Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Suffolk Geography Conference 2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Suffolk Geography Conference 2

1,558

Published on

Second of 2 keynote workshops at Conference on November 28th 2008

Second of 2 keynote workshops at Conference on November 28th 2008

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,558
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Slide from ESRI presentation for GIS Day
  • Transcript

    • 1. Suffolk Geography Conference Session 2 GIS Basics Resourcing Workshop
    • 2. Animoto movie... http://biz.animoto.com/education/faq.html rebecca@animoto.com
    • 3. “…a digital map, data located on the map, and a software application (GIS) that links the two together” Diana Freeman (2004)
    • 4. • A base map – drawn or imported - digital • Data for lines, areas (polygons) points • Data referenced to the map • View data as selected layers • Display data in different ways • Process and query the data – ENQUIRY BASIS TO LESSON !
    • 5. These are the essential skills and processes in geography that pupils need to learn to make progress. 2.1 Geographical enquiry Pupils should be able to: • collect, record and display information • find creative ways of using and applying geographical skills and understanding to create new interpretations of place and space 2.3 Graphicacy and visual literacy Pupils should be able to: • use atlases maps at a range of scales, photographs, satellite images • construct maps and plans at a variety of scales, using graphical techniques to present evidence. 4. Curriculum opportunities Pupils should be able to: d. use varied resources, including maps, visual media and geographical information systems f. make links between geography and other subjects, including citizenship and ICT. The Growing importance of GIS
    • 6. GIS is valuable for mapping and visualising information as well as linking and analysing different spatial datasets. There should be opportunities to learn with GIS and to learn about GIS. 80% of all data has a spatial component
    • 7. Continuum FREE EXPENSIVE EASY TO USE COMPLICATED Often web based BASIC SOPHISTICATED Sometimes a ‘cut-down’ version
    • 8. The brakes on ICT - GIS Logistics - economics • Cost of hardware/software • Access to hardware • Issues of technology Skills - pedagogy • Teacher competence • Pupil competence – lack of ICT co- ordination • Content crowding • Lack of incentive – does it improve standards?
    • 9. Removing brakes: logistics-economics • Cost of hardware/software • Access to hardware • Issues of technology Lower costs Better funding Free resources Wireless laptops PDAs ‘Old’ computers Computers at home Greater speed and reliability of networks and hardware
    • 10. Removing brakes: skills - pedagogy • Teacher competence • Pupil competence – lack of co-ordination • Content crowding • Lack of incentive – how does it improve standards? Vastly increased Pupils as “digital natives” Opportunity to reduce topic content
    • 11. My results are always good, so why should I spend time using GIS?
    • 12. During the key stage pupils should be offered the following opportunities that are integral to their learning and enhance their engagement with the concepts, processes and content of the subject. • use varied resources, including maps, visual media and geographical information systems Interpret as ‘throughout’ ‘Integral’ – not a separate module with a box to tick All aspects – not just a map skill ‘Hands on’ use of software
    • 13. Impact of GIS on the quality of learning in geography Higher technical quality of drawing maps and displaying maps data and better processing of data with statistical tools Links to remote sensing, vertical air photos and GPS / SATNAV... Issues in mapping, e.g. ownership, surveillance, uses of data, “Big Brother” Teaching about maps: scale, symbols etc. New contexts in ‘real world’ applications
    • 14. The time is right Demand from teachers – respond to KS3 orders – syllabus reform Focus on GIS from GA and RGS Interest in vocational learning Involvement of GIS companies Input from OS
    • 15. Geography Geek: Helen Young
    • 16. http://www.geography.org.uk/projects/ks4ict/projectideas/
    • 17. ORDNANCE SURVEY – GIS ZONE
    • 18. Juicy Geography: San Francisco http://www.juicygeography.co.uk/googleearthsanfran.htm
    • 19. Teachers’ TV: hands up who watches ?
    • 20. Google MyMaps
    • 21. Simon Renshaw
    • 22. ALBUM ATLAS Find and tag the location of an album / CD cover...
    • 23. Extra points for going to the location....
    • 24. How can we use Google Earth in Lesson? Bringing case studies to life to support learning and to encourage investigation and research.
    • 25. Using overlay to spatial illustrate information
    • 26. Produce ‘path movies’ to take pupils on visual journey. Example: CBD to Rural-Urban Fringe. 1 2 3
    • 27. Develop Enquiry Work – Windfarm Debate
    • 28. Displaying Field Data – Temperature Longridge Fell
    • 29. Displaying Field Data Distribution of Pubs in CBD
    • 30. Displaying Field Data – Blackpool: Origin of Visits
    • 31. Other Good (Free) GIS Sites Windows Local Live is an excellent site (http://maps.live.com/). Similar to Google Earth, but the air-photo resolution is often much higher. The Magic site (http://www.magic.gov.uk/) is a really good way of getting into some free GIS, simply by using the internet. The site advertises itself as a multi-agency countryside resource. Type in a place or postcode to see a map with countryside information. The best thing is that you can change and manipulate the maps layers. A final recommendation is the Quikmaps site (http://www.quikmaps.com/). Draw pictures and label things on a Google map using simple clicks and drags. Easily move the map to anywhere in the world. The user-friendly nature of the site makes it ideal for students to create maps of their local or personal geographies and fieldwork activities. http://www.ononemap.co.uk/ See properties and prices in an area that are for sale (uses the Google local platform). Good for comparing across areas, regions or postcodes.
    • 32. Climate Change and Plants Your views..... (10 minutes)
    • 33. The Full Monty
    • 34. James and the Giant Peach Digital story-telling... http://tbarrett.edublogs.org/
    • 35. http://www.mapjack.com via http://www.gotoweb20.net
    • 36. Top Ten Tips
    • 37. A few last words...
    • 38. http://wordle.net TOY for manipulating words...
    • 39. http://geographical.ning.com Over 280 members
    • 40. KS3 Ning http://ks3geography.ning.com Over 450 members
    • 41. My contact details alanparkinsonatthega aparkinson@geography.org.uk GeoBlogs GeoBlogs http://www.geographypages.co.uk http://livinggeography.blogspot.com
    • 42. CREDITS Some slides by: Fred Martin (GIS) Christine Lloyd Staples (Media and Film) Noel Jenkins (Wordle and Juicy Geography) Helen Young Digital Explorer Simon Renshaw and students West Ribble Geography Network Via GTT CGeog Networks section Some work by Tom Barrett – check him out !

    ×