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Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices
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Women Communications - Presentation Best Practices

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The Top 10 Women was a workshop created and delivered to the 10% high performers. Learn more about your communications as a women.

The Top 10 Women was a workshop created and delivered to the 10% high performers. Learn more about your communications as a women.

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  • The top 10 communication hurdles — can you relate?Our researchers asked women across the country to describe their toughest communication situations. We analyzed more than 800 circumstances and came up with these top 10:
  • hree studies examined the relationships amonganger, gender, and status conferral. As in prior research,men who expressed anger in a professional context wereconferred higher status than men who expressed sadness.However, both male and female evaluators conferredlower status on angry female professionals than on angrymale professionals. This was the case regardless of theactual occupational rank of the target, such that both afemale trainee and a female CEO were given lower status ifthey expressed anger than if they did not. Whereas women’semotional reactions were attributed to internal characteristics(e.g., ‘‘she is an angry person,’’ ‘‘she is out ofcontrol’’), men’s emotional reactions were attributed toexternal circumstances. Providing an external attributionfor the target person’s anger eliminated the gender bias.Theoretical implications and practical applications arediscussed.
  • Compliments giving and receiving. 3000 women leadership conference – had to turn to person next and give compliment. Women found it difficult to just say thank you. Even when instructor said. “really was shocking”
  • The top 10 communication hurdles — can you relate?Our researchers asked women across the country to describe their toughest communication situations. We analyzed more than 800 circumstances and came up with these top 10:
  • Transcript

    • 1. WORKSHOP for TOP 10 WOMEN Presentation Created For: Heather Ritchie VP of Communications & Operations Alcatel-Lucent Created By: Wave Marketing Group, 2013
    • 2. Start with you
    • 3. Hurdles For Women 1. Confronting or criticizing others 2. Not being taken seriously 3. Feeling self-conscious 4. Dealing with other people's anger 5. Speaking in front of a group 6. Controlling one's emotions 7. Receiving criticism 8. Getting cooperation 9. Setting limits 10. Taking the floor These are communication issues.
    • 4. How we’ll spend our time Do you communicate like a girl? B R E A K What you say: the story L U N C H What you say: exercise B R E A K 10:00 – 11:00 11:00 – 11:15 11:15 – 12:00 12:00 – 1:00 1:00 – 1:35 1:35 – 1:45 How you say it: presentation skills 1:45 – 3:45 What’s next: recommendations 3:50 – 4:30
    • 5. Do you communicate like a girl?
    • 6. What we’ll talk about today Situation What is happening today? Differences What are the main differences in the way men and women communicate? Self Assessment How effectively do you communicate?
    • 7. Leadership and communications skills develop in steps. Biases make the steps more difficult for women.
    • 8. “I still have things to work on. It’s a constant process of reinvention, a constant process of selfimprovement. It’s human nature to want people to point out the things you do well. Having people who honestly tell you the truth is critical”
    • 9. Is it possible to find the RIGHT BALANCE? Too nice Too bitchy
    • 10. LET’S GET RID OF THAT SCALE – AT LEAST IN OUR OWN MINDS
    • 11. “When people come together and talk to each other in groups, the results are influenced as much by the workings of conversational style as by the power of the ideas brought to the table.” Deborah Tannen, PhD Linguistics, Georgetown University
    • 12. What we’ll talk about today Situation What is happening today? Differences What are the main differences in the way men and women communicate? Self Assessment How effectively do you communicate?
    • 13. When generalizing about a population segment as large and diverse as male and female – there is bound to be a degree of inaccuracy and stereotyping. Some of the generalizations may vary by culture.
