Q2 •Death. • Subsidized Rice. Empowerment  • CCT.* Schemes • Social Health Assistance (PNPM) • UCT (if needed) • Disabled. • Neglected Children. Q1 • Neglected Seniors.* * Pilot for the poorest householdsGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 91
    • Clusters of Poverty Alleviation Programs Fourth Cluster The fourth cluster is planned to start in 2012  (complement to the three clusters) 4th CLUSTER Access for the poor to buy very low price  ‘basic needs’  ‐ subsidized by government ‐ EXAMPLES: • Housing • Clean water services • Electricity • Vehicle for public transportation Three Clusters Poverty Alleviation and Social  Welfare ImprovementGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 92
    • 93
    • GOALS: ALIGNMENT OF KEY GOVERNMENT  PRIORITIES WITH MDGs INDICATORS/TARGET (%) 2002 2009 MDGs 2015  ACTUAL TARGETS TARGETS Poverty Population below US$ 1 a day 7.2 10.3 Poverty head‐count ratio 18.2 8.2 7.5 Health Under 5 mortality rate (per 1,000 live births) 60 26 33 Maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000 live births) 307 226 105 Education Net enrollment rate in primary education  92.7 99.6 100 Gross and net enrollment rate at junior level 79.7 98 ‐ Literacy rate of 15‐24 y.o 98.7 100 Water & Sanitation % of population that has access to improved water 78 80 Rural Development  Agricultural sector growth 35GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 94
    • POVERTYGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 95
    • POOR ↔ NON POOR  MOVEMENT      POVERTY STATUS UNIT POVERTY STATUS 2009 POOR  NON‐POORPOOR % 45.6 54.4NON‐POOR % 7.6 92.4 POVERTY STATUS UNIT POVERTY STATUS 2010 POOR  NON‐POORPOOR % 46.4 53.6NON‐POOR % 7.3 92.7GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 96
    • IMPORTANT NOTE: NON‐INCOME POVERTY IS A MORE SERIOUS PROBLEM THAN  INCOME POVERTY. WHEN ONE ACKNOWLEDGES ALL  DIMENSIONS OF HUMAN WELL‐BEING—ADEQUATE  CONSUMPTION, REDUCED VULNERABILITY, EDUCATION, HEALTH  AND ACCESS TO BASIC INFRASTRUCTURE—THEN ALMOST HALF  OF ALL INDONESIANS WOULD BE CONSIDERED TO HAVE  EXPERIENCED AT LEAST ONE TYPE OF POVERTY. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 97
    • 98
    • POVERTY INCIDENCES USING DIFFERENT  MEASUREMENT (%)GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 99
    • GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 100
    • 1998 CRISIS 101
    • THE EVER PRESENT PROBLEM OF INEQUALITY  WHILE, AS MENTIONED ABOVE INDONESIA’S  DEVELOPMENT HAD A WIDESPREAD EFFECT ON THE  POPULATION IN GENERAL AS INDICATED BY DECLINING  POVERTY INCIDENCES AND VARIOUS SOCIAL  INDICATORS, THERE WAS GROWING AWARENESS OF THE  WIDENING GAP BETWEEN INCOME GROUPS, BETWEEN  REGIONS, AND BETWEEN ETHNICS.  GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 102
    •  AT THE HEIGHT OF THE PRAISE FOR THE NEW ORDER  ACHIEVEMENT, MANY INDONESIAN SCHOLARS AND  CRITICS NOTED THE LACK OF DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE AS ONE  OF THE MAJOR CRITICISM OF THE NEW ORDER. THEY ARGUED THAT THE INDONESIAN ECONOMIC SUCCESS  HAD BENEFITED THE URBAN AND INDUSTRIAL SECTOR  WHILE (RELATIVELY) MARGINALIZING THE RURAL AND  TRADITIONAL SECTORS. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 103
    •  DESPITE THE LIBERALIZATION MEASURES UNDERTAKEN IN  RESPONSE TO THE WAVE OF GLOBALIZATION IN THE MID‐ 1980S, CONTROL OF THE ECONOMY CONTINUED TO BE  DIRECT, THROUGH MONOPOLIES IN KEY INDUSTRIES  (ENERGY, PAPER, STEEL, COMMODITIES, TRANSPORT AND  COMMUNICATIONS), OR THROUGH THE CREDIT‐ ALLOCATION POWERS OF FINANCIAL AGENCIES THAT WERE  CONTROLLED BY OR PREJUDICED IN FAVOR OF PRIVILEGED  AND POLITICALLY CONNECTED BUSINESS GROUPS. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 104
