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The brief
 

The brief

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    The brief The brief Document Transcript

    • The brief  Introduce storyline and characters  Be up to 2 ½ minutes (maximum time allowed by MPAA)  Use a selection of shots  Tell the story through the mise en scene and dialogue, not just titles  Use adjectives in the titles, this is common in advertising  Use multiple short takes so not too much detail is given away  Cut to titles rather than superimposing them (unless linked) as when titles are superimposed it can distract from what is being displayed on screen  Use silence it creates a shock in the trailer which can work well with certain scenes  Use different angles to establish hierarchy and establishing shots for setting the location  Movement of the camera is essential to stop shots becoming too static and therefore often boring  No camera shaking  The score must be faded in gradually unless an abrupt beginning/end is required for effect  Use a range of editing techniques such as slow motion and zoom in/outs, possibly use something similar to the ‘eye shot’ in The Comedown’s trailer  Make sure that everything that appears in the scene is meant to be there. This avoids any unintentional meanings being picked up by the audience  No repeating shots  Pay attention to the lighting  Trailers require a variety of shots in different locations as it is unlikely for a film to be set in entirely one location.  Drama films often require a lot of close ups as they're based mainly on human emotions and it is close ups that draw attention to that.  The editing techniques need to match the mood of that particular scene, for example, you would not use a slow fade in a fast, action-packed scene.  The titles do not have to comply to grammatical or the rules of standard English, in fact, if they do not it can help to tell the story more effectively by helping to convey a message.  Not to be simplistic, try and be adventurous with editing, shots and the titles used.  Use a huge range and number of shots.  If a trailer is to use a soundtrack with lyrics they must not overpower what is being said on screen or take the focus away from that.  Lighting is an important aspect to consider and must be altered if it does not work well with the mood of that particular scene, small micro aspects of the trailer like this when put right can have an overall big impact on the trailer itself.  The film's rating usually appears first followed by an establishing shot with some camera movement, this is common to many trailers that I have
    • analysed, and must therefore be something I seriously consider when creating my own.  A shot that introduces the start of the journey may be required in my own trailer as dramas are often based around a journey that a character embarks on.-  Also introduce the 'normal' setting for that characters life (such as the family home in this trailer) this forms a comparison for the abnormal shown such as a change in the characters life which is the issue to which they must adapt or attempt to overcome.  Introduce the 'problem' possibly through dialogue, reinforce the fact that this is an issue through editing/mise en scene/sound. So music intensifying, lower- key lighting and maybe slow motion to suggest its significance.  Dialogue to describe the problem further, now maybe the introduction of titles.  A film about friendship, hope, hardship and dreams  Life lessons/ everlasting friendship  Love, hope, disasters and emotions  Making the audience feel like they’re there  Avoid the stereotypical  - A gripping plot  Well developed characters  An intense film  Happy endings  Emotive scenes  Aspects of reality  A message  Something that 'pulls on your heartstrings'  An engaging story with depth to it  Lots of unexpected twists/turns  An uncertain ending  Lots of action to make it interesting  The unforeseeable  Tension   - Using imaginative shots for scenes that may typically be recorded using another type of shot.  - Think carefully about titles, don't just go for standard and boring, try and be as creative as possible.  More attention must be paid to editing, don't just go with putting all the shots together and running smoothly and be done with it, try and use creative editing techniques.  Slow motion can add tension and drama.
    •  Use lot of shots which are varied, this stops the visual aspect of the trailer getting boring.  Use close ups- to extreme close ups. It really helps to draw attention to the subject that the audience need to be focusing on.  Make titles to match the films logo, this keeps a consistent design theme which is recognisable.  Introduce background story  Use an instrumental soundtrack without voice over as it keeps the audience's attention on what is displayed on the screen.  I need a variety of shots in different locations as it is unlikely for a film to be set in entirely one location.  Drama films often require a lot of close ups as they're based mainly on human emotions and it is close ups that draw attention to that.  The editing techniques need to match the mood of that particular scene, for example, you would not use a slow fade in a fast, action-packed scene.  The titles do not have to comply to grammatical or the rules of standard English, in fact, if they do not it can help to tell the story more effectively by helping to convey a message.