    • 14. Differences are biological Female: Emotion Male: Solution
    • 15. Differences are social… and they show early Girls: Rapport Boys: Status
    • 16. Linguistics WHAT ARE THE ELEMENTS IN A COMMUNICATION STYLE? Conversation Ritual Body Language
    • 17. Differences in linguistic style Linguistics style is a characteristic style of speech or writing.      Directness Pausing and Pacing Word choice Speech elements Turn taking
    • 18. Linguistic style Linguistics style is a characteristic style of speech or writing. STYLE DEGREES OF DIRECTNESS ONE UP ONE DOWN CONFIDENCE GETTING CREDIT QUESTIONS ASKING FOR WHAT THEY WANT MEN MENMORE DIRECT TEND TO BE MORE DIRECT WOMEN INDIRECT WOMEN ARE MORE SENSITIVE TO RAPPORT SO WILL ONE UP POSITION ONE DOWN POSITION TAKE A ONE DOWN OR EQUALIZING POSITION. MEN ARE MORE LIKELY TO PRESENT IDEAS IN A WAY MINIMIZES DOUBTS DOWNPLAY CERTAINTY THAT MINIMIZES DOUBTS. SAY “I”, SAY “WE”, WOMEN ARE MORE LIKELY TO SAY “WE” AND MINIMIZE SHOWCASE WORK MINIMIZE CONTRIBUTION THEIR CONTRIBUTION. MEN ASK LESS QUESTIONS – PARTICULARLY IF IT MAKES ASK LESS QUESTIONS SEEKS AGREEMENT THEM LOOK LIKE THEY DON’T KNOW SOMETHING. WOMEN TEND TO SEE THEIR CIRCUMSTANCES AS ABSOLUTE AND LESS MORE LIKELY TO ASK FOR WHAT THEY FIXED, MORE FIXED AND ABSOLUTE AND LESS NEGOTIABLE. WANT NEGOTIABLE
    • 19. Differences in conversation rituals Conversation is ritual in the sense that we speak in ways our culture has conventionalized and expect certain types of responses.     Apologies Ritual Opposition Compliments Feedback
    • 20. Conversation rituals Conversation is ritual in the sense that we speak in ways our culture has conventionalized and expect certain types of responses. STYLE APOLOGIES CONFLICT COMMUNICATING ANGER COMPLIMENTS FEEDBACK MEN WOMEN APOLOGIZE FOR DIFFERENT MEN ARE LESS LIKELY TO APOLOGIZE. IT KEEPS THEM APOLOGIZE LESS REASONS IN THE ONE UP POSITION. WOMEN ARE MORE LIKELY TO AVOID VERBAL CONFRONTATION AND MORE COMFORTABLE WITH VERBAL AVOIDS CONFLICT WILL PRESENTCOMBAT IDEAS WITH LESS CERTAINTY. PERHAPS FOR GOOD REASON MEN EXPRESS ANGER IN PHYSICAL OUTBURSTS. STATUS GOES EXPRESS ANGER IN PHYSICAL EXPRESS ANGER LESS UP WITH ANGER EXPRESSIONS. OUTBURST WOMEN GIVE MORE COMPLIMENTS AND OFTEN HAVE TROUBLE AND OFTEN LESS COMPLIMENTS, OFTEN ABOUT MORE COMPLIMENTS RECEIVING THEM. PERSONAL THINGS NOT HAVE TROUBLE RECEIVING THEM MORE DIRECT AND CRITICAL MORE BALANCED, MEN ARE MORE LIKELY TO GIVE DIRECT CRITICAL FEEDBACK. FEEDBACK GOOD AND BAD
    • 21. BODY LANGUAGE Warm and Authority
    • 22. Your body language matters When you are first introduced to someone you immediately and unconsciously access him or her for warmth and authority. WARMTH AUTHORITY Open body postures Palm up hand gestures Full frontal body orientation Positive eye contact Synchronized movements Head nods Head tilts Smiles Erect posture Command of physical space Purposeful stride Firm handshake Palm down gestures Long pauses Hold eye contact for long periods Firm concentrated expression - Carol Gorman, Silent Language of Leaders
    • 23. Differences in body language People use body language to subliminally evaluate your credibility, confidence, likability and trustworthiness in the first seven seconds.      Voice Face Head Approach Space
    • 24. Body language People use body language to subliminally evaluate your credibility, confidence, likability and trustworthiness in the first seven seconds. STYLE VOICE FACE HEAD APPROACH SPACE MEN WOMEN THOUGHT TO BE MATURE, THROATY, TENSE TO BE FEMININE, SHALLOW AND JUDGED VOICES ARE THOUGHT MEN HAVE THREE TONES. MASCULINE AND INTELLIGENT AND INTELLIGENT. UNINTELLIGENT TO BE MATURE, MASCULINE SMILE LESS AND MORE FACIAL SIGNS WARM FACIAL AND TEND TO LOOK AT WOMEN USE WARM FACIAL AND TEND TO LOOK AT SPEAKERS MORE. OF AUTHORITY SPEAKERS MORE MEN USE NODS AGREE NODS MOSTLY TOMOSTLY TO AGREE. NODS TO AGREE AND SHOW THEY ARE LISTENING, TILTS HEAD MORE MORE COMFORTABLE WHEN APPROACH TEND TO APPROACH FROM WOMEN TEND TO APPROACH FROM THE FRONT. BY THE SIDE THE FRONT USE MORE SPACE THAN WOMEN WOMEN. MEN USE MORE SPACE THAN USE LESS SPACE, BOTH VERBAL AND PHYSICAL
    • 25. DIFFERENT BETTER
    • 26. Summary of differences MEN WOMEN Positives Positives Physical presence Ability to read body language Direct and forceful approach Good listening skills Body signal power and authority Effective display of empathy Negatives Negatives Overly blunt and direct Overly emotional Insensitive to emotional reactions Indecisive Too confident in own opinion Lacking authority in body language
    • 27. What we’ll talk about today Situation What is happening today? Differences What are the main differences in the way men and women communicate? Self Assessment How effectively do you communicate?
