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Effective Writing for Online Marketing and Branding – Traditional writing styles don’t always work well on the Internet. Tweets use only 140 characters. You’re supposed to get key words into your …

Effective Writing for Online Marketing and Branding – Traditional writing styles don’t always work well on the Internet. Tweets use only 140 characters. You’re supposed to get key words into your tweets, Facebook updates, website and blog. In this salon you’ll learn the best ways to write for all aspects of online branding and marketing–effective tweets, online press releases with subject headers that stand out, using words that get noticed, and more. You’ll leave with a better understanding of how to get as much mileage out of your online words as possible.

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  • 1. Topics   — The  Scale  of  it  all   — Op/miza/on   — Ge4ng  Started   — Website  Copy   — Press  Release   — Blogging   — Facebook   — TwiCer  2
  • 2. The  Numbers  Rock!   —  Facebook:  1,000,000,000  ac/ve  users     —  TwiCer:  175,000,000  ac/ve  users   —  LinkedIn:    150,000,000  registered  users   —  Pinterest:    8,000,000  ac/ve  users   —  Blogs:  346,000,000  people  read  blogs  every  day   —  YouTube:  800,000,000  unique  visitors  last  month  3
  • 3. Demographics  -­‐  Facebook   —  86%  of  Facebook  users  are  age  25  and  older   —  81%  have  some  college  educa/on  or  bachelors/graduate   degree   —  58%  earn  $50,000  or  more  4 4
  • 4. Demographics  -­‐  TwiCer   —  81%  of  people  on  TwiCer  are  age  25  and  older   —  83%  have  some  college  educa/on  or  bachelors/graduate     degree   —  47%  earn  $50,000  or  more  5 5
  • 5. SEO  +  SMO  =  Amplified  “Findability”     —  Social  Media  Op/miza/on  (SMO)  is  the  distribu/on   of  social  objects  (videos,  blog  posts,  tweets,   Facebook  updates)  so  that  they’re  op/mized  to  rise   to  the  top  of  any  related  search  query,  where  and   when  it  is  performed.     —  Search  Engine  Op/miza/on  (SEO)  is  the  process  of   improving  the  visibility  of  a  web  site  in  search  engines   via  the  “organic”  search  results.     —  SMO  and  SEO  are  two  halves  of  a  whole.  6
  • 6. Ge4ng  started  –  do  your  research  7
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  • 11. Listening  to  What’s  Already  Being  Said   —  Set-­‐up  Google  Alerts  for  all  your  keywords,  your   compe/tors,  your  own  company  name,  your  personal   name,  etc.   —  Use  Social  Men/on  to  search  social  media  for  men/ons   of  your  organiza/on  /  compe//on   —  Use  Google  Search  and  Google  Blog  Search  to  find   bloggers  and  other  content  creators  in  your  space   —  Use  Muck  Rack  to  find  journalists  12
  • 12. Website  Copy  –  It’s  an  Art  and  Science   —  Structure  is  important   —  Page  /tles   —  Slugs   —  Meta  descrip/ons   —  H1,  H2  Tags   —  Image  names  and  image  alt  tags   —  Bold  keywords  –  Google  understands  emphasis   —  Internal  linking  13
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  • 16. Website  Copy  –  Best  Prac/ces   —  Ensure  quality  with  proofreading   —  Focus  on  the  most  important  info  up  front   —  Avoid  big  blocks  of  copy  –  break  it  up  with  bullets,   images,  etc.   —  Write  paragraphs  of  no  more  than  6-­‐7  lines   —  Consider  your  target  market  when  wri/ng  content  –   consider  age  group,  region,  etc.    Avoid  jargon.   —  Don’t  just  focus  on  the  specifica/ons  of  the  product  or   service  –  talk  about  what  it  means  to  real  clients   —  Have  a  call  to  ac/on  to  web  visitor  can  have  a  next  step  17
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  • 19. Davd Meerman Scott20
  • 20. Press  Releases   —  Today’s  journalists,  etc.,  consume  content  digitally     —  They  find  it,  share  it  and  interact  with  it  differently   —  Social  networks  enable  people  to  find  and  share  content,   opening  up  new  opportuni/es  for  brands  to   communicate  directly  with  their  audiences   —  Search  engines  are  using  social  signals  in  their  ranking   algorithms,  meaning  that  social  sharing  can  have  a  las/ng   effect  on  the  online  visibility  of  a  message  21
  • 21. Press  Releases  -­‐  Headlines   —  Length  –  Headlines  should  be  between  90-­‐120  characters.   (Characters,  including  spaces)   —  Length  is  perfect  for  sharing  via  TwiCer  -­‐  write  “tweetable”   headlines.     —  Keywords  –  Put  your  most  important  keyword  at  the   beginning  of  the  headline  –  within  the  first  65  characters.   —  Headlines  inform  search  engines  about  on-­‐page  content   and  they  put  more  weight  on  the  content  that  appears  at   the  top  of  the  page    22