    •  PRIVATIZATION IN THE 1980s OFTEN MEANT THE TRANSFER  OF INDUSTRIES FROM DIRECT STATE MONOPOLY TO HANDS  THAT WERE ONLY NOMINALLY PRIVATE BUT REALLY HIGHLY  DIVERSIFIED CONGLOMERATES WHO ENJOYED  PROTECTION FROM OPEN COMPETITION AND  GUARANTEED ACCESS TO STATE FUNDS AND FACILITIES.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 105
    •  AT THE HEIGHT OF THE PRAISE FOR THE NEW ORDER  ACHIEVEMENT, A SCHOLAR (PABOTINGGI) NOTED THE  LACK OF DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE AS ONE OF THE MAJOR  CRITICISM OF THE NEW ORDER. HE ARGUED THAT THE INDONESIAN ECONOMIC SUCCESS HAD BENEFITED THE  URBAN AND INDUSTRIAL SECTOR WHILE (RELATIVELY) MARGINALIZING THE RURAL AND TRADITIONAL  SECTORS. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 106
    •  HE ALSO BELIEVED THAT THE STATE OF THE INDONESIAN  ECONOMY WAS FAR FROM BRIGHT. RAMPANT  MONOPOLY, OLIGOPOLY, AND NEPOTISM INCREASED  INEFFICIENCY AND HOBBLE THE ECONOMY. IN  PARTICULAR, REPRESENTING MANY VIEWS AMONG  OBSERVERS OF INDONESIAN AFFAIRS, HE SAW PROBLEM  IN THE DICHOTOMY BETWEEN THE INDIGENOUS AND  NON‐INDIGENOUS ECONOMIC PLAYERS.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 107
    •  POLARIZATION OF THE INCOME DISTRIBUTION OCCURRED  IN INDONESIA AS THE ECONOMY GREW AND THAT THIS  CONTRIBUTED TO THE PERSISTENT FEELING IN INDONESIA  THAT THE MANY ECONOMIC REFORMS LED NOT TO AN  IMPROVEMENT IN GENERAL WELFARE, BUT ONLY AN  IMPROVEMENT IN THE WELFARE OF THE RICH.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 108
    •  ANOTHER ARGUMENT RAISED AGAINST THE APPARENT  SUCCESS OF INDONESIA’S DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY TURNS  THE SPOTLIGHT ON THE ISSUE OF INCOME DISTRIBUTION.  SOME CRITICS OF THE ECONOMIC REFORMS ARGUED THAT  INCOME DISTRIBUTION WORSENED THROUGHOUT THE  PERIOD OF RAPID GROWTH. THERE IS IN FACT SOME EVIDENCE FOR THIS.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 109
    •  THE GINI COEFFICIENT, CALCULATED FROM  EXPENDITURE DATA, SHOW THAT INCOME DISTRIBUTION  IMPROVED WITH THE GINI‐COEFFICIENT FALLING FROM  0.35 IN 1970 TO 0.32 IN 1990.  BUT THEREAFTER THE DATA SUGGEST SOME  WORSENING IN THE DISTRIBUTION WITH THE GINI  COEFFICIENT RISING TO 0.34 IN 1993 AND TO 0.36 IN  1996, A RISE THAT OCCURRED IN BOTH RURAL AND  URBAN AREAS ALTHOUGH THE INCREASE IN THE RURAL  GINI‐COEFFICIENT WAS SMALL.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 110
    •  HOWEVER, INDONESIA’S INCOME DISTRIBUTION  COMPARES FAVORABLY TO THAT FOUND IN  NEIGHBORING COUNTRIES.  OVER THE PERIOD 1993‐98, THE GINI INDEX WAS 36.5  FOR INDONESIA, 41.3 FOR THAILAND, 46.2 FOR THE PHILIPPINES AND 48.5 FOR MALAYSIA (WORLD BANK.  WORLD DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS 2000).GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 111
    • REGIONAL DISPARITY CENTRALIZED POWER AND UNEVEN DISTRIBUTION OF  WEALTH CREATED DISSATISFACTION AMONG PEOPLE IN  THE OUTLYING REGIONS. WITH ECONOMIC GROWTH AND  INDUSTRIALIZATION, JAVA AND SOME PROVINCES  PROGRESSED FASTER THAN THE REST OF THE REGIONS,  ESPECIALLY THE EASTERN PART THE COUNTRY. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 112
    •  THESE PROVINCES, RICH IN NATURAL RESOURCES, WERE  RESENTFUL OF THE RETURNS THAT THEY RECEIVED FROM  THEIR REGIONS’ CONTRIBUTION TO THE NATIONAL  ECONOMY. THE WIDENING DISPARITY BETWEEN REGIONS  WAS ANOTHER SOURCE OF CRITICISM AGAINST THE NEW  ORDER.  TO A SIGNIFICANT EXTENT THIS PROBLEM STILL PERSISTS  TODAY, AND IS ONE FACTOR DRIVING THE SOVEREIGNTY  CONFLICTS IN ACEH AND PAPUA.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 113