    • 28. Quiz
    • 29. Where do you need to focus? PLAY If you don’t play, you can’t win. ACT All the world’s a stage. THINK Your mindset matters. BRAND SOUND LOOK Stand for something. 90% of your perception. 55% of credibility comes from look. RESPOND Respond appropriately.
    • 30. Goal: unconscious competence THREE I don’t even think about it. I know how to change it, but It comes naturally. I have to think about it. ONE TWO I don’t know what I’m doing I know what I’m doing wrong. wrong. I don’t know how to change it Competence FOUR Consciousness
    • 31. What we have covered Situation Differences Unconscious biases hold women back. Many of them come down to the differences in the way men and women communicate. Men are socialized for status and women are socialized for rapport. This shows up in linguistic style, conversational rituals and body language. Self Assessment After the discussion and quiz do you see a few areas you could work on to be more effective?
    • 32. How we’ll spend our time Do you communicate like a girl? B R E A K What you say: the story L U N C H What you say: exercise B R E A K 10:00 – 11:00 11:00 – 11:15 11:15 – 12:00 12:00 – 1:00 1:00 – 1:35 1:35 – 1:45 How you say it: presentation skills 1:45 – 3:45 What’s next: recommendations 3:50 – 4:30
    • 33. Communications Development Path Adaptive Style Read Audience Your Style Adapt Style/Story to Audience Control over Body Language Understand Your Brand Basics Strong Crisis Communications Build Natural Strengths Advanced Negotiation Develop Core Stump Story Development Next Level Presentation Story Packaging Have Difficult Conversations Presentation Facilitation
    • 34. Recommendations 1. Know your strengths and potential – don’t minimize. 2. Understand differences and preferences…and adapt. 3. Ensure people with valuable things to say are heard. 4. Know and ask for what you want – make it big. 5. Accept not everyone needs to like you -- but you do. 6. Recognize resistance and deal with it. 7. Don’t aim for perfection. 8. Know how to and have difficult conversations. 9. Be sure of your purpose. 10. Keep developing your communication skills
    • 35. “There is a special place in hell for women that don’t help other women.” Madeleine Albright, 64th Secretary of State of the United States
    • 36. “Dare the difference.” Christine Lagarde, IMF head
    • 37. “My grandma always told me, To be a woman, you have to learn how to stand on your own feet. She really meant that because in her time, most Chinese women had bound feet…My grandma, an illiterate village girl, stopped in the middle of her binding process and ran… She had the courage to seek freedom and to really be herself.” Yang Lan, Chair Sun Media Investment Holdings
    • 38. “My mother taught me to always do my duty. I may not have always been successful but I have always tried.” Aung San Suu Kyi, General Secretary of the National League for Democracy
    • 39. People who focus on how others perceive them are less clear about their goals, less open to learning from failure, and less capable of self-regulation. Anchoring in purpose enables women to redirect their attention toward shared goals and to consider who they need to be and what they need to learn in order to achieve those goals. - Harvard Business Review, Sept 2013 Executive coach and psychotherapist Lois P Frankel PhD
    • 40. Recommended Reading  Talking from 9-5 by Deborah Tannen  Presenting to Win by Jerry Weissman  You Just Don’t Understand! Women and Men in Conversation by Deborah Tannen  Resonate by Nancy Duarte  How Remarkable Women Lead by Joanna Barsh and Susie Cranston  Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office by Lois P Frankel  The Silent Language of Leaders by Carol Gorman  Women Don’t Ask by Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever  Toastmasters - www.toastmasters.org  Jock Elliott http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0a_EcZyQts  Neil Pasricha http://www.ted.com/talks/neil_pasricha_the_3_a_s_of_a wesome.html
