2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
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2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report 2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report Document Transcript

  • Georgia Department of defense 2013 annual report
  • contents Letter from the TAG 3 78th Troop Command 18 4 Georgia Air National Guard 19 Chain of Command 5 116th Air Control Wing 21 Joint Stationing Map 6 165th Airlift Wing 22 Mission Statement Economic Impact 7 117th Air Control Squadron 23 2013 Timeline 9 165th Air Support Operations Squadron 23 11 224th Joint Communications Squadron 24 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team 13 283rd Combat Communications Squadron 24 78th Aviation Troop Command 14 139th Intelligence Squadron 25 648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade 15 202nd Engineering Installation Squadron 25 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade 16 530th Air Force Band 26 201st Regional Support Group 17 Combat Readiness Training Center 26 Georgia Army National Guard 1 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • Georgia State Defense Force 27 Language Training Center 41 Joint Staff 29 Educational Opportunities 42 Defense Support of Civil Authorities 31 Georgia Military College 42 4th CMD Support Team 33 University of North Georgia 42 Counterdrug Task Force 35 The Georgia Guard As A Business 43 Public Affairs 36 Georgia Guard Diversity/Breakdown 44 Emerging Missions 37 Historical Roots 45 Agribusiness Development Teams 37 Georgia’s TAG Lineage State Partnership with Nation of Georgia 38 A Global Presence 47 Youth ChalleNGe Academy 39 Soldiers Killed In Service Since 9/11 48 STARBASE 41 Officers of the Georgia Army Guard 49 122nd Regional Training Institute 53 41 Officers of the Georgia Air Guard 46 2013 Annual Report | 2
  • State of Georgia Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL 1000 Halsey Ave. Building 447 Marietta, GA 30060 I t is with great pride that I present you with this Annual Report outlining the accomplishments of the Georgia Department of Defense for 2013. This report reflects the outstanding support and capabilities that our more than 15,000 men and women bring to the global war fight and right here in our great state of Georgia. Over the course of 2013, the Georgia Department of Defense conducted numerous operations and received accolades indicative of our quality organization and outstanding personnel. The Army Chief of Staff selected the Georgia Army National Guard as the National Guard 2013 Army Communities of Excellence winner based upon our best business practices. Globally, we continued to provide ready units to the war fight. Within the United States, our units have provided personnel and equipment capabilities in support of protecting our southern borders against both illegal immigration and drugs. Here in Georgia, your National Guard service members have continued to fight the war on drugs alongside local and state law enforcement agencies through counterdrug operations. It is indeed humbling to lead such great Georgians as they accomplish numerous and varied missions all around the world time and time again. As we face an uncertain federal military budget in the coming years, the Georgia Department of Defense will also face challenges maintaining operational readiness, force structure and mission sets as we compete with the active component and reserves to remain relevant. Over the course of the War on Terrorism, the National Guard and specifically the Georgia National Guard have successfully evolved from a strategic force to an operational force. We must be vigilant and ensure we do not lose the progress we have fought so hard to achieve. Now more than ever, we need you, our fellow Georgians, to show your active support for the Georgia Department of Defense and enable us to be ready when called upon. The Soldiers, Airmen, State Defense Force members, and state employees of the Georgia Department of Defense remain a ready and relevant force that has proven to be integral to our country’s global and domestic operations. As evidenced by the operations carried out over the past year by our well trained and dedicated personnel, your Georgia Department of Defense has answered the call of both its nation and state and is well postured to do so when asked again. The citizens of Georgia can take comfort and pride in knowing its Georgia National Guard is Always Ready, Always There and Always on Target – that is YOUR Georgia National Guard! Sincerely, James Butterworth Maj. Gen. Jim Butterworth The Adjutant General of Georgia 3 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • Mission: The Georgia Department of Defense provides ready and relevant military forces to the Combatant Commanders, and with the consent of the Governor provides command and control, and capabilities to support Homeland Defense and Defense Support to Civil Authorities. Vision: A strong and growing joint military organization, recognized as a leader in strength, readiness, and innovation; an interagency partner and leader; postured for effective response; chosen for new missions and force structure, that provides opportunities for members who live the Ga. DoD values to realize their potential through service to the State and Nation. Values: • • • • • Integrity First Service before Self Initiative Teamwork Continuous Improvement Priorities: • Defend the Homeland • Support the War-Fighter • Continuously Transform the Force Goals: • To care for our members and their families • To be accountable and have the highest of integrity • To tell the story of the great work Georgia National Guardsmen do every day • To enhance existing and develop new partnerships with our host communities • To stay prepared and shape the future through continuous improvement Focus: • • • • Ready Units, Soldiers, Airmen, and Families Competent, Adaptive, Learning Leaders Seamless Connectivity to All Leaders Balanced Contributions from Army and Air Service Components • High Quality of Life for our Soldiers, Airmen and Families 2013 Annual Report | 4
  • Ga. DoD Chain of Command Governor Nathan Deal Commander-in-Chief Maj. Gen. Jim Butterworth Adjutant General Brig. Gen. Joe Jarrard Asst. Adjutant General - Army Commander Ga. Army National Guard President of the United States National Guard Bureau Maj. Gen. Tom Moore Commander Ga. Air National Guard Organization Composition 11,152 Army Guardsmen Mr. Russel Carlson Deputy Adjutant General Ga. Dept. of Defense Brig Gen. John King Director Joint Staff Brig. Gen. Tom Danielson Commanding General Ga. State Defense Force 74% 2737 Air Guardsmen 670 SDF Members 18% 536 State Employees 5 | Georgia Department of Defense 3.5% 4.5%
  • 2013 Annual Report | 6
  • Economic Impact T from our Guardsmen and civilians employed by the GaDoD. With a federal budget of $680 million and state budget of $9 million, the Georgia Department of Defense also produces lasting results in the state with flourishing youth programs, an outstanding military readiness capability, and ingenuity in military construction programs – which at present are injecting more than $57 million into the Georgia economy. Despite our large presence in the state, the Georgia Department of Defense and its operations account for only .001 percent of the state budget in 2014 – just $9 million. Overall, the Georgia Department of Defense annually injects more than a billion dollars worth of money into the Georgia making it a vital part of our thriving economy. This is accomplished through payroll, logistics, maintenance and service contracts, construction and many other ways. As such, the Georgia Department of Defense is one of the largest employers in Georgia and significantly impacts our economy. Additionally, the fact that 150 of the 159 counties either have a National Guard armory or are immediately adjacent to a county with one, demonstrates our statewide economic presence and impact. While our economic impact in Georgia is significant, the most important asset we have is our service members. The Georgia Department of Defense service members are not just the protectors of your communities; we are your brothers and sisters, your neighbors and friends. In times of peace, we live side-by-side by with you, working to make this state great. And in times of war and peril, know that your Georgia Department of Defense will answer the call as we are always ready, always there, always on target! 13,889 he motto for the Georgia Department of Defense reads “always ready, always there, always on target!” That statement paints a highly accurate portrait of what this organization offers the state of Georgia and the nation. In meeting the requirement to provide ready and relevant forces to the combatant commanders and homeland defense and defense support to civil authorities, the Georgia Army and Air National Guard have a significant economic impact upon the economy of the state of Georgia. With a 15 percent increase in personnel since 2005, more than 15,000 men and women make up the Georgia Department of Defense, hailing from each of the 159 counties across the Peach State – making our service members and civilian staff truly “home grown.” In payroll tax alone, the state collects more than $25 million Georgia Guardsmen $2,292,941 in state funds saved by State Defense Force utilization 7 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • $680MILLION Federal funds brought into the state of Georgia $9 million: Amount Georgia funds the Guard 144 million 11,652 YCA Graduates in drug related seizures In addition to having Guardsmen in every Georgia town, the Georgia Guard also has a unit based in 55 of Georgia’s counties. $25 million in state income tax from Guard’s Federal payroll. $61 million in military construction. More than 16,500 Georgia Guardsmen have deployed since 9/11/2001 1,693 deployed in 2013 2013 Annual Report | 8
  • 2013 Timeline National Guard Red Horse Civil Engineers from New Mexico operate heavy equipment across the wide expanse of the Remagen DZ at Fort Stewart, GA, bringing the vital assault landing strip back to life. Lt. Col. Charles Drown, left, medical element commander with the 165th Medical Group, and Capt. Christal Lavelle a physicians assistant with the 116th Medical Group, Georgia Air National Guard, cover a simulated patient with an aluminum warming blanket during the Vigilant Guard 2013 exercise at Camp Blanding, Fla., May 21, 2013. Lawmakers honor Ga. Guardsmen at the Capitol Feb. 22, 2012 – Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle presents a resolution honoring the Georgia Guard on the floor of the State Senate. Georgia National Guard leadership gather to honor the fallen at Marietta National Cemetery. Jan. | | | | Feb. | | | | March | | | | April | | | | May | | | | June | | | | U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Hostage, commander, Air Combat Command, presents the Purple Heart Medal to Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Barry Duffield, 116th Civil Engineering Squadron, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight team leader, during a ceremony at Robins Air Force Base, Ga., Jan. 7, 2013 The Georgia Agribusiness Development Team II (ADT II) returned home from their 10-month deployment to Afghanistan with friends and family filling the 265th Regional Support Group National Guard armory. U.S. Army Spc. Donnie Kessler, a pathfinder instructor, with the 356th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade, of the Georgia Army National Guard, gives a class on basic pathfinder skills to soldiers from Cameroon and the Gabonese Republic. The soldiers were participating in Central Accord 2013, a joint exercise in which U.S., Cameroon and neighboring Central African militaries partner to promote regional cooperation and increase aerial resupply and medical readiness capacity. Starting line for the Some Gave All 5K held in Lula, Ga. - and run the same day by 648th MEB Soldiers in Kabul - in memory of Maj. Kevin Jenrette who was killed in action June 4, 2009 while deployed with the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. 9 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • Guardsmen of the Georgia Army and Air National Guard joined forces with the Army Reserve’s 310th Tactical Psychological Operations Company (Airborne) in a jump training exercise. Soldiers from the Ga. National Guard were from C-Troop (LRS) 3-108th CAV. the 165th Air Wing from Savannah flew the C-130 aircraft. The Ga NG Counter Drug Task Force will be featured on CBS Atlanta’s 11:00 news tonight! Watch as they support local sherrifs with drug eradication. Members of the 128th Airborne Command and Control Squadron received water survival training at Lake Tobesofkee today. It was the first time the 128th (part of the 116th Air Control Wing/ JSTARS) received hands-on water survival training from the Army Guard. Soldiers of the 648th MEB learn the history of the Korean War at the 2nd Infantry Division Museum during Warpath III the largest exercise on the Korean Peninsula since 1953. July | | | | Aug. | | | | Sept. | | | | Oct. | | | | Nov. | | | | Dec. | | | | Hundreds of members of Forsyth County welcomed the more than 300 Georgia Guardsmen of the 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade (BFSB) to the community at a ceremony marking the dedication of the Cumming Regional Readiness Center. Nine female Georgia Guardsmen have been selected to integrate into combat related positions that were formerly all male. Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle; Maj. Gen. Jim Butterworth, Adjutant General, Georgia National Guard; as well as the oldest and youngest attendees of the Guard birthday celebration, cut the cake for the birthday reception. The was cut and served as the culminating event for a day of activities marking the National Guard’s 377th birthday. The Georgia National Guard 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team set high marks for the eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) program to provide Soldiers with an experience similar to combat missions overseas. 2013 Annual Report | 10
  • Georgia Army National Guard A Soldier from Georgia’s 560th Battle Field Surveillance Brigade (BFSB) pushes off a UH-60 Blackhawk for his first jump of the day. 11 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • The GAARNG was selected as the 2013 Army Community of Excellence winner from among its 53 peers. The award recognizes continuous bu s i n e s s pro c e s s i mprov e m e nt ; individual innovation; groundbreaking initiatives; and dedication to efficiency, effectiveness, and customer care. These efforts directly affect the quality of support to Soldiers, Families, civilian employees, and retirees who work, live, train and rely on our organization. The GAARNG is organized into six major subordinate commands (MSCs): the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team in Macon; the 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade in Cumming; the 648th Maneuver Enhancement rig en oe arrard Brigade at Fort Benning; the 78th Troop Georgia’s Asst. Adjutant General - Army Command, 201st Regional Support Commander - Georgia Army National Guard Group / Region 4 Homeland Response Force, and 78th Aviation Tro op Command at the Clay National Guard he Georgia Army Center in Marietta. National Guard The organization’s mission is to (GAARNG) consists provide well trained and motivated of more than 11,100 forces to the Governor and Combatant Citizen-Soldiers Commanders in order to support unified training in more than land operations – offensive, defensive, 57 hometown armories and regional stability and civil support. In 2013, the facilities across the state. Georgia’s Army GAARNG surpassed all federal and state Guard has the eighth largest authorized requirements to include the deployment end strength allocation in the nation, and redeployment of more than 1,400 comprised of combat, protection and Soldiers, representing all six major sustainment units. subordinate commands to Afghanistan, Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, El Salvador, the Country of Georgia, Germany, Korea and Uganda. In addition to overseas operations, the GA National Guard Counter Drug Task Force continues to perform as one of the most successful Counter Drug Task Forces in the country assisting in over $144 million in drug related seizures and the apprehension of 1,185 drug related suspects. The GAARNG also provided key aviation support to the Office of Homeland Security on our nation’s southwest border to safeguard our citizens. The GAARNG’s four strategic priorities ensure continued preparedness to meet all missions: quality strength; ommand gt a j logistics excellence; preeminent facilities; hillip t r i n g f i e l d and continuous improvement. Relative to State Command Sergeant Major quality strength, the GAARNG finished Georgia Army National Guard B .G .J J T C P S S . M . as one of the best in recruiting for FY13 nationally, enlisting more than 1,815 quality recruits and officer candidates. The GAARNG’s logistics excellence efforts are preparing the state to lead the nation in the National Guard Bureau Command Logistics Review Team (CLRT) evaluation in March 2014. The road to success involved a year of internal inspections including C ommand Supply Discipline Program evaluations conducted on each MSC during the 2nd quarter. In addition, numerous Supply & Maintenance Instruction Team visits were conducted during the 3rd & 4th quarter combined with more than 70 field logisticians trained by G4 subject matter experts in our Logistics Survival Course. In support of the GARNG’s third strategic priority of preeminent facilities, the organization is in the process of executing four military construction projects in 2013 totaling $53,000,000 in federal funding matched with $4,000,000 in state funds. Additionally, the Construction Facilities Management Office executed 17 minor construction projects that included eight existing facility renovations and four site improvements totaling $9,000,000 in federal funding and $3,000,000 in state matching funds. C ont i nu ou s i mprov e m e nt i s the hallmark of the GAARNG and its personnel. To complement this effort, the GAARNG’s 122nd Regional Training Institute and Region Training Site-Maintenance achieved the highest rating of accreditation from TRADOC (Training and Doctrine Command) and CASCOM (C ombined Arms Support Command) as an “Institution of Excellence.” It is a multi-state institute for Active Duty, Army Reserve, and National Guard Soldiers in Military Intelligence, Signal, Infantry, Military Police, Transportation, and Ordnance training in addition to offering Officer Candidate leadership training. These accomplishments set the condit ions for t he GAARNG to continually be in a position of strength for increased federal and state funding, future force structure, and full-time manning. 2013 Annual Report | 12
  • 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team Col. Randall Simmons Commander 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team Georgia Army National Guard The 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT), headquartered in Macon, is made up of more than 3,500 Citizen Soldiers who operate out of 26 hometown armories throughout the state. The 48th IBCT is organized into six subordinate battalions: the 1st Squadron, 108th Cavalry (CAV) (Reconnaissance, Sur veillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA)); 1st Battalion, 121st Infantry (IN) Regiment; 2nd Battalion, 121st IN Regiment; 1st Battalion, 118th Field Artillery (FA) Regiment; 148th Brigade Support Battalion (BSB); and the 48th Brigade Special Troops Battalion (BSTB). The 48th IBCT is trained and ready to enter its available year for worldwide deployments or defense of the homeland as a cohesive, well disciplined, well trained and lethal team of teams, of which is “The Brigade” of choice for the unified land operations. The 48th IBCT spent most of 2013 preparing for future overseas deployments in 2014. The Brigade’s culminating training event for 2013 was the Exportable Combat Training Capability exercise #13-06 (XCTC) at Fortt Stewart, Ga. The 48th IBCT Headquarters and select units will deploy in 2014 to Afghanistan to conduct a variety of training and security missions as the United States hands over security operations to the government of Afghanistan. Additionally, the 48th IBCT was the first ARNG unit selected to support the Department of Defense’s regionallyaligned forces mission and will deploy select units to Central America to advise and train partner nation militaries. The 1-108th CAV “Roughriders” spent the past year training and executing cavalry operations in support of the 48th IBCT. The 1-108th successfully completed all gunnery requirements ensuring Troops A and B met the milestones for a culmination combined arms live fire exercise (LFX). Troop C qualified on all assigned weapon systems and executed a dismounted scout team combined arms live fire exercise which included supporting fires from their snipers and mortar section. The 1-108th snipers ran the 48th IBCT “SniperX” to provide sniper sustainment training for all brigade sniper teams. The 1-121st IN “Spartans” focused on offensive unified land operations. The Spartans started the year with Soldier readiness processing and individual skills training and shifted to company level forceon-force operations in February when two rifle companies conducted attacks, with one company in the defense as an opposing force. Battalion and company mortars maintained proficiency through integration into attack/ defense operations. The 2-121st IN “Warriors” focused on the validation of each maneuver element and specialty/staff section with a focus on offensive unified land operations. The Warriors conducted Soldier and family readiness activities, individual and team to squad level re-validation, and the validation of the battalion staff throughout the year. The 1-118th FA “Old Hickory” set the standard for indirect-fire training during XCTC 13-06, where the battalion processed 109 fire missions, fired 2,276 high explosive, white phosphor us, and illumination rounds, and conducted 46 reconnaissance, selection, and occupation of position (RSOP) operations without incident. External evaluators certified both of the battalion’s firing batteries at the culmination of the training. The unit orchestrated the company combined arms live fire lanes by integrating fires from close air support (CAS), 105mm Artillery, and mortars from the brigade’s maneuver battalions. Upon completion of XCTC 13-06, the unit demonstrated that it had refined and perfected the field artillery mission to deliver fires for the Brigade. T h e 1 4 8 t h B SB, “ Wi s h m a s t e r s”, coordinated and conducted three brigade level training events during 2013. Operation “Sharp Scalpel” started off the year by improving the medical proficiency of brigade medics. Gunnery training was conducted in April and a brigade logistics exercise was conducted in May, which facilitated logistics-focused training for all six battalion logistics sections and four forward support companies. The 48th BSTB “Strykers” built upon combat support focused weekend training and integrated its key enablers into the maneuver battalions within the brigade. The battalion’s training focus was mission command, sustainment and mobility operations. Stryker conducted weapons qualifications, demolition and obstacle emplacement training, command post operations, and increased intelligence c o l l e c t i o n a n d a n a l y s i s o p e r at i o n s throughout the year. 48th IBCT Units • 1st Squadron, 108th Cavalry, of Calhoun • 1st Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment, of Winder • 2nd Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment, of Forsyth • 1st Battalion, 118th Field Artillery Regiment, of Savannah • 148th Brigade Support Battalion, of Macon • 48th Brigade Special Troops Battalion, of Statesboro 13 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • 78th Aviation Troop Command Home-stationed at Clay National Guard Center in marietta, the 78th Aviation Troop Command (ATC) is the aviation arm of the Georgia Army National Guard, commanded by Colonel Brock Gaston, with Command Sergeant Major Timothy Jones as his senior enlisted leader. The mission of its 650 pilots, aircrew, maintenance and support personnel is to mobilize and deploy aviation forces in order to provide command and control, counter-drug, air movement, medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) and air assault (AASLT) support for combat operations worldwide and defense support of civil authority operations during state and national emergencies. With the same operational and training requirements as active aviation components, the command maintains 42 rotary wing, fixed wing and unmanned aircraft systems to support all Georgia National Guard units, as well as supporting all services to include routine support to the 75th Ranger Regiment, the 4th and 5th Ranger Training Battalions and the Maneuver Center of Excellence based out of Fort Benning. During training year 2013, the 78th ATC executed more than 8,000 accident free flight hours encompassing multiple deployments and training exercises. Detachment 1, Company B, 1-169th Aviation kicked the year off when they were called upon by the National Guard Bureau to conduct relief operations in October 2012 in response to the devastation Hurricane Sandy wrought on the east coast of the United States. In early February, Company C(-), 1-169th Aviation returned home from Afghanistan, after executing over 300 MEDEVAC missions in support of Regional South Command West. In May, Georgia’s aviation command was called on again to conduct an 1,800 mile cross country mission to Canada, where three UH-60 Black Hawks, three HH-60 Black Hawks, two CH-47 Chinooks, and one C-26 Metroliner flew 560 hours while supporting Canadian ground forces’ pre-deployment combat training. The C-26 fixed wing detachment left home in July to conduct combat operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and in August two UH-60, two HH-60, and two CH-47 helicopters supported the 48th Infantry Brigade’s Exportable Combat Training Capabilities Exercise in preparation for their deployment to Afghanistan. Throughout the year, in conjunction with its primary counter drug mission, C (-), 2-151st Aviation was tasked to be a primary executor of ongoing Southwest Border Patrol Missions, using LUH-72 Lakotas. Col. Brock Gaston Commander 78th Aviation Troop Command Georgia Army National Guard 78th ATC Units • 78th Aviation Troop Command Headquarters, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 1st General Support Aviation Battalion of the 171st Aviation Regiment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Company H, 171st Aviation Regiment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • C Company, 2nd Aviation Security and Support Battalion of the 151st Aviation Regiment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • B Company(-), 1st of the 169th General Support Aviation Battalion, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah • C Company(-), 1st of the 169th General Support Aviation Battalion, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • C Company, 1st General Support Aviation Battalion of the 111th Aviation Regiment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Detachment 1, C Company, 1st Air Assault Battalion of the 185th Aviation Regiment, Winder • 935th Combat Service Support Battalion, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah • Detachment 9, Operational Airlift Command, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Detachment 1, B Company (UAS), 48th Brigade Special Troops Battalion, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah • Army Aviation Support Facility No. 1, Winder Barrow Airport, Winder • Army Aviation Support Facility No. 2, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah 2013 Annual Report | 14
