GENDERIZING
CLIMATE ACTIONS
AND
DISASTER RISK
REDUCTION
17 October 2013
Catanduanes State University
Virac, Catanduanes
Climate Change Mitigation vs. Disaster
Mitigation
•

•

Section 3 of the DRRM Act/RA 10121

– “…Structural and non-structu...
Conceptual Linkages of Climate Change Adaptation
and Disaster Risk Management (CCA-DRM)
Climate Change
Adaptation:

Disast...
Global GHG emissions

Source: IPCC AR4, Synthesis Report (shares are for 2004)
… Share in the current emissions
Australia 1.1%

Indonesia 1.3%

Spain 1.1%
Brazil 1.1%

Poland 1.1%
Nigeria 0.4%

G8 nati...
UNFCCC - Mapping the players
Climate leaders
e.g. Norway

More Supportive
(e.g. 2oC)
Progressive

AOSIS

Philippines

Less...
NET: 21,767.41 Gg CO2-E
Observed and Projected Annual Mean Temperature Anomalies for the Philippines
Period 1951 to 2100 (Departures from 1971-200...
Projected seasonal temperature increase (in °C)
in the Philippines in 2020 and 2050
All areas of the
Philippines will get
...
Projected rainfall change (increase/decrease) in
% in 2020 and 2050 in the Philippines
Usually wet seasons
become wetter
w...
SEA LEVEL RISE
Increasing Intensity of typhoons and precipitation (1945-2006)
A total of 1128 tropical cyclones
entered the PAR and 56 % ...
Climate Change Act of 2009

October 23, 2009 * Malacañang
R.A. 9729
R.A. 10174
•

Mainstreaming climate change
into government policy
formulations

•

Creating the Climate Change
C...
Climate Change Commission
• Sole policy-making body of
the government tasked to
coordinate, monitor and
evaluate the progr...
Simplified Vulnerability
Assessment Approach
Impact Assessment

Vulnerability
Assessment

Action
(Adaptation &
Mitigation)...
Natural Hazards Risk-Based Approach
IPCC Biophysical Vulnerability Approach

The (IPCC) approach is a function of the character,
magnitude, and rate of climat...
Natural Hazards Risk-Based Approach
Differences and Similarities
V = f ( E, S, AC )
National Framework Strategy
on Climate Change
• Government policy and
country’s roadmap towards
climate change mitigation
...
National Framework Strategy
on Climate Change

•
•
•
•

Increasing temperatures
Changing rainfall patterns
Sea level rise
...
The NCCAP

NCCAP:
Ultimate Goal

Build the adaptive capacities of women
and men in their communities, increase
the resilie...
NCCAP’S ULTIMATE GOAL
Build the adaptive capacities of women and men in their communities, increase the resilience of
vuln...
National Climate Change Action Plan 2011-2028

ULTIMATE 1.0 Enhanced adaptive capacity of communities, resilience of natur...
Strategic Actions on Food Security for 2011 to 2028
Strategic Actions on Ecosystem and Environmental Stability for 2011 to 2028

ACTIVITIES

OUTPUTS

IMMEDIATE
OUTCOME

Enhan...
rategic Actions on Human Security for 2011 to 2028

ACTIVITIES

OUTPUTS

IMMEDIATE
OUTCOME

Reduced risks of of men and wo...
Cap Dev as a Strategic Priority
•

NEDA study, conducted through the MDGF 1656: Strengthening
the Philippines’ Institution...
Cap Dev as a Strategic Priority
•

Second, building communities’
capacities for climate adaptation also
builds their abili...
Cap Dev and Strategic Knowledge
•

The following are the key issues that should be addressed
under strategic knowledge:
• ...
ategic Actions for Knowledge and Capacity Development for 2011-2028

ACTIVITIES

OUTPUTS

IMMEDIATE
OUTCOME

Enhanced know...
RA 9729 (Climate Change Act) Sec. 14: Local
Climate Change Action Plan
Barangay

Municipal and
City

•
•

Prioritize CC is...
RA 9729 (Climate Change Act) Sec. 14:
Local Climate Change Action Plan
LGUs shall be the frontline agencies in the formula...
ECO-TOWNS
Ecologically Stable
and Economically
Resilient Towns
Enhancement of Carbon
Water Security
Food Security
Stocks
Renewable Energy from:
Enhancement of Genetic Resources
Hydro Hy...
Environmental CCT
• Conditionality
– E-CCT beneficiary
• Family vs. Community
• Setting the maximum that a family or a com...
Implementation Phase: CC Resilient
Communities & Local Economy
• Identifying measures of resilience
– Increased income of ...
NOTES
•

The People’s Survival Fund Bill can be a possible source of
financing for LGUs.

