The Case for
Technology & Teens
CLA YA Section Annual
Meeting
November 10, 2010
Geri Diorio
Ridgefield Library
Teens
•Impulsive
•Plugged In
•Need involvement
•Like Technology
• What Else???
2
What the Research Says About
Teens Online
Teens and the Internet
• 93% of teens ages 12-17 use the internet
• 87% of onlin...
• 75% of online teen view videos on video-
sharing sites
• 68% of teens use instant messaging
• 14 % of online teens blog
...
5
•8% of teens use Twitter
•8 % of teens use virtual worlds
•Facebook is the SNS of choice
– (PEW, 2010)
What the Research...
6
• 75% of teens have a cell phone
• Teens without computers use their phones to
go online
• 111 texts per day (6 per hour...
Who are teens?
•A Vision of Students
Today
7
Marketing Strategies
• Deliver service to teens
• Create customer satisfaction
• Use available channels (on ground and onl...
Which Tech Tools?
• Use what fits in daily practice– for you/for
your teens
• Use what you have – the tools at hand
• What...
10
Skype Videos
Facebook Surveys
Texting Twitter
Downloadable Audio
Online SRP Free Software
• How do you know what fits?
• How to understand/use/be
effective with new tools?
• Who has the time?
11
Why does tech
fit teens??
• Existing channel
• That’s where the teens are
• Budget friendly
• Easily tailored to local nee...
Concerns with Technology
•Personal implications
•Digital equity
•Legal implications
•Is it really so different?
13
Evaluating Outcomes
• Outputs vs. outcomes
• Are you meeting goals?
• Core Values/Developmental Assets
• Measurable eviden...
40 Developmental Assets for
Adolescents
• Provided by the Search Institute
15
Image from Microsoft clip art
Core Competencies in Social
Networking for YA Librarians
•Uses Web tools and social networking communities to
engage with ...
Technology competencies
related to social networking
•Understands and uses common social networking and
online collaborati...
More support
• ALA Resources for Librarians About Online
Social Networking
Including Toolkits and Advocacy Guides
• Suppor...
Suggested Reading
• danah boyd – smart, articulate researcher
who is teen-centric & teen friendly
• Tame The Web – especia...
Learn More
Connect, Create, Collaborate:
Supporting Teen Needs With
Technology
Conclusions
“The single most important thing (you) can do in
today’s digital world is to stay grounded in the
rapidly chan...
References
• Rainie, Lee. 2009. “Teens and the Internet.”
PowerPoint Presentation. January 9, 2009. Pew
Internet & America...
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CLA YA MTG2010

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Presentation by Geri Diorio at the CLA YA Annual Meeting 2010 on marketing to teens.

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  • Now that we have seen some great ways you can use tech to connect with your teens, I’d like to give you some support systems to give you back up in case people think you shouldn’t be doing all that “social networking stuff” at work.

  • When people talk about teens, they say teens are…READ THE SLIDE
    What are your teens like? Get them to offer examples of their teens…
    Never forget: Reality is important.
    Maybe teens are also thoughtful, bookish, creative, loud, quiet, eager, silly…
    It is not what people think teens are like or what they think teens want, but what teens are really like and what they really want & use & do & need.