  • 648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade Colonel R. Scott Carter Commander 648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade Georgia Army National Guard The current GA Army National Guard MEB force structure contains a brigade headquarters, three separate batt alions, and a s eparate signal company. The units of the 648th MEB are the 878th Engineer Battalion, headquartered in Augusta, GA; the 348th Brigade Support Battalion, headquartered in Ellenwood, GA; the 1-214th FA, headquartered in Elberton, GA; and the 620th Signal Company in Weston, WV. The MEB is a fully operational force, fully engaged in both its contingency (war) and peacetime missions. In Januar y 2013, the 878th Engineer Battalion and 848th Engineer Company mobilized to Fort Bliss, Texas, and deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan, in order to conduct route-clearance operations and training and mentoring Afghan National S ecurity Forces 648th MEB Units The 648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade (MEB) was activated on Oct. 1, 2007 in Columbus, GA and is now headquartered on Fort Benning. The unit has an assigned strength of over 1,600 Soldiers. The current brigade commander Colonel R. Scott Carter and his senior enlisted advisor, Command Sergeant Major John Rainwater took command in March 2013. The 648th MEB is a missiontailored force which conducts support area operations, maneuver support operations, consequence management, and stability operations in order to assure the mobility, protection, freedom of action to the supported force. MEBs are uniquely designed for both war fighting and operational support roles. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Fort Benning, GA • 878th Engineer Battalion, Augusta, GA • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Augusta, GA • Co A, 878th EN (Forward Support Company), Augusta, GA • 876th Engineer Company (Vertical Construction), Toccoa, GA • Detachment 1, 876th Engineer Company (Vertical Construction), Hartwell, GA • 810th Engineer Company (Sapper), Swainsboro, GA • 848th Engineer Company (Sapper), Douglas, GA • 874th Engineer Detachment (Construction), Fort Stewart, GA • 175th Engineer Detachment (Asphalt), Fort Stewart, GA 15 | Georgia Department of Defense in Route Clearance Operations. In addition, the 1st Battalion, 214th Field Artillery also deployed to Afghanistan where they were charged with conducting base defense operations and disrupting enemy forces in their area of responsibility. Training is key to the success of the MEB. In June 2013, staff members of Brigade Headquarters deployed to Fort Leavenworth, KS and embedded with the 301st MEB, an Army reserve unit to participate in a Division-level Warfighter Exercise. The MEB was also chosen to participate in the 2nd Infantry Division Warfighter exercise, one of the largest exercises ever conducted on the Korean Peninsula since the Korean War and will begin movement to South Korea in November 2013. The 648th “Team MEB” was a key participant as the Army validated its 2020 initiatives. • Headquarters Co. 348th BSB, Ellenwood, GA • Co A, 348th BSB, Ellenwood, GA • Co B, 348th BSB, Hinesville, GA • 1160th Transportation Company, Rome, GA • 620th Signal Company, (detached to WV ARNG) Weston, WV • 1st Battalion, 214th Field Artillery, Elberton, GA • Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1-214th FA, Elberton, GA • Battery A, 1-214th, Winder, GA • Battery B, 1-214th FA, Thomson, GA • Battery C, 1-214th FA, Waynesboro, GA • 1214 Forward Support Company (FSC), 1-214th FA, Washington,GA
  • 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade The Georgia Army National Guard’s 560th Battlefield Sur veillance Brigade (BFSB) is commanded by Colonel Raymond Bossert and based at the Cumming Regional Readiness Center in Cumming. The brigade’s senior enlisted leader is Command Sergeant Major Roy Marchert. Since its inception on Oct. 1, 2007, the brigade’s mission is to provide command and control of reconnaissance, surveillance, and intelligence operations in support of a division, corps, or joint task force. The headquarters provides command, control and supervision of the tactical operations of the brigade and attached units, while the headquarters company provides unit administration and logistical support for the brigade staff sections. The 560th is authorized 1,109 Soldiers with which to carry out that mission. During 2013, the 560th BFSB relocated its he adqu ar ters f rom E l lenwo o d to Cumming. The relocation began in April 2013 and culminated in a ribbon cutting event at the newly constructed Cumming Regional Readiness Center (CRRC) in September. The event was attended by the Adjutant General, the Commanding General of the GAARNG, and several prominent members of the Cumming community. The CRRC is 100,000 square feet of space for training Georgia Guardsmen, featuring a theater style auditorium that seats 250 and a drill hall that can seat 400. The 560th BFSB carried out several significant and unique training events in 2013: In March 2013, elements of the 560th BFSB par ticipated in Op eration Ke y Resolve. Operation Key Resolve is an annual command post exercise that includes reception, staging, onward movement, and integration held by United States Forces Korea. It is conducted with Republic of Korea Forces and focuses on the United States Pacific Command Operations Plans that support the defense of South Korea. The 3/108th Cavalry and the 165th Quartermaster Company participated in Operation Central Accord in March 2013. Operation Central Accord is a multinational exercise in which US, Cameroon, and neighboring central African countries partner to promote regional cooperation while increasing aerial resupply and medical treatment capacity. The exercise was hosted by the Cameroon Defense Force and sponsored by United States Army Africa. Major focuses of the operation were parachute rigging, pathfinder operations, aerial resupply, casualty evacuation, field hospital operations, and first aid techniques. In June 2013, elements of the 221st MI Battalion deployed to Camp Williams, Utah to participate in the Panther Strike training exercise, which was an exercise designed specifically to reach military intelligence training requirements. This two-week exercise allowed military intelligence Soldiers within the 221st MI Battalion to train in realistic combat scenarios, sharpening their skills for future support of the war fight. Elements of the 560th BFSB participated in Operation Atlas Vision in July 2013 in Munich, Germany. Atlas Vision is a bilateral US – Russian ground forces exercise that consists of a battalion level command post, computer assisted exercise. Small elements of the 560th BFSB participated in Operation Beyond the Hor i z on i n E l S a l v a d or t o c on du c t comprehensive humanitarian civic assistance exercises. Soldiers specializing in engineering, construction, and health care provided service to communities while receiving valuable deployment training and building important relationships with partner nations. Supporting operations through the state partnership program, in July 2013, the 560th BFSB mobilized and deployed elements of various specialty skills to the Republic of Georgia. The Georgia Training Support Team (GTST) was deployed to provide functional area support to the U.S. Marine Corps’ Georgia Training Team Core and Rotational Mobile Training Teams. These teams had the mission of training Georgian infantry battalions to deploy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Over the course of the year, the 560th BFSB participated in numerous, but smaller overseas deployment training exercises and conducted multiple new equipment fieldings. Col. Ramond Bossert Commander 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade Georgia Army National Guard 560th BFSB Units • 3rd Squadron, 108th Cavalry, Atlanta, Marietta and Douglasville • 221st Military Intelligence Battalion, Gillem Enclave, Forest Park • 420th Network Signal Company, Cumming, GA • 230th Brigade Support Company, Cumming, GA • 165th Quartermaster Company (Light Air Drop Supply), Marietta • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade, Cumming, GA 2013 Annual Report | 16
  • 201st Regional Support Group Col. Vernon Atkinson Commander 201st Regional Support Group Georgia Army National Guard capability to assist civil authorities in saving lives and mitigating suffering in response to a CBRN incident while continuing to provide trained and ready troops to support overseas contingency operations. The Region 4 HRF senior enlisted leader is Command Sgt. Maj. Melvin Farr. The HRF supported the Florida National Guard at Camp Blanding for Vigilant Guard 2013 as part of a multiple disaster scenario exercise featuring hazardous material events. In July 2013, the HRF provided additional support to the Atlanta police department in case of an incident at the Peachtree Road Race. The HRF will concluded the unit’s second external evaluation in December 2013 at Fort McClellan, Ala. The specialty skill sets within the HRF include: command and control, logistics support, communications, hazardous material operations, CBRN security, hazardous material detection and identification, collapsed structure and confined space rescue, personnel and equipment decontamination, medical triage and stabilization, and disaster mortuary affairs. Throughout 2014, the HRF will continue to partner with various local and state first responders to provide real-world training and maintain readiness for the next CBRN incident. Region 4 HRF Units The Georgia National Guard’s Region 4 Homeland Response Force (HRF) was selected as one of ten homeland response forces to support FEMA Region IV as a consequence management agency for chemical, biological, radiological, and/or nuclear (CBRN) incidents. The 201st Regional Support Group is the headquarters command of the Region 4 HRF, which changed unit designations from the 78th Troop Command on Oct. 1, 2013. The 201st RSG/ Region 4 HRF headquarters is located at the Clay National Guard Center in Marietta. Currently commanded by Col. Vernon Atkinson, the 201st Regional Support Group mission is to man, train, and equip a homeland response force to provide a response • 201st Regional Support Group, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 4th Civil Support Team, Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Marietta • 170th Military Police Battalion, Decatur • 178th Military Police Company, Monroe • 190th Military Police Battalion, Kennesaw • 179th Military Police Company, Savannah • 278th Military Police Company, Fort Gordon • Joint Task Force 781 CERFP, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 877th Engineer Company, Augusta • 870th Engineer Detachment, Decatur • 177th Engineer Company (TOPO), Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Marietta • 138th Chemical Company, Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Marietta • 202nd Explosive Ordnance Detachment, Marietta • 1177th Transportation Company, LaGrange • 248th Medical Company, Marietta • 116th and 165th Medical Groups HRF Accomplishments - 2013 -May 2013 Vigilant Guard exercise at Camp Blanding, Fla. -Dec. 2013 Second External Evaluation at Fort McClellan, Ala. 17 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • 78th Troop Command Commanded by Brig. Gen. Craig McGalliard since Oct. 1, 2013, the 78th Troop Command’s mission is to command, control, and supervise Georgia National Guard units attached to the troop command and to provide manned, trained and equipped units available for service in time of war or national emergency. The 78th Troop Command’s Senior Enlisted Advisor is Command Sergeant Major John Smiley. The 78th Troop Command also provided trained and ready troops to support overseas contingenc y operations. The 78th’s senior enlisted leader for 2013 is Command Sgt. Maj. John Smiley. Previously assigned the Homeland Response Force mission, it continues to support its stateside mission of providing Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA) in times of disaster, and provides its subordinate units in support of Operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn. T h e 2 0 1 s t R e g i on a l Supp or t Group (RSG) deployed early 2013 as Agribusiness Development Team III to Afghanistan and the 265th Regional Support Group (ADT II) and returned home to Metter, Ga. Nearly 190 Soldiers of the 1230th Transportation Company mobilized to Afghanistan the summer of 2013, marking their second mobilization since Sept. 11, 2001. The 179th MP Company returned 2013 from Afghanistan after a successful Kabul Base Cluster mission. The 278th MP Company and 1-214th Field Artillery deployed to Afghanistan in 2013. As p ar t of st ate p ar t ne rsh ip programs, the 110th Combat Service S u p p o r t B at t a l i o n f r o m T i f t o n supported several logistics missions in Africa while the 124th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment assisted the country of Georgia with their national disaster response plan and coverage of the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team’s exportable Combat Training Capability exercise. Brig. Gen. Craig McGalliard Commander 78th Troop Command Georgia Army National Guard 78th TC Units • 122nd Regional Training Institute, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Regional Training Site-Maintenance, Georgia Garrison Training Center, Hinesville • 116th Army Band, Joint Forces Headquarters, Ellenwood • 124th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 161st History Detachment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 1962 Contracting Team, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 139th Chaplain Detachment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Headquarters Detachment, 265th Regional Support Group, Metter • Headquarters Detachment, 110th Combat Service Support Battalion, Tifton • 82nd Maintenance Company, Fort Benning, Columbus • 1148th Transportation Company, Fort Gordon, Augusta • 1177th Transportation Company, LaGrange • 1230th Transportation Company, Thomasville 2013 Annual Report | 18
  • Georgia Air National Guard Guardsmen of the Georgia Army and Air National Guard joined forces with the Army Reserve’s 310th Tactical Psychological Operations Company (Airborne) in a jump training exercise. 19 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • M aj . G en . T homas R. M oore Commander Georgia Air National Guard T he Georgia Air National Guard is always committed to its vision of developing top-tier Airmen and units to protect our nation across the spectrum of conflict and to protect its citizens from natural and manmade disasters with our joint services and interagency partners. Even with the uncertainty during sequestration, we will continue to maintain the high deployment tempo and level Chief Master Sgt. Joseph Greene State Command Chief Georgia Air National Guard of excellence expected of the more than 2,800 Airmen of the Georgia Air National Guard. Several of the Georgia Air Guard’s operational units deployed personnel and equipment throughout the year in support of global operations in addition to the units’ Air Expeditionary Force taskings. The Georgia Air Guard’s core missions are still in high-demand. The Georgia Air Guard’s largest unit, the 116th Air Control Wing (ACW) based at Robins Air Force Base, flying the E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) aircraft, has continuously deployed aircraft and personnel in Southwest Asia for the last 12 years, amassing more than 94,000 flying hours in support of combatant commanders, with 8,800 being flown in 2013. The 165th Airlift Wing based in Savannah, flying the C-130H aircraft, has deployed aircraft and personnel to Iraq and Afghanistan, on average, every 18 months. In 2013, the unit flew more than 2,800 hours, 980 of which were flown in combat operations in the Middle East. In February, C-130 aircraft returned from a four-month deployment for the eleventh time in support of the War on Terror. Our geographically separated units also continued their support of the Global War on Terror in 2013. The 202nd Engineering Installation Squadron deployed for 180 days to support Forward Operating Locations in Iraq and Afghanistan.Twenty percent of Brunswick’s 224th Joint Communications Support Squadron mobilized for a six-month rotational deployment to support operational requirements in the USCENTCOM AOR. The 117th Air Control Squadron deployed 80 personnel to support OEF in Southwest Asia, and 25 of the 283rd Combat Communications Squadron returned from a six-month tasking to Southwest Asia. Although some of our units did not deploy this year, they did support real world taskings and important inspection, training and exercise operations in their regular and joint environments. The 165th Air Support Operations Squadron conducted its first Combined Unit Inspection, as well as support GA ARNG’s 48th IBCT during its XCTC exercise at Fort Stewart, GA. Several personnel from the 139th Intelligence Squadron were tasked to support Active Duty USAF and national intelligence missions at NSA/CSS Georgia and 1AF/AFNORTH. Members from the 116th Force Support Squadron participated in the 57th Presidential Inauguration by feeding more than 5000 guard members. The 530th Air Force Band, otherwise known as the Air National Guard Band of the South, concluded its 66-year history with a deactivation ceremony in September 2013. As of October 1, 2013, the trademark name and logo will be carried by the 572nd Air Force Band from Tennessee. When not deployed, our units continue to maintain mission readiness by taking an active role in supporting Georgia’s homeland defense and defense support to civil authorities’ missions. By providing unique capabilities – such as information awareness assessment, engineering, airlift and communications support – the Georgia Air Guard is well positioned to meet the growing demands of civil authorities. Our Airmen train regularly during exercises with the Georgia National Guard’s 78th Homeland Response Force; the 4th Civil Support Team; the Chemical, Biological, Radiological/ Nuclear, and Explosive enterprise; FEMA Region IV; other FEMA regions; and with our partners in the Georgia Emergency Management Agency. Our dual-status nature, with responsibilities to the state and federal government, makes our mission unique and provides the flexibility for both local and global response. In these times of fiscal constraint, we are expected to do more with less, but we will continue to provide highly motivated mission-ready forces for employment by the Governor and the United States Department of Defense. 2013 Annual Report | 20
  • 116th Air Control Wing Col. Kevin D. Clotfelter Commander 116th Airlift Wing With nearly 11 years of continuous deployment support to United States C entral C ommand and increasing involvement to all combatant commands, the116th Air Control Wing (ACW) c o nt i nu e s t o p rov i d e E - 8 C Jo i nt SurveillanceTarget Attack Radar System (JSTARS) aircraft as ‘a national asset’. The Command, Control, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance airborne platform detects, tracks, and solves problems to optimize the use of military force and safeguard American lives. Residing at Robins Air Force Base, Warner Robins, Georgia, JSTARS is the sole provider of the much lauded and persistently tasked E-8C fleet. The 116th ACW has been on a continuous deployment cycle since 9/11 and flown more than 86,000 combat hours with over 8,800 hours in deployed operations during the calendar year of 2013. The 116th ACW is established as the total force host and the Air National Guard lead for Team JSTARS with the 461st Air Control Wing providing Regular Air Force personnel to the ‘Active Associate’ construct.The 116th is considered a ‘Total Force’ expert, helping to meet future force construct demands. As we begin 2014, the 116th ACW and Team JSTARS is ready to meet the challenges that lie ahead, focusing on the core missions of Global Reach, Global Power, Global Vigilance. The wing was recently awarded its 17th Air Force Outstanding Unit Award, deploying close to 2,000 personnel who supported six United States combatant commanders during the highest operations tempo in the wing’s history. T h e 1 1 6 t h O p e r at i o n s G r o u p displayed unsurpassed combat readiness by deploying crews to five separate theaters within a 13-day window to supp or t shor t - not i c e d e pl oy me nt operations. Simultaneously, Team JSTARS conducted 10 C ombined Planning Operations Exercises along with seven Joint Air Sea Battle Exercises with Naval Forces. Team JSTARS has continued to set the pace by flying over 6,000 flight hours in support of DoD operations. The 116th OG continued its tradition of success by awarding an elite group the Georgia Medal for Valor, the Earl T. Ricks Leadership Award, the Lance P Sijan Leadership Award and the General George C. Kenney “Lessons Learned” Award. Superior maintenance and operations integration is at the core of effective flying. The 116th Maintenance Group’s 96 percent sortie completion rate increased aircraft availability to support critical missions around the globe in multiple overseas and domestic locations, surpassing an unprecedented 86,000 combat hours flown. The focus on maintenance earned the 2013 Secretary of the Air Force Field-level Maintenance Award for the 116th and 461st Aircraft Maintenance Squadrons. The 116th Mission Support Group also provides support, both overseas and abroad. The group’s Force Support, C o m mu n i c at i o n s , L o g i s t i c s , a n d Security Squadrons deployed personnel 21 | Georgia Department of Defense and provided logistics support to four Combatant Commands. At home, the MSG Contracting Office awarded over $5.4 million worth of contracts, insuring construction and repair projects,and commodities purchases were completed to meet mission requirements.The 116th Civil Engineering Squadron, an arm of the MSG, managed and maintained nearly 1M square feet of real property at Robins AFB and Dobbins ARB and coordinated over $2.4 million of sustainment, restoration and modernization projects. Making national headlines, Force Support fed more than 5,000 guard members assisting with the 57th Presidential Inauguration and the 116th Explosive Ordnance Flight interviewed as subject matter experts afterthe Boston Bombing. Epitomizing ‘Service Before Self ’, the synergistic efforts of three Security Forces personnel stepped into action to perform CPR on a Delta passenger in flight, saving her life. Maintaining a healthy force is always a challenge, but in 2013, the 116th Medical Group (MDG) prepared more than 550 members for deployment to prime locations and performed the important task of monitoring the medical status of flying personnel. The MDG is fully mission capable to respond to any emergency. The group also participated in four CBRNE Enhanced Rapid Force and Homeland Response Force exercises and evaluations to include Search and Extraction capabilities. Fifty ANG members earned qualifications in one or more of the following certifications: Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, Trauma Nurse Core Course and PreHospital Trauma Life Support. During drill weekends, the116th MDG evaluated the health status of approximately 1,300 personnel. The men and women of the 116th ACW are proud to serve and consider it an honor to take an active role in their communities and in protecting thenation. The 116th’s reach spans globally because our support begins locally.The 116th continues to be always ready, always there, and always on target. Go Guard!