• Mainstreaming of CCA-DRR is al...
CCA and DRR Integration
in LGUs
Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate
Change Adaptation (DRR/CCA) in Local
Devel...
Integrating framework
(Output 2/Activity 2.1)

Handbook on Establishing,
Managing and Maintaining
DR/CR data
(Output 2/Act...
DRR/CCA Integration
Sectoral Impacts

CC Scenarios

Biophysical effects

Adaptation Strategies

VnA Tool
VA Tool
(Integrat...
DRR/CCA Integration
Biophysical Effects
1. Spatial/temporal variability
2. Hazard characterization using CC
scenarios (e.g...
DRR/CCA Integration
Sectoral Impacts
1. Agriculture

4. Water

2. Forestry

5. Health

3. Coastal
U
N
H
A
B
I
T
A
T
Urban Risk Assessment
Approach
Zones of coastal
regulation
"Genderizing Climate Vulnerability
Assessment Tools: the Women at the Center
Project Experience"
Marita P. Rodriguez with ...
Summary of Major Changes and Perceived Causes
Sitio Ibuan
(Agricultural)

Sitios Cabgan &
Mahaba (Fisheries)

Perceived Ca...
What Oxfam Found Out
 Women and men are differently affected by climate
change hence it is important to look into their
n...
Therefore...
• VNA or any tools need to involve women if we
want a holistic picture of community situation
– Asking approp...
Epilogue
Epilogue
Climate Change Office
Climate Change Commission
Rm 238 Mabini Hall, Malacañang Compound
San Miguel, Manila
Telefax: 736-11...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Chang...
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International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Change Commission -- Gendered Dimensions of Environmental Protection, Disaster Risk Reduction Management and Sustainable Development

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International Research Forum, Envinromental Protection, Local Governance and Accountability, Disaster Risk Reduction, Sustainable Management, Catanduanes State University

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  • Source: NFSCC, 2010
  • Change in Mean Temperature
    Under the A1B scenario the seasonal mean temperatures in the Philippines are expected to rise by about 0.8ºC to 1.3ºC for 2020 and 1.5 ºC to 2.6 ºC by 2050.
    Under the A2 emission scenario the seasonal mean temperatures in the Philippines are expected to rise by about 0.5 °C to 0.9 °C for 2020 and 1.2 °C to 2.0 °C by 2050.
    Widespread warming is projected in most parts of the country in 2020 and 2050.
    Projected seasonal temperature increase is quite consistent in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao throughout the four different seasons with higher increase expected in 2050.
  • Source: Francoise Gemenne, Policy responses to climate-induced migration: Findings from ADB Project and relevance to the Philippines Philippines Country Workshop on Climate-Induced Migration
    Manila, 13 September 2011, quoting NASA
  • A sea level rise of 1 cm puts 1 million people at risk of displacement
  • The Philippines experience the Most number of the most intense typhoons and precipitation
    Red = category 5
  • Before ‘Sendong’ and After ‘Sendong’. HOUSES on Isla de Oro, a sandbar, were swept away by rampaging waters of Cagayan River when Tropical Storm “Sendong” hit Cagayan de Oro on Dec. 17. Photo by Yeb Saño
  • Before ‘Sendong’ and After ‘Sendong’. FEW OF the houses on a bank of Cagayan River in Sitio Calacala remained after the storm. Photo by Yeb Saño
  • Figure above presents a simplified vulnerability assessment approach as recommended by the IPCC, as discussed in an unpublished report of Dr. Kendra Gotangco to the CCC (Philippines)
  • Dr. Gotangco: biophysical vulnerability has much in common with the concept of risk as elaborated in the natural hazards literature. The principal difference: natural hazards risk-based approach is that risk is generally described in terms of probability. Whereas the IPCC and the climate change community: (biophysical) vulnerability simply as a function of certain variables. Nonetheless, the determinants of both biophysical vulnerability and risk are essentially the same, which are hazards and social vulnerability.
     
