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1 to 1 Customer Service - Build a Dynamic Contact Center Routing Strategy
 

1 to 1 Customer Service - Build a Dynamic Contact Center Routing Strategy

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  • Lizanne Kaiser, from Genesys Business Consulting. Mike Carpenter, a Genesys Solution Architect
  • We’re here today to share with you best practices around One-to-One Customer Service. Specifically, we’re going to explain how to build a Dynamic Contact Center Routing Strategy.There are three key questions we’ll cover.First, What’s the problem we’re trying to solve? It’s about how many contact center customer service strategies overemphasize Stability at the expense of Business Agility.Second, What’s the solution? We’ll show you how it’s possible to build Controlled Flexibility into your customer service strategy.And finally, What’s the best approach for doing this? We’ll explain that you need to get used to change being a regular part of your customer service operations. The New Normal is that the only constant is change. We’ll show you how to manage and plan for this change. And we’ll show you the kinds of integrated tools and infrastructure you need to enable this sort of change management.
  • So, What’s the problem??For years companies have been demanding operational stability and dependability from their contact center environments. High availability with little-or-no downtime or outages. Rock-solid Network Operations Centers (NOCs) with monitoring and incident escalations. Disaster Recovery. Business Continuity Planning. Service Level Agreements (SLAs). The list goes on. And as companies have partnered for more of their services and infrastructure, the expectations and contractual obligations around Stability have become even more stringent. Whether it’s hosting in the Cloud, leveraging Managed Services, or relying on contact center outsourcers – companies are demanding their partners ensure stability and reliability.
  • But at what cost?? Aside from the actual financial cost of maintaining this sort of reliability and redundancy, a hidden cost has also been its impact on the culture and working relationship between the business and their technology partners. For instance, imagine the business needs to make some updates to the environment or call flow experience in response to changing customer expectations, market demands, or regulatory requirements. The business describes the updates they need to the Technology team, and Technology provides an estimate of three-to-nine months, for example, to deploy those changes.And typically what ensues is a conversation such as what’s shown here. Technology explains that in order to make the change, they need to understand the requirements, design it, implement it, integrate it, test it, roll it out slowly, and build in reporting so the business can monitor the results. This process needs to be followed to ensure quality and to take precautions so that stability and service level guarantees can be met.More often than not, the desired update gets canceled, watered down, or rolled out too late to be effective. And the deployed system quickly becomes an outdated dinosaur. It briefly met the business requirements at the time it was first built, but soon after became obsolete. The updates required simply can’t be rolled out fast enough to meet the speed of business these days. Sound familiar??
  • So what’s a business to do? Demand some agility with your stability! Just like you require performance criteria as part of your SLAs with your technology partners, you also need to bake in room for flexibility. This can be accomplished by including as part of your requirements certain predefined parameters and control knobs, so the business can make timely updates themselves. Now, let’s face it. Technologyis going to get R-E-A-L-L-Y nervous about handing the controls over directly to a business person. How can Technology be held responsible for the system’s performance, if the business can just go in there and change anything willy-nilly at any time?
  • The solution is the business and Technology need to agree ahead of time the sorts of things that the business will likely need to make changes to over time. Based on that, the Technology teamneeds to build a ‘library’ of parameters and business rules (that affect things like IVR treatments and routing strategies) in a language and interface that is user-friendly for their business partners. The components of this library are modular, allowing the business to combine them together like Lego® blocks to construct the desired experience and business flow. At the same time, Technology builds in certain constraints on what the business is allowed to touch and change, and all parts are pre-tested ahead of time to ensure reliability. The business is given some control, but not enough to actually hang themselves!
