How To Be Outstanding In Your Field (Work)

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A presentation delivered at a Geography A level network meeting in Dereham, Norfolk on 4th June 2008

A presentation delivered at a Geography A level network meeting in Dereham, Norfolk on 4th June 2008

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  • 1. How to be “out standing in your field” (work) Alan Parkinson
  • 2. Selected slides borrowed from http://www.geography.org.uk/secondary/ofstedconference/ David Holmes’ slides Field Studies Council Adviser
  • 3. “ Fieldwork makes geography come to life, puts everything into context in glorious 3D and helps students really grasp how geography literally shapes the world around us.” Kate Humble http://www.geographyteachingtoday.org.uk/fieldwork /
  • 4. Some questions… (answers not provided…) – via SLN
    • We are already committed to UK examples and fieldwork. Is this a problem?
    • How much fieldwork do we have to do?
    • We aim to complete a modular exam in January, how much time will we have to complete fieldwork?
    • How important is fieldwork for the assessment? The exam papers suggest fieldwork for certain areas of the specification... but do we need examples for all areas of each module?
    • How much emphasis will you put on fieldwork?
    • Getting the balance right.... it is possible to teach the content and the key concepts of each strand of the module then "bolt on " the fieldwork techniques used to investigate change... OR... should we start with fieldwork techniques used to address the strand of the module then teach the content around this...
  • 5. New ‘A’ level specifications
    • Using a weather diary and synoptic maps
    • Localised river flooding – fieldwork in a small catchment
    • Pressure on coastal areas: development and conservation
    • Psammoseres and haloseres (locally available ecosystems)
    • Rates of coastal retreat or degree of coastal flooding risk (Norfolk)
    • Success of coastal defence schemes
  • 6. New ‘A’ level specifications
    • ‘ Virtual fieldwork’ using the idea of CLONE TOWNS (see GA website from 2008 Conference – fully worked idea from RGS)
    • Pattern of spatial inequality in one URBAN and one RURAL area: primary and secondary data
    • Success of contrasting solutions to rural inequality
    • Research into the profile of places that need rebranding – rural places & urban places
  • 7. New ‘A’ level specifications GEOGRAPHYPAGES MATERIALS http://www.geographypages.co.uk/norfolkrealign.htm
  • 8. New ‘A’ level specifications REBRANDING RURAL URBAN Local activities and farming. Rebranding shopping, commercial and Post-production countryside: rural residential areas. heritage and ‘food-towns’. Promoting city identity. Using art, media and new Using sport as a catalyst and ‘pump-primer’ Technologies Rebranding declining coastal holiday resort. Rebranding for a sustainable future.
  • 9. New ‘A’ level specifications REBRANDING RURAL URBAN Rural tourism Flagship schemes in city centres e.g. waterfront Adding value locally Gentrification of suburbs Heritage and tourism in historic centres. Rebranding for a sustainable future.
  • 10.  
  • 11. New ‘A’ level specifications “ Opportunities for fieldwork are present here…”
  • 12. New ‘A’ level specifications
    • What processes and factors are responsible for distinctive fluvial landforms?
    • Identify a range of features associated with erosion and deposition in river systems, such as waterfalls, rapids, gorges, V-shaped valleys, knick points, river terraces, flood plains, meanders, ox-bow lakes, levees, deltas.
    • Identify and explain the processes responsible for the features identified, stressing the interplay of weathering, mass movement and river erosional, transport and depositional processes
    • Understand the role of various factors in the development of the identified landforms,
  • 13. New ‘A’ level specifications Students could, with reference to a chosen drainage basin produce a report on the physical and human factors contributing to flood risk. http://betterriverbasins.wwf.org.uk/
  • 14. New ‘A’ level specifications
    • Identify a range of features associated with erosion and deposition in coastal systems such as cliffs, shore platforms, arches, stacks, headlands and bays, beaches, spits, bars, barrier beaches, tombolos, sand dunes, salt marshes, submergent and emergent coastlines, raised beaches and relic cliffs, fjords and rias.
    • Identify and explain the processes responsible for the features identified, stressing the interplay of weathering, mass movement, wave action and tidal processes
    • Understand the role of various factors in the development of the identified landforms, including rock type and structure, aspect and sea level change.
  • 15. New ‘A’ level specifications
    • Identify a range of features associated with erosion and deposition in cold environments, such as cirques, aretes, U -shaped valleys, waterfalls, lakes, moraines and outwash plains.
    • Identify and explain the processes responsible for the features identified, stressing the impact of climatic conditions, weathering, mass movement, glacial erosions and deposition
    • Understand the role of various factors in the development of the identified landforms, including rock type and structure, aspect, glacier type.
