Sheffield Ga Branch Fieldwork Session
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Sheffield Ga Branch Fieldwork Session

on

  • 3,032 views

Presentation for GA Branch meeting, December 2008

Presentation for GA Branch meeting, December 2008

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,032
Views on SlideShare
2,964
Embed Views
68

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
27
Comments
0

10 Embeds 68

http://livinggeography.blogspot.com 43
http://livinggeography.blogspot.co.uk 14
http://www.slideshare.net 3
http://livinggeography.blogspot.com.au 2
http://livinggeography.blogspot.nl 1
http://livinggeography.blogspot.ie 1
http://livinggeography.blogspot.co.nz 1
http://livinggeography.blogspot.co.at 1
http://livinggeography.blogspot.com.es 1
http://livinggeography.blogspot.ca 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Sheffield Ga Branch Fieldwork Session Sheffield Ga Branch Fieldwork Session Presentation Transcript

  • How to be “out standing in your field” (work) Alan Parkinson GA Secondary Curriculum Development Leader
  • Aims / Menu
    • Fieldwork: learning outside the classroom – ENQUIRY based fieldwork
    • Planning: which field shall we work in ?
    • Outcomes: more than just data
    • Presentation: fetch me the scales !
    • Other people’s efforts
    • Check http://livinggeography.blogspot.com
    • Presentation available at
    • http://www.slideshare.net/GeoBlogs
  • Chapter 18 of GA Secondary Geography Handbook Chapter 10 of Primary Geography Handbook (and many more GA publications relating to fieldwork)
  • Good practice ? “It’s the process not the product...” Image: Alan Parkinson
  • Animoto movie... http://biz.animoto.com/education/faq.html [email_address]
  • Image: Nick Russill
  • Fieldwork on the Salt Marsh
    • Exploring ZONATION and SUCCESSION
    Image: Alan Parkinson
  • What OFSTED think (if you’re interested)
    • “ Well planned fieldwork in geography adds clear value to learning in the subject as well as providing a positive contribution to the wider curriculum.”
    • “ Follow up from fieldwork also provides very good support for extended writing, numeracy linked to the analysis of data, sketching, map work, formulating hypotheses and thinking skills.”
    • “ Enquiry-based fieldwork sharpens and deepens learners’ understanding of geography and the progressive development of geographical skills”
  • FSC Progression in Levels Making sure that fieldwork is appropriate, but also leaving room for further development. See handout
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Benefit of the local area
    • Accessible
    • Can be visited frequently, and cheaply, and observe changes over time
    • Pupil perceptions of their local area
    • “ Alternative narratives”
    • Geo Orienteering David Rogers
  • IKEA Frames
  • Fieldwork in the School Grounds
  • http://daviderogers.blogspot.com
  • “ Over to you” – student based learning QCA – 2020 Vision
  • Controlled Assessment – what might happen?
  •  
  • Val Vannet Smartboard David Rogers GeoOrienteering “ A virtual fieldtrip is like a virtual pint of beer” Chris Durbin
  • Adding value and “closing the loop” Secondary Geography Handbook , GA 2006
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • “ Word processed rather than hand-written”
  • Data Collection
  • Image: Alan Parkinson
  •  
  • Castleton: accessibility... http://www.geographypages.co.uk/peaks.htm
  • http://www.gabcast.com
  • Increasing convergence of technology
  • Field Sketches ? Cheat…. http://www.dumpr.net Image: Alan Parkinson
  • Image copyright The Sun
  • Google Earth
    • PLACEMARKS (add content…)
    • Upload video to YouTube (phone videos) & embed
    • PATHS (transects with waypoints)
    • QUESTIONNAIRE DATA (plotted with GE Graph)
    • LAND USE ZONING (with POLYGONS)
  • Some examples of fieldwork... Emma Johns: Hitchin Hastings: Nigel Chadwick & Lucy Rawe Val Vannet: My Patch
  • http://www.beacon-dodsworth.co.uk/products/people-classification/whats-your-p2-type.php
  • New ‘A’ level specifications
    • Using a weather diary and synoptic maps
    • Localised river flooding – fieldwork in a small catchment
    • Pressure on coastal areas: development and conservation
    • Psammoseres and haloseres (locally available ecosystems)
    • Rates of coastal retreat or degree of coastal flooding risk (Norfolk)
    • Success of coastal defence schemes
  • New ‘A’ level specifications
    • ‘ Virtual fieldwork’ using the idea of CLONE TOWNS (see GA website from 2008 Conference – fully worked idea from RGS)
    • Pattern of spatial inequality in one URBAN and one RURAL area: primary and secondary data
    • Success of contrasting solutions to rural inequality
    • Research into the profile of places that need rebranding – rural places & urban places
  • New ‘A’ level specifications GEOGRAPHYPAGES MATERIALS http://www.geographypages.co.uk/norfolkrealign.htm
  • New ‘A’ level specifications REBRANDING RURAL URBAN Local activities and farming. Rebranding shopping, commercial and Post-production countryside: rural residential areas. heritage and ‘food-towns’. Promoting city identity. Using art, media and new Using sport as a catalyst and ‘pump-primer’ Technologies Rebranding declining coastal holiday resort. Rebranding for a sustainable future.