  • Within the Genesys Rules System, there are three key components:First, theGenesys Rules Development Tool (GRDT) is used by the Technology team to create the business rules. This is an Eclipse plug-in that allows advanced users (business rules developers) to create templates that define the discrete rule conditions and actions that will comprise the rules. Each rule condition and action includes the plain-language label that will be displayed in the business users’ interface, as well as the rule language mapping that defines how the underlying data will be retrieved or updated. The Rules Development Tool can be installed on its own (in a standalone Eclipse platform), or within Genesys Composer to take advantage of this integrated development environment. Second, the Genesys Rules Authoring Tool (GRAT) is a web-based application designed for the Business User. This Business User Interface allows a business manager to create, edit, package into groups, validate, deploy, and audit rules based on the templates that the Technology team built for them in the Genesys Rules Development Tool. Often times the Business User is a Business Analyst, Contact Center Operations administrator, or Line of Business manager – someone who has a solid understanding of the business requirements, desired customer service treatments, and the potential impact of these rules on contact center operations. The business rules are written in plain language, but they still require someone with a fairly analytical approach who understands the logic of how various business rules work in conjunction. Finally, there is the Genesys Rules Engine (GRE). This is not a user interface, per se, but rather a rule evaluation server with a standards-based REST interface, so that it can readily communicate with channel-specific application code, routing logic, and attached data that is screen-popped to the agent desktop. The Genesys Rules Engine evaluates the rule packages deployed by the Rules Authoring Tool. Once a rule package is deployed, Genesys applications can request the Rules Engine to evaluate the logic defined in this rule package.The Genesys Rules System is also integrated with the core Genesys platform so that it can access and take advantage of this unified framework’s capabilities. For instance, role-based permission is administered through the general Genesys Administrator tool which is part of the core Genesys platform, in order to determine which users can access with rules packages within the Genesys Rules Authoring Tool.
  • So, let’s see how Conversation Manager meets the needs of the Business Users by providing Agility, while still maintaining Stability.First, the Business needs the ability to directly make changes to certain parts of the customer service experience, such as IVR prompting and call flows, routing strategies, and screen-pops to the agent desktop. This is a view of the Genesys Rules Authoring Tool, illustrating how a business user can go in and directly make a change to one of the business rules.
  • These changes should be managed through a Business User Interface containing business rules written in plain English. Business users can create and modify rules through rule templates that have been created for them by the Technology team and exposed through this Business User Interface. Business rules can either be represented in this tool as a decision table, as the top screenshot shows. Or for more complex rules, they can be represented as a linear rule, as the lower screenshot illustrates. In either case, you can see that the rule is written in plain language – not code – and is readily understandable to a business person.
  • The business rules should be written in a modular fashion – as a series of conditions and actions – that allow the business to instrument what customer service experience they want to deliver under which circumstances. You can see in these rules that certain Conditions need to be met, such as the customer needs to be associated with a particular customer segment and the value of the order needs to be greater that a certain amount. And if those Conditions hold true, then the specified Actions will occur, such as offering the customer a special promotion and routing them to an agent with a specific skill set.
  • Business users can define parameters used within business rules. For instance, the top example shows the business user selecting the type of customer service the customer should receive – either from an agent or via voice self service. The lower example demonstrates that the business user can enter values for certain types of parameters, but that the value must be within a certain predefined range. If an invalid value is entered, error messaging appears alerting the business user what the permissible range of values is. This is one of the ways in which the Technology team is able to maintain control over the types of changes a business user can make.
  • This example shows that the business rules are not necessarily restricted to the voice channel (namely IVR and inbound routing call flows). Genesys Conversation Manager was created with the ability to extract business logic out of the channel-specific application code and instead centralize it for reuse across customer service channels. By making Conversation Manager channel-agnostic, it also means that Conversation Manager is uniquely qualified to handle cross-channel customer interactions. Namely, related customer interactions that start off in one channel (such as on the website or within a mobile application) and then transition to another channel (such as an voice call with an agent). Conversation Manager works across channels and media types, for both inbound and outbound customer contacts.
  • When the Business makes changes or additions to rules, they will want to test those rules before deploying them, to make sure the logic is performing as expected. The Genesys Rules Authoring Tool has the capability of creating reusable test sets for validating the outcome of the rules. The Business User creates a set of test cases and enters values for the various Conditions and Actions. The test set then validates if the rules as currently constructed will perform as expected. This screenshot shows that the first four test cases passed, but the final one failed. This is because the value of the Age variable (18) was too high per the business rule Condition. But once this value was lowered to 17, the test case was rerun and passed. This gives the Business User a systematic way of validating their rules prior to deployment.
  • Deployment of rules can either be done on demand or as scheduled deployments.
  • One of the advantages of Genesys Conversation Manager is that it encourages collaboration. Different individuals can be responsible for different rules and sets of rules. Peers can review each others work prior to deployment, and make suggestions for changes. But with so many people potentially touching the rules, there needs to be both a process and a product capability to track and monitor who is changing what. This screenshot shows that there are different people who have changed and deployed different rule packages, and there are comments capturing what changes are included in that update.