    • ATTEMPTS AT EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT DURING THE NEW ORDER PERIOD VARIOUS MEASURES WERE  UNDERTAKEN TO ADDRESS THE IMBALANCES. THROUGH VARIOUS SCHEMES: GRANTS, MICRO CREDIT IS,  SUBSIDIES, USING VARIOUS MECHANISMS THROUGH  THE  BANKING SECTOR AND THROUGH  FISCAL  POLICIES, THERE  WERE ATTEMPTS TO RIGHT THE BALANCE. THE PRESIDENTIAL INSTRUCTION (INPRES) MECHANISM WAS   AMONG THE MOST EFFECTIVE MECHANISM PROVIDING  GRANTS TO THE REGIONS AS WELL AS TO SECTORS  SUCH  EDUCATION AND HEALTH AND TARGETED TO THE POOR SUCH  AS IDT. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 114
    •  THOSE MEASURES WERE EFFECTIVE IN REDUCING POVERTY  BUT NOT SUFFICIENT IN OVERCOMING THE IMBALANCES. IN THE 1980’S THROUGH THE PROMOTION OF DOMESTIC  PRODUCTS CAMPAIGN, THE GOVERNMENT LAUNCHED  AFFIRMATIVE ACTION TO PROMOTE AND PROTECT LOCAL  PRODUCTS. IN PARTICULAR COMING FROM SMALL AND  MEDIUM INDUSTRIES (PRESIDENTIAL DECREE 10/1980).GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 115
    •  THE PROGRAM WAS EXPANDED TO GIVE ASSISTANCE TO THE  INDIGENOUS (PRIBUMI) BUSINESSMEN. THE RESULT WAS  VISIBLE, NOW MANY OF THOSE INDIGENOUS BUSINESSMEN  PROMOTED AT THAT TIME HAD RISEN TO BECOME BIG  BUSINESSMEN AND EVEN CONGLOMERATES. IN THE 1990’S THE INPRESES WERE ENLARGED BOTH IN  COVERAGE AND AMOUNT TO ASSIST THE REGIONS WITH  MORE GRANTS. BUT ALL THOSE EFFORTS WERE NOT SUFFICIENT TO ARREST  THE WIDENING GAP  BETWEEN THE RICH AND  THE POOR,  BOTH INCOME GROUPS AS WELL AS REGIONS.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 116
    • 117
    •  FOR THE COMMON PEOPLE, PEOPLE WHO ONLY HAVE  MEAGER INCOMES, PEOPLE IN THE RURAL AREAS AND IN  THE OUTER REGIONS ESPECIALLY IN THE EASTERN PART OF  INDONESIA, THERE IS THE PREVAILING SENSE OF INJUSTICE.  ONE OF THE CRITICISMS DIRECTED AT THE GOVERNMENT IS  THE WAY POVERTY IS MEASURED. INDONESIAS POVERTY  LINE CORRESPONDS TO PURCHASING POWER PARITY (PPP) US$ 1.25, WHILE THE WORLD BANK USES PPP US$ 2 AS THE  PROPERTY THRESHOLD. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 118
    •  IF ONE APPLIES THE WORLD BANK STANDARDS TO  INDONESIA’S STATISTICS (US$2 PPP), THEN PEOPLE LIVING  UNDER POVERTY LINE WILL BE 23.78%. IT CORRESPONDS TO  51 MILLION PEOPLE IN 1993 PPP US$. IF ONE APPLIES 2005  PPP US$, IT WILL BE 49.91% OR 120 MILLION IN 2011.  IN ITS 2006 REPORT, THE WORLD BANK UNDERLINES THAT  THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE LIVING BELOW US$2‐A‐DAY IN  INDONESIA COMES CLOSE TO EQUALING ALL THOSE LIVING  ON OR BELOW US$2‐A‐DAY IN ALL THE REST OF EAST ASIA  OUTSIDE CHINA. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 119
    •  IF PEOPLE LIVING ABOVE INDONESIAS POVERTY LINE BUT  BELLOW INTERNATIONAL (WORLD BANK) POVERTY LINE IS  CATEGORIZED TO BE NEAR POOR, THEN THERE ARE 11.42%  OR 27.3 MILLION NEAR‐POOR.  THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE POOR AND  NEAR‐POOR IS  ACTUALLY ONLY IN STATISTICS. IN REAL LIFE THERE IS LITTLE  THAT DISTINGUISHES THE POOR AND THE NEAR‐POOR,  SUGGESTING THAT POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGIES  SHOULD FOCUS ON EMPOWERING AND IMPROVING THE  WELFARE OF AT LEAST A QUARTER OF THE POPULATION  (STILL USING THE 1993 PPP US$ INSTEAD OF 2005).GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 120
    •  DISPARITY IS A REAL PROBLEM.  FIRST BETWEEN RURAL AND URBAN AREA. 15.72% OF RURAL  POPULATION ARE POOR COMPARED TO 9.23% IN THE URBAN  AREA. MOST OF THE POOR PEOPLE IN THE RURAL AREAS  WORK IN AGRICULTURE. AND MANY WORK ON SMALL PLOTS  OF LAND OR AS LABOR FARMERS.  REGIONALLY, THE HIGHEST POVERTY INCIDENCES ARE FOUND  IN EASTERN PART OF INDONESIA, NOTABLY PAPUA’S 32%,  WEST PAPUA’S 31.9%, MALUKU’S 23%, EAST  NUSATENGGARA’S 21.2%, AND WEST NUSATENGGARA’S  19.7%. ACEH, A RICH PROVINCE BUT RAVAGED BY YEARS OF  HOSTILITY, WAS SIXTH AT 19.6%. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 121