  • 165th Airlift Wing Georgia’s 165th Airlift Wing is located at Savannah International Airport and is composed of more than 900 men and women, who support, maintain and fly the unit’s eight C-130H “Hercules” aircraft. The mission of the 165th Airlift Wing is to provide tactical airlift of personnel, equipment and supplies. During 2013, aircraft and crews of the 165th flew missions to dozens of nations around the world. The unit maintains one of the highest aircraft operational readiness records in the National Guard and the U.S. Air Force. As a National Guard Wing, part of its dual-mission is also subject to be called upon for assistance during state emergencies to airlift food, medical supplies, equipment, and personnel domestically or internationally. These missions extend the emergency relief support during natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, forest fires, search and rescue operations, and defense support to civil authorities. For example, after the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, 165th crews were on alert stand-by to aid victims in the northeast. Ultimately, other units were called to participate in these efforts, but Wing members were ready to answer the call if necessary. The 165th ser ves as the host base for Brunswick’s 224th Joint Communications Support Squadron, Hunter Army Air Field’s 117th Air Control Squadron, the 165th Air Support Operations Squadron, and the Combat Readiness Training Center both in Garden City, Ga. In January, the wing served as the lead unit in an operational readiness exercise. The wing was validated as a ready-to-deploy unit with a “satisfactory” rating. Immediately, the wing started preparing for a unit compliance inspection which was just recently completed, receiving a satisfactory grade. The war effort continued with twelve members of the 165th Small Air Terminal heading to Afghanistan for a five-month rotation with 25 members of the Civil Engineering Squadron and Fire Department. In 2013, the 165th flew more than 2,800 hours, of which 980 hours were flown in combat/combat support operations in the Middle East. This increased the wing’s combat experience to ten years of combat operations and well over 11,600 combat flight hours without a single mishap. In October 2012, the 165th C-130 aircraft began the more than 6,000mile journey for a four-month stint at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia. This is the tenth time the 165th has deployed to the Middle East or Afghanistan in support of the War on Terror. Accompanying those aircraft were more than 85 Georgia Guard Airmen, including members of the Wing’s operations personnel and its maintenance department. This included four flying crews. In May and June 2013, the unit t o o k p a r t i n t w o S OU T HC OM Operation Coronet Oak deployments. The purpose of Coronet Oak is to resupply U.S. Operations in South and Central America. From April to June, it also provided one airlift and two crews to support Operation New Dawn, providing CONUS aeromedical transport for AMC. Since the beginning of operations in the Persian Gulf, the 165th has been integrally involved in air operations. Several elements of the Wing have deployed throughout the region, with Airman serving in Uzbekistan, Turkey, Kuwait, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Previously in 2009, the 165th deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. In 2005, the unit deployed aircraft and more than 100 personnel to KarshiKhanabad, Uzbekistan, for 11 months. During this period, the unit airlifted more than 35,660 tons of cargo in support of the War on Terror.It was initially called to active duty in 2003 in Col. James Edenfield Commander 165th Airlift Wing support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Savannah’s C-130s were joined by additional C-130s from the Nevada and Delaware Air National Guard and attached the 737th Air Expeditionary Squadron to put aircraft in the air and move equipment, food and people in support of deployed operations. The Wing continues to receive numerous awards, including nine Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards, and enjoys the reputation of being one of the top airlift units in the nation. This is all directly attributed to the professionalism and esprit-de-corps of the Guardsmen who have served, and are now serving, within its ranks. 2013 Annual Report | 22
  • 117th Air Control Squadron Control of the highly charged and congested airspace over a given combat zone is the responsibility of the Georgia Air National Guard’s unique 117th Air Control Squadron (ACS), of Savannah. During exercises, contingencies, o r a c t u a l w a r, t h e 1 1 7 t h AC S’s command and control mission is to provide air control for military aircraft in their sector. As a Control and Reporting C enter, the 117th serves as the senior command and control element for the Theater Air Force Commander and directs the air war as assigned. Tr ai n e d ai r c ont rol l e rs h ave the responsibility of directing aircraft entering, exiting or crossing congested airspace using an array of sophisticated radar equipment and sensors that provide greater coverage than most small city airports. In fall 2013, the 117th mobilized 8 0 p e rs on nel on Tit l e 1 0 a c t ive dut y f or a 1 7 9 - d ay d e p l oy m e nt to Southwest Asia. The unit will coordinate with Army and Nav y forces to lead the regional air defense of the Persian Gulf area. The unit will track, identify, and control aircraft in assigned areas while executing the orders of the Combined Aerospace Operations Center. The unit will return in lateSpring 2014. 1 1 7 t h has supp or te d s e ve r a l test and communications for a l l AC S u n it s , and t he u n it has been selected again to be the first ACS to re ceive ne w upg rade d communications equipment based on their track record of excellence. The unit recently began supporting c om mu n i c at i ons for E me rge nc y O p erat ions C enter exercis es for Hunter Army Airfield. Tw i c e t h i s y e a r, 1 1 7 t h operations personnel went to Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada to support Carrier Air Wing workups and wargames as they prepared for deployment to S outhwest Asia. This gave 117th operations personnel the opportunity to train with pilots from carrier groups that will be supported during the unit deployment 2013-2014. The 117th was also acknowledged for its community efforts in 2013: contributing over $1,000 to local charities and received recognition for its “top five participation” in the Combined Fe dera l C amp aig n, w it h a 100% contribution rate. 165th Air Support Operations Squadron Close Air Support (CAS) for advancing ground units is often critical in perilous combat environments like Afghanistan. The “Battlefield Airmen” of Garden City’s 165th Air Support O p erat ions S qu adron (ASOS) deploy with, advise and assist joint force commanders in planning, re qu e st i ng , c o ord i n at i ng an d controlling CAS, reconnaissance, and tactical airlift missions. In May 2013, the 165th ASOS conducted its first Combined Unit Inspection consisting of 9th Air Force STAN/EVAL and ACC Unit Compliance Inspection. The 165 ASOS was rated an “Excellent” overall with five members earning “Superior Performers” and an additional two members receiving the Inspector General coin. This performance far exceeded Air Force standards. While 2013 marked the first time since 2002 that the ASOS did not have members overseas supporting combat operations, the training and operations tempo has not slowed down. Members have conducted CAS training missions in Florida, Michigan New York, North Carolina and Townsend Bombing Range here in Georgia. Additionally, members went to Germany and Latvia to train on bombing ranges in those 23 | Georgia Department of Defense respective countries. In addition, the 165th ASOS deployed to Fort Stewart, Ga. to support the 48th Infantry Brigade C omb at Te am, G e org i a Ar my National Guard, during the latter’s XCTC in September, conducted annual training at Moody AFB, and graduated two members from Basic Airborne School at Fort Benning, Ga.
  • 224th Joint Communications Squadron The 224th Joint Communications Support Squadron (JCSS) provides communications support as directed by the United States Transportation C ommand, Air Force Space Command, and Ga. DoD. It is one of six active, reserve and Air National Guard units assigned to the Joint Communications Support Element. In 2013, the 224th JCSS mobilized 20% of its Airmen for a six-month rotational deployment in support of operational requirements in the U.S Central Command’s area of responsibility. Four Bronze Stars, ten Joint Service Commendation Medals, and eight Joint Service Achievement Medals were awarded 283rd Combat Communications Squadron G e o r g i a’s 2 8 3 r d C o m b a t C ommunications S quadron is responsible for “first-in” rapid deployment and “build-up” of an integrated force with state-of-theart communications equipment and multi-skilled personnel. The unit provides scalable command and control, i nte l l i ge n c e, s u r ve i l l an c e an d reconnaissance,and information operationscapabilities to expeditionary air and space forces for any contingency operation. The 283rd recently returned from a six-month Joint to 224th Airman for contributions to the success of numerous direct action combat missions of supported Joint Task Forces. During this deployment, the 224th embarked on a five-month humanitarian mission aboard the USS Pearl Harbor to six IndoPacific countries in Samoa, Tonga, the Marshall Islands, Kiribati, the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. Their actions enabled the command element to provide remote communications and track move ments of 793 p ers onnel t hroug hout t he mission. The squadron’s level of support to civil authorities in 2013 was also impressive, providing direct support to NORTHC OM/CYBERC OM homeland defense missions. The Citizen-Airmen of the 224th JCSS consistently displayed unwaver ing commit ment and preparedness to respond to both domestic and federal missions. The men and women of the 224th s h ow e d p r o f e s s i o n a l i s m a n d dedication, responding to both contingency and humanitarian operations while maintaining readiness to respond to any possible domestic threat. Additionally, the squadron generously responded to community needs, donating more than 500 hours, $20,000 and 57 pints of blood, to a variety of charities. They continue to personify the Citizen Soldier on the battlefield and in the local community. Expeditionary Tasking in Southwest Asia. Located in Marietta, Ga., the 283rd is perfectly situated for a quick response anywhere in theregion. 2013 Annual Report | 24
  • 139th Intelligence Squadron The primary mission of the 139th Intelligence Squadron (IS) is to execute cryptologic intelligence operations to satisfy strategic, operational and tactical intelligence requirements of national decision makers, combatant commands, combat operations, plans and forces. Additionally, the 139th IS has the state mission to provide a trained and equipped force to assist the citizens of Georgia in times of emergency. The 45-member intelligence squadron employs 38 traditional and seven full-time Guardsmen. The unit fits the total force initiative “classic associate” squadron model of t he Air Force by work ing alongside the Active Duty’s 480th Intelligence, Sur veillance, and Reconnaissance Group at Fort Gordon. The 139th IS is tasked to support two distinct USAF missions: the Distributed Common Ground System and NationalTactical Integration. Following its standup in 2008 as Detachment1, 116th Air Control Wing, the 139th IS was federally recognized as a USAF Squadron in 2010, and also declared initial operational capability in 2010. Full operational capability is expected to be reached in late 2014. The 139th IS continued a high operational mission tempo in 2013, with several personnel tasked to support active duty USAF and national intelligence missions at NSA/CSS Georgia and 1AF/ AFNORTH. Additionally, two personnel augmented the 117th Air Control Squadron’s deployment t o C E N T C OM . T S g t Tr av i s Huffman won NSA/CSS’s National Threat Operations Center Military Performer of the Quarter for 1st Quarter 2013. The amount and variance of operational support was quite extensive across the spectrum. 139 IS was recognized with its first Air Force Outstanding Unit Award in 2013 for achievements during the Feb 2010-May 2011 timeframe. The 139th IS also continues to support regular production of the nation of Georgia’s diplomatic, i n for m at i on a l , m i l it ar y, an d e c o n o m i c s u m m a r y, w h i c h supports the Adjutant General and Georgia Department of Defense staffs in their efforts with the State Partnership Program. 202nd Engineering Installation Squadron T h e e n g i n e e r i n g , installation, removal, relocation, repair and serviceability of sophisticated command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, sur veillance, and reconnaissance systems at Air Force inst al lat ions worldwide is the responsibility of the men and women of the 202nd Engineering Installation Squadron (EIS) headquartered at Robins Air Force Base. The unit also provides disaster relief and assists state authorities during emergencies by providing d i s a s t e r r e c o v e r y, r e s t o r a t i o n a n d re p a i r of G a . D o D, f e d e r a l and civil communcations infrastructure. The unit spent much of 2013 preparing for the AFSPC Un it C omp l i an c e Ins p e c t i on and preparing for real world deployments.Beginning in O c t o b e r, t h e u n it m o bi l i z e d 2 7 Airmen for a 180-day “bootson-the ground” deployment to the Middle East supporting For ward Op erating L o cations in Afghanistan. Residing at Robins Air Forc e B a s e , War n e r R o bi ns , G a the unit consists of 111 highly 25 | Georgia Department of Defense skilled technicians (11 of w hom are full-time) specializing in communications support for nine Air Guard bases and 21 g e o g r ap h i c a l l y s e p a r at e d u n i t s in the southeast region of the Un it e d St at e s , P u e r t o R i c o a n d t h e U. S . Vi r g i n I s l a n d s . T h i s exceptional team ensures the s qu a d ron l i ve s up t o it s m ott o : “G l o b a l Te c h n i c i a n s , A ny t i m e Anywhere.”
  • 530th Air Force Band The 530th Air Force Band (also known as the Air National Guard Band of the South) support global Air Force and Air National Guard missions by fostering patriotism and communicating a strategic message by performing musical services for the military community as well as the general public. The unit was officially inactivated October 1, 2013. Major Alan McConnell relinquished command to Major General Thomas Moore, and the few remaining and former members were recognized for Combat Readiness Training Center Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Gr ab ow sk i assu me d c om mand of Savannah’s Combat Readiness Training Center in 2013, a place where the only constant in the past year has been change. The threatened personnel cuts of early 2012 took effect in FY 2013. A unit totaling 85 lost 26 of its fulltime personnel – a total of more than 450 years combined military experience. Still, the unit’s strategic vision did not change, nor the demands placed upon it. While absorbing the staff reductions, the CRTC made a concerted effort to lean forward in a number of areas which will continue to pay dividends to the state and Total Force far beyond the foreseeable future. Colonel Todd Freesemann’s initiative legitimized the CRTC’s indigenous Cyber Training School throughout the Air Force. The staff, working with Air Education Training Command (AETC), commenced the arduous task of accrediting the only Air National Guard Cyber Training Facility which included their contributions. Prior to inactivation, the band was reduced in size but remained active by using four ensembles to fulfill mission requests in three states. The band’s final community performance was a Memorial Day parade in Savannah, Ga., with its final official performance at Air Headquarters Family Day celebration in July at Clay National Guard Center. Up on i n a c t iv at i on , t he b an d s marketing name, “The Air National Guard Band of the South,” its brand and mission were transferred to the 572nd Air Force Band, located in Tennessee. The Air National Guard Band of the South’s rich history will always be a part of the heritage of the Georgia Air National Guard. each instructor achieving professorial status so students attending the cyber courses would not only receive AFSC credit, but also college credit through the Community College of the Air Force. The school now has two ‘regular’ Air Force instructors permanently assigned to the team, joining the resident ANG staff of the CRTC, a feat not seen elsewhere in the Guard. The continuing efforts by the Marine Corps to expand Townsend Bombing Range moved forward in FY 2013 as Town Hall meetings were conducted to better brief the public and our neighbors in Long and McIntosh Counties of the possibilities in store. At present, Townsend owns a 5K acre footprint, but with the now-allocated congressional funding, the Range is expected to grow to nearly 32K acres, facilitating the needs of the F-35’s scheduled arrival at MCAS Beaufort in late 2014. At the same time, Air Force JTACS are training on the range, working with fighter aircraft from the Air Force, ANG, Marines and Navy. The local presence of the 165th ASOS continues to attract other ground units to the range from other bases/services. The CRTC’s continuing flexibility allows it to improve its Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation with advancing technologies, providing today’s air warrior with exceptional logistical support and the most realistic electronic war environment utilizing Joint Threat Emitters and link capability ensuring they remain on the leading edge of the nation’s ability to bring the air battle to the enemy, regardless of the fighter airframe. Finally, in years past the Remagen DZ at Fort Stewart had been an exceptionally critical training area for C-130 pilots needing Assault Landing training on a dirt strip. Over the past several years of war, C-130 crews have continued this activity in the theater of operations, but in the days of the drawdown, these same pilots will be required to continue this skill. Realizing this need, CRTC command determined the Remagen DZ could once again become a valuable commodity. Working with Ft. Stewart command, and a hybrid ANG/US Army Red Horse Civil Engineering Squadron from New Mexico, the old DZ has returned to life and the first C-130s are scheduled to land there in January 2014. 2013 Annual Report | 26
  • Georgia State Defense Force Brig. General Tom Commanding General Danielson Georgia State Defense Force When ordered by the Adjutant General, the Georgia State Defense Force (GSDF) provides an organized, trained, disciplined, rapid response, uniformed force. GSDF volunteers respond to needs and emergency situations as defined by the Adjutant General and the Governor, and assist local authorities where such missions do not conflict, as authorized under the Official Code of Georgia, Title 38. In 2013, the GSDF ran its first formal National Association for Search and Rescue certification course for select Search and Rescue Specialization II personnel, while at the same time modernizing training courses across all spectrums of the GSDF force. More than 400 GSDF volunteers met at Fort Stewart to participate in their Annual Training (AT), creating a realistic exercise putting the totality of each unit’s training into action. AT 2013 was designed as a force-wide search and rescue mission run as an Army Readiness Training Evaluation Program. In 2013, the GSDF continued to run nationally recognized search and rescue courses as well as Officer Candidate School, Captain/Warrant Officer Candidate School, soldier leadership and numerous Initial Entry Training courses. GSDF also stood up its own Military Entrance Processing Station. Other highlights for the organization in 2013 include its support of the Georgia Army National Guard 171st Aviation at their annual training; providing search and rescue support to the Jenkins County Emergency Management Agency; assisting the Georgia Army National Guard in testing its tactical communications through a communications exercise and participating in several OPFOR exercises in support of Georgia National Guard deployment at Clay National Guard Center in Marietta and Ft. Stewart, GA. Prior-service veterans comprise approximately 33 percent of the GSDF force. State Defense Force members act as a force-multiplier to 27 | Georgia Department of Defense the Ga. DoD, capable of immediate response whenever they may be needed, assisting with everything from search and rescue missions, to disaster relief efforts, to helping reunite redeploying Guardsmen with their families. When called upon, the GSDF volunteers also provide a variety of support functions for the Georgia National Guard including family support, legal assistance, medical and chaplaincy support, and technical assistance in a variety of other areas. The GSDF also performs defense support to civil authority missions such as evacuation and control during natural disasters, perimeter safety, and medical assistance at major public events. The Georgia State Defense Force provides a wide variety of training and educational opportunities – from military operations to Community Emergency Response Team training – for its own personnel as well as the personnel of the Georgia National Guard. The strong working relationship with the Georgia National Guard allows the GSDF to remain relevant and ready to serve the state and its citizens, now and long into the future.
  • Members of the Georgia State Defense Force (GSDF) unload a simulated casualty during a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) training exercise 2013 Annual Report | 28
  • Joint Staff Brig. General John King Director Joint Staff Division, Strategic Management Office, and the State Partnership Program (SPP). The Family Programs Division is responsible for planning, developing, supervising, and directing family programs for the Georgia National Guard and Reserve members and their families. This includes families of all deployed military personnel – regardless of service component – during all levels of contingency and mobilization operations throughout the state. This division also advises the Adjutant General on matters relating to family readiness and quality of life and is instrumental in assisting service members seeking employment. The Strategic Management Office advises the Adjutant General on matters relating to organizational self-improvement. This office uses several programs throughout the year such as the Army Performance The Ga. DoD Joint Staff is responsible for the strategic management, leadership, and direction of the Georgia Department of Defense, which includes the Ga. Army National Guard, the Ga. Air National Guard, and the Ga. State Defense Force. The Joint Staff provides the Adjutant General with time-sensitive intelligence and information and seeks to build the strength of the Ga. DoD through internal and external partnerships. While the primary mission of the Joint Staff is providing defense support to civil authorities, homeland security, and homeland defense, it provides leadership in several other areas. The Joint Staff has oversight of the Ga. DoD’s Family Programs 29 | Georgia Department of Defense Improvement Criteria, the Malcom Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, and the Managers’ Internal Control Program to continually improve the efficiency and effectiveness of business processes in the organization. The State Partnership Program provides unique partnership capacity-building capabilities to combatant commanders and U.S. ambassadors through partnerships between U.S. states, territories and the District of Columbia and foreign countries. The SPP supports U.S. national interests and security cooperation goals by engaging partner nations via military, sociopolitical and economic conduits at the local, state and national level. The state of Georgia’s partner is the country of Georgia. This partnership was one of the first SPP partnerships established in the program and the Georgia DoD routinely conducts several engagements throughout the year as part of the SPP mission. The Georgia National Guard’s Joint Force Headquarters located on Clay National Guard Center.
  • 1st Lt. Monicia Porter, a native of Thomasville, Ga., with the 1230th Transportation Company in support of the 524th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, Task Force Lifeliner, 1st Sustainment Command (Theater), at Camp Marmal, Afghanistan, ground guides one of her platoon’s vehicles out of their motor pool in preparation to conduct a sustainment and retrograde support mission to a remote location in Northern Afghanistan. 2013 Annual Report | 30
  • Defense Support of Civil Authorities The Georgia Department of Defense is always ready to provide support to the Georgia Emergency Management Agency (GEMA) and the citizens of Georgia in the event of natural and/or manmade disasters. We do this by maintaining relationships, developing and subsequently refining our written plans, conducting exercises and supporting real world events. There are several conferences we also make sure to attend annually that help us stay at the forefront of emerging initiatives in emergency preparedness. In April 2013, we participated in U.S. Northern Command Annual Interagency Hurricane Table Top Exercise hosted by U.S. Army North in San Antonio, Texas. This exercise focused on synchronization across state and federal agencies, the purpose being to present Interagency Partners the capabilities each entity brings to the response and the method by which they bring those capabilities. This allows all domestic operations officers from the National Guard’s hurricane States and territories to come together to discuss their plans, preparedness and exercises in order to ensure the National Guard is always ready. The Georgia Department of Defense also has representation at GEMA’s Emergency Managers Association Group meetings and their seasonal preparedness meetings at the State Operations Center. At the Georgia Department of Defense, we continually develop and refine our written emergency operations plans by conducting Joint Planning Group meetings throughout the year and by conducting external reviews of our plans. We work with other agencies in order to share and discuss those plans. For example, in 2013, we shared our plans with the Georgia Department of Public Health, Georgia Emergency Management Agency, the Alabama National Guard and the Florida National Guard. The most effective way to remain prepared for natural or manmade disasters is to conduct various exercises. The Georgia Department of Defense participated in many emergency response exercises throughout 2013. In addition to participating in the U.S. Northern Command Annual Interagency Hurricane Table Top Exercise, we also participated in exercises, Ardent Sentry and Vigilant Guard in May 2013. Exercise Ardent Sentry was a bilateral exercise that involved numerous federal, provincial, state and local agencies in Canada and the U.S. The exercise focused primarily on Defense Support of Civil Authorities, but contained elements of the Homeland Defense mission as well. The primary objective of the exercise was to give federal, provincial, state and local authorities the opportunity to work together across a full spectrum of training opportunities to better prepare participants to respond to state and national crises. The exercise stressed consequence 31 | Georgia Department of Defense management for a range of manmade and natural disasters. Elements of the Georgia National Guard also traveled to Florida in May to participate in Exercise Vigilant Guard, which is an annual interagency training drill. Along with state and local first responders, members of the Georgia and Florida National Guard trained together in this scenario-based exercise to reinforce the relationship needed to support the needs of citizens during domestic emergencies. During the month of May, the Ga. DoD participated in GEMA’s 2013 Hurricane Exercise. In June we conducted an internal tornado scenario exercise in order to prepare ourselves for the potential of tornado emergencies in the state of Georgia. During 2013, the Georgia Department of Defense provided support to civil authorities during real-world events, as well. Our Joint Staff sent representatives to the Fulton County Emergency Operations center in support of the Peachtree Road Race. Our 4th Civil Support Team and the 116th Air Control Wing’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team supported local, state, and federal authorities throughout the year on a variety of civil support operations. The Georgia Department of Defense stays ready to support the state of Georgia and its citizens through our attendance at conferences, our development and refining of our written plans, by conducting exercises and by supporting real world events. The Georgia Department of Defense will always be ready to provide defense support to civil authorities.