  • SO let’s look at some hard numbers about what teens are really like.
    The PEW Internet Project is a wonderful source for information. (Click on link to show them the site.)
    They conduct studies and polls and give a clear snapshot of our times. They present their findings in very understandable form and are happy to share.
    This is what they have to say about teens and the online or virtual world. (These numbers are from earlier this year)
    Look at slide and read and comment
  • Does this line up with what you have seen in your teens?
    Yes? No? Your examples, please!
  • I’d also like to touch on cell phone usage in teens.
    About 3/4’s of all teens have a cell phone.
    Teens from low income homes, who may not have computers at home, are likely to have a cell phone and use it this way.
    From a recent Nielsen study: Texts: If that is the average, imagine how high the number must go – 200 or so…
    Other forms of communication have remained stable (calls, e-mail, SNS, IM) but texting has grown.
    Does this line up with your experience with your teens?
  • So those are the hard numbers. I’d like to show you this great snapshot of teens put together by a professor of anthropology at Kansas State University.
    It also gives you hard numbers, but literally puts a face on them,
  • To explain to your administration, or any other doubters why you are doing all this “tech stuff” the first step is a marketing strategy. And it is called a strategy for a reason --- saves time and allows for a focus of resources. In other words, it is a plan.
    To make your strategy, look at how your kids use your library.
    Go where your kids are.
    Look at what you have & can use.
    Learn new things.
    Do not be afraid to try new things.
    Chart your progress 1. To learn how it’s going and 2. To show proof of how well it works to any doubters
    Don’t be afraid to discard things that don’t work for you - what works in one community may not work in another.
  • You have seen many good tech ideas today - but keep in mind YOUR library’s reality.
  • Here are the ways you’ve seen today to use tech with your teens. They are some of the best ways, for now, to reach out to your kids - and the research backs you up on this!
    By the way, I saw FOR NOW because things change; sometimes rapidly.
  • So if you try things - how do you know what to try? How do you make the most out of these ideas you got today?
    You could make a K - W –L Chart It is used in classrooms, teachers ask students what they already Know; then students set goals specifying what they Want to learn; and after a time, students discuss what they have Learned. Use this for yourself! It’s handy!
    Build on what you know - you already have iPods, cell phones, computers - you know how to use these tools - you can build on your knowledge from wherever your starting point it.
    Sometimes you get to attend workshops/meetings like this! Or you could attend classes - YALSA offers some online ones every semester. Check with the State Library - they offer classes and workshops for continuing education at little cost.
    MOST OF ALL, I WANT TO STRESS THE VALUE OF PLAYING AND NOT BEING AFRAID - try things. You can’t break your computer or the Internet.
  • As we spoke about earlier – the research shows and your own experience shows, the teens are online – let’s meet them there.
    There is justification in this. You are not randomly “playing” online.
    It even meets their needs. We’ll get to the 40 assets in a moment.
    With the press about online bullying, I know some people are hesitant to embrace social networking in a library environment, but the benefits outweigh the risks and it is important to meet kids where they are and perhaps teach them something about safe and productive online use.
  • Legit concerns, but libraries & librarians must grow & adapt. There’s the old saw about videos and then DVDs making their way into the library - did they belong? No one would argue now, but it is true!
    Not every teen has a computer/smart phone - it’s not treating them with equity, That is not correct. Teens are wiley when it comes to getting online. School (Lana IMming me from class - kids texting me from class), the library (kids going onto FB after school at the Library), their friends computers, the numbers of cell phones are on the rise) - it is a legitimate way to reach this population of patrons.
    No, books are not going away, but Reference databases on online now - we don’t spend as much of our budget on paper ref books as on online DBs. Cell phones are everywhere and teens and adults are texting like mad, TextALibrarian at Ridgefield… Joe Murphy at Yale – go where the students are – colleges are starting to offer texting reference advisory.
    You could keep your professional online self separate from your personal one if you like, but I think it’s easier to simply not e-mail, text, or post on FB anything you wouldn’t write on a post-card. Be honest and smart.
    Still you may get resistance, here’s how to counter/deal
  • Dealing with administration
    Hopefully they are behind you, but if you need to make a case…and even if you don’t need to make a case, it’s good to know how you stand.
    Track circ stats
    Track program attendance stats
    Track reference question stats
    Give them hard numbers to show how you are reaching your patrons.
    Working virtually helps you supply your teens with important developmental assets.
  • These are shown to be what teenagers need. And libraries can meet these needs. Especially by meeting the teens where they are - online. And by helping them establish a solid footing in how to be a responsible, smart person online.
  • As Linda Williams pointed out last month:
    WebJunction has aggregated and synthesized competency definitions from a number of library organizations, subjected them to “vigorous subject matter expert review,” and published them as the Competency Index for the Library Fieldwhich you can get online as a PDF.
    But here are some highlights that concern Social Networking.
  • Furthermore, they’ve included some technological competencies relating to social networking. These are vetted competencies. They are worth taking seriously.
  • But beyond collecting personal evidence, there is support for you through ALA/YALSA and other professional organizations.
    If you need more back-up, you can turn to some of these organizations.



  • To keep up to date & informed, May I suggest three writers & thinkers to try.

    danah boyd - social media researcher known for her public commentary on the use of social networking sites by youth.

    Michael Stephen blogs at Tame The Web, and teaches Library science. He also has interesting folks blog for him too.

    Kevin Kelly founded Wired magazines and writes in a thought-provoking way about technology. He doesn’t blog in one place, but you can often find him at Wired or The New York Times.
  • If you want to dig deeper, as I mentioned, you can take an online course through YALSA.
    They offer online classes several times a year, and I thought this was a nice piece of synchronicity. The upcoming one is all about teens and tech. It will run from February through March 2011 and you can sign up now.
    The classes run at your own pace - you log in at your convenience and read and respond to the discussion when you have time.
  • From my big pink bible “Connecting Young Adults and Libraries”
  • My references are not in MLA or APA format. Sorry. I am SO done with school.
  • CLA YA MTG2010

