National 5 Sources
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National 5 Sources

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    National 5 Sources National 5 Sources Document Transcript

    • National 5 Geography Sources of further informationPhysical EnvironmentsSuggestion of resources and organisationsUK national parksExamples include: Cairngorm National Park Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park Yorkshire Dales National ParkBoth Scottish national parks have worked closely with the National Nature Reserves and EducationScotland to produce a wealth of resources for Scottish Schools.For upland limestone landscapes teachers/lecturers may find the Yorkshire Dales National ParkAuthority particularly useful.Scotland’s GeoparksGeoparks are territories with exceptional Earth heritage that are using it to promote sustainabledevelopment. There are currently two in Scotland and others in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: Northwest Highlands Geopark Geopark Shetland The European Geopark NetworkOther stakeholders who can reinforce Geography learningThere are many organisations outwith schools/colleges that are enthusiastic to be involved in thedelivery of education. The Physical Environments Unit Outcomes give ideal opportunities for engagingwith activities which support the curriculum. In some cases these organisations may also be interestedin visiting schools/colleges.
    • This list suggests just some of the organisations who may be able to offer a real-life perspective onissues of land use, conflict and management: Royal Society for the Protection of Birds — charity and major Scottish landowner Scottish Natural Heritage — government body responsible for many rural issues John Muir Trust — charity and landowner BP — global energy company with a range of educational materialsOther possible sources of information to support learning are: Education Scotland: Outdoor Learning Thinking through Geography (for thinking skills activities) British Geological Survey Geological Society — Rock cycle education materialsThe above lists are not exhaustive. Local agencies are often the most appropriate.Learners aiming to gain National 5 level should be comfortable with a range of map skills. These skillsshould include: compass directions scale and distance contour and relief patterns identifying location using grid systems, including Ordnance Survey grid referencing identifying landforms, characteristics and land uses specialist thematic mapping skills associated with weather systems, such as synoptic chartsIt might be reasonable expect a National 5 candidate to be comfortable with both four-figure and six-figure grid references. National 5 candidates would also be expected to comprehend complex specialistmaps, such as detailed synoptic charts.Many of these skills are obtained earlier in a learner’s education.Complementary certification — The John Muir AwardTeachers/lecturers may find that incorporating complementary certification within their core curriculumaids learning and teaching as well as greatly increasing enjoyment and enthusiasm levels of learners.One such example would be the John Muir Award (JMA) scheme.The JMA involves participants discovering a wild place, exploring it, conserving it and then sharing whatthey have found. This has clear parallels with the Physical Environments Outcomes, where discovering isthe classroom learning, exploring is conducting fieldwork, conserving may involve fieldwork with anoutside agency, so further understanding landscape management issues.Human EnvironmentsSuggestion of resources and organisations British Red Cross National Geographic BBC Learning ScotlandOther stakeholders who can reinforce Geography learning
    • There are many organisations outwith schools/colleges that are enthusiastic to be involved in thedelivery of education. The Human Environments Unit Outcomes give ideal opportunities for engagingwith activities which support the curriculum. In some cases these organisations may also be interestedin visiting schools/colleges.This list suggests just some of the organisations who may be able to offer a real life perspective on issuesof human development issues, population distribution and change, land use and change in urban areasand explanations of land use and change in rural areas: Oxfam UK UK Census Bureau Traidcraft
    • Other possible sources of information to support learning are: Education Scotland: Outdoor Learning Thinking through Geography (for thinking skills activities) The Geography Site (General resources)Living graphs afford learners the opportunity to create theoretical graphs, annotated with real lifeinformation. For example, a population pyramid of a developed and a developing country may becreated. Comment cards with facts such as ‘Grandparents are rare’ will then be given to each learner,pair or group. Learners will then have to decide where to place their comments and on which pyramid,before justifying their choice. Again, this provides an opportunity for peer assessment and co-operativelearning.Link to Badger book and also Rich Allaway Jelly Baby population game etcAudio/visual presentationsThere are many clips available on-line to illustrate key points of the Course, especially when studyingissues in developing countries. Opportunities exist for co-operative learning while watching audio/visualpresentations as each group may be assigned to note taking for a particular presentation. This couldtake the form of a ‘research carousel,’ with various groups watching various presentations, beforesharing their findings. This form of research would allow for more than one case study to be investigatedby a class and would be a good co-operative activity.Case study examples:Transforming Industrial Heartland — Liverpool and RandstadThis video programme features two case studies in Europe: Liverpool: A Tale of Two Cities and Randstad:Preserving the Green Heart. The city of Liverpool in England and the metropolitan region of theRandstad in the Netherlands are tied together by the common themes of modernisation, transportationand trade, as well as quality of life issues. Unit Support Notes for Geography: Human Environments(National 5) Unit 48
    • Urban and Rural Contrasts — Delhi and DikhatpuraThis video program features two case studies on India in the region of South Asia: Delhi: Bursting at theSeams and Dikhatpura: Help Through Irrigation.There is also an exciting opportunity for innovative fieldwork, such as Clone Towns, which is analternative urban study.Recording pedestrian flow using mobile phones and Google Earth Learners can use grid references tolocate predetermined points in an urban area. They then record pedestrian flows, and use their mobilephones to text their data back to a central location. The data is used to plot flows on Google Earth, orfree online GIS can be used to create 3D field maps. This is another excellent opportunity for co-operative learning and peer assessment. The site ‘Geography Teaching Today’ provides extensiveguidelines.Use of ICTThere are many useful sites on-line for learners and educators to use, eg: BBC Scotland Learning allowslearners the opportunity to investigate at their own pace.There are many interactive map programmes available which allow learners to explore HumanEnvironments from the classroom, e.g. Google Earth.Web sites such as those mentioned below are excellent for the investigation of differences andsimilarities in basic human development issues between developed and developing countries, eg BBCEducation, Cyber School Bus, GCSE Bitesize, World Bank.Rural changesAt National 5, learners might be asked to take on the role of a farmer and to describe the changes theyhave witnessed over a period of time.Role-play scenarios can also be adapted to suit/challenge the learners. The final product might be awritten report, an oral presentation or more original end-product.Global IssuesResources like ‘GeoActive’ and ‘Geofile’ provide detailed case study material but equally TheIndependent newspaper provides comprehensive reports on a variety of global issues.International Disaster Database for flood events. Here you can create sources of evidence to showlocations, dates, trends and costs for a variety of man-made and natural disasters. These can be used tointroduce the issue to the learners Learners should be provided with the opportunity to examine a rangeof sources related to the issue. These could include maps, diagrams, graphs, charts and statisticalinformation, e.g. a table to show the percentage deforestation over a given time frame, a map to showhurricane tracks in the North Atlantic, a line graph to show tourist numbers in Greece..Extracted from support documents produced by SQA – http://www.sqa.org.uk