  • 78th Homeland Response Force participates in training exercises during Vigilant Guard 2013. 2013 Annual Report | 32
  • 4th WMD Civil Support Team T he 22 personnel of the 4th Weapons of Mass D e st r u c t i on ( W M D ) C i v i l S u p p o r t Te a m (CST) provide support to civil authorities at domestic chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear ( C BR N ) i nc i d e nt s ite s by of fe r i ng identification and assessment of hazards. They also advise civil authorities and facilitate the arrival of follow-on military forces during emergencies and incidents of WMD ter ror ism, intent iona l or unintentional release of CBRN materials, and natural or man-made disasters that result in, or could result in, catastrophic loss of life or property. The 4th WMDCST complements and enhances, but does not duplicate, state CBRN response capabilities. The Adjutant General can either employ the 4th WMD-CST to support the state response under the direction of the governor or aid in another state’s request for response under another governor. The 4th WMD-CST is comprised of full-time Army and Air National Guard p ers onnel. The str uc ture of the unit is divided into six sections: command; operations; communications; a d m i n i s t r at i on / l o g i s t i c s ; m e d i c a l / analytical; and survey. E ach WMD-CST deploys to an incident site using its internally assigned vehicles, which include a command vehicle, operations trailer, and a communications platform called the unified command suite. This command suite provides a broad spectrum of secure communications capabilities the 4th WMD-CST also can deploy with an analytical laboratory system vehicle containing a full suite of analytical equipment to support the characterization of hazards and several general-purpose vehicles. The CST can be moved by air, rail, commercial truck or ship. The 4th WMD-CST was one of the first ten WMD-CST units originally established by the U.S. Department of Defense. In 2013, Georgia’s 4th WMD-CST was active across the state training with first responders at Cobb County Safety Village, providing vital support for largedraw events, technical assistance for Secret Service appointed National Special Security Event (NSSE) with Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA) for the National Democratic Convention, support of other National Level Exercises. Also in 2013, the 4th WMD-CST participated in a WMD training exercise with the Office of Secure Transportation (OST) with the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The exercise underscored the value the CST brings to the state and other federal agencies in the event that a CBRN incident exceeds the capability of local responders to control. For large draw events, the unit provided numerous sweeps and technical support to Atlanta first responders during events such as the Atlanta Falcons 2013 season games at the Georgia Dome and to the Atlanta Police Department for the 2013 Peachtree Road Race. The 4th WMDCST also provided demonstration and capabilities briefs with local and state first responders at the Albany Marine Corps Logistics Base. The 4th WMD-CST can deploy 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to assist the State of Georgia and other FEMA Region 4 states. Staff Sgt. Jonathon Dean, survey team chief, and Sgt. 1st Class Deric Richardson, survey CBRN non-commissioned officer in charge, briefed and advised local first responders during a radiological exercise at Georgia State University. 33 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • Staff Sgt. Natasha Daniels swept 4th CST entry team Guardsmen with a pancake radiation detector for any traces of contamination during the radiological training exercise with GSU and local first responders. Cobb County Fire and Emergency Services participated in a first responder joint exercise hosted by the Georgia National Guard’s 4th Civil Support Team along with other local, state and federal agencies. Jake Robitzsch and Ken Singleton “evacuate” South Carolina National Guard Sgt. Joseph Berendzen, Jr. to a nearby utility vehicle for transport to Kennestone Hospital as part of the 4th CST’s joint first responder exercise at Cobb County Safety Village. Georgia National Guard 4th CST team members suited up to approach the radiological source and make entry into the building. 2013 Annual Report | 34
  • Counterdrug Task Force The Georgia National Guard C ounterdrug Task Force (GANGCDTF) conducts full spectrum law enforcement support operations which bridge the gap between Department of Defense and civil authorities in the fight against illicit drugs and transnational threats to the homeland. The GANGCDTF contributes military support for local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies and community based organizations in addition to their parent combatant commanders. The GANGCDTF’s mission is to reduce the supply and demand for illegal drugs by fostering relationships and partnering with law enforcement, communit y organizat ions, and school districts. The GANGCDTF is comprised of over 40 members of both the Ga. Army National Guard and Ga. Air National Guard, who assist law enforcement agencies specifically through illegal narcotic and property s e i z u re op e r at i on s , m a r iju a n a eradication missions, information and trend analysis, case support and antidrug classroom instruction. The GANGCDTF contributed to the following drug, property, and currency seizures in FY 2013: 2,349 lbs of cocaine valued in excess of $37.2 million; 2,634 ecstasy pills valued in excess of $65,850; 14,640 lbs of marijuana valued in excess of $43.9 million; 766 lbs of methamphetamine valued in excess of $15.3 million; property in excess of $3.9 million, and Air crew members from Georgia’s Army National Guard Counter Drug Task Force (CDTF) patrolled the skies north of Rome, Ga. looking for marijuana. Their efforts resulted in their harvesting over 20 plants thereby keeping $40,000 of maijuana off the streets of Georgia. 35 | Georgia Department of Defense currency in excess of $19.8 million. In addition to the $120.2 million in drug related contraband, the GANGCDTF assisted in the arrest of 1,185 drug related suspects. Notably, in the fall of 2013 an Airmen attached to Federal Aviation Administration assisted in the tracking and apprehension of four aircraft valued at $1.6 million and the seizure of over 694 lbs of cocaine valued in excess of $11 million in a single operation. Our marijuana eradication efforts in FY 2013 resulted in the detection and destruction of over 9,544 plants valued in excess in $23.8 million. The GANGCDTF continues to perform as one of the most successful Counter Drug Task Forces in the country assisting in nearly $144 million in drug related seizures in FY 2013.
  • Public Affairs T h e G e or g i a D e p a r t m e nt of Defense Public Affairs Office supp or ts t he 15,000 memb er organization The State Public Affairs Office fulfills the Georgia DoD ‘s obligation to engage the public, key stake holders and the command in order to both inform internal and external audiences through varied trusted lines of communications means and methods and provide valued community relations in order to set conditions for situational awareness of GaDoD activities , capabilities and to garner support for GaDoD strategic goals. The Georgia Guard continues to be a DOD leader in online presence and interactivity. Recognized as the owner of one of the premier websites in the entire Department of the Army, The Georgia Guard was also designated as a Keith L. Ware award winner in the Command Blog category. The Professional Guardsman was recognized as the third best in the entire Army component to include active, reserve and Guard units in all States and territories. Public Affairs staff members were also recognized for individual contributions in the Keith L. Ware competition. The Georgia Guardsman’s Historic Battle Review column received an honorable mention for individual writing in the article series categor y. Meanwhile, the Georgia Guard Public Affairs Officer contributed writing and imagery to Best Field Newspaper Keith L. Ware award winning Keris Strike newsletter which documented the 560th BFSB’s training mission in Malaysia. It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words and it would appear that the public and the media agree as Georgia Guard public affairs crossed a milestone on Veterans Day with the one millionth view of its high-resolution image collection on Flickr. In just over a year, Flickr site traffic doubled and images of the Georgia National Guard were distributed by media outlets across the nation. Georgia Guard images were instrumental in the National Guard Bureau’s 377th Birthday and Honor their Service campaigns. An image from the return ceremony of ADT-III was even featured on the Country Music Awards. Production of the Georgia Guardsman magazine entered its 60th year in November. Six decades of Georgia Guardsman magazines are maintained on a digital archive accessible through the Georgia Guard’s home page. This resource continues to provide historical context of the Guard’s mission and relevance through the years. Sequestration had a devastating impact on community relations. In the course of 2013, the Georgia Guard was forced to decline support to more than 120 requests for static displays, band appearances, and guest speakers. These public events are crucial to building the bridge between the military and the public as all too often the general public does not have the opportunity to interact with uniformed military personnel. In lieu of the opportunity to communicate face-to-face, the Georgia Guard concentrated on its social media presence and observed a 21% increase in its Facebook reach among key demographics. Already the second-most followed National Guard state on Twitter, the Georgia Guard added more than 3,000 followers – nearly doubling its total from the previous year. 2013 Annual Report | 36
  • Emerging Missions Na t i o n a l G u a r d s m e n h a v e a unique blend of civilian and military skills. It is this dual, CitizenSoldier nature and temperament of Guardsmen which allows them to be so effective when conducting missions. A Guardsman not only provides combatant commanders with a trained military professional but, as a bonus, Guardsmen bring a myriad of civilian skills and experiences to the battlefield. The National Guard has conducted missions in E astern Europe, South America, Africa, and Central America for over two decades and is heavily involved in the warfight in Afghanistan. Agribusiness Development Teams Agribusiness Development Teams (ADTs) are a collaborative effort of the Network Science Center at West Point (NSC), and the National Guard Bureau’s ADT Mission. The Army National Guard has employed the Agribusiness Development Team (ADT) concept successfully in Central America for approximately 20 years. The National Guard Bureau has completed significant planning to provide the Coalition Joint Task Force (CJTF) commander with a resource to favorably impact the agribusiness sector, and the ADT so far has been very well received and has been very busy passing along agricultural knowledge, providing security forces (SECFOR), and hard work as well. The Georgia ADTs are composed of Army National Guard Soldiers and Airmen with backgrounds and The State Partnership Program, agribusiness development teams and training and reconstruction teams are excellent examples of the National Guard using civilian skills to support the geographical combatant commanders’ theater campaign plans. Helping civilian populations through noncombat initiatives is nothing new to the Georgia National Gu ard . In t h e War on Te r ror, Guardsmen have helped Iraqis and Afghans improve infrastructure, advance law enforcement, bring utilities to towns and villages, and enhance relationships with local leaders. For example, as 2013 came to a close, Georgia Guard engineers used their military and engineering skills to make the roads safer in Afghanistan. The 1230th Transportation Company was one of the last Coalition units in Kunduz, Afghanistan prior to the transfer of authority to the civil authorities in the region. Last year, Guardsmen with the 560th BFSB traveled literally half way around the world to mentor the Malaysian Army in peacekeeping op erations. Three agribusiness development teams with the 201st HRF have deployed to Afghanistan to teach the farmers there sustainable agriculture techniques. And our 18year State Partnership Program with the nation of Georgia continues, as that country became the largest nonNATO contributor to the fight in Afghanistan. Georgia’s Guardsmen have proven themselves repeatedly in combat as well as in humanitarian and domestic response missions. They consistently perform at the professional level that the state and nation expects. expertise in various sectors of the agribusiness field and have been formed to provide training and advice to Afghan universities, provincial ministries, and local farmers. ADT members also bring personal ties and relationships that allow them to leverage the assets and expertise of Land Grant Universities (LGUs) and Cooperative Extension Services within their home state. The ADT undertook and completed projects to improve the expertise of Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation, and Livestock (MAIL) employees and the general knowledge of farmers in the area. Specific areas of expertise and experience for the ADT members i nclud e ag r i c u ltu re ( t ra dit i ona l farming), horticulture (orchards and vineyards), pest management, irrigation, animal husbandry, food processing, marketing, agricultural engineering, soil science, ice production, and storage. The Georgia National Guard committed to a three-year obligation to provide ADTs in Afghanistan. The first of these deployed for southeastern Afghanistan in the spring of 2011. The majority of the service members come from the 201st Regional Support Group and the 265th Regional Support Group. In preparation for that deployment, the Georgia Guardsmen have used the new language lab at Clay National Guard center to improve their understanding of the Pashto and Dari languages used in Afghanistan. The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences provided additional agriculture training and technical expertise at the Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton. The ADT III completed the last mission for Georgia in November 2013. They conducted 211 missions across northern Helmand province to include agriculture, pest management, and veterinary training with district and provincial staff, plus developed an agricultural radio program to reach remote communities. 37 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • State Partnership Program with the Country of Georgia The State Partnership Program’s purpose is to establish enduring civilmilitary relationships in order to improve international security and build partnership capacity across all levels of society. In 2013, the partnership’s eighteenth year, this was accomplished in three ways: verifying Georgia’s disaster response capability, preparing Georgian Soldiers to contribute to coalition combat operations, and developing a long-term amputee care capability. “…We cannot count on full success without the establishment and activation of vitally important state institutions… for we strongly believe that your assistance and support of our initiative will undoubtedly strengthen Georgia’s fledgling democratic institutions and will help us become active members of the family of nations.” (Dr. P. Chkheidze, Permanent Representative; Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Letter to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, John M. Shalikashvili, dated August 31, 1994) The Georgia National Guard supported Exercise Shared Horizons, a multinational disaster response exercise sponsored by US European Command. The exercise focused on expanding Georgia’s disaster response capability towards a regional disaster response framework in the South Caucasus. The success of this exercise, in its final year, verified Georgia’s regional disaster response hegemony. The Country of Georgia is the largest non-NATO contributor of forces to International Security Forces – Afghanistan (ISAF). The successful conclusion of the Georgia Train and Support Team (GTST) mission after three rotations is a testament to the Georgia National Guard’s commitment to the country’s successful participation. Georgian Soldiers continue to own battle space in Afghanistan and Georgia is capable of providing interoperable, effective combat forces for coalition operations. Improved disaster response and combat capabilities enhance Georgia’s global interoperability and are key ingredients for Georgia’s NATO aspirations. Our Georgian partners are now ready to consider exporting these capabilities and, in keeping with Dr. Chkheidze’s wishes, “become active members of the family of nations”. The State of Georgia also provided project management of the Building Amputee Care – Georgia (BAC-G) program. This program builds Georgia’s ability to provide effective long-term care for amputees. It also improves the effectiveness of the care by minimizing the cost and time to transport soldiers to a care facility outside of Georgia. This, in turn, allows finite resources to focus on care and not administrative and logistical costs of transport and remote administration. This one-of-a-kind program is supported at the highest levels of government and is heralded as a model of success. For 2014, the State Partnership Program will continue to build on past successes while vigilantly seeking out and exploring emerging opportunities to leverage U.S. strategy, develop additional partnerships, and enhance global security. 2013 Annual Report | 38