    Overall, Dr. Gotangco emphasized the need for adaptation planning and assessment because a system with high adaptive capacity, does not necessarily translate to adaptation. Adaptive capacity must encompass all the processes that determine whether or not adaptation takes place, and to what extent, including those associated with different scales and systems, representing the environmental, economic and geopolitical context in which the system of interest is embedded.
  • Source: The IPCC framework (IPCC AR4, TAR WG2). The IPCC framework is defined by the above equation wherein: V - Vulnerability is the degree to which a system is susceptible to, and unable to cope with, adverse effects of climate change, including climate variability and extremes.
    E - Exposure is the nature and degree to which a system is exposed to significant climatic variations
    S - Sensitivity is the degree to which a system is affected, either adversely or beneficially, by climate variability or change. The effect may be direct (e.g., a change in crop yield in response to a change in the mean, range or variability of temperature) or indirect (e.g., damages caused by an increase in the frequency of coastal flooding due to sea level rise).
    AC - Adaptive Capacity is the ability of a system to adjust to climate change (including climate variability and extremes) to moderate potential damages, to take advantage of opportunities, or to cope with the consequences.
  • Dr. Gotangco: biophysical vulnerability has much in common with the concept of risk as elaborated in the natural hazards literature. The principal difference: natural hazards risk-based approach is that risk is generally described in terms of probability. Whereas the IPCC and the climate change community: (biophysical) vulnerability simply as a function of certain variables. Nonetheless, the determinants of both biophysical vulnerability and risk are essentially the same, which are hazards and social vulnerability.
     
    Overall, Dr. Gotangco emphasized the need for adaptation planning and assessment because a system with high adaptive capacity, does not necessarily translate to adaptation. Adaptive capacity must encompass all the processes that determine whether or not adaptation takes place, and to what extent, including those associated with different scales and systems, representing the environmental, economic and geopolitical context in which the system of interest is embedded.
  • Dr. Gotangco: biophysical vulnerability has much in common with the concept of risk as elaborated in the natural hazards literature. The principal difference: natural hazards risk-based approach is that risk is generally described in terms of probability. Whereas the IPCC and the climate change community: (biophysical) vulnerability simply as a function of certain variables. Nonetheless, the determinants of both biophysical vulnerability and risk are essentially the same, which are hazards and social vulnerability.
     
    Dr. Gotangco key message: emphasized the need for adaptation planning and assessment because a system
    with high adaptive capacity, does that necessarily translate to adaptation. Adaptive capacity must encompass all the processes that determine whether or not adaptation takes place, and to what extent, including those associated with different scales and systems, representing the environmental, economic and geopolitical context in which the system of interest is embedded.
  • Strengthening Climate Resilience – developed by Christian Aid
  • Source: URBANRISK ASSESSMENTS AN APPROACH FOR UNDERSTANDING DISASTER & CLIMATERISK IN CITIES, Urban Development & Local Government Unit
    Finance, Economics and Urban Department, The World Bank
  • Adaptation thru policy intervention/regulation
    Source: Florida Department of Environmental Protection, as cited in POLICY FRAMEWORKS FOR ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN COASTAL ZONES:
    THE CASE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO (Ellina Levina, OECD John Jacob, Luis Enrique Ramos Bustillos, and Ivonne Ortiz)
  • Women: camote, mangrove
    Men: abaca, corals/seaweeds
  • Photos taken from http://pinoytrees.blogspot.com/2009/07/manilas-long-lost-resident.html
    it is widely accepted that the term Tagalog came from the word 'Taga-Ilog' o river dwellers, (referring to the Pasig River of former Rizal province towns and Manila)
    http://philreview.blogspot.com/2008/07/tagalog-origin.html
    The city's name , originally Maynilad , is derived from that of the nilad plant , a flowering shrub adapted to marshy conditions , which once grew profusely along the banks of the river; the name was shortened first to Maynila and then to its present form http://www1.cs.columbia.edu/~noemie/alignment/data/test/hum/manila-hum.txt
    it is widely accepted that the term Tagalog came from the word 'Taga-Ilog' o river dwellers, (referring to the Pasig River of former Rizal province towns and Manila)
    http://philreview.blogspot.com/2008/07/tagalog-origin.html
  • it is widely accepted that the term Tagalog came from the word 'Taga-Ilog' o river dwellers, (referring to the Pasig River of former Rizal province towns and Manila)
    http://philreview.blogspot.com/2008/07/tagalog-origin.html
  • International Research Forum Plenary Talk by Dennis dela Torre, Planning Officer V, Office of the Secretary, Climate Change Commission -- Gendered Dimensions of Environmental Protection, Disaster Risk Reduction Management and Sustainable Development