    • 41. Back-up Slides
    • 42. Your Personal Brand Tips & Technics On Your Brand
    • 43. GROOMING Gucci or Gap It‟s how comfortable you feel and how well your clothes fit. But in general you want to adapt to your forum (a tie for the Board of Directors) and your persona (a jacket for a visionary, rolled up sleeves for a man who executes) Make your clothes work for you and wear a warm color close to your face. White washes out pale-skinned speakers and black casts shadows, especially under fluorescent lights Well-groomed means no wrinkles and clothes that fit. Not too small. Not too big You should speak louder than your clothes Your clothes shouldn’t match the wallpaper
    • 44. GROOMING Don‟t be camera shy Cameras are machines. They make nearer objects look bigger than objects further away Vertical lines will slim you down, so button the jacket Patterns can be tricky, so avoid them if you can What your clothes look like when you stand is different when you’re sitting Cameras will pick up anything that jingles or makes noise. Empty your pockets, remove your bracelets Call ahead and get recommendations During the interview is not the time to fussing with your hair
    • 45. DELIVERY Delivery & Style Connection with audience (eye contact, facial expressions) Emotional Projection and Interaction Sincerity Confidence Vocal variety & projection (unwords, volume and tone) Conviction (passion) Body language Respect Story-telling Dealing with unmotivated, negative and hostile participants Persuasiveness and influencing skills Presence and charm Pacing and white space Pronunciation and accent reduction Persuasiveness and influencing skills Presence and charm On point Staying relaxed and focused under pressure Audience rapport and connection Audience memory and organization devices Not defensive Good recovery from mistakes Content transfer issues
    • 46. Delivery – Second by Second PREPARATION INTRODUCTIONS Developing your story Scoping out the logistics Set up & Meeting the Audience Setting tone & credibility WHERE THE MAGIC HAPPENS Connecting and Persuading Making your point Driving action CLOSURE Leaving on a high note Shutdown Follow up Elvis is in the building Everyone is gone A B 10sec
    • 47. Lines To Not Cross  Speaking down or patronizing participants  Playing favorites with the audience  Not meeting the standards that you set for the class (i.e. being late from lunch breaks when you expect everyone else to be back on time)  Telling war stories  Using an attendee as a negative example  Not being sensitive to participant comfort and safety  Calling people by the wrong name  Using foul language  Not modeling what you are training  Using language over the heads of your participants
    • 48. From Head To Toe Eyes Face Mouth & Voice Hands Body and Body Movement Stance Pacing & Whole Body Motion Feet
    • 49. Tips From Head To Toe FACE AND EYES Make your neutral face a smiling one. Keep your eyes on your audience. Don’t cover your face. MOUTH AND VOICE Make sure that you’re heard. Your voice matches your presentation in passion and conviction Pace yourself. Breath.
    • 50. Tips From Head To Toe HANDS Open Palm. No props. Things break. BODY Lead with your chin. Sit leaning forward slightly.
    • 51. Tips From Head To Toe STANCE Respect your audience. Keep a non-defensive stance. FEET AND PACING Have a locked start position. Walk with purpose.. Be deliberate Stop on key points.