  • 16. New ‘A’ level specifications
    • Identify a range of features associated with erosion and deposition in hot arid and semi-arid environments, such as sand dunes, canyons and canyon landscapes, sculptured rocks, wadis and salt pans.
    • Identify and explain the processes responsible for the features identified, stressing the impact of climatic conditions, weathering, mass movement, and the action of wind and water
    • Understand the role of various factors in the development of the identified landforms, including rock type and structure.
    “ Opportunities for fieldwork might be present here…”
  • 17. New ‘A’ level specifications 2 contrasting stretches of coastline ?
  • 18. New ‘A’ level specifications Unit 4A: Geography Fieldwork Investigation Paper 90 minute exam, worth 20% of ‘A’ level (40% ‘AS’) Casts candidates as active researchers with some responsibility for managing and reflecting on their own learning activities in relation to a topic of particular interest and/or for which there are particular study opportunities. In addition, candidates will be assessed on fieldwork skills.
  • 19. New ‘A’ level specifications By the end of the investigative work in the field, candidates will be expected to: • display an understanding of the purpose of the investigation and relevant spatial and conceptual background • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the geographical content, concepts and processes • plan, construct and carry out sequences of enquiry
  • 20. New ‘A’ level specifications
    • show an awareness of the suitability of the data collected and the methods used
    • • be aware of the alternatives and evaluate
    • methodology
    • • use this information in a straightforward way,
    • presenting it in a different or more easily
    • understood form, eg graphs, maps
    • • be familiar with alternative methods of data
    • presentation/processing
    • • analyse, interpret and evaluate geographical
    • information, issues and viewpoints and apply
    • understanding in unfamiliar contexts
  • 21. New ‘A’ level specifications • draw conclusion(s) relating to the specific enquiry, understand their validity, limitations and implications for the study • demonstrate an awareness of safety issues and risk assessment in geographical fieldwork • select and use a variety of methods, skills and techniques to investigate questions and issues, reach conclusion and communicate findings • use and understand their own experience of fieldwork and enquiry.
  • 22. New ‘A’ level specifications Apologies – didn’t have time to do this specification… Tom Biebrach has started a WIKI page http://wjecalevel.pbwiki.com/
  • 23. “ Word-processed rather than hand written….”
  • 24. Some suggestions for ICT in Fieldwork
  • 25. GOOGLE EARTH (trail for Norfolk Geography Conference)
    • PLACEMARKS (add content…)
    • Upload video to YouTube (phone videos) & embed
    • PATHS (transects with waypoints)
    • QUESTIONNAIRE DATA (plotted with GE Graph)
    • LAND USE ZONING (with POLYGONS)
  • 26. Increasing convergence of technology
  • 27. Isle of Arran
  • 28. RISK ASSESSMENTS With thanks to Paula Owens, Primary Curriculum Projects Leader, GA
  • 29. Aerial view of area with Google 1
  • 30. What are the risks ? What action can we take to stay safe? Risk : falling over on bumpy, hard car park surface. Action : walk rather than run. Look carefully. Risk : steep, slippery slope Action : keep clear. Risk : moving cars Action : Look, listen & think. Stay close to adults N 1
  • 31. Aerial view via Google of Beach area to be visited 2 Note the end terraced house.
  • 32. What risks ? What action can we take to stay safe? Risk : sharp objects and other rubbish on beach Action : check carefully before sitting down. Risk : hot sun can burn skin Action : sun cream and hats 2 Here is the same house seen from ground level.
  • 33. On Kenny O Donnell’s ODBLOG.
  • 34. Adding value and “closing the loop” Secondary Geography Handbook , GA 2006
  • 35. NINGS Online social networks Mine http://newedexcelgeog.ning.com (EDEXCEL) Victoria Ellis http://aqageog.ning.com/ (AQA) Anyone want to start an OCR one ?
  • 36. Field Sketches ? Cheat …. http://www.dumpr.net
  • 37. http://www.gandljdean.co.uk/ribble/index.html Virtual River Tour – create your own tour, or Urban trail ?
  • 38. http://www.text2mindmap.com Thanks to Kevin Cooper for the spot…
  • 39. Rachael Peryer , Cromwell Community College , Cambridgeshire, designed this to help her A level students get to grips with Chi square, Mann Whitney U and Spearman’s Rank . All of the c ards are cut up and muddled together. Students then have to sort them into three piles (one for each test).  Each pile is then sorted into order to reflect the following: What the test is for and general information How to do the test What the test results means et c .
  • 40. http://www.beacon-dodsworth.co.uk/products/people-classification/whats-your-p2-type.php Thanks to Noel Jenkins for the spot
  • 41. With thanks to:
    • Richard Meadows
    • Rachael Peryer
    • Paula Owens, GA
    • Images by Andrew Stacey and me…
    • Paris model via Kenny o’ Donnell and colleagues
    • Members of http://newedexcelgeog.ning.com