    1. 1. GENDERIZING CLIMATE ACTIONS AND DISASTER RISK REDUCTION 17 October 2013 Catanduanes State University Virac, Catanduanes
    2. 2. Climate Change Mitigation vs. Disaster Mitigation • • Section 3 of the DRRM Act/RA 10121 – “…Structural and non-structural measures undertaken to limit the adverse impact of natural hazards, environmental degradation, and technological hazards and to ensure the ability of at-risk communities to address vulnerabilities aimed at minimizing the impact of disasters. Such measures include, but are not limited to, hazard-resistant construction and engineering works, the formulation and implementation of plans, programs, projects and activities, awareness raising, knowledge management, policies on land-use and resource management, as well as the enforcement of comprehensive land-use planning, building and safety standards, and legislation.” Section 3n of the Climate Change Act/RA 9729 – Mitigation in the context of climate change, “refers to human intervention to address anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of all GHG, including ozone depleting substances and their substitutes.” – Adaptation “refers to the adjustment in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which moderates harm or exploits beneficial opportunities.”
    3. 3. Conceptual Linkages of Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Management (CCA-DRM) Climate Change Adaptation: Disaster Risk Management Reduce vulnerability to: Gradual changes in climatic parameters Sea level rise Rising mean temperature Reduce vulnerability to: Climate- and weather-related hazards Extreme weather events with increased frequency and severity Changes in precipitation patterns Geophysical hazards Ecological hazards Direct connection Potential connections Exploit connections using co-benefit strategies Top-down / National gov’t policies. Bottom-up / Community-based (SOURCE: Castillo, Charlotte Kendra G, 2007)
    4. 4. Global GHG emissions Source: IPCC AR4, Synthesis Report (shares are for 2004)
    5. 5. … Share in the current emissions Australia 1.1% Indonesia 1.3% Spain 1.1% Brazil 1.1% Poland 1.1% Nigeria 0.4% G8 nations about 45% Iran 1.5% South Africa 1.5% Mexico 1.5% Korea 1.6% USA 20.9% India 4.6% Latin America and Carribean 4.8% Russia 5.3% EU 8.8% Japan 4.3% Germany 2.8% China 17.3% Canada 2.2% Source: CDIAC 2007 UK 2% France 1.3% Italy 1.6%
    6. 6. UNFCCC - Mapping the players Climate leaders e.g. Norway More Supportive (e.g. 2oC) Progressive AOSIS Philippines Less powerful Progressive G77 Mexico S.Korea Brazil Indonesia New Japan India Canada Saudi/ OPEC Russia Rogues/deal-breakers Important swing states Climate champions Other EU China Australia Zealand Other G77 Core/deal-makers EU S.Africa African Group Less supportive (e.g. 2oC) US More powerful
    7. 7. NET: 21,767.41 Gg CO2-E
    8. 8. Observed and Projected Annual Mean Temperature Anomalies for the Philippines Period 1951 to 2100 (Departures from 1971-2000 normal values) 4.00 OBS 3.50 A1B 3.00 A2 °C ) 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 MEAN TEMPARATURE PERIOD A1B 2020 28.4 2050 29.4 2100 30.5 BASELINE 27.40 0.00 -0.50 A2 28.1 29.1 30.8 PAGASA-DOST 6 9 0 2 1 9 0 2 6 8 0 2 1 8 0 2 6 7 0 2 1 7 0 2 1 6 0 2 6 5 0 2 1 5 0 2 6 4 0 2 1 4 0 2 6 3 0 2 Year 1 3 0 2 6 0 2 1 0 2 6 1 0 2 1 0 2 6 0 2 1 0 2 6 9 1 9 1 6 8 9 1 8 9 1 6 7 9 1 7 9 1 6 9 1 6 9 1 6 5 9 1 -1.00 5 9 1 ( y l o n A u t a r p m e T 0.50
    9. 9. Projected seasonal temperature increase (in °C) in the Philippines in 2020 and 2050 All areas of the Philippines will get warmer All areas in the Philippines are expected to rise by 0.9 °C to 1.1 °C in 2020 and by 1.8 °C to 2.2 °C in 2050 Source: PAGASA
    10. 10. Projected rainfall change (increase/decrease) in % in 2020 and 2050 in the Philippines Usually wet seasons become wetter which could lead to flood occurrences Usually dry seasons become drier which could lead to drought spells Source: PAGASA
    11. 11. SEA LEVEL RISE
    12. 12. Increasing Intensity of typhoons and precipitation (1945-2006) A total of 1128 tropical cyclones entered the PAR and 56 % of this tropical cyclone reached typhoon intensity. Each year, the Philippines is hit by an average of 20 typhoons. Most of the deadliest and exceptionally damaging typhoons that hit the Philippines occurred in the last two decades: Over US$2 Billion in direct damages and causing the deaths of over 25,000 Filipinos (excluding damages from Ketsana and Parma) Source: PAGASA