    •  INDONESIA IS LOSING ITS INVESTMENT [DURING THE NEW  ORDER] ON IRRIGATION BECAUSE IRRIGATED LAND HAS  TURNED INTO CONCRETE OR ASPHALT. AND AS A RESULT, WE  ARE NOW AGAIN BECOMING THE BIGGEST RICE IMPORTER  AS WE WERE, BEFORE WE ATTAINED RICE SELF‐SUFFICIENCY  BACK IN THE1980’S.  THE MEAGER LAND AVAILABLE FOR THE FARMERS TO TOIL IS  SHRINKING. AS IT IS NOW 17.17% OF FARMER HOUSEHOLDS  OWN LESS THAN 0.10 HA WHILE 39.24% OWN BETWEEN  0.10 TO 0.50 HA. THIS SITUATION CONTRIBUTES TO THE  ABJECT POVERTY OF FARMING FAMILIES. AGRARIAN REFORM  IS A MUST, AND URGENTLY NEEDED TO GET TO THE CORE OF  RURAL POVERTY.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 122
    •  WITH ALL THOSE PROGRAMS INDONESIAS BUDGETARY  ALLOCATIONS TO SOCIAL AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT  PRIORITIES AS A PROPORTION OF GROSS DOMESTIC  PRODUCT (GDP) STILL REMAIN AMONG THE LOWEST IN  SOUTHEAST ASIA.  OBVIOUSLY THE POLICY MAKERS FACE A CRITICAL  TRADE‐OFF BETWEEN BALANCING THE STATE BUDGET  AND MAKING NECESSARY SOCIAL INVESTMENTS  (SUMARTO, SURYAHADI, AND BAZZI, 2008).  THERE IS INSUFFICIENT MEASURES TO CLOSE THE GAP  BETWEEN RICH AND POOR.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 123
    •  THE SITUATION IS ILLUSTRATED BY A REPUTABLE  BUSINESS MAGAZINE, FORBES ASIA. IN ITS DECEMBER  2011 ISSUE, THE MAGAZINE PUBLISHED 40  WEALTHIEST PEOPLE IN INDONESIA.  THE MINIMUM WEALTH TO GAIN ENTRY, MEANING  THE “POOREST” AMONG THE RICH, IS $630 MILLION.  TOGETHER THEIR WEALTH IS $85 BILLION, AN  INCREASE OF 18% FROM LAST YEAR, COMPARE TO  INDONESIA’S GDP GROWTH WHICH WAS “ONLY” 6.5%.  AND $85 BILLION IS EQUAL TO 10% OF INDONESIA’S  GDP.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 124
    •  THOSE ARE THE VERY FEW PEOPLE THAT GET THEIR  RICHES FROM INDONESIA’S LAND, MINERALS, TREES  AND PLANTATIONS, WATER, AND PEOPLE’S SAVINGS.  IN THE MEANTIME, INDONESIA HAS 57.2 MILLION  POOR AND NEAR‐POOR PEOPLE, AND TWICE THAT  NUMBER IF ONE APPLIES  2005 US$ PPP. MILLIONS OF  PEOPLE NEED TO HAVE SUBSIDY EVEN FOR THE VERY  BASIC NECESSITIES OF LIFE.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 125
    •  IN STATISTICAL TERM, THE DISPARITY SHOWN BY THE  Q5/Q1 RATIO (THE HIGHEST/LOWEST QUINTILE RATIO) WHICH ACCORDING TO OUR STATISTICAL BUREAU  [BPS] IN 2010 WAS 6.28, WHILE IN 2006 IT WAS 4.81  INDICATING THAT THE GAP IS WIDENING IN THE LAST  FIVE YEARS. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 126
    • AVERAGE EXPENDITURES BY DECIL Growing disparity: lower growth in lower income groupGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 127
    • RISING GINI RATIOGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 128
    • 129
    • UNEMPLOYMENT AND POVERTY SOURCE: BPSGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 130
    • EMPLOYMENT 1988‐2011 7,24% 7,82% 6,50% 7,0 6,06% 6,10% 7% 5,78% 4,92% 5,50% 6.46% 4,78% 6,50% 4,70% 3,64% 4,0 4,30% 4% 1,0 0,79% 1%Million 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 ‐2,0 ‐2% ‐5,0 ‐5% ‐8,0 ‐8% Changes in labor force Changes in employment ‐11,0 Economic growth ‐11% ‐13,13% ‐14,0 ‐14%  BETWEEN 2002‐2005, NEW ENTRANTS TO THE LABOUR FORCE WAS LARGER THAN  EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY.  2006‐2010: EMPLOYMENT  OPPORTUNITY WAS LARGER THAN NEW ENTRANTS TO THE  LABOUR FORCE, REDUCING UNEMPLOYMENT.  IN 2011 THERE WAS AN INCREASE IN LABOUR FORCE OF 800 THOUSANDS, WHILE  EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY ROSE BY1.46  MILLION. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 131