    • 52. Let’s Practice Eyes Body and Body Movement Face Pacing and Whole Body Motion Mouth & Voice Stance Hands Feet
    • 53. Phone Tips Don‟t monologue Talk to people that you happen not to be able to see Be aware of your cadence Pacing is more important than ever – give shorter answers to questions, and pause more. Let people hear your energy and enthusiasm: Stand when you present Be more animated than normal Have paper and a pen nearby. Take notes. Refer to your notes when you speak up – show that you’ve been paying attention! Instead of „eye contact‟, you want to have „ear contact‟ Interweave names, locations, functions or teams into your conversation Ask more questions than you usually would – prefaced by names Directionality counts! Avoid having your voice muffled by speaking while looking straight ahead. Don’t talk down into the phone Use your PowerPoint tools (Pen/Felt pen tools)
    • 54. Exercise Choose one of the topics below. Prepare and deliver a 2-3 minute speech on the topic. Pick one of your favorite holidays. Describe the holiday and why you like it. PERSONAL Think about the games that you played when you were younger. What was your favorite and describe a memorable time playing that game? Describe the trip that you would most like to take in your lifetime When you think of comfort food, what do you think of and how did it become so memorable to you? What are your priorities for the next 1-3 years? WORK What are your most recent accomplishments for your function? Who are your competitors and why are they on your list?
    • 55. I thought I was going to sneak away tonight. What a glorious night. Every face I see is a memory. CHUNKING EXERCISE "MEET JOE BLACK" (1998) WILLIAM PARRISH 65TH BIRTHDAY PARTY SPEECH http://www.americanrhetoric.com/MovieSpeeches/mo viespeechmeetjoeblack.html It may not be a perfectly perfect memory. Sometimes we had our ups and downs. But we're all together and you're mine for a night. And I'm going to break precedent and tell you my one-candle wish: That you would have a life as lucky as mine, where you can wake up one morning and say, "I don't want anything more." ...Sixty-five years. Don't they go by in a blink....
    • 56. LOU GEHRIG FAREWELL TO BASEBALL ADDRESS DELIVERED 4 JULY 1939, YANKEE STADIUM, NEW YORK http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/lou gehrigfarewelltobaseball.htm Fans, for the past two weeks you have been reading about a bad break I got. Yet today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth. I have been in ballparks for seventeen years and have never received anything but kindness and encouragement from you fans. Look at these grand men. Which of you wouldn’t consider it the highlight of his career just to associate with them for even one day? Sure I’m lucky. Who wouldn’t consider it an honor to have known Jacob Ruppert? Also, the builder of baseball’s greatest empire, Ed Barrow? To have spent six years with that wonderful little fellow, Miller Huggins? Then to have spent the next nine years with that outstanding leader, that smart student of psychology, the best manager in baseball today, Joe McCarthy? Sure I’m lucky.
    • 57. WILLIAM JEFFERSON CLINTON OKLAHOMA BOMBING MEMORIAL PRAYER SERVICE ADDRESS DELIVERED 23 APRIL 1995 IN OKLAHOMA CITY, OK http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/wjcoklahoma bombingspeech.htm I am honored to be here today to represent the American people. But I have to tell you that Hillary and I also come as parents, as husband and wife, as people who were your neighbors for some of the best years of our lives. Today our nation joins with you in grief. We mourn with you. We share your hope against hope that some may still survive. We thank all those who have worked so heroically to save lives and to solve this crime – those here in Oklahoma and those who are all across this great land, and many who left their own lives to come here to work hand in hand with you. We pledge to do all we can to help you heal the injured, to rebuild this city, and to bring to justice those who did this evil.
    • 58. Linguistics WHAT ARE THE ELEMENTS IN A COMMUNICATION STYLE? Conversation Ritual Body Language
    • 59. Summary of linguistic style Linguistics style is a characteristic style of speech or writing. MEN WOMEN MORE DIRECT INDIRECT ONE UP POSITION ONE DOWN POSITION CONFIDENCE MINIMIZES DOUBTS DOWNPLAY CERTAINTY GETTING CREDIT SAY “I”, SHOWCASE WORK SAY “WE”, MINIMIZE CONTRIBUTION ASK LESS QUESTIONS SEEKS AGREEMENT DEGREE OF DIRECTNESS ONE UP ONE DOWN QUESTIONS
    • 60. Degree of directness Men are often more direct. Women have a tendency to say what they mean without spelling it out.
    • 61. One up and one down Men are more sensitive to power so will work to take a one up position. Women are more sensitive to rapport so will take a one down or equalizing position.
    • 62. Confidence Men are more likely to present ideas in a way that minimizes doubts. Women are more likely to present work in a way that downplays certainty.
    • 63. Getting credit Men are more likely to say “I” and showcase their work. Women are more likely to say “we” and minimize their contribution.
