Whmis training course for external publishing

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Custom developed WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Material Information System) self-teach program.

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Whmis training course for external publishing

  1. 1. Workplace Hazardous Material Information System Redlen Technologies Self-Teach Training program
  2. 2. Welcome to WHMIS Welcome! This self-teach program is designed to help you learn how to keep yourself safe when working with hazardous chemicals here at Redlen. It will also provide you with some insight as to your rights and responsibilities as an employee, and Redlen’s responsibilities to protect you. Be sure to set aside time to work through this program without distractions. If you have any questions, please ask! Our goal is to help you learn how to do your job safely. Throughout this program you will come across links to self check assessments. These are online and will give you instant feedback on your ability to understand and apply the material. The final written assessment is also online, and will be printed out to file in our records. The assessment is entirely “open book” and you may use any materials provided in this program during the assessment. If you score less than 70% you will be asked to participate in additional WHMIS training. To get the most out of this program, you should: 1. Read all of the material and complete the self-assessments as you go. 2. Complete the final online assessment and learn your score from your Trainer. 3. Apply what you have learned on the job to keep yourself and your co-workers safe.
  3. 3. Why do I need WHMIS training? If you look around Redlen, you will find hazardous products such as acids, solvents, compressed gases, oils, cleaners, printer toners, and many others used every day. No matter what job you do, at some point you will come face to face with them. The purpose of WHMIS is to protect the health and safety of Canadian workers from these hazardous products. • It provides information on the hazards and protection measures for hazardous products used in the workplace. • It requires the participation of: – Manufacturers/Suppliers – Employers – Employees
  4. 4. After training you will be able to: • Explain what WHMIS is and how it affects you • Identify hazardous products in the workplace • Explain the information on a WHMIS supplier and workplace label • Find, use, and understand the information on an MSDS / SDS Once you can do this, you will be able to handle, store, and use hazardous products in a safe manner, and continue your task-specific on-the-job training.
  5. 5. After your on-the-job training you will be able to: • Identify the hazardous material(s) with which you’re working • Explain the hazards of the material(s): health, environmental, compatibility and reactivity, etc • Explain how you protect yourself from those hazards: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), engineering controls, administrative controls • Explain what to do in the event of an emergency with the material(s): spill, fire, first aid, etc • Identify where to find additional information
  6. 6. Redlen is required to provide all the health and safety information about the hazardous products that you work with, or near, and provide you with training on how to understand it. It is up to YOU to apply that knowledge in your daily work!
  7. 7. What is WHMIS? Workplace – Deals with products used in the workplace Hazardous Materials – Dangerous products which may cause fires, explosions, health problems, or environmental concerns Information System – Provides critical information about hazardous materials to employees using and working near, or supervising those who use and work near hazardous materials It is a Canadian system of regulations for use within Canadian workplaces
  8. 8. Not everything is subject to WHMIS: Some materials are Partially Exempt. Some materials are Completely Exempt. • No WHMIS supplier label or MSDS required- already covered by other legislation. • Education, Training, and Workplace labels still required • E.G. Food and drugs, medical devices, radioactive substances, etc • No WHMIS requirements • Occupational Health &Safety (OH&S) regulations may still apply • E.G. Wood and products made of wood, Tobacco and Tobacco products, hazardous wastes, or materials which do NOT fall into any WHMIS class (such as Tellurium)
  9. 9. HOW WELL ARE YOU DOING? TAKE THE SELF-ASSESSMENT TO CHECK! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RedlenWHMISintro (If hyperlink not working: Right click and select “Open Hyperlink,” or copy/paste address into Internet Explorer)
  10. 10. But what ARE the hazards? Different materials pose different hazards to you. It is the responsibility of the Supplier/ Manufacturer to classify a product. – Classification is based on the types of hazards the material poses – A material may fall into multiple classes – WHMIS has 6 classes with a corresponding 8 hazard symbols to quickly communicate the material’s hazards. Know the symbol = Know the Hazard!