    • RISE IN FORMAL EMPLOYMENT 80,00 80% 69,27% 70,00 66,93% 70% 62,17% 2010‐2011, THERE WAS AN  60,00 60% INCREASED IN FORMAL  MILIION OF WORKERS 50,00 50% Jumlah pekerja EMPLOYMENT BY 5.71  Persentase 37,83% PERCENTAGE MILLION, RISING FROM  40,00 33,07% 40% 30,73% 33.07% TO 37.83% 30,00 30% THE NUMBER OF INFORMAL  20,00 20% WORKER DECLINED BY 4.24  10,00 10% MILLION, OR FROM 66.93%  0,00 0% TO 62.17%.    2005 2010 2011 Formal (dalam juta) FORMAL (MILLION) Informal (dalam juta) INFORMAL (MILLION) % Formal % Informal GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 132
    • OPEN UNEMPLOYMENT AND UNDER‐EMPLOYMENT (2005 ‐ 2010) 2005 2010OPEN EMPLOYMENT (NOT WORKING) 11,9 MILLION (11,2%) 8,3 MILLION (7.1%)UNDER‐EMPLOYMENT (WORKING LESS THAN 35 HOURS/WEEK) 28,9 MILLION (30,8%) 33,3 MILLION (30.7%) OPEN UNEMPLOYMENT AND UNDER 2001 ‐ 2010 UNDER‐EMPLOYMENT (MILLION) 11,9 33,3 33,5  12  OPEN EMPLOYMENT (MILLION) 10,9 32,2  31,6 11  10,3 9,9 10,0 31,1 30,9  30,4 10  9,4 9,1 9,0 29,6  28,9 29,2 28,9 29,1 9  8,3 8,0 28,3  27,7 27,9 8  27  7  2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 UNDER‐EMPLOYMENT OPEN EMPLOYMENTGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 133
    • UNEMPLOYMENT BY AGE  3.500.000 AGE 15‐24  %  3.000.000 YEARS 2007 (Ø) 35  2.500.000 2008 (Ø) 29 31% 2009 (Ø) 28  2.000.000 29%UNEMPLOYED 2010 (Ø) 29 15 ‐ 19  1.500.000 20 ‐ 24 Ø = AVERAGE FEBRUARY  25 ‐ 29 AND AUGUST  1.000.000 30 ‐ 34 35 ‐ 39 40 ‐ 44  500.000 45 ‐ 49 50 ‐ 54 55 +  ‐ 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 *) 134 GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 134
    • IMBALANCE ECONOMIC AND EMPLOYMENT STRUCTURE ECONOMIC STRUCTURE EMPLOYMENT STRUCTURE 2010 February 2011 Services (10,19%) Agriculture (15,34%) Social Services  (15,30%) Finance (7,21%) Finance (1,85%) Agriculture (38,17%)Transportation (6,50%) Mining (11,15%) Transportation (5,02%) Trading  (13,72%) Trading (20,88%) Mining (1,22%) Manufacturing (24,82%) Construction (5,02%) Construction(10,29%) Manufacturing (12,31%) Electricity, gas, water (0,23%) Electricity(0,78%) Unemployed 7% Others Manufacturing/ 15% Industry 6% Agriculture 72% 135 POOR HOUSEHOLD
    • TRADABLES AND NON TRADABLES IN GDP 2001‐2010 (%)10,00 8,96  9,00 8,55  8,19  7,81  8,00 7,43  7,13  7,00 6,30  6,02  6,00 5,28  4,89  5,00 3.81 3.85 3.86 3.85 4,00 3.51 3.23 3.72 3.47 3.05 3,00 6,35 6,01 6,10 2.64 5,69 5,50 4,50 4,78 5,03 4,58 2,00 3,64 1,00 0,00 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 PDB GDP Sektor non tradable Non Tradable Tradable tradable SektorSektor tradable: (1) Agriculture, Animal Husbandry, Forest and Fishery, (2) Mining (3) Manufacturing Industry. Sektor non‐tradable:  1. Electricity, Gas, Clean Water, 2. Construction, Trading, Hotel, and Restaurant, 3. Transportation and Communication, 4.Finance, Real Estate and Corporate Service, 5. Social Services.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 136
    • REGIONAL DISPARITY 35 31.9 32.0 30 Jakarta = 3,75%, Papua =  25 31,98%, Indonesia =  23.0 21.2 20 12.49% 18.8 19.6 19.7 16.9 17.5 15.8 15.8 16.1 15 13.9 14.214.2 14.612.5 10.3 10.7 11.3 10 8.5 8.5 8.6 8.7 9.0 9.2 7.4 6.6 6.8 5.3 5.8 6.3 5 3.7 4.2 0 P.Barat Keppri Gorontalo Papua Sumut Maluku Jambi Jakarta Yogya Sumbar Sumsel Babel Kaltim Aceh Jatim Sultra Banten NTT Lampung Sulut Bengkulu Malut Kalbar Kalteng Jateng NTB Kalsel Sulbar Sulteng Jabar Bali Sulsel Riau Poverty incidence by provice (2011)GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 137