  • New ‘A’ level specifications REBRANDING RURAL URBAN Rural tourism Flagship schemes in city centres e.g. waterfront Adding value locally Gentrification of suburbs Heritage and tourism in historic centres. Rebranding for a sustainable future.
  •  
  • New ‘A’ level specifications “ Opportunities for fieldwork are present here…”
  • New ‘A’ level specifications
    • What processes and factors are responsible for distinctive fluvial landforms?
    • Identify a range of features associated with erosion and deposition in river systems, such as waterfalls, rapids, gorges, V-shaped valleys, knick points, river terraces, flood plains, meanders, ox-bow lakes, levees, deltas.
    • Identify and explain the processes responsible for the features identified, stressing the interplay of weathering, mass movement and river erosional, transport and depositional processes
    • Understand the role of various factors in the development of the identified landforms,
  • New ‘A’ level specifications Students could, with reference to a chosen drainage basin produce a report on the physical and human factors contributing to flood risk. http://betterriverbasins.wwf.org.uk/
  • New ‘A’ level specifications
    • Identify a range of features associated with erosion and deposition in coastal systems such as cliffs, shore platforms, arches, stacks, headlands and bays, beaches, spits, bars, barrier beaches, tombolos, sand dunes, salt marshes, submergent and emergent coastlines, raised beaches and relic cliffs, fjords and rias.
    • Identify and explain the processes responsible for the features identified, stressing the interplay of weathering, mass movement, wave action and tidal processes
    • Understand the role of various factors in the development of the identified landforms, including rock type and structure, aspect and sea level change.
  • New ‘A’ level specifications
    • Identify a range of features associated with erosion and deposition in cold environments, such as cirques, aretes, U -shaped valleys, waterfalls, lakes, moraines and outwash plains.
    • Identify and explain the processes responsible for the features identified, stressing the impact of climatic conditions, weathering, mass movement, glacial erosions and deposition
    • Understand the role of various factors in the development of the identified landforms, including rock type and structure, aspect, glacier type.
  • New ‘A’ level specifications
    • Identify a range of features associated with erosion and deposition in hot arid and semi-arid environments, such as sand dunes, canyons and canyon landscapes, sculptured rocks, wadis and salt pans.
    • Identify and explain the processes responsible for the features identified, stressing the impact of climatic conditions, weathering, mass movement, and the action of wind and water
    • Understand the role of various factors in the development of the identified landforms, including rock type and structure.
    “ Opportunities for fieldwork might be present here…”
  • RISK ASSESSMENTS With thanks to Paula Owens, Primary Curriculum Development Leader, GA Image by Andrew Stacey
  • Isle of Arran – Flickr images
  • Aerial view of area with Google 1
  • What are the risks ? What action can we take to stay safe? Risk : falling over on bumpy, hard car park surface. Action : walk rather than run. Look carefully. Risk : steep, slippery slope Action : keep clear. Risk : moving cars Action : Look, listen & think. Stay close to adults N 1
  • Arial view via Google of Beach area to be visited 2 Note the end terraced house.
  • What risks ? What action can we take to stay safe? Risk : sharp objects and other rubbish on beach Action : check carefully before sitting down. Risk : hot sun can burn skin Action : sun cream and hats 2 Here is the same house seen from ground level.
  •  
  • Parents’ Evenings and Open Evenings – data collection and publicity opportunities !
    • After the event...
    • Follow up
    • Picture competition
    • Displays of pupil work and quotes for publicity materials
    • ‘ Modelling’
    • WHAT HAVE YOU DONE ?
  • Handouts
    • Example sheets from Wickersley Comprehensive School fieldtrip: 1980
    • Data collection sheets: a variety of sheets from my own and other schools
    • Closing the loop: from GA Ofsted conference
    • FSC Progression Sheet
    • Ideas for quick and easy fieldwork in school grounds
    • Val Vannet: My Patch
    • Learning outside the Classroom Manifesto
  • Selected slides taken from http://www.geography.org.uk/secondary/ofstedconference/ David Holmes’ slides Field Studies Council Adviser
    • Presentation available at
    • http://www.slideshare.net/GeoBlogs
  • With thanks to:
    • Richard Meadows
    • Rachael Peryer
    • Paula Owens, GA Primary Curriculum Development Leader
    • David Holmes
    • Images by Andrew Stacey and me…
    • Members of SLN Forum, and the Edexcel Ning http://newedexcelgeog.ning.com
    • http://www.geographypages.co.uk/virtual.htm
    • Jamie Buchanan Dunlop
    • David Rogers for Enquiry Slides and GeoOrienteering
    • GTT website Fieldwork section: Eleanor Coulber
    • The Sun website