  • 22. Press  Release  -­‐  Headlines   —  Include  numerals  in  the  headline.    Readers  like  data   points.   —  Releases  with  numerals  in  the  headline  perform  beCer  than   releases  that  don’t.       —  “Ten  top  xxx  facts/ideas/steps,  etc.”    tell  your  readers   about  that  in  the  headline   —  U/lize  a  subhead  to  add  more  detail   —  90-­‐120  character  headline  length  is  preCy  restric/ve   —  Spli4ng  long  headlines  into  shorter  headlines  and   subheads  makes  it  easier  for  readers  to  scan  the  copy  23
  • 23. Press  Releases  –  Best  Prac/ces   —  Crap  a  hook  –  tell  a  story   —  Research  before  you  write  on  releases  and  content  form   industry  compe/tors   —  Avoid  jargon   —  Minimize  technical  or  industry  jargon   —  Provide  resources   —  Add  value  to  by  including  photos,  videos,  links  to  source   material  and  any  other  in-­‐depth  resources   —  Keep  your  audience  in  mind  when  crea/ng  your  message    24
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  • 26. Blogging  Best  Prac/ces   —  Answer  industry  ques/ons   —  Comment  on  industry  news   —  Provide  how-­‐to  based  content   —  Encourage  readers  to  comment   —  Post  consistently  –  3  to  5  /mes  per  week  27
  • 27. Blogging  Best  Prac/ces   —  Pose  Engaging  Ques/ons  -­‐  At  the  end  of  a  post,  pose  a  brain-­‐ s/mula/ng  ques/on.     —   Get  readers  to  offer  /ps  -­‐  It  could  be  a  problem  that  you’re   facing,  or  something  your  customer  is  facing.  Make  it  a   contest;  publicly  credit  the  reader  with  the  best  /ps  on  your   blog  so  that  everyone  can  see.   —  Start  With  An  Engaging  Opener  –  Your  opening  should  engage   the  reader  from  the  word  go,  something  that’ll  ignite  their   curiosity,  mo/vate  their  thought  process  and  get  them   engaged.  Make  your  opener  funny,  insighsul,  wiCy  and   outrageous  if  need  be.   —     28
  • 28. Blogging  Best  Prac/ces   —  Make  the  content  graphically  vivid  -­‐  Paint  a  picture  with   your  words,  and  draw  people  into  the  scene  you’re   pain/ng.   —  Write  in  your  speaking  voice,  as  though  you’re  cha4ng   with  friends.     —  Provide  A  Conclusion  –  sum  up  the  essence  of  your  ar/cle   in  a  short  conclusion.  Your  conclusion  should  ideally  /e   up  your  points  together  and  provide  a  short  glimpse  of   what  the  ar/cle  is  all  about.  29
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  • 33. ‹#› 34
  • 34. Where  does  FB  Fit  in?   —  Increase  visibility   —  Connect  with  customers     —  Increase  engagement   —  Promote  your  brand   —  Create  a  community   —  Promote  and  manage  events   —  Give  back  to  loyal  customers  through  special  offers  and   discounts  35
  • 35. Facebook  Best  Prac/ces   —  Write  interes/ng  and  relevant  posts  will  encourage   followers  to  engage  with  your  posts   —  Liking,  commen/ng  and  sharing  are  important     —  Facebook  uses  the  level  of  engagement  to  determine  how   many  people  see  your  posts   —  Reveal  the  human  side  of  a  company,  give  it  personality   —  Provide  useful  informa/on  that  people  won’t  get   elsewhere  (or  at  least  not  as  quickly)   —  Respond  to  comments,  complaints,  requests  real-­‐/me   —  Have  a  plasorm  for  announcing  news,  promo/ons,   events  36
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  • 46. TwiCer   —  An  informa/onal  tool  –  provides  informa/on  to  others   —  A  conversa/onal  tool  –  respond  to  other  people’s  tweets   and  engage  in  dialogue   —  Great  way  to  network  and  communicate  with  new  and   old  contacts   —  You  choose  the  message,  not  the  recipient  47
  • 47. Anatomy  of  a  Tweet  48
  • 48. TwiCer  Best  Prac/ces   —  Listen!     —  Set  up  simple  searches  that  allow  you  to  hear  men/ons  of   your  company   —  TwiCer  is  a  real-­‐/me  opportunity  to  listen  in  on  the   conversa/ons  of  200  million  users   —  Serve  as  a  resource   —  Provide  informa/on  that  helps  your  target  audience  in  a   quick,  easy-­‐to-­‐use  format  49
  • 49. TwiCer  Best  Prac/ces   —  Use  your  own  style  when  engaging  with  others   —  Ask  relevant  ques/ons  on  TwiCer  and  consumers  are   happy  to  share  opinions   —  People  like  being  asked  to  provide  input  on  topics  of   interest   —  Thinking  of  offering  a  new  service?    Ask  for  input   beforehand   —  Take  advantage  of  the  online  community  to  gain   feedback  and  generate  new  ideas  that  will  result  connect   with  the  audience  served  by  your  business  50
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  • 53. The  Content  Landscape   54
  • 54. Website  ‹#› 55
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  • 59. Thank  You!   Bridget  Gibbons   bridget@gibbonsdigital.com   Gibbonsdigital.com   @gibbonsdigital   v.com/gibbonsdigital  60