    • WESTERN VS EASTERN INDONESIA % RGDP 1980 1990 2000 2010 WI 80 84 83 82 EI 20 16 17 18 %  1980 1990 2000 2010 Population WI 83 82 81 80 EI 17 18 19 20 Gini 2007 2008 2009 2010 Coefficient WI 0.33 0.31 0.32 0.35 EI 0.34 0.33 0.34 0.38Western Indonesia: Aceh, Sumut, Sumbar, Riau, Kepri, Jambi, Sumsel, Babel, Bengkulu,  Lampung, DKI, Jabar, Banten, Jateng, DIY, Jatim, BaliEastern Indonesia:  Kalbar, Kalteng, Kalsel, Kaltim, Sulut, Gorontalo, Sulteng, Sulsel, Sultra, Sulbar, NTB, NTT, Maluku, Malut, Papua, Papua Barat GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 138
    • 139
    •  THE HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INDEX IS A SUMMARY  MEASURE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. IT MEASURES  THE AVERAGE ACHIEVEMENTS IN A COUNTRY IN THREE  BASIC DIMENSIONS OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: 1. A LONG AND HEALTHY LIFE, AS MEASURED CY LIFE  EXPECTANCY AT BIRTH. 2. KNOWLEDGE, AS MEASURED BY THE ADULT (OVER 25)  POPULATION MEANS YEARS OF SCHOOLS AND EXPECTED  YEARS OF SCHOOLING. 3. A DECENT STANDARD OF LIVING, AS MEASURED BY GDP PER CAPITA IN PURCHASING  POWER PARITY (PPP) TERMS IN US  DOLLAR.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 140
    • HDI ASEAN 2010 2010 COUNTRY LEVEL INDEX SINGAPORE 27 0.846 BRUNEI 37 0.805 MALAYSIA 57 0.774 THAILAND 92 0.654 PHILLIPINES 97 0.638 INDONESIA 108 0.600 VIET NAM 113 0.572 CAMBODIA 124 0.490 MYANMAR 132 0.451 169 In 2009 Indonesia’s HDI was 111 Source: HDR 2010: The Real Wealth of Nations (UNDP)GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 141
    • HDI BY COMPONENTS (Selected Countries, 2011) LIFE EXPECTANCY MEANS YEARS OF  EXPECTED YEARS   SCHOOLING OF SCHOOLINGPhilippines  68.7 8.9 11.9China 73.5 7.5 11.6Thailand 74.1 6.6 12.3Malaysia 74.2 9.5 12.6Indonesia 69.4 5.8 13.2Viet Nam 75.2 5.5 10.4Source: HDR 2010: The Real Wealth of Nations (UNDP)GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 142
    • HDI  BY PROVINCE, 2004 ‐ 2010*Using BPS incidesSource: BPSGRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 143
    • HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INDEX  INDONESIA, 1980‐2011Source: Human Development Report – UNDP, 2011GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 144
    • INDONESIA’S HDI TRENDS (By Components) LIFE  EXPECTED  MEANS YEARS  GNI PER  HDI VALUE EXPECTANCY  YEARS OF  OF  CAPITA  AT BIRTH SCHOOLING SCHOOLING (2005 PPP$) 1980 57.6 8.7 3.1 1.318 0.423 1985 60.0 10.1 3.5 1.539 0.460 1990 62.1 10.4 3.3 2.007 0.481 1995 64.0 10.5 4.2 2.751 0.527 2000 65.7 11.1 4.8 2.478 0.543 2005 67.1 11.8 5.3 2.840 0.572 2010 68.9 13.2 5.8 3.644 0.613 2011 69.4 13.2 5.8 3.716 0.617Based on consistent time series data, new component indicators and methodologySource: Human Development Report – UNDP, 2011 GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 145
    • 1998 CRISIS 146
    •  IN MOST DEVELOPING COUNTRIES POOR PEOPLE HAVE  TROUBLE GETTING PROMPT, EFFICIENT SERVICE FROM THE  PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION.  TO CHANGE THIS, THE FIRST STEP IS BUILDING THE CAPACITY OF  PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION.  OFFICIALS NEED TRACTABLE REGULATORY FRAMEWORKS, WITH  PROPER PERFORMANCE INCENTIVES AND MECHANISMS TO  ENSURE ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESPONSIVENESS TO CLIENTS,  INCLUDING POUR PEOPLE. POOR ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN ENGENDERS INEFFICIENCY  AND CORRUPTION, TYPICALLY HURTING POOR PEOPLE THE  MOST.  (World Development Report 2000/2001: Attacking Poverty, World Bank)GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 147
    •  DURING THE PAST TWO DECADES, AS SOCIETIES AND THEIR  GOVERNMENTS HAVE BECOME AWARE OF THE NEED OF  PUBLIC SECTOR REFORMS TO FOCUS PUBLIC ACTION AND  PROGRAMS ON SOCIAL PRIORITIES AND INCREASE THE  CAPACITY OF THE STATE TO REDUCE POVERTY.  PUBLIC SECTOR REFORM AND MODERNIZATION HAVE GREAT  POTENTIAL TO REDUCE POVERTY, IF THEY ARE AT THE CORE  OF A DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY THAT ESTABLISHES CLEAR  PRIORITIES FOR PUBLIC ACTION. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 148
