Beyond the Desktop: The Internet’s Impact on the Workplace

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Over more than a decade has the internet provided a seemingly limitless bounty of information readily accessible to the world. However, behind the blur of Internet speed are transformations that go beyond computer desktop: large-scale transformations that have only recently been recognized. The internet has yielded unprecedented effects on the workplace, such as the handicap of person-to-person communication; the crossover of businesses into foreign territory; and the disjointedness of business from workplace demands. It is only now that these effects have been realized: the proliferating idea of the internet as a simple medium for person-to-person communication has masked the Internet’s impact on the landscape of basic workplace practices.

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Beyond the Desktop: The Internet’s Impact on the Workplace

  1. 1. SAMPLE ONLY Beyond the Desktop: The Internet’s Impact on the Workplace Gilian Ortillan October 4, 2007 LBED 3110 Paul Tyndall
  2. 2. SAMPLE ONLY For twenty years, the internet has provided a seemingly limitless bounty ofinformation readily accessible to the world. It serves as a channel of interpersonalrelations, allowing for instantaneous communication between parties both across theroom and across the world. In the workplace, these appear to be the most obviousexamples of how the internet has been applied to daily functioning. However, behind theblur of the internet’s speed are transformations that go beyond computer desktop; large-scale transformations that have only recently been recognized. The internet has yieldedunprecedented effects on the workplace: interfering with person-to-personcommunication; crossing businesses into new foreign markets; and denaturalizingtraditional everyday business practices. It is only in the past several years that theseeffects have been realized: the proliferating idea of the internet as a simple medium forperson-to-person communication has masked the internet’s impact on the landscape ofbasic workplace practices. The lines between companies with previously little or no affiliation have beenblurred with the surge of internet-based business. The internet has opened the door forcompanies to expand into multiple industries, introducing them as new competitors inmarkets already vacated by established corporations. Wallace cites an example with thewebsite Amazon, which originally began as an online book retailer and has since hassince expanded its inventory into furniture and electronics, pitting itself against majorcompanies like Sears and Best Buy (9). ... .. The internet has also been the medium for a unique type of workplacemiscommunication. Traditional face-to-face communication is a multi-faceted processthat takes into account such factors as speech, tone, gesture, facial expression and culture.
  3. 3. SAMPLE ONLYHowever, such e-mail messages remove such factors from communication, which canconsequently lead to misinterpretation by the receiver of the message. Even the mostsimplest of messages, such as “That’s fine,” can be misconstrued when small details suchas the absence of a period are noticed. While on paper, typos and improper punctuationmay not trigger an emotional reaction, within the context of an e-mail message theintention of the sender can easily be distorted. This may be due to the fact that unlikepaper communication—such as memos, which has a widely understood level offormalization in Western culture—the form and etiquette of communication across digitalmedia has yet to be standardized. In other words, there is no of foundation forunderstanding the general nature of e-mail correspondence. Wallace also notes that theuse of “CC” (carbon copy) and “BCC” (blind carbon copy) have also been misused (4),and that improper use of it—such as needlessly forwarding it to a supervisor—can alsodistort the sender’s intention of the message. While the internet has certainly sped upinterpersonal communication, it has created issues unique to traditional face-to-facecommunication. ...
  4. 4. SAMPLE ONLY Works CitedWallace, Patricia. “The Internet in the Workplace: How New Technology is Transforming Work.”Download mp3 music, buy mp3 music – MP3fiesta.com. Retrieved October 4, 2007, from http://www.mp3fiesta.com/

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