Land Use, Agriculture & Farmland Protection Strategies
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Preserving agricultural land resources requires thinking on a grand scale, a palette of tools, and a long-term outlook. This presentation discusses innovative zoning and subdivision concepts tailored ...

Preserving agricultural land resources requires thinking on a grand scale, a palette of tools, and a long-term outlook. This presentation discusses innovative zoning and subdivision concepts tailored to enhancing the long term viability of agriculture and the agricultural landscape.

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Land Use, Agriculture & Farmland Protection Strategies Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Land Use, Agriculture & Farmland Protection StrategiesAmerican Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10,2010 George R. Frantz, AICP George R. Frantz & Associates
  • 2. Agriculture in New York • $3.6 billion economic sector; („05) • 7.55 million acres; • 35,600 farms. (avg. farm size +/-212 ac.) Source: NYS Agriculture & Markets. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 3. Agriculture in New York • Dairy: – 3rd leading US producer; – 11.7 billion pounds; – $1.91 billion Source: NYS Agriculture & Markets. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 4. Agriculture in New York• Fruits/Vegetables: – $705 million; – 2nd in apples; – 3rd in grapes, strawberries; – 6th in fresh market vegetables; Source: NYS Agriculture & Markets. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 5. Agriculture in New York• Livestock & Poultry: – 246 million pounds livestock; – $390 million Source: NYS Agriculture & Markets. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 6. Agriculture in New York • Floriculture: – $200 million; – 24.5 million s.f.; – 5th in nation. Source: NYS Agriculture & Markets. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 7. In The Beginning…• The crop of the future… American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 8. ISSUES • Political - – Property Rights; – Pro Development Bias; – Property Taxes;American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 9. ISSUES • Economic viability; • Low land values Map: Tompkins County Agricultural Lands & Open Space Preservation Feasibility StudyAmerican Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 10. Protection Toolbox• Zoning – Crude but can be relatively effective;• Design - Cluster subdivision design can have site-specific benefits;• Agric. Enterprises – Providing revenue streams to support farm operations. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 11. 4 Basic Premises1. Agriculture is a legitimate land use, not a mere holding action until the developers arrive; American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 12. 4 Basic Premises2. Residential development & agriculture are inherently incompatible land uses; American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 13. 4 Basic Premises3. Agriculture is a business - economic viability is critical. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 14. 4 Basic Premises4. Contiguity is critical to long- term viability American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 15. Zoning Red Flags• Minimum farm size;• Poorly worded definitions;• No definitions. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 16. Zoning Red Flags• Special permit process for agricultural facilities;• Excessive setback requirements for agricultural buildings; American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 17. Agricultural Zoning• Agriculture use is the pre- eminent land use in zoning district;• Residential development potential is significantly reduced;• Agricultural commerce permitted;• “Right to farm” language incorporated. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 18. Agricultural Zoning“The purpose of the A1–Agricultural District is toprotect the agricultural production resources ofthe Town of Ulysses as seen today in viableagricultural operations, and the agriculturalheritage of the Town as seen today in thevariety of land uses and the openness ofagricultural fields..”Town of Ulysses Zoning Law, Art. V, Sect. 5.1 American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 19. Zoning & Right to Farm“In the A1–Agricultural District, agriculture shallbe the primary land use. Within the District anyagricultural practice determined to be a soundagricultural practice by the New York StateCommissioner of Agriculture and Marketspursuant to Article 25-AA, Section 308… shallnot constitute a private nuisance.” Town of Ulysses Zoning Law, Art. V, Sect. 5.2 American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 20. Agricultural Enterprises“A retail or wholesale enterpriseproviding services or productsprincipally utilized in agriculturalproduction, including structures,agricultural equipment andagricultural equipment parts,batteries and tires, livestock, feed,seed, fertilizer and equipmentrepairs, or providing for wholesaleor retail sale of grain, fruit, produce,trees, shrubs, flowers or otherproducts of agricultural operations.” Town of Ulysses Zoning Law Adopted Aug. 30, 2005 American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 21. AgriculturalEnterprises• Farm stand / Farm market;• Agri-Tourism / Farm Tours U-Pick / Corn Mazes;• Bed-n-Breakfast / Lodge;• Feed / Fertilizer / Parts / Equipment Sales;• Farm Structures;• Food Processing American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 22. Agricultural Enterprises • Reflects reality of contemporary farm operations;American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 23. AgriculturalEnterprises• Provide supplemental income; American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 24. Agricultural Enterprises • Requires well crafted, precise definitions, design standards;American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 25. AgriculturalEnterprises• Some uses subject to site plan approval. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 26. Fixed-Ratio Zoning• Limits ability to subdivide, & create non- agricultural lots;• Based on ratio, i.e. “1 lot for each 24 acres…” of the parent tract;• Size of non-agricultural lots generally limited to < 2 acres;• Flag lots, cluster subdivision, enable farmers to sell lesser quality lands for development.• “Mother Map” approach simple to administer, track subdivisions. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 27. Fixed-Ratio Zoning• Successfully utilized in Pennsylvania;• +/-30-year history. I-83 American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 28. Conventional 2-Ac. Lots
  • 29. Fixed-Ratio Zoning- 1:2
  • 30. Fixed-Ratio Zoning- 1:10
  • 31. Land Values • Aggressive fixed- ratio zoning can negatively impact farmers‟ economic viability; American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 32. Flag Lots A lot meeting the minimum lot area, lot width and lot depth requirements of the zoning district within which it is located, and which is connected to a public road or highway right-of-way by a strip of land at least 25 feet in width for its entire length. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting & Expo Washington, D.C. September 10, 2010
  • 33. Final Thought The cheapest and most effective agricultural lands protection tool is increased density in urban & suburban areas...
  • 34. Questions? Celebrating Two Centuries on the Land: Peter & John Frantz Farms 1805-2005 Frantz Hill, Penn Township, Lycoming County, PA _____________________________________________George R. Frantz, AICP 604 Cliff Street, Ithaca, N.Y. 14850 607-256-9310 geoplan57@gmail.com