  11. 11. Class A- Compressed Gases Description • Pressurized gas contained in a cylinder or tank (eg Hydrogen, Argon, Nitrogen, Oxygen) • May explode if heated: heat causes gases to expand, increasing the internal pressure. • May explode if dropped: if cylinder is damaged, gases will escape through the damaged (weakened) area How to protect yourself • Handle with care: do not drop • Keep away from fires or potential ignition sources. NO SMOKING NEAR TANKS! • Cylinders must be stabilized against a wall with straps or other similar containment • When transporting, use carts which have safety chains or straps to hold tank
  12. 12. Class B- Flammable & Combustible Description • Will catch fire and burn (eg Acetone, Methanol, Hydrogen) • May ignite spontaneously in air at the right temperature • May release a flammable gas when in contact with water • May cause fire when exposed to heat, spark, flames How to protect yourself • Keep material away from heat sources (hot plates, soldering irons, etc.) • Keep material away from ignition sources (sparks, flames, etc.) • Store containers only in designated areas (such as fire suppressant cabinets)
  13. 13. Class C- Oxidizing Material Description • Provides oxygen to a flame (eg. Bromine, oxygen) • May react violently or explode when in contact with combustibles such as fuels • May spontaneously ignite when in contact with combustibles such as wood • May burn skin and eyes How to protect yourself • Wear proper personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves, safety glasses, lab coat, etc. when handling • Keep away from flammables and combustibles • Keep away from ignition sources • Store containers only in designated areas
  14. 14. Class D1- Poisonous and Infectious Immediate, serious toxic effects Description • May cause immediate, deadly health effects (eg Nitric Acid, Hydrofluoric Acid) • Are potentially fatal, even in small amounts • May cause permanent damage • May burn eyes and skin upon contact How to protect yourself • Use EXTREME CAUTION! • Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including safety glasses, gloves, lab coat, etc. • Avoid inhaling. Use in well ventilated area (such as a fume hood or Biological Safety Cabinet) • Store only in designated areas
  15. 15. Class D2- Poisonous and Infectious Other Toxic Effects Description • Materials causing immediate irritation, or long term (chronic) effects, (eg Cd dust, Hexane) • Poisonous substances that are not immediately dangerous • May cause long term problems such as cancer • May be a skin or eye irritant • May be a skin sensitizer How to protect yourself • Handle with caution • Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including safety glasses, gloves, and lab coat • Avoid inhaling. Use in well ventilated area (such as a fume hood or Biological Safety Cabinet) • Store only in designated areas
  16. 16. Class D3- Poisonous and Infectious Biohazardous Description • Contains harmful microorganisms: viruses and bacteria (eg salmonella, HIV) • May cause serious disease, which may lead to death How to protect yourself • Take every possible measure to avoid contamination • Only handle when using full proper protective equipment and clothing • Store in designated areas
  17. 17. Class E- Corrosive Description • Acidic or Caustic materials which can destroy skin or eat through metals (eg. Nitric Acid, Hydrofluoric Acid, Sodium Hydroxide) • Cause severe skin and eye irritation/ damage upon contact • May cause tissue damage upon prolonged contact • May be harmful if inhaled How to protect yourself • Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including safety glasses, gloves, and lab coat • Avoid inhaling. Use in well ventilated area (such as a fume hood) • Store only in designated areas
  18. 18. Class F- Dangerously Reactive Description • Can undergo a dangerous reaction when exposed to heat, shock, pressure, or water (eg Bromine, cyanide) • Very unstable • May release a toxic or flammable gas when in contact with water • May explode from shocks, friction, or increase in temperature How to protect yourself • Keep materials away from heat • Do not drop containers • Store in a cool, flame-proof area
  19. 19. Take a moment to consider: You see a label with these two symbols on it. What sort of precautions should you take?
  20. 20. Take a moment to consider: This material is POISONOUS/INFECTIOUS causing IMMEDIATE SERIOUS EFFECTS (class D1) and CORROSIVE (class E). To protect yourself, wear full protective clothing including gloves, lab coat, safety glasses, etc. Only open the container and work with the material inside a designated well vented workspace such as a fume hood. Avoid inhaling it, or getting it on your skin.
  21. 21. Routes of Entry (or How it gets in your body) With all hazardous materials, the key to knowing how to protect yourself is to know how it may affect you during use, or during an emergency (fire, spill, etc). – Inhalation: is there a chance you will breathe in fumes (small particulates), dust, mists/aerosols, or vapours (gases)? If so, protect your lungs with a respirator, fume hood, BSC (Biological Safety Cabinet), or similar! – Ingestion: is there a chance you will swallow the material, or get it on your lips? If so, protect your face with a face shield! – Absorption: Is there a chance the material will be absorbed by your skin, will cause surface tissue damage, or will be injected (such as by air pressure)? If so, protect your skin with gloves, lab coats, sleeve protectors, and face protection!