    13. 13. Climate Change Act of 2009 October 23, 2009 * Malacañang
    14. 14. R.A. 9729 R.A. 10174 • Mainstreaming climate change into government policy formulations • Creating the Climate Change Commission • Formulating the National Strategic Framework on Climate Change • Formulating the National Climate Change Action Plan • Creating the People’s Survival Fund
    15. 15. Climate Change Commission • Sole policy-making body of the government tasked to coordinate, monitor and evaluate the programs and action plans of the government relating to climate change • Independent and autonomous body attached to the Office of the President
    16. 16. Simplified Vulnerability Assessment Approach Impact Assessment Vulnerability Assessment Action (Adaptation & Mitigation) Assessment Prioritize and Build Capacity Monitoring and Evaluation Prioritize and Implement Actions
    17. 17. Natural Hazards Risk-Based Approach
    18. 18. IPCC Biophysical Vulnerability Approach The (IPCC) approach is a function of the character, magnitude, and rate of climate change and variation to which a system is exposed, its sensitivity, and its adaptive capacity V = f ( E, S, AC )
    19. 19. Natural Hazards Risk-Based Approach
    20. 20. Differences and Similarities V = f ( E, S, AC )
    21. 21. National Framework Strategy on Climate Change • Government policy and country’s roadmap towards climate change mitigation and adaptation, with emphasis on disaster risk reduction (DRR) • Basis for the program on climate change planning, research and development, extension, and monitoring of activities on climate change
    22. 22. National Framework Strategy on Climate Change • • • • Increasing temperatures Changing rainfall patterns Sea level rise Extreme weather events VISION: A climate risk-resilient Philippines with healthy, safe, prosperous and self-reliant communities, and thriving and productive ecosystems CLIMATE PROCESS DRIVERS • • • • • CLIMATE CHANGE Energy Transport Land Use Change & Forestry Agriculture Waste SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Goal: To build the adaptive capacity of communities and increase the resilience of natural ecosystems to climate change, and optimize mitigation opportunities towards sustainable development. Capacity Development Knowledge Management IEC and Gender Advocacy Mainstreaming Research and Development Technology Transfer CROSS-CUTTING STRATEGIES SOCIETY IMPACTS AND VULNERABILITY • Ecosystems (River Basins, Coastal & Marine, Biodiversity) • Food security • Water resources • Human health • Infrastructure • Energy • Human society ENVIRONMENT ECONOMY Multi-stakeholder Partnerships Financing Valuation Policy, Planning and Mainstreaming MEANS OF IMPLEMENTATION
    23. 23. The NCCAP NCCAP: Ultimate Goal Build the adaptive capacities of women and men in their communities, increase the resilience of vulnerable sectors and natural ecosystems to climate change, and optimize mitigation opportunities towards gender-responsive and rightsbased sustainable development 31
    24. 24. NCCAP’S ULTIMATE GOAL Build the adaptive capacities of women and men in their communities, increase the resilience of vulnerable sectors and natural ecosystems to climate change, and optimize mitigation opportunities towards gender-responsive and rights-based sustainable development Intermediate Outcomes Intermediate Outcomes Ecosystem and Ecosystem and Environmental Environmental Stability Stability Water Water Sufficiency Sufficiency Food Food Security Security Human Human Security Security Climate-Smart Climate-Smart Industries and Industries and Services Services Sustainable Sustainable Energy Energy Knowledge and Knowledge and Capacity Capacity Development Development Successful transition towards Successful transition towards climate-smart development. climate-smart development. Ultimate Outcomes Ultimate Outcomes
    25. 25. National Climate Change Action Plan 2011-2028 ULTIMATE 1.0 Enhanced adaptive capacity of communities, resilience of natural ecosystems, and sustainability of built OUTCOMES environment to climate change. 2.0 Successful transition towards climate-smart development.