  • Business also needs reporting, so they can monitor the customer experience and business results as a result of these rules updates. Since activities and outcomes related to these rules can be associated with specific customer calls and interactions as attached data, all of this data can be shared with the core Genesys framework and reported on through our suite of Performance Management offerings. Namely, the business results of these rule interactions can be stored in InfoMart and reported on using Interactive Insights or your preferred reporting layer.
  • Next, let’s consider the needs of the Technology user in order for this approach to be successful.First, Technology needs the ability to develop core customer service experiences (IVR, Routing, Screen-pop, Agent Desktop, Reporting, etc.) as they do today. This shot illustrates how a Developer might choose to create the IVR and Routing call flows within the Genesys Composer integrated development environment. For instance, the latest version of Genesys Composer includes a new “Business Rule” function block to assist in invoking the Genesys Rules Engine from within a VoiceXML or SCXML application.
  • Technology needs the ability to take business logic that here-to-fore has been embedded in specific application code (such as VoiceXML for the IVR or SCXML for the routing strategies) and externalize it within more general business rules. One of the advantages of this approach is it allows business rules that are relevant across various customer service channels to be managed centrally. Today often times rules to control customer treatments have been implemented channel by channel. Conversation Manager Rules System lets you write your customer treatment rules in a single location and then apply them to all channels. Not only does this make the customer experience more consistent, it also makes management of the customer experience more dynamic. For example, this code snippet illustrates how a customer preference – such as a preferred airport or preferred language – can be defined in a single location and then referenced across channels.
  • Technology need to be able to expose select parts of the customer service experience to the Business through the Business User Interface. Namely, they need to be able to create a library of reusable business rule templates – in the form of Conditions and Actions – that are written in plain language (not code). The Technology team does this using the Genesys Rules Development Tool, which allows them to define the parts of the business rules that the Business Users will see in the Genesys Rules Authoring Tool. Namely, for each Condition and Action, the Developer will define the ‘plain language’ wording that the Business User will see, as well as define the rule language mapping about how data will be retrieved or code executed for that particular rule template.
  • Technology also needs the ability to constrain any pick lists, values, or ranges that the Business User can enter. When an input value is used in rule Condition or Action, thisrequires the Business User to input a value. In order to create a more stable and reliable solution, the rule template Developer can constrain the user’s input by defining the type of input values, such as Integer, Numeric, String, Boolean, Date, Time, etc. For some input types, the template Developer may optionally define constraints as well. This example shows that the valueentered must match a Java Regular Expression containing only letters or numbers.
  • The Technology team needs the ability to test the individual elements (called ‘facts’) that are used to construct the Conditions and Actions, before these rule templates are published to the Business Users in the Rule Authoring Tool.
  • The Technology team needs the ability to administer who has access to which rules, by specifying role-based permissions. This is done through a centralized interface called Genesys Administrator that is part of the core Genesys framework. So in this example you can see that a Business User named Tracy has access to the Genesys Rules Authoring Tool, and has been granted permission to perform a number of specific activities, such as creating, deleting, modifying, and viewing rules; she can perform similar operations of setting up calendars for scheduling deployments; and she can perform similar functions in terms of managing test scenarios.
  • Technology needs the ability to review changes and control deployments. Through the Rules System, the Technology team can check the audit trail, inspect rule packages, and monitor deployments. Some organizations adopt a checks-and-balances process whereby the business makes the changes to the rules, but the Technology team then reviews the rules prior to deploying them. And Technology needs the ability to monitor the performance of the overall system and roll back changes, if necessary, by reverting to a previous version of the rules.
  • So, to summarize, here is what the Technology team is looking for in order to provide their Business customers with Agility, while still maintaining Stability.
  • Aside from having the right sort of business rules system, what else is needed to support this approach? Well, we all need to realize that The New Normal is that the only constant is change. The speed of business is too fast these days to respond to every situation reactively. The sorts of changes that the business may need to make on a fairly regular, ongoing, or predictable basis need to be anticipated in advance and baked into the solution ahead of time. Also, annual priorities and budgets need to allow for continuous updates and additions to the rules system over time. The Business can’t possible predict everything it needs at the start of a project, nor does the Technology team have the bandwidth to build everything at once. So start small, but plan on adding to it continuously.