    •  THE FUNCTIONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE  OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR NEEDS TO BE RATIONALIZED TO  IMPROVE RESOURCE ALLOCATION FOR PROGRAMS  THAT ARE SOCIAL PRIORITIES AND HAVE GREATER  CAPACITY TO REDUCE POVERTY.  MOST IMPORTANT IS TO STREAMLINE AND "RIGHTSIZE"  PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIVE ENTITIES AND PRIVATIZE  PUBLIC ENTERPRISES AND OTHER OPERATIONAL PUBLIC  PROGRAMS. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 149
    •  BEYOND RATIONALIZING THE STRUCTURE OF THE PUBLIC  SECTOR THERE IS A NEED TO IMPROVE PUBLIC  MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS TO MAKE PUBLIC PROGRAMS  MORE EFFICIENT AND ACCOUNTABLE.  INVOLVING CIVIL SOCIETY IN PLANNING, MONITORING, AND  EVALUATING PUBLIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES IS ALSO  CRUCIAL TO ENSURE STEADY PROGRESS TOWARD A FULLY  RESPONSIVE AND ACCOUNTABLE STATE. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 150
    •  LEGISLATIVE OVERSIGHT OF THE EXECUTIVE, CARRIED  OUT ACCORDING TO TRANSPARENT PROCEDURES, IS AN  IMPORTANT PART OF MONITORING AND IMPROVING  PERFORMANCE. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIONS ALSO NEED  TO BE SUPPORTED AND ACTIVELY MONITORED BY  POLITICAL LEADERS.  BUT SOMETIMES THIS PROCESS BECOMES SUBJECT TO  POLITICAL PARTY’S INTEREST OR THE PERSONAL GOALS  OR WHIMS OF INDIVIDUAL POLITICIAN, RESULTING IN  EXCESSIVE POLITICAL INTERFERENCE. THE QUALITY OF  PUBLIC SERVICE IS REDUCED WHEN PUBLIC OFFICIALS  ARE HELD ACCOUNTABLE MORE TO THEIR  HIERARCHICAL SUPERIORS THAN TO THE PEOPLE THEY  SERVE.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 151
    • 1998 CRISIS 152
    • ON POVERTY POVERTY IN INDONESIA HAS THREE SALIENT FEATURES.   FIRST, MANY HOUSEHOLDS ARE CLUSTERED AROUND THE NATIONAL  INCOME POVERTY LINE OF ABOUT PPP US$1.25‐A‐DAY, MAKING EVEN  MANY OF THE NON‐POOR VULNERABLE TO POVERTY.   SECOND, THE INCOME POVERTY MEASURE DOES NOT CAPTURE THE  TRUE EXTENT OF POVERTY IN INDONESIA; MANY WHO MAY NOT BE  ‘INCOME POOR’ COULD BE CLASSIFIED AS POOR ON THE BASIS OF  THEIR LACK OF ACCESS TO BASIC SERVICES AND POOR HUMAN  DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES.   THIRD, GIVEN THE VAST SIZE OF AND VARYING CONDITIONS IN THE  INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO, REGIONAL DISPARITIES ARE A  FUNDAMENTAL FEATURE OF POVERTY IN THE COUNTRY. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 153
    •  THREE IMPORTANT ELEMENTS FOR EFFECTIVE POVERTY  REDUCTION.   FIRST, ALL PROGRAMS SHOULD INTEGRATE EQUITY OBJECTIVES. IT  WAS A CORRECTION FOR THE PAST APPROACH EMPHASIZING ONLY  EFFICIENCY.   SECOND, THE POOR, WHO ARE THE FOCUS OF THE PROGRAMS,  MUST PARTICIPATE FULLY IN THEIR DESIGN, IMPLEMENTATION, AND  MONITORING.   THIRD, MORE SPECIFICALLY, THEY MUST BE EMPOWERED TO RUN  THE PROGRAMS THEMSELVES. THE KEY IS EMPOWERMENT, NOT CHARITY.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 154
    • ON EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT INCOME DISPARITY IS A PROBLEM IN INDONESIA AS IT IS  IN MOST OF THE DEVELOPING WORLD.  DESPITE THE POSITIVE TRENDS IN POVERTY REDUCTION  AND ECONOMIC GROWTH, THE GAP IS NOT  NARROWING, IT IS WIDENING. GROWTH IS ESSENTIAL, THROUGH GROWTH NEW JOBS  WILL BE CREATED, THE COUNTRY’S DEBT WOULD BE  BETTER SERVICED, MACROECONOMIC STABILITY WOULD  BE STRENGTHENED AND MOST IMPORTANTLY, POVERTY  WOULD DECLINE. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 155