    26. 26. Strategic Actions on Food Security for 2011 to 2028
    27. 27. Strategic Actions on Ecosystem and Environmental Stability for 2011 to 2028 ACTIVITIES OUTPUTS IMMEDIATE OUTCOME Enhanced resilience and stability of natural systems and communities. 1. Ecosystems protected, rehabilitated and ecological services restored. 1.1 CC mitigation and adaptation strategies for key ecosystems developed and implemented 1. 2. Management and conservation of protected areas and key biodiversity areas improved 1. 3. Environmental laws strictly implemented. 1. 4. Capacity for integrated ecosystembased management approach in protected areas and key biodiversity areas enhanced. 1. 5 Natural resource accounting institutionalized. 1.1.1. Conduct a nationwide gendered ecosystem vulnerability and risk assessment. 1.1.2. Derive and implement mitigation and adaptation strategies for key ecosystems. 1.1.3. Implement the National REDD Plus Strategy (NRPS). 1.2.1. Expand the network of protected areas (PAs) and key biodiversity areas (KBAs). 1.2.2. Establish ecosystem towns or ecotowns in protected areas and key biodiversity areas. 1.2.3. Design genderfair innovative financing mechanisms and a bundle of CC adaptation assistance for ecotowns communities. 1.3.1. Implement moratorium on polluting and extractive industries in PAs, KBAs and other environmentally critical areas. 1.4.1. Increase knowledge and capacity for integrated ecosystem-based management at the national, local and community levels. 1.5.1. Review and revise policy on Phil. EconomicEnvironmental and Natural Resources Accounting. 1.5.2. Implement training program on wealth accounting or ENRA for key government agencies.
    28. 28. rategic Actions on Human Security for 2011 to 2028 ACTIVITIES OUTPUTS IMMEDIATE OUTCOME Reduced risks of of men and women and other vulnerable groups (children, elderly and persons with disability) from climate and disasters. 1. CCA and DRR practiced by communities and sectors at all levels. 2. Health and social sector delivery system are responsive to climate change. 3. CC –adaptive human settlements and services developed, promoted and adopted. 1.1. CCA-DRRM integrated in local plans 1.2. Knowledge and capacity for CCA-DRRM developed and enhanced 2.1. Health personnel and communities capacity on CC health adaptation and risk reduction developed 2.2. Public health surveillance system developed and implemented in all provinces 2.3. Health emergency response, preparedness and post-disaster management implemented at the national and local level 3.1. Adaptive and secured settlement areas for vulnerable communities and climate-refugees 3.2. Population congestion and exposure to CC risks reduced 1.1.1. Conduct provincial-level vulnerability and risk assessments 1.1.2. Mainstream and implement CCA-DRRM in the local plans based on information from the vulnerability and risk assessment. 1.2.1. Develop and implement knowledge management on CC and disaster risks 1.2.2. Increase local and community capacities for CCA-DRRM . 2.1.1. Integrate CC and DRR in the training of health personnel and community workers, 2.2.1. Implement communitybased public health surveillance system for CCsensitive diseases. 2.3.1. Improve system for health emergency preparedness and response for climate and disaster risks 2.3.2. Improve system for postdisaster health management. 3.1.1. Develop a long term plan for adaptation of highly CC vulnerable population and climate refugees . 3.2.1. Extensive IEC program on CC risks and population management .
    29. 29. Cap Dev as a Strategic Priority • NEDA study, conducted through the MDGF 1656: Strengthening the Philippines’ Institutional Capacity to Adapt to Climate Change project, found 3 core issues that have to be addressed (NEDA 2010): • the need for the participating institutions to formulate their CCA Policy which would serve as a guide for them to effectively address climate change adaptation and mitigation; • the need for “relevant, timely and accessible data and information” is critical for the planning and implementation of climate change adaptation and mitigation; • the need to build knowledge and capacities of staff and officers of agencies on climate change adaptation and mitigation.