  22. 22. HOW WELL ARE YOU DOING? TAKE THE SELF-ASSESSMENT TO CHECK! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RedlenWHMISHazards (If hyperlink not working: Right click and select “Open Hyperlink,” or copy/paste address into Internet Explorer)
  23. 23. WHMIS consists of 3 components to communicate hazards: Education & Training Labels MSDS / SDS • Used to provide • Used to ensure • Purpose is to detailed everyone knows alert workers to information to how to read labels a products workers and and MSDS potential employers hazards • This presentation regarding a is for general product’s hazards education. and protection Material specific measures training will be part of your Onthe-Job training.
  24. 24. WHMIS labels A WHMIS label is often your first indication that the material is hazardous. The label tells you how to handle the product safely, and directs you to the MSDS for more information. What you want to learn from the WHMIS labels are: • What are the hazards of the product? • How can you use it safely? • What should you do if something goes wrong? • Where can you find more information?
  25. 25. There are 2 types of WHMIS labels Supplier Label • Comes with the material from the supplier • Standardized format for easy recognition • Contains 7 pieces of information Workplace Label • Created on the worksite when the material is transferred to a different container • Affixed by the employee (you) who transferred the material • No standard format • Contains 4 pieces of information
  26. 26. Supplier label must include • • • • • • • Product Identifier: Must exactly match the MSDS Risk Phrases: Tell you the Hazards Hazard Symbols: Tell you the Hazards First Aid measures: Tell you what to do in an emergency Precautionary measures: Tell you how to use it safely Refer to MSDS: Tells you where to find more info Supplier name and address: Tells you where to find more info • Must have a distinct “hash mark” border for easy identification. • Must be bilingual (English and French, Canada’s official languages)
  27. 27. Workplace labels must include • Product Identifier Must exactly match the MSDS • Risk Phrases Tells you the hazards • Precautionary Measures Tells you how to protect yourself • • Reference to MSDS Tells you where to find more information • No standard format, but MUST include these 4 items of information. May be in the “language of the workplace.” At Redlen, that is English. Used on-site for secondary containers
  28. 28. Examples of Work Place Labels available on Redlen’s Database: Used for dry CZT contaminated waste: Used for waste water: Used for liquid organic waste: User-Completed: Cross out hazard symbols which do not apply
  29. 29. Take a moment to consider: You see this label on a jar on the plant floor. What precautions should you take before working with this material?
  30. 30. Take a moment to consider: We use organic solvents throughout the plant for various operations. • They are flammable, so caution should be taken to keep it away from heat sources (such as hot plates or soldering irons), sparks, or flames. • It can cause immediate irritation, so care must be taken not to get any on your skin. • It can cause long term chronic effects, so care must be taken to protect your lungs and soft tissues: use in a fume hood, or wear a respirator with a suitable cartridge filter.
  31. 31. Labelling Responsibility • Manufacturers are responsible for Supplier Labels • Employers are responsible to replace supplier labels if they are illegible, and to provide adequate materials and training for creation of workplace labels • Employees (YOU) are responsible to create Work Place labels, affix Work Place labels, and to notify your supervisor if a label becomes illegible (torn, ink runs, etc). Only replace a label when you are 100% certain of the contents. DO NOT USE A CHEMICAL IF THE LABEL IS NOT CLEAR!
  32. 32. Other means of Identification Sometimes labels are impractical. Materials still require a way to identify them, so other means of identification may be used. E.g. – – – – Colour coded piping systems Hazardous Waste produced in the workplace Placards in front of beakers/flasks/test tubes When one operator is in complete control of a substance, and it is never left unattended (including lunch breaks, shift end, and passing off to another operator) Training is required to ensure everyone knows what the “other means” in use are, and what they mean.