  • Youth ChalleNGe Academy The Georgia National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Academies (one at Fort Stewart in Hinesville and one at Fort Gordon in Augusta), add solid value to the state and to local communities. The program began in September 1993 and has since graduated more than 11,000 at-risk youth into the work force, the military or further educational efforts. This 11,000 number is more impressive when one considers that it translates to more than 10% of the total YCA graduates for the entire country and that Georgia was the third state in the country to even hit the 10,000 graduate mark. The academies are designed for 16-18 year-olds who have dropped out of high school without a diploma. Candidates who become residential cadets in the program enter a challenging 22-week intensive General Educational Development (GED) preparation program, get thorough training in military discipline and structure, attain a grounding in the U.S. Constitution, achieve completion of service learning projects, and have exposure to a multitude of life skills classes. Each academy campus is funded for a yearly target of 425 graduates. Each academy generally exceeds its graduation target in two classes each year, making a total of four classes and reaching a total state goal of 850 graduates per year. In addition, the overall achievement rate for diploma attainment is above 70%, which is phenomenal given that each class is 100% comprised of high school dropouts. This percentage of GED attainment is almost double what this age group is able to achieve outside of YCA. More than 55% of YCA graduates go on to enter the work force, about 25% seek further education, and almost 20% enter some branch of military service. In fact, Georgia YCA graduates have attended some prestigious schools: Emory University; The Citadel; The Law School of Charleston; Georgia State University; Georgia Southern University; East Georgia College; Georgia Military College; Paine College, Augusta Technical College, Savannah Technical College, Brewton-Parker College, etc. Some have become pilots, at least one an MD, an attorney, several top NCOs and officers in the military, and many police officers including a chief, etc. The added value to Georgia and local communities could be summed up with three examples: the thousands of graduates who now can go on to lead productive lives as participatory citizens; the value of the community service performed by YCA cadets in Georgia averaging over half-a million dollars per year; and the final results of a cost analysis done by the Rand Corporation. The Rand Corporation study concluded for every dollar invested in the program, there was a return of two dollars and sixty cents. 39 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • A new graduate of the Youth ChalleNGe Academy receives her diploma during the campus’ graduation ceremony in Augusta, Ga. 2013 Annual Report | 40
  • STARBASE T he G e org i a D e p ar t me nt of Defense’s Peach State STARBASE program seeks to raise the interest in and improve the knowledge and skills of at-risk youth in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The program exposes students and their teachers to real world applications of STEM disciplines through experiential learning, simulations, and experiments. G eorgia’s STARBASE s er ves approximately 1,000 fifth graders a n n u a l l y, w i t h q u a n t i f i a b l e improvement in their academic skills. Before participation in the program, students are tested over topics that will be covered during their STARBASE experience, and post-tests are given to them on their last academic day. Comparisons of these tests demonstrate an average 71% increase in gained and retained knowledge of Georgia standardized science and math objectives. A t S TA R B A S E , s t u d e n t s participate in challenging “hands-on, minds-on” activities related to aviation 122nd Regiment Regional Training Institute G A A R NG’s 1 2 2 nd R e g i me nt R e g i o n a l Tr a i n i n g I n s t i t u t e provides regionalized combat arms, leadership, militar y occupational specialty, additional skill identifier, noncommissioned officer education system, and general studies training for the Army National Guard, United States Army Reserve, and the Active Component. Language Training Center Since June 2010, the Georgia Language Training Center (GA LTC) has been recognized as the premier East Coast facility for linguist training and pre-mobilization Language and Cultural training. This cost effective facility boasts four large classrooms e qu ipp e d w it h f u l l mu lt i m e d i a instructional systems, a well equipped language library, and a certified Army Personnel Testing (APT) test site. and STEM careers, including flight simulation, Computer Aided Design (CAD) engineering, and integrated team building exercises. They interact with militar y personnel and see application of their academic studies in the real world at Dobbins Air Reserve Base and the Clay National Guard Center. This program provides students with 25 hours of stimulating experiences by exposing youth to the technological environments and positive role models found within the Georgia National Guard. The RTI plans and programs training within its region based on requirements identified by the individual training branch, the Army Program for Individual Training and the Training Requirements Arbitration Plan. The 122nd trains and educates the region’s all-volunteer forces to be technically current and tactically proficient as an expeditionary Army. The RTI te aches S oldiers to op e r at e i n a j oi nt - i nt e r a ge n c y, intergovernmental and multinational environment and to conduct fullsp e c tr um op erations prote c ting national security and national defense strategies domestically and abroad. This year the 122nd RTI achieved the highest rating of accreditation from TRADOC (Training and Doctrine Command) and CASCOM (Combined Arms Support C ommand) as an “Institution of Excellence.” In 2013 RTI conducted 59 different courses for MOS and ASI training resulting in 1,512 graduates. As part of a national partnership with the Defense Language Institute, the GALTC’s primar y mission is to prov ide ref resher cours es to Guardsmen from across the Nation, who learned a language as part of their military education. These courses enhance language proficiency and cultural awareness. To support the need to deploy Soldiers that are knowledgeable in the language and culture of their d e p l oy m e nt a re a , t h e Nat i on a l Guard provides L anguage and C u l t u r a l Aw a r e n e s s t r a i n i n g (LCAT) to individuals as part of the training received in preparation for mobilization. The GA LTC is responsible for providing the LCAT training to key leaders and identified Soldiers in an intensive two week training session at that GA LTC in languages that vary from Persian-Farsi to Albanian. To date the GA LTC has trained over 450 Soldiers in preparation to overseas deployment. The GA LTC serves as a unique asset to the region and the nation as a whole as it is the only Language Training Center on the East Coast and the first of its kind for the National Guard. 41 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • Educational Opportunities for Guardsmen The National Guard offers military service with the mission to support and defend not only the Constitution of the United States, but also that of individual States. Therefore, as members of the National Guard, Georgia Guardsmen are also members of the “Reserve Components.” Guardsmen may qualify for numerous federal education benefits – some of which are unique to the GARNG while others come as part of being a member of the Reserve Components team. Guardsmen, their family members, and their employees are eligible for a variety of Federal Education benefits to assist in the pursuit of higher education objectives. Soldiers of the Georgia Guard have a variety of resources to pay for higher education. Upon enlistment, all Guardsmen qualify for the Federal Tuition Assistance program which covers up to 100% of tuition and certain mandatory fees (capped at $4,500 per fiscal year) for accredited courses at colleges, universities, trade, or secondary schools. These funds are paid on a first-come, Georgia Military College Georgia Military College (GMC) is an accredited, liberal arts, junior college open to high school graduates who are determined to earn a college degree. GMC serves many students, with campuses located in Milledgeville, Au g u s t a , C o l u m b u s , Fa i r b u r n , Madison, Warner Robins, Stone University of North Georgia The University of North Georgia (UNG) was created through the recent consolidation of North Georgia College & State University and Gainesville State College. With four campuses - in Cumming, Dahlonega, Gainesville, and Oconee County - and a student population of about 16,000 students, UNG is the seventh-largest public university in Georgia. first-served basis, so early application and a proactive attitude is vital. Some Guardsmen are also eligible for VA benefits like the Montgomery GI Bill – Selected Reserve, or Post 9/11 GI Bill. These funds are in addition to FTA, and can go toward paying for school essentials like books, fees, and housing. HERO scholarships are available for those Guardsmen who have deployed to combat zones, or the children of those Guardsmen. These scholarships can cover up to $2,000 per academic year, capped at $8,000. For more information on educational opportunities visit http://www.msccn.org/ GANationalGuard/GAJobs.html Mountain, Sandersville and Valdosta. GMC also offers online programs. Students interested in the elite Corps of Cadets in Milledgeville may compete for one of 39 State Service Scholarships offered annually to Georgia Air or Army Guardsmen. This full scholarship is valued at over $22,000 each year. GMC is one of only five schools in the nation to offer the Early Commissioning Program that leads to a commission as a second lieutenant in two years. Enlisted Guardsmen may participate in the Simultaneous Membership Program while attending GMC. Qualified stud ents may re ceive an ROTC Scholarship that covers tuition and books. Federal Tuition Assistance and VA benefits are accepted. As a state designated leadership institution and The Military College of Georgia, it is one of only six senior military colleges in the United States and its Corps of Cadets numbers more than 750 students. UNG offers more than 100 programs of study, and has many benefits for the Georgia Guardsmen on its campuses. Georgia Military scholarships are awarded to several Georgia Army Guardsmen every year, offering a full-ride for four years including tuition, fees, books, meals, and housing. North Georgia also continues to improve its strategic language program offering languages such as Russian, Chinese and Korean, among many other languages and romance languages, as academic majors or specialties. The school’s Guard Partnership Program allows enlisted Georgia Guardsmen to serve as ROTC cadets while still drilling with their National Guard units. Members of the program are Simultaneous Membership Program cadets, and receive extra benefits, like an additional monthly stipend and elevated drill pay. Other programs like Federal Tuition Assistance, VA benefits, and ROTC grants may also be available for those who qualify. 2013 Annual Report | 42
  • The Georgia Guard as a Business With more than 15,000 members and a budget of over $690 million, the business of conducting operations in the Georgia Department of Defense is complex. . As one of the larger National Guard organizations, the Ga. DoD competes annually for resources and funding with 54 other states and territories to support our operations. For the past five years, the Ga. DoD’s business practices have been recognized as one of the top three performing National Guard organizations within the nation by the National Guard Bureau. In FY 2013, The GaARNG was recognized as the best business model within National Guard Bureau when they won the “Army Communities of Excellence Award.” Internal assessments are conducted by program managers, senior leaders, in-house auditors and members of our governance management team which includes our Inspector General, Judge Advocate General, Internal Review Division and a federally appointed Property and Fiscal Accountability Officer. Accountability for management actions are maintained through the use of the internal management control process as mandated by the Federal Manager’s Integrity Act of 1982. Fiscal Accountability is maintained by actions of our federally appointed property and Fiscal Accountability officer and is achieved through a Program Budget advisory Council, who monitors our annual funding levels versus actual execution of funds. Reviews of our funding levels are conducted by our resource management division and any discrepancies are investigated aggressively. Results from our assessments are reviewed annually by our senior leadership team during our Strategic Management Board. During the board, current organization performance is reviewed and areas for improvement are identified to accomplish the future vision of the Ga. DoD. During the Strategic Management Board, senior leaders use a formal strategic planning process to determine current organization performance, refine business directions, set missions, visions and values, and ensure the organization is postured to meet the expectations of our customers. From the strategic planning process, updated Ga. DoD strategic priorities, goals and objectives are established and are communicated to the department leaders for action plan development and implementation using a five-year strategic planning cycle. O verall performance of our business practices is assured through the aggressive monitoring of key performance indicators by our senior leaders that provides early indications of our ability to deliver our services and to meet customer expectations. Each major department within the Ga. DoD manages a key performance indicator dashboard and tracks progress of our goals and objectives. Reviews and evaluations of performance are conducted by program managers and process improvement teams to make in-course corrections on programs not meeting expectations. When performance expectations fall Geogia DoD strategic priorities, goals and objectives are communicated to the workforce through the issuance of annual yearly training/operational guidance by our three primary internal department commanders. Guidance is communicated down through the workforce by subsequent guidance, and policies are issued by subordinate leaders and first line managers to ensure that the overall mission and work of the organization is understood and executed by all employees. The understanding and deployment of this guidance is evaluated by the annual assessments. short, new processes are identified and implemented to ensure we still accomplish the goals of the Ga. DoD and provide quality service to our customer. The Ga. DoD remains in constant contact with our customers through various forums such as workshops, conferences, direct meetings, and biannual surveys to ensure we continue to not only meet but exceed their expectations. Feedback and assessments from our customer engagements are entered to our annual assessment of processes and considered during our strategic planning processes. 43 | Georgia Department of Defense
  • 1% Georgia Guard Diversity 7,694 White 5,119 Black / African American 38% 57% 529 Hispanic 181 Asian / Native Pacific Islander / Hawaiian/Other Rank Breakdown 3% 9615 Army Guard Enlisted Soldiers 1238 Army Guard Officers 200 Army Guard Warrant Officers 17% 1% 9% 70% 2352 Air Guard Enlisted 377 Air Guard Officers Ga. DoD Full-time Personnel 640 Permanent Air Technicians 377 Permanent Army Technicians 18% 23% 103 Temporary Air Technicians 363 Temporary Army Technicians 799 Army Active Guard Reserve 489 Air Active Guard Reserve 14% 29% 13% 3% 2013 Annual Report | 44