    30. 30. Cap Dev as a Strategic Priority • Second, building communities’ capacities for climate adaptation also builds their ability to cope with the impacts of climate change. Where these capacities have been destroyed due to economic failure and natural disasters, the focus of capacity development is on retaining existing capacity assets and motivating a return of capacity. The basic principle during times of crises is to ‘building back better’ capacities so that communities are able to recover faster from the crises.
    31. 31. Cap Dev and Strategic Knowledge • The following are the key issues that should be addressed under strategic knowledge: • Having access to relevant information and localizing it from the Philippine perspective • Creating a good data management and reporting system • Disseminating relevant information
    32. 32. ategic Actions for Knowledge and Capacity Development for 2011-2028 ACTIVITIES OUTPUTS IMMEDIATE OUTCOME Enhanced knowledge and capacity of women and men to address climate change. 1. Enhanced knowledge on the science of climate change. 2. Capacity for CC adaptation, mitigation and disaster risk reduction at the local and community level enhanced. 3. CC knowledge management established and accessible to all sectors at the national and local levels. 1.1. Improved capacity for CC scenario modeling and forecasting. 1.2. Government capacity for CC adaptation and mitigation planning improved. 2.1. CC resource centers identified and established . 2.2. Formal and nonformal capacity development program for climate change science, adaptation and mitigation developed. 3.1. Gendered CC knowledge management established. 1.1.1. Establish centers of excellence on CC science at the national and regional level. 1.1..2. Improve government systems and infrastructure required for CC modeling and climate forecasting. 1.2.1. Develop and implement a capacity building program for government agencies on CC. 1.2.2. Develop and implement a national integrated program for the conduct of risk, vulnerability and adaptation assessments. 1.2.3. Implement a national system for monitoring greenhouse gas emissions. 2.1.1. Establish network CC resources in all regions. 2.2.1. Integrate CC in basic and higher education curricula 2.2.2. Develop and implement gendered and accessible CC adaptation and mitigation special or customized technical training programs. 3.1.1. Establish web-based network of resource centers. 3.1.2. Implement gendered IEC on CC adaptation and mitigation. 3.1.3. Validate and monitor the implementation of NCCAP.
    33. 33. RA 9729 (Climate Change Act) Sec. 14: Local Climate Change Action Plan Barangay Municipal and City • • Prioritize CC issues and identify and implement best practices Directly involved w/ municipal and city governments Consider CC adaptation as one of their regular functions Provincial Provide technical assistance, enforcement and information management in support of municipal and city climate change action plans National Government Extend technical and financial assistance to LGUs for the accomplishment of their LCCAP An inter-local government unit collaboration shall be maximized in the conduct of climate-related activities
    34. 34. RA 9729 (Climate Change Act) Sec. 14: Local Climate Change Action Plan LGUs shall be the frontline agencies in the formulation, planning and implementation of climate change action plans in their respective areas, consistent with the provisions of the Local Government Code, the Framework and the National Climate Change Action Plan
    35. 35. ECO-TOWNS Ecologically Stable and Economically Resilient Towns
    36. 36. Enhancement of Carbon Water Security Food Security Stocks Renewable Energy from: Enhancement of Genetic Resources Hydro Hydro Meteorological Green Industries and Eco-tourism mitigation Solar & Wind
    37. 37. Environmental CCT • Conditionality – E-CCT beneficiary • Family vs. Community • Setting the maximum that a family or a community can sustainably protect • Benefits vs. incentive for behavior change – How much is sufficient incentive?
    38. 38. Implementation Phase: CC Resilient Communities & Local Economy • Identifying measures of resilience – Increased income of beneficiaries from livelihood activities – Decreased in ecosystem damage – Reduced disruption to economic activities during extreme climate events – Increased municipal / provincial income • Designing eco-town performance monitoring and evaluation framework – Natural resources accounts – Gross provincial income accounts