    •  BUT GROWTH IS NOT AN END IN ITSELF. IT IS OF  UTMOST IMPORTANT TO ENSURE THAT GROWTH  WILL NOT RESULT IN INCREASES IN INEQUALITY, AS  OFTEN OCCURS IN MOST DEVELOPING ECONOMIES  INCLUDING IN INDONESIA. HIGH GROWTH IS MOST  DESIRABLE, BUT IT ALSO HAS TO BE BALANCED AND  INCLUSIVE, AND ALSO SUSTAINABLE.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 156
    •  THE PATTERN OF GROWTH IS JUST AS IMPORTANT AS THE  RATE GROWTH. THE RIGHT KIND  OF GROWTH IS NOT THE  VERTICAL FLOWS ALLOWING FOR THE TRICKLE DOWN OF  BENEFIT TO THE POOR, BUT THE KIND THAT ALLOWS  HORIZONTAL FLOWS, BROADLY BASED, EMPLOYMENT  INTENSIVE AND NOT COMPARTMENTALIZED (KENDRA AND  SILK, 1995 AND RANIS, 1995)  THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A TRICKLE DOWN EFFECT OF  GROWTH  TO EQUILIZE BENEFIT OF DEVELOPMENT. IT MAY  TRICKLE DOWN BUT ONLY IN TRICKLES, THE MAIN STREAM  GOES INTO OTHER DIRECTION, THE HAVES.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 157
    •  INDONESIA’S RELATIVELY HIGH GROWTH SO FAR HAS  BEEN AT THE EXPENSE OF ITS ENVIRONMENT. ITS  FOREST HAS BEEN OVER EXPLOITED, RIVERS POLLUTED,  CITIES LITTERED WITH WASTE.  THE SAD STORY OFTEN TOLD IN INDONESIA ABOUT ITS  WEATHER WHEN IT IS DRY THERE IS SHORTAGE OF  WATER WHICH AFFECTS THE CROPS. BUT WHEN IT IS  WET THE RICE FIELDS AND THE VILLAGES ARE FLOODED.  SO THE CARE OF ENVIRONMENT SHOULD BE SPELLED IN  THE SAME BREATH AS THE NEED FOR GROWTH. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 158
    •  PUTTING A CURB ON INDIVIDUAL INITIATIVE, INVENTIVENESS AND COMPETITIVENESS,  IS NOT AN  OPTION. ON THE CONTRARY IT SHOULD CONTINUE TO  BE ENCOURAGED.  BUT THE WEALTH OF THE INDIVIDUALS SHOULD BE  SHARED BY OTHERS, IN A FAIR AND JUST WAY.   NOT ONLY FOR THE RICH TO GET RICHER, BUT ALSO TO  GET THEIR BUSINESS SUCCESSES DIRECTLY BENEFIT THE  PEOPLE.  SOME COUNTRIES, INCLUDING INDONESIA ADOPTED.  CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR). IT IS FINE  BUT NOT ENOUGH. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 159
    •  ONE OPTION IS PROGRESSIVE INCOME TAX SYSTEM. TAX  SYSTEM NOW FAVOURS THE RICH. INDONESIA SHOULD  ADOPT PROGRESSIVE TAXATION, A RISING TAX RATES AS  INCOME RISES. IT CAN GO TO AS HIGH AS 50% FOR THE  HIGHEST INCOME BRACKET, AND FOR INHERITANCE.  JAPAN, SCANDINAVIAN AND OTHER EUROPEAN  COUNTRIES HAVE DOING SO FOR DECADES. IF THE RICH WANT TO AVOID THE HIGH INCOME TAX, THEY  CAN ALWAYS REINVEST AGAIN, SO THE TAXABLE INCOMES  WILL NOT GROW THAT MUCH AND BY DOING SO THEY  WILL CREATE MORE JOBS, AND STILL CONTINUE TO  BECOME RICHER.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 160
    •  THERE IS  A NEED  TO RECALIBERATE INDONESIA’S  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY. MORE ACTIVE ROLE OF THE GOVERNMENT TO MAKE SURE  THAT THE IDEALS OF ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY AND SOCIAL  JUSTICE EMBODIED IN THE CONSTITUTION, ARE  ACHIEVABLE.  MORE ACTIVE REDISTRIBUTION EFFORT FROM THE  GOVERNMENT IS A MUST. GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 161
    •  IN CONCLUSION, THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD NOT BECOME  A SPECTATOR IN THE ECONOMIC GAME, BELIEVING THAT THE  LESS GOVERNMENT IS THE BETTER GOVERNMENT AND THE  LEAST GOVERNMENT IS THE BEST GOVERNMENT. THE GOVERNMENT NOT ONLY HAS TO SET THE RULES OF THE  GAME AND MAKE SURE THE RULES ARE FOLLOWED, BUT THE  GOVERNMENT SHOULD TAKE PART IN THE GAME AS A PACE  MAKER. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AND SMART INTERVENTION ON THE  PART OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION ARE IMPORTANT  ELEMENTS IN POVERTY ERADICATION AND EQUITABLE  DEVELOMENT.GRIPS_2012 www.ginandjar.com 162
    • どうもありがとうございました