  • Historical Roots Before there were United States, even before there were 13 colonies, there was the foundation of a National Guard on this continent. In the early 17th century, colonial life was hardscrabble. In addition to the constant threat of the elements, disease, and starvation, early colonists faced danger from French incursions from the north and west, Spanish designs from the south, and competition for land and resources with indigenous peoples. Whereas a clear need for security forces existed, there were neither the funds nor manpower resources available to create a full-time military force to protect the fledgling civilian population. While England maintained a professional army, that force’s base of operations was more than 3,000 miles distant across the Atlantic Ocean and was insufficient to defend the expanding colonies. To resolve the problem, the Massachusetts legislature ordered the establishment of militia companies to serve in three regiments in the towns around Boston. These militia companies were composed of citizens who would make themselves available as a ready response force. The concept of the citizen Soldier as an economical alternative to a standing army began with that declaration on December 13, 1636, a concept that has equal relevance in the era of persistent conflict. Nearly a century would pass before Lord James Oglethorpe and a party of colonists sailed up the Savannah River to form the colony of Georgia. Oglethorpe was well familiar with the utility of the Citizen-Soldier, and would move swiftly to establish and train the Georgia Militia. It is not an exaggeration to say that the Georgia National Guard was founded with the first English footfalls upon the west bank of the Savannah River. The reasons for Georgia’s founding as a colony were strategic as well as economic. The colony served as a bulwark between the colonies to the north and Spanish and French interests to the south and west. Oglethorpe appreciated the need for a trained militia force and, upon arriving in Savannah in 1732, he initiated the first muster of Georgia’s Citizen-Soldiers. Oglethorpe’s actions would prove prescient when, in 1742, a Spanish force sailed from St. Augustine Florida to St. Simons Island with a force of more than 2,000 troops. To meet the coming threat, Oglethorpe had at his disposal regulars of the 42nd Regiment and the Scot Highlanders to bolster the ranks of his militia forces and indigenous volunteers. On July 7, 1742, Oglethorpe’s scouts sighted an isolated element of Spanish troops near Gully Hole Creek. Oglethorpe personally led an assault that inflicted 30% casualties on the Spanish, including their entire officer corps. In response, the Spanish landed 200 elite Grenadiers who proceeded to march inland in a column formation. As they reached 45 | Georgia Department of Defense a marsh bordered by dense woods, the Grenadiers took volley fire from Oglethorpe’s forces. Concealed by trees and gunsmoke, Oglethorpe’s small force routed the numerically superior Spanish at Bloody Marsh. Stung by the two quick ripostes, the Spanish withdrew from St. Simons and would not again seriously contend for Georgian soil. Since the rattle of muskets echoed over that marsh on St. Simons Island, the Georgia National Guard has been a ready and relevant presence in all of our nation’s conflicts. From the American Revolution and the War of 1812 to the great shattering of the American Civil War, volunteer militia units formed the backbone of our nation’s fighting force. In the 20th and 21st centuries, the Georgia Guard has played an increasingly pivotal role on the international stage while maintaining a vital state-side mission. From the era of the smoothbore musket, to the age of Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar Systems, the Guard’s capabilities have increased but our key value remains the same. Like those Citizen-Soldiers of old who had one hand on the plow and one on the musket, our Citizen-Soldiers and -Airmen live and work in our communities and are always prepared to leave home and hearth to protect that which we value. We are YOUR Georgia Guard..
  • Georgia’s Adjutant General Lineage Rank Name Appointment Date of relief Lt. Col. Lt. Col. Lt. Col. Lt. Col. Brig. Gen. Maj. Gen. Col. Col. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Maj. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Maj. Gen. Maj. Gen. Maj. Gen. Maj. Gen. Maj. Gen. Maj. Gen. Maj. Gen. Col. Maj. Gen. Lt. Gen. Maj. Gen. Maj. Gen. Augustus C. G. Elholm Jonas Fauche Daniel Newman John C. Easter Daniel Newman Henry C. Wayne John B. Baird Jon S. Stephens John M. Kell Phil G. Byrd James W. Robertson Sampson W. Harris Andrew J. Scott William G. Obear J. Van Holt Nash Arthur McCollum J. Van Holt Nash Lewis C. Pope Charles M. Cox Homer C. Parker Charles M. Cox Lindley W. Camp John E. Stoddard Marion Williamson Sion B. Hawkins Clark Howell Samuel M. Griffin Alpha A. Fowler, Jr. Ernest Vandiver George J. Hearn Charlie F. Camp George J. Hearn Ernest Vandiver Joel B. Paris III Billy M. Jones Joseph W. Griffin Jerry D. Sanders William P. Bland David. B. Poythress William T. Nesbitt Jim B. Butterworth Dec. 19, 1792 Feb. 20, 1796 Dec. 13, 1806 Nov. 13, 1817 Dec. 25, 1837 Dec, 12, 1860 Oct. 16, 1879 Nov. 6, 1882 Jan. 1, 1887 Oct. 11, 1900 Nov. 12, 1900 Dec. 1, 1903 July 2, 1907 Aug. 7, 1911 Jan. 1, 1913 Dec. 4, 1917 March 1, 1919 Oct. 28, 1922 July 2, 1923 June 28, 1927 July 1, 1932 Jan. 11, 1933 Jan. 12, 1937 Oct. 1, 1940 Jan. 14, 1941 Jan. 12, 1943 Sept 28. 1944 March 22, 1947 Nov. 17, 1948 June 21, 1954 July 10, 1957 Jan. 13, 1959 Jan. 12, 1971 Nov. 2, 1971 Jan. 14, 1975 Nov. 1, 1983 Jan. 15, 1991 April 1, 1991 July 1, 1999 Oct. 28, 2007 Sept. 30, 2011 Jan. 15, 1795 Nov. 2, 1806 Nov. 10, 1817 Nov. 11, 1835 Dec. 22, 1840 May 10, 1865 Nov. 5, 1882 Dec. 31, 1886 Oct. 5, 1900 Nov. 11, 1900 Nov. 30, 1903 July 1, 1907 July 1, 1911 Dec. 31, 1912 Aug. 26, 1917 March 1, 1919 Oct. 20, 1922 June 30, 1923 June 27, 1927 June 30, 1932 Jan. 8, 1933 Jan. 12, 1937 Sept. 30, 1940 Jan. 14, 1941 Jan. 12, 1943 Sept. 28, 1944 March 22, 1947 Nov. 16, 1948 June 20, 1954 July 9, 1957 Jan. 12, 1959 Jan. 11, 1971 Nov. 1, 1971 Jan. 13, 1975 Oct. 31, 1983 Jan. 14, 1991 March 15, 1991 Jan. 31, 1999 Oct. 28, 2007 Sept. 30, 2011 Present The Boar’s Head Explained The boar’s head on the wreath depicted in the patch worn by Georgia National Guardsmen is an adaptation of the crest authorized by the National Guard for the state of Georgia, approved March 20, 1922. The wild boar symbolizes courage and ferocity. The boar’s head, which stems from the coat of arms of James Oglethorpe – founder of the Colony of Georgia – is also the emblem of hospitality. The red, white and blue colors are the official colors of Georgia. 2013 Annual Report | 46
  • A Global Presence The Georgia National Guard deployed more than 1,500 Guardsmen overseas in 2013 in furtherance of its mission to provide military forces to combatant commanders. On the ground and in the air, the Georgia National Guard has been a vital part of overseas combat operations contributing more than 16,000 Army and Air Guardsmen to the war fight since the opening months of the War on Terror. Among the Georgia Army National Guard units that supported operations in Afghanistan in 2013 were the 214th Field Artillery Battalion of Elberton, 278th MP Company and 878th Engineers Battalion of Augusta and the 848th Engineer Company of Douglas. Georgia’s Agribusiness Development Team III also contributed military and agricultural capability to assist the Afghan people in 2013. Meanwhile, units of the 116th Air Control Wing and 165th Airlift Wing continued to support missions in multiple combat commands overseas. The Georgia Air National Guard has maintained a constant rate of deployment overseas of personnel and resources. The Georgia Guard also supports overseas training missions designed to build good will and interoperability among partner nations. In 2013, the Georgia Guard supported overseas training missions in Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, El Salvador, Germany and South Korea. In 2014, the Georgia National Guard’s State Partnership with the country of Georgia will enter its second decade. The Georgia National Guard’s support for overseas contingency operations will continue in 2014. The 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team departed on its second Afghanistan deployment in December and the 1230th Transportation Company participated in some of the last missions conducted in Kunduz, Afghanistan. Missions of the Georgia Air National Guard will span the globe from the north Pacific to the South Atlantic. At any given time in the coming year there might well be a Georgia National Guardsman on five continents supporting contingency and training missions. 2013 Deployments at a Glance Burundi State Partnership - Georgia Alberta, Canada Afghanistan El Salvador Cameroon 47 | Georgia Department of Defense South Korea
  • Georgia National Guard Soldiers Killed in Service Since 9/11 Rank Full Name Unit Date Country SFC SPC SGT SGT PFC SGT SPC SPC SFC SPC SGT SPC SGT PFC SSG SPC SPC SGT SPC SGT SSG SSG SPC SPC SGT SGT SSG SFC SSG MAJ SPC 1SG SGT SPC CPL SSG SGT SFC Willoughby, Christopher Robert Boles, Dennis Joel Gillican, Charles Crum Mercer, Chad Michael Brunson, Jacques Earl Fuller, Carl Ray Kinlow, James Ondra Thomas, John Frank Anderson, Victor Anthonio Haggin, Jonathon Christopher Jones, David Randall Shelley, Ronnie Lee Ganey, Jerry Lewis Gibbs, Mathew Vincent Warren, Charles Houghton Dingler, Joshua Paul Saylor, Paul Anthony Strickland, Thomas James Stokely, Michael James Draughn, George Ray Hollar, Robert Lee Merck, Dennis Paul Dodson, Philip Allan Futrell, Marcus Shawn Travis, Philip Lamar Maravillosa, Myla L. Edwards, Amos Collins Weaver, Davy Nathaniel Beale, John Curtis Jenrette, Kevin Michael Jordan, Jeffrey William Blair, John David Chavers, Brock Henry Johnson, Isaac Lee Morales, Raymundo Porras French IV, Alex Holmes, David Roberts Jr, Edgar N Co H, 121st Infantry (LRSU) Co C, 1st Bn, 171st Aviation Regiment Service Battery, 1-118 Field Artillery 2d Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment 2nd Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment 2nd Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment Co A, 2d Bn, 121st Infantry, 48th BCT 2nd Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment 2nd Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment 2nd Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment 2nd Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment 2nd Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment 648th Engineer Bn, 48th Infantry Brigade 648th Engineer Bn, 48th Infantry Brigade 648th Engineer Bn, 48th Infantry Brigade 1st Bn, 108th Armor Regiment 1st Bn, 108th Armor Regiment 1st Bn, 108th Armor Regiment Troop E, 108th Cav, 48th Infantry Brigade Troop E, 108th Cav, 48th Infantry Brigade Troop E, 108th Cav, 48th Infantry Brigade Co B, 878th Engr Bn 148th FSB, 48th BCT 148th FSB, 48th BCT 148th FSB, 48th BCT 221st MI Battalion, 560th BFSB 1st Bn, 118th Field Artillery Regiment Hqs Co, 48th Infantry Brigade 1st Bn, 108th RSTA, 48th Inf Bde 1-108 RSTA, 48th Inf Bde 1-108 RSTA, 48th Inf Bde 1st Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment Co D, 2d Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment 1-108th RSTA, 48th Inf Bde Co D, 148 FSB, 48th Infantry Brigade 1st Bn, 121st Infantry Regiment 810th Engineer Company, 48th BCT 810th Engineer Company, 48th BCT July 20, 2003 Iraq Oct. 24, 2004 Kuwait May 14, 2005 Kuwait June 30, 2005 Iraq July 24, 2005 Iraq July 24, 2005 Iraq July 24, 2005 Iraq July 24, 2005 Iraq July 30, 2005 Iraq July 30, 2005 Iraq July 30, 2005 Iraq July 30, 2005 Iraq Aug. 3, 2005 Iraq Aug. 3, 2005 Iraq Aug. 3, 2005 Iraq Aug. 15, 2005 Iraq Aug. 15, 2005 Iraq Aug. 15, 2005 Iraq Aug. 16, 2005 Iraq Sept. 1, 2005 Iraq Sept. 1, 2005 Iraq Oct. 20, 2005 Iraq Dec. 2, 2005 Iraq Dec. 2, 2005 Iraq Dec. 2, 2005 Iraq Dec. 24, 2005 Iraq Feb. 17, 2006 Iraq May 18, 2008 Afghanistan June 4, 2009 Afghanistan June 4, 2009 Afghanistan June 4, 2009 Afghanistan June 20, 2009 Afghanistan July 6, 2009 Afghanistan July 6, 2009 Afghanistan July 21, 2009 Afghanistan Sept. 30, 2009 Afghanistan June 26, 2010 Afghanistan Aug. 17, 2010 Afghanistan 2013 Annual Report | 48
  • Officers of the Georgia Army National Guard MG WILTON S. GORSKE BG JOE F. JARRARD BG JOHN F. KING BG CRAIG M. MCGALLIARD BG KENNETH C. ROBERTS BG REX A. SPITLER COL ANTHONY ABBOTT COL VERNON C. ATKINSON II COL KIRK O. AUSTIN COL BARRY K. BEACH COL KEVIN C. BERKMAN COL THOMAS H. BLACKSTOCK JR COL RAYMOND D. BOSSERT JR COL CRAIG S. BROOKS COL THOMAS M. CARDEN JR COL PERRY A. CARTER COL RANDAL S. CARTER COL CLIFFORD B. CHICK COL WILLIAM A. DENT COL JEFFERY R. EDGE COL MARK G. ELAM COL ROBERT B. GASTON COL ANTHONY L. HALL COL REX E. HALL COL VICKI L. HEGGEN COL KEITH E. KNOWLTON COL LANITA R. KUHN COL DAVID S. LEE COL MARK A. LONDON COL HARRY S. MCCORKLE COL JEFFREY A. OLIVE COL LUTALO O. OLUTOSIN COL GUILLERMO J. PIERLUISI COL HARVE T. ROMINE COL BENJAMIN E. SARTAIN COL MICHAEL L. SCHOLES COL RANDALL V. SIMMONS JR COL WALLACE E. STEINBRECHER COL DANIEL L. TOWNSEND COL RICHARD D. WILSON COL JOSEPH C. WOOD LTC CHRISTOPHER B. AASGAARD LTC JONATHAN L. ADAMS LTC ALAN B. ALEXANDER LTC DAVID S. ALLEN LTC ERIK ANDERSEN LTC WILLIAM E. BAILEY LTC STEVEN A. BALLEW LTC TERRY L. BARRON LTC MARC E. BELSCAMPER LTC CHARLES B. BENNETT LTC REED L. BERRY LTC BRIAN S. BISCHOFF LTC RUSSELL N. BLOODWORTH JR LTC JIMMY W. BOANE LTC PHILIP J. BOTWINIK LTC JOHN D. BOYER LTC THOMAS J. BRIGHT LTC GREGORY B. BROWN LTC KELLY C. BROWN LTC MARK W. BROWN LTC BRADLEY M. BUEK LTC DAVID E. CASEY LTC BOBBY L. CHRISTINE LTC JOHN G. CHURCH LTC MICHAEL E. COLLINS LTC REGINALD L. COOK LTC KEVIN T. DANIELS LTC ROBERT C. DAVIS LTC BARRY A. DEATON LTC JEFFREY C. DICKERSON LTC ROGER M. DILLARD LTC ANTHONY E. DUPLECHIEN LTC BRIAN K. EILTS LTC BRIAN W. ELLIS LTC ROBERT T. EVANS LTC JOSE J. FERNANDEZ LTC GEORGE L. FISHER LTC MICHAEL B. FORDHAM LTC ANTHONY D. FOURNIER LTC JASON W. FRYMAN LTC JAMES M. FULMER JR LTC JOHN T. GENRY JR LTC GLYN C. GOLDWIRE LTC EDUARDO C. GRANADOS LTC JOHN H. GROTH LTC ISRAEL S. HAM LTC KEVIN T. HAMM LTC THOMAS W. HANLEY LTC GRETCHEN E. HARBIN LTC TIMOTHY A. HEAD LTC EDWIN PATTON HENDRICKS JR LTC JOSEPH B. HENSON LTC JOSEPH C. HESTER JR LTC FRANK E. HOLDER LTC DAVID F. HOLLAND LTC SCOTT M. HOVIS LTC MICHAEL O. HULSEY LTC KENNETH P. HUTNIK LTC ANDREAS JONES LTC CHRISTOPHER J. KEMPER LTC THOMAS C. KIMBALL LTC JAMISON R. KIRBY LTC BRIAN W. LASSETTER LTC EDWIN A. LASTER LTC THOMAS J. LESNIESKI LTC JOHN G. LOWE LTC JOSEPH A. LYNCH LTC MICHAEL B. MADDOX LTC SHARON A. MAXWELL LTC GEORGE W. MCCOMMON LTC ALEXANDER V. MCLEMORE LTC JAMES L. MCNAIR III LTC THOMAS C. MEEKS LTC JOHN M. MILLER LTC REGINALD G. A. NEAL LTC ERIC W. NORRIS LTC JEFFREY A. PLAUGH LTC TODD A. PERKINS LTC ANTHONY B. POOLE LTC ROBERT A. POULOS LTC ROBERT L. POWERS LTC SPENCER T. PRICE LTC ROSEMARY ROBERTSON LTC KEVIN C. SANDERS LTC WILLIAM M. SAXON LTC THEODORE R. SCOTT III LTC JAMES E. SHUMAN LTC MATTHEW D. SMITH LTC PAUL A. SMITH LTC TIFFANY M. SNEED LTC DANE A. SNOWDEN LTC WILLIAM A. SOCRATES LTC JOHN W. STRAIN II LTC SHANE P. STRICKLAND LTC MICHAEL W. SUMMERS LTC ANTHONY K. SUTTER LTC CATHERINE M. TAIT LTC GARY D. THURMAN LTC JOHN M. TILL LTC FREDERICK L. TOPLIN LTC IVAN R. UDELL LTC ROBERT T. UTLAUT LTC ANITA Y. VINSON-BRITMAN LTC GLEN H. WALTERS LTC CARL L. WHITE MAJ SCOTT E. ANDERSON MAJ TIMOTHY I. ARCELAY MAJ WILLIAM G. ARP MAJ JOHN H. AVERA MAJ JASON S. BAKER MAJ ANDREW W. BANISTER MAJ ANDREW W. BEACH MAJ SHANNON R. BEALL MAJ JUSTIN L . BEAULIEU MAJ BRENDA L. BEEBE MAJ GLENDON H. BELL MAJ KEITH E. BELL MAJ THOMAS R. BENNETT JR MAJ PHILIP R. BOYD MAJ WILLIAM R. BROACH MAJ BOBBY J. BROOKSHIRE MAJ DREW C. BROWN MAJ ELTON G. BROWN MAJ MARK A. BROWN MAJ PERVIS L. BROWN MAJ STEPHEN L. BROWN MAJ CHRISTOPHER M. BUCK MAJ CHRISTOPHER H. BUNKER MAJ GERALD D. BURRIS MAJ CHRISTOPHER M. BURTON MAJ WILLIAM H. CABANISS MAJ TERENCE L. CAPLE MAJ CHARLES A. CARTER JR MAJ BILLY CHAU MAJ KYRA R. CLARK MAJ JIMMY L. COATES JR MAJ JOHN P. COLE MAJ JAMES D. COLLIE MAJ JAMES P. CORBIN MAJ CHRISTOPHER M. CORLEY 49 | Georgia Department of Defense MAJ KAREN A. CORSETTI MAJ WILLIAM G. COX JR MAJ JOSEPH M. CREVAR MAJ JAMES D. CRILL MAJ CHARLES B. CURL JR MAJ BLAIR L. DAVIS MAJ MARK C. DEDERICK MAJ SCOTT D. DELIUS MAJ SHAWN B. DILLON MAJ QUINTIN T. DOLL MAJ HENRY F. DONALDSON II MAJ PAUL N. DOUGLAS MAJ ERICA L. DUBOSE MAJ JACOB W. DUNN MAJ JON S. DURRANCE MAJ VINCENT M. DUVALL JR MAJ RODNEY C. EDENFIELD MAJ JASON A. ELLINGTON MAJ JOSHUA P. EMERSON MAJ SHAWN M. EMERY MAJ NATASHA D. ENGLISH MAJ CARLOS C. ENRIQUEZ MAJ JOSEPH P. FAIRFAX II MAJ JOHN M. FILIATREAU MAJ JEFFREY T. FREEMAN MAJ JOHN M. FUCHKO III MAJ LUKE W. GASPARD MAJ RONALD A. GRANT MAJ SHELBY C. GRANT MAJ DARRELL D. GREEN MAJ LYNN L. GROSVENOR MAJ JAMMY L. HALL MAJ JONATHAN P. HAMILTON MAJ TABETHA M. HAMMOND MAJ ALAN