    39. 39. NOTES • The People’s Survival Fund Bill can be a possible source of financing for LGUs. • Mainstreaming of CCA-DRR is also being done by NEDA and DILG. • The CCC is currently engaging with the HLURB regarding updating the CLUP process to make it climate-smart. Next would be DILG’s CDP process.
    40. 40. CCA and DRR Integration in LGUs Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation (DRR/CCA) in Local Development Planning and Decision-making Processes Slides taken from: NEDA - REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT COORDINATION STAFF, NDRRMC, DILG, UP MSI, WB, CHRISTIAN AID, UN HABITAT, FLORIDA DEP
    41. 41. Integrating framework (Output 2/Activity 2.1) Handbook on Establishing, Managing and Maintaining DR/CR data (Output 2/Activity 2.3) Supplemental Guidelines on Mainstreaming Integrated DRR/CCA in land Use and Physical Framework Planning (Output 2/Activity 2.2) Reference Manual on Mainstreaming DRR/CCA in local land use planning (Output 2/Activity 2.4) 10 VA reports (Output 3/Activity 3.1) 10 DRR/CCA-enhanced subnational land use/physical framework plan (Output 2/Activity 2.5) Capability building (Output 1/Activity 1.2) NAP on CC (Output 4/Activity 4.1) Multi-stakeholder mechanism for CC on local level (Output 5/Activity 5.1/5.2) 10 CC adaptation projects demonstrated in 10 pilot communities (Output 3/Activity 3.2/3.3) Documentation of best practices in community level CC adaptation projects (Output 3/Activity 3.4) IEC/Advocacy (Output 1/Activity 1.1)
    42. 42. DRR/CCA Integration Sectoral Impacts CC Scenarios Biophysical effects Adaptation Strategies VnA Tool VA Tool (Integrated DRR/CCA) (Integrated DRR/CCA) DRR/CCA Plans Demonstration Projects SNC MDG-F DRR/CCA Project
    43. 43. DRR/CCA Integration Biophysical Effects 1. Spatial/temporal variability 2. Hazard characterization using CC scenarios (e.g., hydrologic modeling) 3. Inclusion of creeping or slow-onset events
    44. 44. DRR/CCA Integration Sectoral Impacts 1. Agriculture 4. Water 2. Forestry 5. Health 3. Coastal
    45. 45. U N H A B I T A T
    46. 46. Urban Risk Assessment Approach
    47. 47. Zones of coastal regulation
    48. 48. "Genderizing Climate Vulnerability Assessment Tools: the Women at the Center Project Experience" Marita P. Rodriguez with Marie M. Nuṅez th 5th Consultation Series: Community-Based Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Tools November 21, 2011, SMX Convention Center
    49. 49. Summary of Major Changes and Perceived Causes Sitio Ibuan (Agricultural) Sitios Cabgan & Mahaba (Fisheries) Perceived Causes Sitio Ibuan Sitios Cabgan & Mahaba Decline in crop Decline in fish catch Intense rain harvests and seaweeds and intense harvest heat Pests in rice, some viral diseases in banana Diseases in fish Intense rain catch and seaweeds and intense heat High tide level moving inward Cannot fish during Climate and non-climate factors such as illegal fishing and polluted waters Intense rain and intense heat; illegal fishing; polluted waters; increasing sea surface temperature Rising tidal levels Strong waves during
    50. 50. What Oxfam Found Out  Women and men are differently affected by climate change hence it is important to look into their nuanced situation:  Women concerns: immediate family needs like settlement, health and food security  Men concerns: long-term needs like sustainable livelihood; children’s education  Adaptation measures need not be new as long as this addresses needs and vulnerabilities of women and men  Yuha Tu Banwa  Fish sanctuary, WMA, herbal and vegetable gardening
    51. 51. Therefore... • VNA or any tools need to involve women if we want a holistic picture of community situation – Asking appropriate questions – Separate sessions for women and men • This would ensure women benefits as much as the men in the adaptation projects that will be identified - End of Oxfam presentation
    52. 52. Epilogue
    53. 53. Epilogue
    54. 54. Climate Change Office Climate Change Commission Rm 238 Mabini Hall, Malacañang Compound San Miguel, Manila Telefax: 736-1171 Email: info@climate.gov.ph; dennisdelatorre@gmail.com www.climate.gov.ph

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