    • 64. Asking questions Men ask less questions – particularly if it makes them look like they don’t know something. Women are more likely to ask questions which may put them in a one down position.
    • 65. Asking for what they want Men are more likely to ask for what they want. Women tend to see their circumstances as more fixed and absolute and less negotiable.
    • 66. Summary of conversation rituals Conversation is ritual in the sense that we speak in ways our culture has conventionalized and expect certain types of responses. STYLE APOLOGIES CONFLICT COMMUNICATING ANGER COMPLIMENTS FEEDBACK MEN WOMEN APOLOGIZE LESS APOLOGIZE FOR DIFFERENT REASONS MORE COMFORTABLE WITH VERBAL COMBAT AVOIDS CONFLICT PERHAPS FOR GOOD REASON EXPRESS ANGER IN PHYSICAL OUTBURST EXPRESS ANGER LESS LESS COMPLIMENTS, OFTEN ABOUT THINGS NOT PERSONAL MORE COMPLIMENTS AND OFTEN HAVE TROUBLE RECEIVING THEM MORE DIRECT AND CRITICAL FEEDBACK MORE BALANCED, GOOD AND BAD
    • 67. Apologies Men are less likely to apologize. It keeps them in the one up position. Women are more likely to apologize as a way of establishing rapport.
    • 68. Conflict: Ritual Opposition Men are more comfortable with verbal combat and will more aggressively present ideas and engage in debate. Women are more likely to avoid verbal confrontation and will present ideas with less certainty.
    • 69. Conflict: Communicating Anger Feedback Men express anger in physical outbursts. Status goes up with anger expressions. Women are less direct with their feedback often balancing good Women express anger and bad. less. Status goes down with anger expression.
    • 70. Compliments Feedback Men are less likely to give compliments. They accept compliments more easily. Women give more compliments and often have trouble receiving them.
    • 71. Feedback Men are more likely to give direct critical feedback. Women are less direct with their feedback often balancing good and bad.
    • 72. Summary of body language differences People use body language to subliminally evaluate your credibility, confidence, likability and trustworthiness in the first seven seconds. STYLE MEN WOMEN VOICE THOUGHT TO BE MATURE, MASCULINE AND INTELLIGENT JUDGED TO BE FEMININE, SHALLOW AND UNINTELLIGENT FACE SMILE LESS AND MORE FACIAL SIGNS OF AUTHORITY WARM FACIAL AND TEND TO LOOK AT SPEAKERS MORE HEAD NODS MOSTLY TO AGREE NODS TO AGREE AND SHOW THEY ARE LISTENING, TILTS HEAD MORE MORE COMFORTABLE WHEN APPROACH BY THE SIDE TEND TO APPROACH FROM THE FRONT USE MORE SPACE THAN WOMEN USE LESS SPACE, BOTH VERBAL AND PHYSICAL APPROACH SPACE
    • 73. Voice Men have three tones. Throaty, tense voices are thought to be mature, masculine and intelligent. Women have five tones. Breathy, tense voices judged to be feminine, shallow and unintelligent.
    • 74. Face Men smile less and more facial signs of authority. Women use warm facial and tend to look at speakers more.
    • 75. Head Men use nods mostly to agree. women use them to agree and show they are listening. Women tilt head more.
    • 76. Approach Men are more comfortable when approached by the side. Women tend to approach from the front.
    • 77. Space Men use more space than women. Women use less space – verbal and physical.
    • 78. “When I first went into business, I had a tough time. It’s countercultural to be the most energetic person at the meeting. It’s countercultural to assert yourself. Through most of my thirties and forties, I had to work on it, to have a seat the table and have a point of view. I think I found a sweet spot that feels like I’m still me.” Andrea Jung, CEO Avon
    • 79. “The story is never what she says, as much as we want it to be. The story is always how she looked when she said it. Clinton says she doesn’t fight it anymore; she just focuses on getting the job done..” Christine Lagarde, IMF head
    • 80. Don’t wing it… work on it. WE WORK IN A FIRST DRAFT CULTURE. TYPE AN EMAIL. SEND. WRITE A BLOG ENTRY. POST. WHIP UP SOME SLIDES. SPEAK. IT’S IN CRAFTING AND RE-CRAFTING THAT EXCELLENCE EMERGES. - Nancy Duarte, HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations

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