D. HAMMONDS MAJ SAMUEL A. HARRIS III MAJ CORTNEY L. HAWKINS MAJ DAVID J. HENDERSON MAJ JUSTIN R. HENRY MAJ ANDREW L. HEYMANN MAJ JOSIE J. HOBBS MAJ JEREMY D. HORSTMAN MAJ MATTHEW L. HOWARD MAJ ALAN R. HUSTAD MAJ JOHN R. HUTCHINSON III MAJ GREGORY S. JACKELS MAJ KATHRYN A. JACKSON MAJ GREGORY T. JONES MAJ CHRISTOPHER C. KEHL JR MAJ CHRISTOPHER B. KELLEY MAJ COREY D, KING MAJ NATHANIEL L. KNIGHT MAJ SUSAN O. KOAGEL MAJ STEVEN N. KOBAYASHI MAJ DUSTIN J. KRACK MAJ MATTHEW J. KUKLA MAJ DAVID G. LAUER MAJ JEAN P. LAURENCEAU MAJ JEREMIAH D. LAXSON MAJ ROBERT A. LEE MAJ JASON B. LEWIS MAJ KARL A. LIPETZKY MAJ MICHAEL F. LIPPER MAJ ALEXANDER A. MAGG MAJ AIMEE E. MANION MAJ TREVOR J. MANN MAJ KRIS J. MARSHALL MAJ CHRISTOPHER J. MARTINDALE MAJ HENRY MCCLOUD III MAJ TREVIS A. MCCULLOUGH MAJ ANDREW B. MCDONALD MAJ PATRICK H. MCDOUGALD MAJ THOMAS A. MCDOWELL MAJ JEFFREY J. MCELHANEY MAJ JOHN F. MCKENNA MAJ JOHN D. MCRAE II MAJ PABLO E. MERCADOTORO MAJ DANIEL W. MILLER JR MAJ KENNETH J. MILLER MAJ FLETCHER D. MITCHUM MAJ SHAWN P. MONIEN MAJ JEFFREY W. MORAN MAJ JEFFREY L. MOULTON MAJ YASIN I. MUHAIMIN MAJ JASON H. NEUMANN MAJ CHARLES C. NEWTON JR MAJ JOHN B. NICHOLS MAJ KEVIN M. NICKLAY MAJ KIMBERLY A. NORMAN MAJ KERRI K. ONEAL MAJ CALVIN F. OXENDINE MAJ WILLIAM M. PARKER JR MAJ KYLE A. PEARSON MAJ KEVIN T. PEEK MAJ GERALD J. PELLEGRINI JR MAJ BRYAN E. PETERSON MAJ EDWARD A. PIASTA MAJ ERNEST F. POLK III MAJ THOMAS P. POMIAN JR MAJ MARIEL C. POTTS MAJ CHRISTOPHER S. POWELL MAJ MICHAEL A. PRIETO MAJ CHRISTOPHER D. REBER MAJ JEFFERY D. REED MAJ ROSALYN K. REESE MAJ DIXON C. REEVES MAJ DARYL F. REMICK MAJ LUCAS B. RICE MAJ SAMUEL J. ROBERTS MAJ VERNON D. ROBINSON MAJ JONATHAN S. ROSCOE MAJ COPELAND J. ROWELL MAJ JAMES W. RUSH MAJ DAVID A. RUSSO MAJ SCOTT C. SCHEIDT MAJ BARRY B. SIMMONS MAJ HEATHER J. SIMON MAJ ADAM K. SMITH MAJ ALICE H. SMITH MAJ ANNA M. SMITH MAJ KATHLEEN K. SMITH MAJ RICHARD H. S. SONG MAJ NICOLA Q. SPLETSTOSER MAJ SUSAN C. STAHL MAJ JOSHUA P. STAUFFER MAJ DAVID L. STEVENS MAJ NATHANIEL C. STONE MAJ GEORGE C. STURGES MAJ ANNA R. TALERICO MAJ TIMOTHY P. TATEM MAJ RODNEY K. TATUM JR MAJ DENNIS U. THIBAULT MAJ STASSA M. THOMAS MAJ COLIN J. THOMPSON MAJ DONALD J. THOMPSON MAJ JOSEPH A. TORRES MAJ STEPHEN P. TUCKER MAJ FLINT H. TYLER MAJ JAMES T. VANEMBURGH MAJ ROBERT P. VENTON MAJ ROBERT M. WALKER MAJ RAYMIE W. WALTERS MAJ RUSS W. WALTERS MAJ CYNTHIA M. WARREN MAJ RAY P. WATSON MAJ JASON S. WESTMORELAND MAJ TREVOR P. WHELESS MAJ JEROLD L. WILLIAMS MAJ TARSHA L. WILLIAMS MAJ DAVID M. WIMBUSH MAJ ROBERT J. WOLFORD MAJ GREGORY P. WORDEN MAJ SHAWN K. WORKMAN CPT YASIN I. ABDULAHAD CPT ROBERT P. ABRAMS CPT LEE A. ADAMSON CPT JAMES H. ALEXANDER JR CPT AUSTIN D. ALLEN CPT CHRISTOPHER L. ALLEN CPT GEORGE L. ALLEN CPT CARL A. ANDERSON CPT JERMAINE D. ANDERSON CPT JAMIE M. ANDREWS CPT NINIASHAKA K. ANTOINE CPT BRIAN G. ARROWOOD CPT JAMES D. ASHER III CPT BROOKS H. ASKEW CPT WALTER N. AUSTIN CPT ELIZABETH L. BAKER CPT FRANCISCO J. BARROQUEIRO CPT JAMES W. BARROW CPT TAWANDA B. BAXTER CPT JOSHUA E. BELL CPT JIMMY L. BELLAMY JR CPT MATHEW R. BENASULY CPT ANNICK J. BERGHMAN CPT KARA R. BERGS CPT DAVID BIDOT CPT KEVIN M. BLACK CPT KEYONNA N. BLASSINGAME CPT ALLOU D. BLEOUE CPT RANDALL P. BOATNER CPT STEPHEN D. BODA CPT MATTHEW A. BONNETTE CPT TIMOTHY W. BOUTWELL CPT PATRICK H. BREWER
  • CPT JAMES T. BROOKS CPT DANIEL S. BROWN CPT ISRAEL N. BROWN CPT JANAIRE R. BROWN CPT ROBERT W. BROWN II CPT TOMMY W. BROWN CPT DENNIS E. BRYAN CPT ANTHONY G. BURMEISTER CPT SALVATORE J. BUZZURRO CPT GREGORY A. CALHOUN CPT JEFFERY S. CARDEN CPT WILLIAM M. CARRAWAY CPT ELIJAH J. CARROLL CPT BRYAN C. CHAVERS CPT DANIEL M. CHICOLA CPT MICHAEL S. CHISM CPT RUSSELL J. CHRISTOPHER CPT JASON J. R. CLARK CPT JAMES H. CLAY III CPT SHANE M. CLEMONS CPT BYRON C. COLEY CPT GEORGE B. CONSTANTINE III CPT CHRISTOPHER J. COOPER CPT TRAVIS J. CORNWALL-BURNHAM CPT BRADLEY J. CORTAZZO CPT SHILO C. CRANE CPT DUSTIN R. CRAPSE PT BUKEKIA A. CROFT CPT FRANCIS C. DALY CPT THOMAS N. DALY CPT ZACHERY B. DARBY CPT RUSSELL F. DASHER JR CPT DAVID J. DESCOTEAUX CPT LUCAS M. DESTEVENS CPT RAYMOND N. DEVOE CPT PAUL W. DIETZEL CPT ADAM J. DOSS CPT CHRISTOPHER E. DRYDEN CPT BRETT D. DUKE CPT JEDIDIAH B. DUNCAN CPT THEODORE E. DUNHAM CPT SHANE B. DURHAM CPT CHRISTOPHER J. EDGECOMB CPT MEGAN R. EHRREICH CPT JASON D. ELLIS CPT WESLEY P. EMINGER CPT JOHN D. EVANS III CPT DANIEL L. FALL CPT KEITH A. FARMER CPT JUAN F. FERNANDEZ-GOMEZ CPT MICHAEL C. FERUNDEN CPT KEITH FLOYD CPT BRETT A. FRANCEK CPT TIMOTHY J. FULLER CPT SAMUEL B. GARDNER CPT RYAN D. GAVANT CPT DARREL E. GEVING CPT FARIBORZ GHAFOORI CPT RICHARD J. GIAMBRA CPT CHRISTOPHER S. GODDARD CPT MICHELLE A. GRANT CPT MICHAEL L. GRAVES JR CPT JENNIFER M. GREEN CPT DARRYL G. GRIFFING JR CPT. PATRICK M. GROVER CPT LUKE E. GURLEY CPT CHRISTOPHER GUYTON CPT BRYAN M. HALPERN CPT JOHN S. HARRISON III CPT LARRY J. HARTMAN CPT DAVID HARVEY II CPT GREGORY D. HAWLEY CPT CRAIG A. HENDERSON CPT SHAWN T. HENDERSON CPT HUGH W. HENRY CPT MARIE B. HERBORT CPT JUAN C. HERNANDEZ-HUERTAS CPT DEBRA S. HIGGS CPT JEREMY J. HILL CPT PAUL G. HILLIER CPT TIMOTHY W. HOFFMAN CPT STEVE T. HOLLAND CPT KEVIN E. HOLLEY CPT ROBERT J. HOLMES JR CPT TRAVIS B. HOLMES CPT AARON M. HOLT CPT TERRELL L. HOOD CPT DAVID H. HOWELL CPT SCHUYLER F. HOYNES CPT JEROME L. HUNT CPT NUIR A. HUSSEIN CPT ROBERT B. HUTSON CPT JOSHUA P. INGALLS CPT JENNIFER L. JAACKS CPT KYLE S. JAACKS CPT JAMES R. JACKSON CPT THOMAS A. JACKSON CPT CHRISTINA M. JOHNSON CPT JEREMY C. JOHNSON CPT LAMAR A. JOHNSON CPT LYNNETTE A. JOHNSON CPT MICHAEL J. JOHNSON CPT TAWANNA L. JOHNSON CPT STEPHEN M. JOHNSTON CPT KENNETH R. JONES CPT CRAIG L. KELLER CPT JONATHAN W. KIEL CPT SIDNEY H. KIM CPT SCOTT W. KIRCHOFF CPT MOSHE D. KIRKLAND CPT SONYA Y. KNIGHT CPT GREGORY S. KOESTER JR CPT TYRONE A. LANDERS CPT JOSEPH V. LATELLA JR CPT MICHELLE D. LEEWADE CPT JUSTIN S. LESLIE CPT JAMES O. LIMBAUGH CPT DERREK LITTLE CPT BRANTLEY P. LOCKHART CPT JONATHAN N. LORD CPT ROBERT E. LOWRANCE CPT SEAN D. MACK CPT SHARLETTA K. MAHONE CPT JONATHAN K. MALLETT CPT MICHAEL G. MALLON CPT BRYON P. MARSH CPT NATHAN M. MARSH CPT ROBERT S. MARSHALL CPT MICHAEL J. MARTIN CPT CODY A. MARTINEZ CPT KEVIN D. MATTHEWS CPT CHRISTOPHER L. MAXEY CPT TONY A. MAY CPT MARK A. MCCALL CPT JOSHUA W. MCCARTHY CPT KERI E. MCGREGOR CPT DAVID S. MCLEOD CPT STEVEN A. MCRAE CPT MICHELLE E. MEADORS CPT LUIS M. MENDEZ JR CPT HERBERT K. MIHAN JR CPT GEOFFREY T. MILLER CPT THOMAS MING CPT JERRY MITCHELL IV CPT MICHAEL K. MITCHELL CPT ANTHONY R. MOON CPT RICHARD T. MORRIS CPT ROBERT M. MORRIS JR CPT ANDREA D. MORRISON CPT NAJEEB A. MUHAIMIN CPT HENRY C. MULLINS CPT KENNETH T. MURRAY CPT MATTHEW E. MUSE CPT SOO K. NAMER CPT LESLIE M. NELSON CPT JOSHUA C. NEUMAN CPT DANIEL A. NICHOLS CPT IAN P. NORTON CPT JOSELYNE NORTON CPT CANDICE G. NUNEZ CPT DARYL T. OEHRLEIN CPT TAMMY C. ONEAL CPT MATTHEW J. OSUCHA CPT ABRAHAM E. OWEN CPT ANDREW C. PARKER CPT JOSEPH R. PARKER CPT AQUITA M. PATILLO CPT JOSHUA S. PATTERSON CPT PAULA L. PAUL CPT MICHAEL J. PERSLEY CPT MARC J. PFROGNER JR CPT PHALLY PHORN CPT JOHN D. PINION CPT JON A. PIRTLE IV CPT CAMERON B. PLUNKETT CPT JEREMY D. POISSON CPT JAY T. PORTER CPT MICHAEL J. PRCHAL CPT JOHN E. PRIDGEN CPT NICOLE S. PUGH CPT CHRISTOPHER J. PULLIAM CPT EDWIN R. PURVEE CPT COLLIN M. RADER CPT STACEY M. RAMEY CPT JONATHAN D. RAZZANO CPT MATTHEW B. REESE CPT LORENZO Z. RICHARDSON CPT JOHN W. RIDDLE CPT LEIF A. RIVERA CPT BENJAMIN A. ROBERTS CPT CHRISTOPHER D. ROBERTS CPT NAKIA D. ROBINSON CPT STACIA R. ROETH CPT DANNY R. ROGERS CPT JULIUS A. ROGERS CPT BENJAMIN ROSICHAN CPT PAUL L. ROTHENBUHLER CPT JASON C. ROYAL CPT MICHAEL C. RUDIO CPT BENJAMIN A. RUSSELL CPT STEVEN C. RUSSELL CPT ROBERT P. SAYLE III CPT ROBERT T. SCHWARZ CPT EMIR N. SEHIC CPT DANIEL R. SEKULA CPT JONATHAN A. SELLARS CPT JOSEPH D. SEWALL CPT JASON E. SHELTON CPT ANDY B. SHEPHERD CPT DUSTIN W. SHOUPE CPT JOHN R. SHULL CPT ELIJAH M. SIMPSON CPT JENNIFER L. SIMS CPT ALVIN D. SINGH CPT BRYANNA R. SINGLETON CPT BENNIE L. SMITH JR CPT CHRISTOPHER E. SMITH CPT MATTHEW A. SMITH CPT CARLTON A. SPARKS II CPT JULIA M. STAFFORD CPT WILLIAM D. STEMBRIDGE CPT KENTON P. STENROSE CPT BRENT W. STEVERSON CPT JULIAN C. STEWART CPT ROBERT W. STILLS JR CPT JACOB O. STIMSON CPT RICHARD D. STONE SR CPT RANDALL C. STOVER CPT AVERY K. SUMMERS CPT JOYCE A. SWINTON CPT KYLE C. TAFEL CPT SHARLENE G. TAYLOR CPT PARRISH G. THIBAULT CPT BRETT A. THOMAS CPT HERVAYE L. THOMPSON CPT HUBERT E. THOMPSON JR CPT JENNIFER E. THOMPSON CPT JUSTIN K. THOMPSON CPT MICHAEL E. THOMPSON CPT RALPH D. THORNTON CPT WILLIAM L. TODD JR CPT RACHEL L. TORRES CPT QUINITA L. TOWNSEND CPT PAUL A. TREMBLAY JR CPT JOHN M. TURK II CPT CHAD D. TYSON CPT ZACHARY T. UNDERWOOD CPT GREGORY E. VANISON CPT DAVIS R. VARNER CPT MICHAEL E. VISKUP CPT ERNEST N. VIVIAN JR CPT JESSE L. WADDY CPT JACE A. WALDEN CPT ABBY R. WALKER CPT TRISHA J. WALKER CPT JAMES B. WALTON CPT JOHNATHAN C. WALTON CPT CHRISTOPHER J. WATKINS CPT JOHN P. WEAVER CPT SAMUEL T. WEEKS CPT TODD A. WEISER CPT ALEXANDER H. WESTBERRY CPT CHARLES W. WESTRIP IV CPT GEOFFREY E. WHITAKER CPT DAVID J. WHITE CPT LARRY J. WILLIAMS CPT LOUIS L. WILLIAMS CPT MICHAEL L. WILLIAMS CPT KEVIN S. WILSON CPT NATHAN A. WILSON CPT SAMUEL A. WILSON CPT MATTHEW J. WINN CPT JEFFREY M. WISZ CPT GARRISON A. WOOD CPT ROY WOODS JR CPT HOMER J. WRIGHT III 1LT MANSELL K. ADZOBU 1LT MATTHEW C. ALEXANDER 1LT MATTHEW J. ALEXANDER 1LT DEREK S. AMBROSE 1LT TIA N. AMOLING 1LT ANTHONY M. AMOS 1LT NERUN AMPAIPAST 1LT MATTHEW J. ARNOLD 1LT IAN M. BAHR 1LT MARK A. BAILEY 1LT MICHELE M. BANGSBOLL 1LT JOSEPH L. BARBANI 1LT ANTOINE J. BARNES 1LT CECIL J. BARNES 1LT SHAMEKA R. BARNES 1LT TANDREA S. BEASLEY 1LT JORDAN R. BECK 1LT JOSEPH A. BEDINGFIELD 1LT KENDRA D. BELLAMY 1LT MICHAEL L. BINSTOCK 1LT MADISON C. CONRAD 1LT PAUL J. BLOOMER 1LT DANIEL R. BODIE 1LT SEDRICK D. BOLES 1LT RODERICK C. BONNER 1LT KASSANDRA A. BOYER 1LT RAYMOND B. BRAMBLETT 1LT KENYANNIA R. BRIDGES 1LT MIKEAL C. BROOKS 1LT JAMES A. BROWN III 1LT TRAVIS F. BULLOCK 1LT MACK T. CAMPBELL 1LT JOSHUA M. CARR 1LT JAMES R. CARVER II 1LT JEREMY P. CATOB 1LT BILLY R. CATON III 1LT JEANNIE M. CAUTHEN 1LT ANTHONY K. CECIL II 1LT ANDREW Y. CHANG 1LT JEFFERY C. CHARLTON 1LT CUTHBERT CHRISTOPHER 1LT WILCO CIVIL 1LT ADONIS S. COLON 1LT SELENA J. COLSTON 1LT JEREMY M. COMBS 1LT JOSHUA K. COMBS 1LT RANDELL L. CONYERS II 1LT TYLER J. COOK 1LT DANIEL A. CORN 1LT JOSTEN C. CORNETT 1LT JAMES C. CORRIGAN 1LT ANDEE J. COURSON 1LT ZACHARY L. COWAN 1LT JENNIFER A. COWART 1LT DERRICK E. CRAWFORD 1LT AARON S. CRISP 1LT BERNARD H. CRUZ 1LT WILLAM T. CULPEPPER 1LT QUENTIN E. CUMMINGS 1LT EARL CUMMINGS-PETERLIN 1LT JAMES J. CURTIS 1LT ISRAEL J. DARBE 1LT WILLIAM R. DARNELL 1LT CECIL E. DAVIS 1LT LANCE R. DAY 1LT JULIUS A. DEGUIT 1LT RAYMOND P. DILLARD 1LT JOHN C. DINE 1LT RICHARD K. DOSTROPH 1LT TYLER V. DUNLAP 1LT CASEY L. DURHAM 1LT MICHAEL A. ECHEVARRIA 1LT TENIKA R. EDGE 1LT ROCHELLE L. EDMOND 1LT ADAM J. EICH 1LT JAMES L. ELLIS JR 1LT WILLIAM W. ELLIS 1LT DEREK S. ELLYSON 1LT NATHAN ELLYSON 1LT ERIC W. ELZEA 1LT STEPHANIE A. ERBERICH 1LT NICHOLAS P. ETHERIDGE 1LT JASON E. FELKER 1LT JOSEPH E. FIALA 1LT CHRISTOPHER R. FLETCHER 1LT MICHAEL C. FLYNN 1LT SONNY FONG 1LT KISHA A. FORD 1LT PHILLIP R. FORRESTER 1LT BRIAN A. FOSTER 1LT SAMANTHA N. FRAZIER 1LT BRYAN A. FREDERICK 1LT AMANDA E. FREEMAN 1LT FRANK B. GAMSBY 1LT ANTHONY V. GARAY 1LT JERRY M. GARNER 2013 Annual Report | 50
  • 1LT CHRISTY M. GARRETT 1LT SHANE L. GIDDENS 1LT ADAM D. GLOVER 1LT RELANA E. GOMEZ 1LT JORDAN W. GOMOLAK 1LT AMANDA K. GREEN 1LT ERICK B. GREEN 1LT DANIEL K. GRIFFIN 1LT PHILLIP C. GRIFFIN 1LT CHARLES W. GRIMSLEY 1LT JOSEPH M. GUIKEMA 1LT BRANDON M. GUNNELS 1LT FRANK A. HACHMUTH 1LT MARK D. HALL 1LT DONALD HAMMOND II 1LT MICHELLE A. HANLEY 1LT CHRISTY L. HANSON 1LT ROBERT A. HARRISON 1LT KRISTOPHER F. HARSHMAN 1LT ROSWELL A. HATHAWAY III 1LT LATONYA N. HICKS 1LT MAXWELL D. HILL 1LT MARK E. HODGES 1LT NATHANIEL HOLLOWAY III 1LT ALEXANDER J. HORN 1LT DAWN C. HOWELL 1LT MARC S. HOWELL JR 1LT MARCUS HUGGINS 1LT ADAM M. IVEY 1LT GEORGE JACKSON 1LT JOHN W. JACKSON 1LT CHARLES B. JAEGER 1LT ROOSEVELT F. JAMES IV 1LT EVANS M. JAMIESON 1LT DILLON J. JARRETT 1LT PATRICK T. JARVIS 1LT APRIL JOHNSON 1LT JEREMIAH J. JOHNSON 1LT LAUREN R. M. JOHNSON 1LT MARINA R. JOHNSON 1LT TILMAN JOHNSON 1LT ANATASHIA R. JONES 1LT JASON D. JONES 1LT KARL M. JONES JR 1LT TAMIKA S. JORDAN 1LT INSUNG KANG 1LT WILLIAM T. KELLEY III 1LT RYAN C. KING 1LT JOHN M. KISHIMOTO 1LT MATTHEW C. KISS 1LT DANIEL J. KLEIN 1LT MEGAN C. KOTSKO 1LT THOMAS D. KRUKLIS 1LT JAMES S. KUMP 1LT JEFFREY L. LANCE 1LT DANIEL M. LARSON 1LT ERIK D. LAWSON 1LT PAUL M. LEACHMAN 1LT IAN D. LEWIS 1LT MICHAEL E. LEWIS 1LT MARC D. LHOWE 1LT JAMAR W. LITTLEJOHN 1LT STEPHEN LOMAN 1LT BRANDON S. LONG 1LT NICHOLAS J. LONG 1LT CHARLES W. LOVELL 1LT ANDREW R. LYTLE 1LT ALFREDO T. MATOSMARIN 1LT JOHN S. MAYFIELD 1LT JAMES A. MCCOY III 1LT RICHARD R. MCELWAIN 1LT BRIAN MCKENNA 1LT GEORGE A. MCLAIN 1LT ANDREW A. MCLEAN 1LT PHILLIP D. MCMINN 1LT MARCUS T. MCMULLEN 1LT BRITTANY D. MCPHERSON 1LT JAMES A. MEDLER II 1LT ZACHARY A. MELDA 1LT EBONI C. MILLER 1LT GARY E. MILLER 1LT CAL J. MINCEY 1LT REGINA L. MITCHELL 1LT BRIAN H. L. MIZE 1LT ZACHARY MOORE 1LT MICHAEL MOORES 1LT DON W. MORGAN JR 1LT WILLIAM T. MORRISON 1LT ALBERTO C. MOSCOSO 1LT RANDALL C. MOSS 1LT BRIAN P. MURPHY 1LT CHRISTOPHER F. MURPHY 1LT MICHAEL P. MURPHY 1LT JOHN E. MYERS 1LT WILLIAM R. NALL 1LT ANTONIO C. NASH 1LT TIM H. NGUYEN 1LT JARRETT K. NIEVES 1LT LAWRENCE M. NIX 1LT NEAL L. L. NOEL II 1LT KARL M. NSONWU 1LT ROTIMI S. OLUWO 1LT JOEL B. PARIS 1LT ALEJANDRO V. PASCUAL 1LT RYAN C. PEARSE 1LT STUART M. PEARSON 1LT DAVID R. PECK 1LT CHASSITY D. PELLEGRINO 1LT MONICIA A. PORTER 1LT SETH A. PORTER 1LT GRANT A. POWERS 1LT AARON C. PROCTOR 1LT DAVID M. PROTUS 1LT ADAM J. PULSNEY 1LT DARREN L. RAGER 1LT JAMES L. REDDICK 1LT JACOB W. RICE 1LT FLOYD M. RINEHART 1LT GODFREY G. RITTER JR 1LT KIRK B. ROBERSON 1LT JAMES R. ROBSON 1LT TARAH M. ROE 1LT TIMOTHY L. ROLLINS JR 1LT REBECCA E. ROYALTY 1LT STEPHANIE RUDOLPH 1LT ROBERT M. RUSHTON 1LT MADISON M. RYBECK 1LT SASHA D. SALTERS 1LT MARC D. SAVIOLI 1LT ALAN C. SCHMITZ 1LT ANDREW R. SCHWAB 1LT RYAN A. SCHWARTZ 1LT BART A. SCOCCO 1LT WILLIAM B. SHERFESEE 1LT MARGARET M. SHINDELL 1LT ASHLIE R. SHREWSBURY 1LT GRACE SIGUNGA 1LT MATTHEW T. SILVA 1LT WILLIAM I. SMILEY 1LT DEVIN M. SMITH 1LT JARED D. SMITH 1LT KEVIN R. SMITH 1LT GABRIEL M. SNELL 1LT KHANXAY SOUPHOM 1LT JEREMIAH K. STAFFORD 1LT MARIELLE A. STOCKDALE 1LT JEROME L. STOKES 1LT PAUL J. STRELLA 1LT THEA D. SULLIVAN 1LT CHRISTOPHER W. TATUM 1LT MAXWELL K. THELEN 1LT PATRICK C. TILLEY 1LT TYLER R. TORRES 1LT ROLAND K. TOWERY III 1LT KARTINA L. TRIPP 1LT NATHAN P. TURK 1LT CHRISTOPHER E. VALLOT 1LT MELINA C. VASQUEZ 1LT IVAN E. VAZQUEZ-GARCIA 1LT DONIEL K. WADE 1LT EBONI N. WALKER 1LT BRETT W. WALLACE 1LT JAMES B. WARD 1LT NICHOLAS S. WARD 1LT CHARLES W. WELLS 1LT ELLIOTT H. WELLS JR 1LT SAMUEL W. WHITE 1LT SUSAN G. WHITE 1LT JONATHAN L. WHITMIRE 1LT ANGELA M. WILLIAMS 1LT CHRISTOPHER M. WILLIAMS 1LT JASON F. WILLIAMS 1LT LETITIA T. WILLIAMS 1LT DORICE R. WILSON 1LT DEREK J. WOLFE 1LT SAMUEL A. WOLFSON 1LT JONATHAN B. WOOD 1LT RYAN A. WOOD 1LT TIMOTHY B. WOODY 1LT DONFREA D. WOOLFORK 1LT MARK A. WORKMAN 1LT TAMARA N. WRIGHT 1LT WILLIE L. WRIGHT III 1LT TANESHIA R. YORK 1LT DAVID W. YOUNG 2LT DANIEL C. ADCOCK 51 | Georgia Department of Defense 2LT KIMBERLY R. ADKINS N 2LT CHERRYL A. AGOSTO 2LT ELVIA AGUILERA 2LT DECRETA S. AIKEN 2LT ADAM J. ALIG 2LT DUSTIN E. ALLARD 2LT SHAWN P. ALLEN JR 2LT STEPHEN D. ANDREWS 2LT TERRY J. AUSTIN 2LT BENJAMIN D. BANE 2LT THOMAS A. BEARDEN III 2LT ROGER G. BEAVER 2LT THOMAS A. BENAVIDES 2LT AMARI T. BENLEVI 2LT ATHENA L. BENNETT 2LT BRYAN J. BESHIRI 2LT TODD J. BESIER 2LT BLAKE M. BEST 2LT LONNIE C. BEST 2LT SPENSER R. BETTIS 2LT WILLIAM B. BISHOP II 2LT LESLIE A. BITTENBINDER 2LT CHRISTOPHER A. BLACKBURN 2LT DEONDRE J. BONDS 2LT MARK T. BOYD 2LT BENJAMIN M. BOYKIN 2LT RICHARD A. BRAGG JR 2LT JEREMY C. BRANN 2LT JASON A. BRISTOL 2LT CHERRISA C. BROCKINGTON 2LT ROBERT C. BROMFIELD 2LT KURTIS C. BRONSTON 2LT COLTON B. BROWN 2LT DWAYNE K. BROWN 2LT EDWARD D. BROWN 2LT JERIEL R. BROWN 2LT CHRISTOPHER S. BUONO 2LT HAROLD T. BURGESS 2LT LOGAN X. BURNS 2LT DALLAS J. BURTON 2LT ARTHUR L. BUSH 2LT CHRISTOPHER P. BUTLER 2LT STEVEN L. CAISON 2LT ASHLEY N. CALLAHAN 2LT ERIC S. CAMPBELL 2LT JOSEPH S. CAMPBELL 2LT MICHAEL S. CAPACCIO 2LT PRESTON W. CAPERS 2LT MICHAEL W. CARLSON 2LT ALEXANDER S. CARPENTER 2LT WILLIAM M. CHANCEY 2LT TYLER M. CHAPMAN 2LT PRECIOUS E. CLEMENTS 2LT JORDAN B. CLOWER 2LT ELI J. COHEN 2LT JORGE L. CONDE 2LT RAZALYN R. COOK 2LT ROSALIND E. COOPER 2LT ROBERT R. CORBETT 2LT SCOTT D. CORWIN 2LT BRANDEN R. COX 2LT JOHN B. COX JR 2LT JERRY P. CRAM 2LT JARED M. CRANDALL 2LT ADAM B. CRANFORD 2LT SHAWANN L. CRUMPLER JR 2LT DANIELLE R. CUMMINGS 2LT JAVONNE A. CUMMINGS 2LT JEFFREY S. CURTIS 2LT NELLIE M. DALEY 2LT WESLEY J. DANDRIDGE 2LT YANICK N. DARKO 2LT MICHAEL H. DASILVA 2LT BETH A. DATRI 2LT ANDREW K. DAVIDSON 2LT ASHLEY M. DAVIS 2LT SCOTT N. DELOZIER 2LT JAMES S. DILWORTH 2LT CHAD A. DOUGLAS 2LT EMILY R. DRESSER 2LT MICHAEL J. DYKSTRA 2LT NELS L. EBY 2LT JOSEPH J. EDWARDS 2LT GABRIEL D. EGAS 2LT ROGER M. ELBAZ 2LT MATTHEW R. ELLIS 2LT KRISTOPHER L. EMBRY 2LT AARON D. ENGLISH 2LT JASON M. ETZEN 2LT JESSE D. EVANS 2LT CANDICE R. FIELDS 2LT ANTHONY S. FINCH 2LT TYLER E. FITZGERALD 2LT TRENTON M. FLOYD 2LT CHARLES G. FOLLIN III 2LT LANDIS P. FORD 2LT JONATHAN R. FORTNER 2LT ANDREW C. FRANKLIN 2LT SHANTE L. FRAZIER 2LT STEVEN P. FREUND II 2LT JASON E. GAINES 2LT ROBERT C. GARMAN 2LT SAMARA N. GARRISON 2LT ROBERT W. GARTNER 2LT DAVIS GIADOO 2LT NATHANIEL L. GIANCOLA 2LT RYAN L. GILES 2LT ZAKARY B. GOLOWICH 2LT SARAH L. GORDONAKHVLEDIANI 2LT JASON GOZA 2LT JOHN T. GREENE 2LT CHARLES R. GRIFFIN JR 2LT JASMINE D. GRIGGS 2LT WILLIAM O. GRIMM JR 2LT JASON A. GRINER 2LT EDWARD A. GYLFE JR 2LT JOSEPH P. HACKNEY 2LT JOSEPH M. HALL JR 2LT JACQUELINE M. HANDLOSER 2LT CHAKA C. T. HARDEMON 2LT JACK K. HARMON 2LT NATHAN G. HARRIS 2LT RICHARD T. HART JR 2LT ERIC J. HAYES 2LT KEVIN H. HENDERSON 2LT DAVID HENDRIX 2LT BRANDON T. HENRY 2LT CHRISTIAN D. HICKS 2LT DAREN B. HIGGINBOTHAM 2LT DEXTER A. HIGGS JR 2LT EBONY S. HINTON 2LT BRETT W. HOLDER 2LT ASHLEY D. HOLLINS 2LT SHADRICK D. HOLLIS SR 2LT JEFFREY T. HOPE 2LT KEITH A. HOPPER 2LT JONATHAN R. HORN 2LT HERBERT K. HOWE 2LT ASHLEIGH A. ISAACSON 2LT COURTNEY L. JAMES 2LT STEPHANIE L. JAMES 2LT TREVORIS K. JEFFERSON 2LT IAN M. JENNINGS 2LT BRUCE L. JOHNSON II 2LT CORETHA JOHNSON 2LT TIMOTHY A. JOHNSON 2LT JEFFERY L. JOHNSTON 2LT PAUL E. JOHNSTON 2LT JEREMY G. JONES 2LT STEFEN D. J. JONES 2LT NOVA L. JUDE 2LT EDNER J. JULIEN 2LT TAKAYOSHI KAKIUCHI 2LT BETHENY A. KAPPER 2LT TIMOTHY C. KELLY 2LT JACK K. KIBLINGER 2LT FRANCES K. H. KIM 2LT JOSHUA A. KINSEY 2LT TREVOR J. KOVITCH 2LT RYAN M. KRIVANEK 2LT MARTIN A. LANDRITO 2LT CHRISTOPHER A. LANDRUM 2LT JOSHUA A. LEE 2LT KRISTOPHER P. LEONG 2LT NICOLE M. LESIEUR 2LT DANIEL V. LIMONCHENKO 2LT JOSHUA A. LITTLE 2LT DONTAVIUS M. LOGAN 2LT CORTNEY T. LOKEY 2LT BRITTANI N. LOWE 2LT CHARLES A. LUMMUS 2LT MATTHEW C. LUSTIG 2LT JOSUE MACIAS 2LT MICHAEL MACIAS 2LT JULIA A. MACK 2LT TYRE M. MADDOX 2LT ANGEL M. MADERA 2LT TEALE L. MARCHETTE 2LT MATTHEW H. MARSHALL 2LT CHRISTIAN D. MARTIN 2LT SAMUEL G. MARTIN 2LT MIESHA T. MASTERS 2LT WILLIAM J. MAYFIELD 2LT SEAN M. MCCULLEY 2LT DUSTIN L. MCDONALD 2LT ANDREW J. MCDOUGAL