    1. 1. The Case for Technology & Teens CLA YA Section Annual Meeting November 10, 2010 Geri Diorio Ridgefield Library
    2. 2. Teens •Impulsive •Plugged In •Need involvement •Like Technology • What Else??? 2
    3. 3. What the Research Says About Teens Online Teens and the Internet • 93% of teens ages 12-17 use the internet • 87% of online teens use email • 97% of teens play video or computer games • 73% of online teens use social network sites – (PEW, 2010) 3
    4. 4. • 75% of online teen view videos on video- sharing sites • 68% of teens use instant messaging • 14 % of online teens blog • 55% of teens use Wikipedia – (PEW, 2010) 4 What the Research Says About Teens Online
    5. 5. 5 •8% of teens use Twitter •8 % of teens use virtual worlds •Facebook is the SNS of choice – (PEW, 2010) What the Research Says About Teens Online
    6. 6. 6 • 75% of teens have a cell phone • Teens without computers use their phones to go online • 111 texts per day (6 per hour) • After texting, taking and sharing photos is the next most popular cell phone use – (PEW, Nielsen, 2010) What the Research Says About Teens and Cell Phones
    7. 7. Who are teens? •A Vision of Students Today 7
    8. 8. Marketing Strategies • Deliver service to teens • Create customer satisfaction • Use available channels (on ground and online) • Stay within budget • Appeal to local audience/preferences • Measure outcomes/outputs 8
    9. 9. Which Tech Tools? • Use what fits in daily practice– for you/for your teens • Use what you have – the tools at hand • What works? • Make strategic decisions about advertising and promotion based on your marketing strategy. 9
    10. 10. 10 Skype Videos Facebook Surveys Texting Twitter Downloadable Audio Online SRP Free Software
    11. 11. • How do you know what fits? • How to understand/use/be effective with new tools? • Who has the time? 11
    12. 12. Why does tech fit teens?? • Existing channel • That’s where the teens are • Budget friendly • Easily tailored to local needs • Potential for engagement • Meets teen needs (40 assets) 12
    13. 13. Concerns with Technology •Personal implications •Digital equity •Legal implications •Is it really so different? 13
    14. 14. Evaluating Outcomes • Outputs vs. outcomes • Are you meeting goals? • Core Values/Developmental Assets • Measurable evidence 14
    15. 15. 40 Developmental Assets for Adolescents • Provided by the Search Institute 15 Image from Microsoft clip art
    16. 16. Core Competencies in Social Networking for YA Librarians •Uses Web tools and social networking communities to engage with and provide services to young adults •Understands and articulates the particular importance of engaging with young adults in nontraditional ways that extend beyond the physical library •Involves young adults in the investigation and evaluation of tools to identify those most applicable to the library’s young adult services •Explores the potential of social networking to connect and interact with young adults and meet their information needs
    17. 17. Technology competencies related to social networking •Understands and uses common social networking and online collaboration tools •Locates and reads blogs and listens to podcasts; demonstrates familiarity with micro-blogging (Twitter) •Demonstrates familiarity with instant messaging tools (Meebo, Skype), social networking sites (MySpace, Facebook, LinkedIn, Ning) and social bookmarking (Delicious, Diigo) •Demonstrates familiarity with photo-sharing (Flickr, ShutterFly), music-sharing (Last.fm, Pandora, iTunes) and video-sharing (YouTube) •Locates and follows information sources to stay informed of new technologies and social tools Webjunction
    18. 18. More support • ALA Resources for Librarians About Online Social Networking Including Toolkits and Advocacy Guides • Supporting Information Literacy and 21st Century Learners AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner National Educational Technology Standards • Copyright in the Digital Age Center for Social Media • Online Safety Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use 18
    19. 19. Suggested Reading • danah boyd – smart, articulate researcher who is teen-centric & teen friendly • Tame The Web – especially this post about using social media to connect with teens • Kevin Kelly on techno-literacy 19
    20. 20. Learn More Connect, Create, Collaborate: Supporting Teen Needs With Technology
    21. 21. Conclusions “The single most important thing (you) can do in today’s digital world is to stay grounded in the rapidly changing digital landscape, stay abreast of the research and best practices, read the blogs, join the electronic discussion lists, attend the conferences, and engage others in the profession in conversations about where they are doing in their libraries to meet teens where they are: online and out in the virtual world.” (Suellentropp and Gorman, 2009)
    22. 22. References • Rainie, Lee. 2009. “Teens and the Internet.” PowerPoint Presentation. January 9, 2009. Pew Internet & American Life project. • Lenhart, Purcell, Smith, Zickuhr. 2010. “Social Media and Young Adults.” Report. February 3, 2010. Pew Internet & American Life project. • Wesch, Michael. “A Vision of Students Today.” Video. Spring 2007 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGCJ46vyR9o • Hoenke, Justin. “Using Social Media to Connect With Teens.” Blog article. Tame the Web. March 17, 2010. 22
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