  33. 33. What you need to do on the job • Read the Supplier label BEFORE using any material to understand the hazards • Apply workplace labels every time you transfer material to a new container (eg. Bottle, etch vessel, bucket, etc). Never assume your co-workers know what you’re working with. Tell them with a label! • Never put a material into a container labelled for a different material • Never put a label on a container if you are not 100% certain of it’s contents An improperly labelled container is a very high safety risk!
  34. 34. HOW WELL ARE YOU DOING? TAKE THE SELF-ASSESSMENT TO CHECK! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RedlenWHMISlabels (If hyperlink not working: Right click and select “Open Hyperlink,” or copy/paste address into Internet Explorer)
  35. 35. MSDS and SDS Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and Safety Data Sheets (SDS) are technical documents which provide detailed information on the hazards and protection measures for each material. They also contain information on safe handling practices, emergency procedures, and storage requirements for the material, which is a great tool for employers to use for setting up safety programs. MSDS must be updated every 3 years to ensure information remains current. What you want to learn from the MSDS is: • What are the hazards of the product? • How can you use it safely? • What should you do if something goes wrong?
  36. 36. MSDS help answer “What are the hazards?” They Include: • Fire and Explosion data – When and how it can catch fire • Reactivity data – What it reacts with – Under what conditions it will react • Toxicological properties including routes of entry and associated symptoms; listed in terms of LD50/LC50 numbers and Exposure Limits – – – – – LD50 is the Lethal Dose: ingestion/absorption LC50 is the Lethal Concentration: inhalation Lethal to 50% of an animal test population Lower the LD/LC numbers, the more lethal the substance is! STEL: Short Term Exposure Limit (15 minutes) and TWAE: Time Weighted Average Exposure (Averaged over an 8hour period) – Exposure to potential inhalation hazards: particulate, fume, vapour, aerosols
  37. 37. MSDS help answer “How can you use it safely?” Lists Preventative measures including: • Recommended Engineering controls • Recommended Personal Protective Equipment
  38. 38. MSDS help answer “What should you do if something goes wrong?” • Includes information on First Aid measures • Includes information on Spill clean-up procedures • Includes information on Reactivity and incompatible chemicals • Includes information on Fire Fighting procedures
  39. 39. Where can I find the MSDS? By law, Redlen is required to have MSDS available for you to review for ALL hazardous products which fall under WHMIS. MSDS must be readily available to anyone using, or working near the hazardous material. MSDS are accessible in the Document Cards on the Redlen Database, and in binders stored near the THM prep area (room #160) in the hallway. They are maintained by the Safety Committee.
  40. 40. Understanding the MSDS MSDS are technical documents, and use technical language. Because of this, they may be challenging to understand. Attached is a glossary of the common terms and acronyms used on MSDS to help you interpret how severe the hazards may be. To open it, double click on the icon when NOT in slideshow mode. Feel free to print it and keep on hand as a reference. It is also available on the database as RPT-09-007.
  41. 41. What you need to do on the job • Read the MSDS or SDS BEFORE using any material to understand the hazards • Ask yourself, your Trainer, and your Supervisor: – What are the hazards? Consider chemical reactions, pressure explosions, thermal or chemical burns, inhalation hazards, risk of cut or other injury, etc. – How can I work with this safely? Consider using a fume hood, light shields, downdraft tables, specific PPE, etc – What should I do if something goes wrong? Consider what to do in the event of a spill, a fire, skin exposure, etc. Do you know Redlen’s evacuation plan, paging procedure, and the location of fire extinguishers, first aid equipment, and spill supplies?
  42. 42. HOW WELL ARE YOU DOING? TAKE THE SELF-ASSESSMENT TO CHECK! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RedlenWHMISMSDS (If hyperlink not working: Right click and select “Open Hyperlink,” or copy/paste address into Internet Explorer)
  43. 43. For more information: • Contact the WHMIS Trainers with any questions you may have. • Check out the WHMIS Course Material available on the server: – WorkSafe BC’s WHMIS PDF publications: • WHMIS at Work • WHMIS Participant Work Book • WHMIS Core Material – PPE guides – and more!
  44. 44. ARE READY FOR THE FINAL ASSESSMENT? https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RedlenWHMIS2 (If hyperlink not working: Right click and select “Open Hyperlink,” or copy/paste address into Internet Explorer) Please answer all questions and click the “done” button at the end to notify the Training Coordinator that you have finished. Totals will only be sent out to Redlen Employees.

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