  • 2LT JACOB G. MCINNES 2LT DAVID S. MCINTYRE 2LT SCOTT A. MCINTYRE 2LT MATTHEW C. MCKELVEY 2LT MARCUS D. MCKINNEY 2LT JOSEPH K. MCLAIN 2LT ADAM W. MCMAHAN 2LT TRENT A. MCMURTREY 2LT EULALIA MENDEZ 2LT MATHEW A. MEPHAM 2LT JOSHUA D. MIDDLETON 2LT ROY W. MONROE 2LT DANIEL T. MOORE 2LT DARLENE N. MOORE 2LT RUSSELL W. MOORE 2LT JOSEPH A. MORGAN 2LT MATTHEW S. MORRILL 2LT NICHOLAS J. MYERS 2LT ANTHONY C. NELSON 2LT THOMAS N. NOVAK 2LT OCONNOR HUGH THOMAS 2LT PADILLA KYLE RANSFORD S 2LT PADRON DANNY 2LT PAGAN CHRISTOPHER GEORGE 2LT PAGANO GREGORY ROBERT 2LT PALMER NATALIE MICHELE 2LT PARKER DONOVAN KAREEM 2LT PARKER WAYNE ELLIOTT JR 2LT PARKS ANTONY THORN 2LT DECKERY R. PATTERSON 2LT BRENT J. PAUL 2LT MICHAEL R. PETTIS 2LT JONATHAN R. PFENNINGER 2LT ALVIN E. PITTMAN II 2LT CHERONAE A. PORTER 2LT JONATHON H. POSADA 2LT DARIUS J. POSTELL 2LT CASHIF D. PRITCHARD 2LT STEPHEN M. PRITCHARD 2LT RHAN M. RAETHKE 2LT JAMES P. RAMSEY III 2LT JOSEPH M. REYNOLDS 2LT JOSHUA R. REYNOLDS 2LT ROBERT E. RICHARDSON 2LT SANTOS RIVERA III 2LT MICHAEL T. ROACH 2LT RASHAD A. ROBERTS 2LT ELIZABETH M. ROBERTSON 2LT TENESHA C. ROBINSON 2LT BRYAN R. ROOT 2LT NICHOLAS P. ROSI 2LT ERNEST K. ROUSE III 2LT KENNETH A. RUIZ 2LT JOSHUA B. SAM 2LT ADAM T. SANDERS 2LT DONNA E. SANDERS 2LT BARRETT E. SATHIANATHAN 2LT BENJAMIN S. SCANLON 2LT STEPHEN R. SCHAFF 2LT ALEXANDER A. SCHEIB 2LT WILLIAM A. SCHMETZER 2LT ADAM J. SCHULTZ 2LT KATI L. SCHUMM 2LT SYRENA M. SCIPIO 2LT GUY B. SERAPION 2LT CODY M. SEYMOUR 2LT SEBRINA C. SHARPER 2LT GREGORY A. SIGMON 2LT OSCAR D. SIMMONS V 2LT RYAN J. SIMMONS 2LT MILTON T. SIMPSON 2LT NICHOLAS A. SIMPSON 2LT SHI-REI D. SINGLETON 2LT BENJAMIN S. SKELTON 2LT MATTHEW A. SLOVER 2LT ANTHONY A. SMITH 2LT BERTRICE D. SMITH 2LT IRWING SMITH 2LT KASANA L. SMITH 2LT KEITH C. SMITH III 2LT ROBERT K. SMITH JR 2LT EMILY B. SNYDER 2LT ANTONIO D. SOLOMON 2LT DAVID R. SOOY 2LT COLBY C. SPECK 2LT KEVIN M. SPENCE 2LT GERALD J. SPENCER 2LT CHRISTINA L. SPRUILL 2LT CHRISTOPHER C. STANLEY 2LT BRIAN J. STAUFF 2LT JACOB L. STEEN 2LT CHERELLE S. STEVENSON 2LT ANDREW B. STINSON 2LT TODD A. STOYKA 2LT JEREMY A. STRAUB 2LT BRADY K. SWART 2LT CAREY S. SWYMER 2LT RICHARD P. TABOR 2LT ERIC R. TALAVERA 2LT JOHN E. TATE III 2LT MICHAEL C. TAYLOR JR 2LT CANDACE S. THOMAS 2LT ZACHARY T. THURBER 2LT ADAM C. TOLAR 2LT ADRIAN TORRES 2LT JESSY L. TOSCANO 2LT KENYAN A. TRAILLE 2LT KYLE J. TREDWAY 2LT CHIQUITTA L. TROUPE 2LT NICHOLAS T. TROUY 2LT JONATHAN W. TURNER 2LT DEREK M. UEBEL 2LT ETHAN W. VALIQUETTE 2LT STEVEN A. VASQUEZ 2LT MICHAEL A. VIK 2LT EDUARDO M. VOLOCH 2LT WILLIAM T. WALDEN 2LT ALEXANDER J. WALDROP 2LT CHRISTIAN A. WALL 2LT LACEY A. WALTERS 2LT SHARONDA F. WATSON 2LT THOMAS F. WATSON 2LT STEPHEN A. WAYNICK 2LT QUINTIN G. WEEKLY 2LT CHRISTOPHER R. WEST 2LT JOEL D. WETTSTONE 2LT JENNIFER P. WHARTON 2LT MATTHEW K. WHISENANT 2LT JODY A. WHITE 2LT JASON D. WILCOX 2LT ANDREAS P. WILDER 2LT JAMES C. WILFORD II 2LT JUMAANE P. WILLIAMS 2LT ZACHARY T. WILLIAMS 2LT JAROD A. WILLIAMSON 2LT BRYANT A. WINE 2LT JASON P. WITCHER 2LT BARRY B. WOOD 2LT MYKEL A. WOOTEN Warrant Officers of the GAANG CW5 JERRY C. BAKER II CW5 GARY K. BUTTON CW5 PETER J. DEMKOW JR CW5 ALVIN D. FAULKNER CW5 THOMAS J. GOLDEN CW5 HAROLD H. HAY JR CW5 ROBERT NEGRON CW5 HENRY G. WOOD III CW4 GARY A. ARNOLD CW4 ANGELA A. BELDING CW4 STUART J. BOTHWELL CW4 MICHAEL A. BROWN CW4 WALTER J. CANNON CW4 ROBERT P. CAPEZZUTO CW4 WILLIAM F. CLAYBORN CW4 BRYAN K. CROWDEN CW4 BOBBY E. DENNIS CW4 DARRYL T. FARR CW4 EARL H. FREEMAN CW4 DOUGLAS G. GAHRING CW4 MARK A. GRISSOM CW4 BRIAN K. GUNTER CW4 FLORENCE A. HAUSLER CW4 ROBERT B. HAUSLER CW4 KEITH D. HODGE CW4 JAMES K. HOGUE CW4 CARL S. JACKSON CW4 WILLIAM D. JOHNSON CW4 DAVID F. KESKE CW4 TIMOTHY L. LADSON CW4 RICARDO MARTINEZ CW4 OWEN A. MCDANIEL CW4 MCKEE ERIC BRUCE CW4 SCOTT R. MELIUS CW4 JAMES B. MESSER CW4 ADRIAN M. MONTAGUE CW4 MARK W. MORRIS CW4 KENNIE A. PAGAN CW4 RANDALL T. PIFER CW4 JIMMY W. POLK JR CW4 STEPHEN P. PUCKETT CW4 ANTHONY D. REGISTER CW4 WADE H. RICHARDSON CW4 DUANE E. SANDBOTHE CW4 KENDRICK L. SIMMONS CW4 BRANDON K. THOMAS CW4 DARRELL R. WAGNER CW4 LAWRENCE B. WALKER JR CW4 JEFFERY H. WALLIS CW4 JOANNA L. WILLIAMSON CW4 SAMUEL E. WILLIS CW4 DEAN L. WOOD CW4 CHARLES E. WOODWARD CW3 ANAS BASHIR CW3 DOUGLAS M. BERG CW3 LANCE M. BRENNAN CW3 ADAM J. BUTLER CW3 ANDREW M. CASHEN CW3 ALTON G. CHAPMAN CW3 GLENN A. CHILDS CW3 GEORGE M. CHIP CW3 MARK B. CUMMINGS CW3 BRYAN B. DURRETTE CW3 KENNETH W. DYSON CW3 DONOVAN J. FEIST CW3 JULIE A. GAMBLE CW3 ROBERT E. HEDRICK III CW3 JAMES L. HIGGINS JR CW3 ALAN O. HUGHES CW3 MARK A. JOINER CW3 ANNETTE F. JONES CW3 BARBARA A. JONES CW3 GERALD A. KEY II CW3 JAMES G. LINCE CW3 STEPHEN D. MEIN CW3 ROBIN L. MIXON CW3 RUSSELL D. MOTES CW3 NATHANETTE E. PERRY CW3 WILLIAM L. REESE CW3 KIM L. ROBINSON CW3 DAVID M. SCOTT CW3 THOMAS G. SHEDD CW3 JOSEPH SHIVER JR CW3 JONATHAN L. SMITH CW3 ROBERT A. STINER CW3 VALERIE M. THOMAS CW3 CALEB C. WALDRON CW3 RONALD D. YOUNG CW2 JEFFREY D. ADAMSON CW2 JEFFREY S. ANDREWS CW2 JOHN L. ANGIER CW2 MARCEL ANTHONY CW2 KARL M. AUER CW2 SERAFIN AVITIA IV CW2 TIMOTHY A. BEABOUT CW2 SAMUEL J. BLANEY CW2 BRYAN K. BOLING CW2 CHRISTOPHER M. BRIASCO CW2 ANTHONY D. BROOKS CW2 REUBEN D. T. BUSSEY CW2 DANIEL R. BUTTON CW2 PATRICK D. CAVANAGH CW2 JUSTIN C. CHADWICK CW2 DONNA M. CHEEK CW2 RUSTY A. CRAWFORD CW2 FELICIA M. CURRIE CW2 DAMIAN V. CUTTIE CW2 GREGORY C. DELGADO CW2 WILLIAM E. EMORY CW2 KIM L. GROGAN CW2 JOSHUA E. HAGEMAN CW2 BENJAMIN C. HAKENSON CW2 LONNIE J. HARPER CW2 JESSIE F. HARRIS CW2 JOHN J. HERRERA CW2 STANLEY D. HIGHSMITH CW2 JOHN L. HODGES JR CW2 ROGER D. HOLDER CW2 JONATHAN M. HOLLAND CW2 JASON M. HOWLAND CW2 MARCUS A. HURSEY CW2 JERALLE L. JALIL CW2 JAMES A. JOHNSON CW2 CHARLES T. JONES CW2 PIOTR KARP CW2 JOHNNY W. KELLEY CW2 JONATHAN A. KEMP CW2 DOUGLAS R. KIRKLAND CW2 DOYLE R. KOBECK CW2 JOHN KULLMAN III CW2 AMY G. LAWLER CW2 MICHELLE J. LEAVINS CW2 MARCUS J. LEMING CW2 DELECIA A. LOPEZ CW2 SHAWN S. MCAFEE CW2 BRADLEY W. MCAULEY CW2 EVA M. MCCARLEY CW2 JOHN C. MCELVEY JR CW2 TIMOTHY A. MERLINO CW2 TIFFANIE S. MONROE CW2 TIMOTHY A. MOORE CW2 GLENN S. MOSELEY SR CW2 ANTHONY NORRIS CW2 OMAR D. PATTERSON CW2 ROBERT J. PELUSO CW2 WILLIAM R. PIERCE CW2 DOUGLAS M. POWERS CW2 KEITH T. ROBERSON CW2 JOHN D. ROBERTS CW2 JOSHUA D. ROBERTSON CW2 JOSHUA M. ROSADO CW2 JOHNATHAN S. SCOTT CW2 ANTHONY M. SEBEK CW2 LAURA K. SEVERIN CW2 JEFFREY D. SIMMONS CW2 WILLIAM R. SLAUGHTER JR CW2 GARY A. SMITH II CW2 KELLI A. SMITH CW2 SANDRA L. SMITH CW2 WILLIAM J. SPURGEON CW2 JAMES T. STEVENS CW2 JEREMIAH J. SUTHERLAND CW2 MICHAEL A. SZALMA CW2 DARNIECE S. THOMAS CW2 ROBERT R. TYSON CW2 JON D. WALDORF CW2 LANCE A. WASDIN CW2 CARL L. WELCH CW2 LATOYA M. WESTBROOKS CW2 FRANCIS B. WILLIAMS III CW2 JASON K. WILLIAMS CW2 MICHAEL O. WILSON CW2 MATTHEW B. WORLEY CW2 ROBERT G. WRIGHT WO1 JOSELYN N. ANDERSON WO1 RAMON A. ANTUNEZ WO1 SCOTT L. BOYD WO1 SIDNEY G. BRASWELL V WO1 CAROL R. CALDWELL WO1 JONATHAN Z. CAMPBELL WO1 LANDON J. CARPENTER WO1 JAMAAL DEAN WO1 COLIN R. DOWNEY WO1 DAVID N. FIELDS WO1 CLIFFORD C. GIBBS WO1 JEREMY H. HARTMAN WO1 HUNTER M. HOLDER WO1 AMANDA R. JUSTUS WO1 WILLIAM R. KNOX WO1 JASON E. KOHARCHIK WO1 BRUCE D. MADDOX WO1 ASHLY T. MENTZER WO1 KEITH R. PATTILLO WO1 MICHAEL L. POLING III WO1 WILLIAM D. PRICE WO1 JAMES C. RAMSEY WO1 THOMAS R. SEAGROVE WO1 GILBERT C. SHEPPARD WO1 KIRK G. SPRADLEY WO1 JERRY VANLIERE 2013 Annual Report | 52
  • Officers of the Georgia Air National Guard MAJ GEN JAMES B. BUTTERWORTH MAJ GEN THOMAS R. MOORE BRIG GEN ROBERT L. SHANNON JR BRIG GEN WILLIAM L. WELSH COL KEVIN D. CLOTFELTER COL HAROLD D. DAVIS II COL JAMES K. EDENFIELD, COL ROBERT A. FRANKOSKY JR COL MICHAEL J. GASPAR COL RAINER G. GOMEZ COL MURIEL L. HERMAN COL ERIC. JONES COL STEVEN M. KLEIN COL GREGORY S. MCCREARY COL STEPHEN C. MELTON COL PATRICK M. MORGAN COL JOHN D. MULLINS COL LOUIS J. PERINO COL JESSE T. SIMMONS JR COL JEFFREY L. THETFORD COL MARK A. WEBER COL DANIEL J. ZACHMAN LT COL ENIO E. AGUERO LT COL KIMBERLY M. AINSWORTH LT COL RONALD K. ALDRICH LT COL THOMAS H. ATKINSON IV LT COL GWENDOLYN A. BADIE LT COL STEPHEN P. BAFFIC LT COL ELIZABETH A. BAKER LT COL COREY L. BENTLEY LT COL WILLIAM R. BOHNSTEDT LT COL PETER M. BOONE LT COL JAMES J. BOWERS JR LT COL RICHARD D. BRIGHT LT COL JAMES D. BROOME JR LT COL MARK E. BROTHERS LT COL ANDREW P. CADDEN LT COL ANDRE H. CAMPBELL LT COL JEWEL R. CHURCHMAN LT COL CHRISTOPHER A. CLAREY LT COL MICHAEL S. CLAY LT COL PATRICK K. COTTER LT COL BRADFORD W. COUSAR LT COL JONATHAN C. COX LT COL ANTHONY J. COYLE LT COL ROBERT S. CREECH LT COL KONATA A. CRUMBLY LT COL PATRICIA J. CURTIS LT COL NANCY M. DAKIN LT COL CHRISTOPHER J. DARROW LT COL CHRISTINA L. DARVEAU LT COL CHRISTOPHER D. DAVIS LT COL RONALD D. DEAL LT COL THOMAS W. DIXON LT COL KEITH E. DOBBE LT COL CHARLES E. DROWN JR LT COL VALERIE A. DUNHAM LT COL CHRISTOPHER M. DUNLAP LT COL DAVID L. EADDY LT COL VICTOR A. ELLIS LT COL JOHN G. FARRELL JR LT COL KEITH D. FILER LT COL MICHAEL M. GESSER LT COL HUGH R. GOSS LT COL THOMAS F. GRABOWSKI LT COL REBECCA A. GRAY LT COL NEAL D. GURI LT COL EMMANUEL HALDOPOULOS LT COL ELIZABETH A. HARRIS-LAMKIN LT COL JOHN R. HICKS LT COL FANEY L HILLIARD LT COL JOEL P. HOWLE LT COL DARIN R. JACOBY LT COL DAVID A. JOHNSON LT COL ROBBY A. KEY LT COL TIMOTHY R. KING LT COL KRISTOPHER A. KRUEGER LT COL JULIO R. LT COL LEA CHRISTOPHER S LT COL LEA JOLENE M LT COL LEITH JAMES D LT COL LEWIS TROY J LT COL LIKOS ANNA M LT COL WILLIAM A. LIPKO LT COL CHRISTOPHER T. LUDLOW LT COL ANDREW D. MAGNET LT COL HERBERT R. MARAMAN LT COL JAMES P. MARREN LT COL RENEE M. MASSEY LT COL KEVIN C. MCINTYRE LT COL DAVID D. MILLER LT COL AARON L. MORRIS LT COL ROBERT K. NASH LT COL DEBORAH J. NAZIMIEC LT COL ROBERT S. NOREN LT COL FRANCISCO ORELLANA LT COL DONALD P. PALLONE LT COL ALAN G. PEASLEE LT COL RODNEY J. PRATKA LT COL DAVID A. PURVIS LT COL CHRISTOPHER M. QUIMBY LT COL CHRISTOPHER S. RACHAEL LT COL CLAYTON M. RAMSUE LT COL JOSEPH M. REED LT COL LORIEANN RENTZ LT COL MICHAEL D. RUMSEY LT COL SALVADOR SANCHEZ-TROCHE LT COL DANA G. SAWYERS LT COL JON J. SHOWALTER LT COL DAVID C. SIMONS LT COL DAVID C. SMITH LT COL MONICA N. SMITH LT COL CHRISTIAN M. SODEMANN LT COL RONALD N. SPEIR JR LT COL DAVID J. SPISSO II LT COL KURT M. STEGNER LT COL PAUL J. SYRIBEYS LT COL GREGORY O. TAYLOR LT COL DARLYNN R. THOMAS LT COL RICHARD S. ULMEN LT COL JOHN M. VERHAGE LT COL JOHN M. VERWIEL LT COL STEVEN F. VICSOTKA LT COL FRED D WALKER JR LT COL JOSHUA L. WARREN LT COL TERRANCE D. WEBB LT COL CHARLES F. WEST III LT COL DAVID W. WHITE LT COL WILLIAM K WHITE LT COL JOHN A WHITTINGTON LT COL GEOCLYN R. WILLIAMS LT COL THOMAS M. WILLIAMS LT COL BRIAN A. ZWICKER ALI ARIF N MAJ RONALD M. ALLIGOOD MAJ NICHOLAS L. ANTHONY MAJ MERRICK P. BARONI MAJ PHILIP S. BATTEN MAJ WILLIAM D. BENNIS MAJ JEFFREY M. BERRY MAJ TRAVIS O. BILBO MAJ KENNETH E. BILLINGS MAJ SCOTT R. BISHOP MAJ JOHN G. BLACKBURN MAJ JAMES E. BOURGEAULT MAJ BRIAN S. BOWEN MAJ MICHAEL H. BRANTLEY MAJ ROGER M. BROOKS IV MAJ BRYAN S. BROWN MAJ LAWRENCE A. BROWN MAJ BILLY J. CARTER JR MAJ CYRUS R. CHAMPAGNE MAJ CHRISTIAN A. COOMER MAJ VANESSA K. COX MAJ DERRICK S. DAILEY MAJ WILLIAM E. DANIELS JR MAJ RYAN W. DECKER MAJ ALLAN T. DELACRUZ MAJ REX E. DELOACH JR MAJ TODRICK L. DOBSON MAJ JONATHAN M. DREW MAJ SCOTT L. DUBEE MAJ JAMES W. EDENFIELD JR MAJ BRIAN K. ELLIS MAJ THOMAS J. FAULK JR MAJ BRIAN M. FERGUSON MAJ SEAN P. FOX MAJ NORMAN A. FRANCIS MAJ BRADLEY J. GARDNER MAJ ALEX L. GENIO 53 | Georgia Department of Defense MAJ JACQUELINE E. GIBSON MAJ DANIEL W. GOWDER MAJ RONALD B. GREER JR MAJ STEPHEN M. GROGAN MAJ JACK W. GROOVER III MAJ LARRY W. HADWIN JR MAJ RYAN W. HAMPTON MAJ MERYL B. HENRY MAJ BENJAMIN R. HILD MAJ CHADWICK Q. HILDE MAJ AMY D. HOLBECK MAJ PATRICIA L. HOOD MAJ ABBY E. HUDSON MAJ CHARLES A. JACOBS MAJ WILLIAM J. JACOBS MAJ LAUREEN W. JAMES MAJ TRAVIS W. JAMES MAJ TIMOTHY D. JOHN MAJ TROY E. JOHNSON MAJ TODD W. JONES MAJ DEBORAH L. KEENE MAJ JOHN R. KENARD MAJ EDWARD A. KING MAJ AMY E. KISER MAJ RYAN S. LATHAN MAJ MICHAEL G. LEWIS MAJ TASHA L. LISCOMBE-FOLDS MAJ JOHN M. LLOYD MAJ CHARLES A. LOIACONO JR MAJ MATTHEW T. LOIBL MAJ PHILIP G. MALONE MAJ RICHARD H. MANSFIELD MAJ WILLIAM J. MARTIN II MAJ LORI L. MCCORVEY MAJ ROBERT D. MCCULLERS MAJ ELMER F. MCDANIEL JR MAJ ANTHONY M. MCRAE MAJ JOHN A. MIMS MAJ BRADLEY R. MOORE MAJ MICHAEL R. MOORE MAJ WILLIE O. NEWSON JR MAJ KENNETH W. NICHOL MAJ MICHAEL G. NORKETT MAJ DALE P. NUNNELLEY MAJ ANTHONY S. OGLE MAJ JENNIFER R. POLSTON MAJ TERRI PROSPERIE MAJ DAVID O. PROWELL MAJ TYLER L. RANDOLPH MAJ DOUGLAS M. ROBERTSON MAJ BRIAN J. ROBINSON MAJ CARLTON W. ROGERS JR MAJ MICHAEL T. ROY MAJ AMY L. SANDBOTHE MAJ JASON D. SCOTT MAJ ERIC S. SMITH MAJ RICHARD C. SMITH MAJ WILLIAM E. ST. CLAIR MAJ TREVOR S. SWAIN MAJ HECTOR M. TAPIA-MARQUEZ MAJ JAMES F. TAYLOR JR MAJ SHANNON D. THOMPSON MAJ WENDELL V. TROULLIER MAJ GENA M. TUTTLE MAJ MARK E. VALDEZ MAJ AMY A. WALLACE MAJ CHARLES B. WARREN MAJ STACY B. WATSON MAJ BRADLEY M. WEBB MAJ SHELDON WILSON MAJ JOHNIE A. WINN MAJ RUSSELL S. WOOD MAJ JOSEPH F. ZINGARO CAPT DANA L. BROWN CAPT DONALD M. CAMP JR CAPT ALTON A. CHINSHUE CAPT LAWRENCE B. COMPTON JR CAPT MELVIN D. CUTLIP CAPT ROBERT S. FERGUSON JR CAPT CLAYTON F. GIBBS CAPT JESSICA GREER CAPT CHRISTOPHER M. HANES CAPT DOUGLAS D. HARRIS CAPT THOMAS E. HERSCH CAPT PHILLIP A. INIGO CAPT JACKSON GRETA DENISE CAPT MIA Y. JACOBS CAPT DEAN P. JOHNSON CAPT CHRISTEL S. LAVELLE CAPT JUSTIN T. LESAK CAPT CASEYLEE J. LIPSCOMB CAPT BRENT A. MATHIS CAPT BENJAMIN K. MILLER CAPT CHRISTOPHER D. MOORE CAPT WENDELL L. NOBLE CAPT MITCHELLE J. PAULK CAPT ROLANDO L. PEREZ CAPT GORDON L. POLSTON III CAPT DARIN P. PORTER CAPT BRANDON L. RIEKER CAPT EVELYN D. RIVERA CAPT DANIEL J. ROUTIER CAPT CEZARY SNIADECKI CAPT DANIEL Q. SPEIR CAPT KEITH S. STANDRING CAPT PAMELA STAUFFER CAPT CHRISTOPHER SWANN CAPT THOMPSON STEVEN E CAPT CHAD A. YOUNG CAPT KERBY A. YOUNG CAPT DAVID M. ZABOROWSKI 1LT BILLY W. BASSETT 1LT STEVEN A. BIRD 1LT ROBERT L. BRUMFIELD 1LT MONICA R. DEAN 1LT DANIEL J. ENGLISH 1LT SACRIAL S. HOWARD 1LT DANA A. IONITA 1LT SARAH V. KATHE 1LT AMANDA L. KIRSCHKE 1LT KIERAN C. MCLEOD-HUGHES 1LT CHRISTOPHER J. PROVENCE 1LT JASON T. WIMES 1LT BRYANNA P. WOOLEY 2LT HOPE A. BELL 2LT JOEL A. CONRAD 2LT PHILLIP B. GELLINS 2LT SHANTEL M. GIBSON 2LT JEFFREY T. HARRELL 2LT ALBERT C. HOLMES JR 2LT MIKIA B. JOHNSON 2LT ELISA L. JONES 2LT SHYLAH D. KIRCH 2LT DESIREE M. PATTERSON 2LT CASEY E. PATTON 2LT GLEN T. PEOPLES 2LT ALLEN C. REDMOND 2LT KEVIN D. RHODEBACK 2LT ERIC M. SCHULTZ 2LT TODD A. SWANSON 2LT CHESTER G. THOMAS 2LT SELENA J. YOUNG
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