  • This approach requires a continuous Business Rules Lifecycle. Step One: The Business and Technology agree ahead of time what sorts of business rules are needed, and Technology develops rule templates in the Rules Development Tool. Step Two: The Business uses these templates to modify and create rules within the Rules Authoring Tool. Step Three: The Business and/or the Technology team then validates the rules using test cases.Step Four: Then the rules are deployed as a package. Step Five: The Rules Engine then evaluates the rule logic and communicates with the other applications through a standard interface.Step Six: The Business and Technology audit the changes that were made and monitor how the rules are performing in terms of customer experience and desired business results. This provides new insights into what should be changed or added in the next rule development step. And the cycle repeats itself.
  • In fact, this round-trip lifecycle is especially good at Champion / Challenger Testing – also known as A/B Testing. For instance, let’s say the Business isn’t sure about their exact requirements. They don’t know if a rule should be one way, or another way. They’re curious about what different customer experience or business results they may get depending on which version of the rule they use. So, they take two versions of the rules they are considering. In most cases, one of these rules will be the rule that is currently in deployment. We’ll call this the ‘Champion.’ It’s proven itself fairly well. But could there be a better customer service experience? So the Business creates an alternative version of the rule. We’ll call this the ‘Challenger.’ Both of these rules are deployed. The Challenger is deployed to a small percentage of trial customers, and the Champion remains in production with the majority of the customers. Then you compare the results and see which rule performs better in terms of the success criteria you’ve defined. If the Challenger performs better, this becomes the new Champion, and it is deployed to a much larger percentage of customers, or even across the entire customer base. The former Champion is retired. Or, if the original Champion performs better, then the Challenger is backed out, and no harm’s done since it’s only been exposed to a small percentage of customers. Chances are, even if the Challenger wasn’t successful, there was still something learned from the process. Perhaps the Challenger can be re-engineered and trialed again. This allows for continuous improvement. It also allows for more creativity in discovering how to optimize the current experience. The business doesn’t always know what the correct requirements are at first. Sometimes you don’t know what’s best till you give it a try.
  • This approach and rule system of course won’t cover every foreseeable change. But if at least some portion of what the business thinks they may need to change on a fairly frequent or predictable basis can be anticipated and baked in in advance, then this frees up Technology resources to be more responsive to the truly unexpected and urgent situations when they do arise. And the library of business rule templates can always be added to over time, if there are new things that the business discovers they will need to change on a fairly regular or predictable basis. However, the golden rule here is 80/20. Try to identify the 20% of the system that needs to be adaptable to account for 80% of the ongoing changes. Don’t try to build all conceivable changes into the system, because that’s neither manageable nor affordable. In other words, 80% of your customer service strategy is going to be ‘Business as Usual’ and will require few, if any, regular updates. But about 20% will require fairly regular and continuous change, in order to be responsive to your market demands and customer expectations.
  • In conclusion, we want to leave you with a few key takeaways.Building a Dynamic Customer Service Routing Strategy may be right for your organization if you’re looking to: Drive a better customer experience; Connect conversations across channels; Utilize resources more efficiently; Increase business agility; Ensure system stability; Reduce Total Cost of Ownership; Enable continuous improvement; Centrally manage business rules; Improve Business-IT collaboration. Reduce your Total Cost of Ownership; and Migrate to IP at your own pace per business requirements, rather than seeing this as a technology-driven rip-and-replace.

1 to 1 Customer Service - Build a Dynamic Contact Center Routing Strategy 1 to 1 Customer Service - Build a Dynamic Contact Center Routing Strategy Presentation Transcript

  • 1-to-1 Customer Service Best Practice #6: Build a Dynamic Contact Center Routing Strategy
  • Presenters Lizanne Kaiser Michael Carpenter Sr. Principal Business Consultant Genesys Solution Architect Genesys 2 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Overview – 3 Key Questions 1. What’s the problem?? • Stability without Agility 2. What’s the solution? • Build controlled flexibility into your customer service strategy 3. What’s the best approach? • The New Normal: The only constant is change 3 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Stability – A ‘Must Have’!!! High Availability Alerts Dependability Disaster Recovery Rock Solid Reliability Escalation 5-9s Outsourcer No Downtime Overflow NOC Managed Services Redundancy Strong 0 Outages Powerful Cloud Backup SLAs Business Continuity Accountability Contingency Stability 4 Monitoring © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Stability – But at What Cost?? “3-to-9 months?!? To make one little change??” “It’s not as simple as you think….” Business “But our business needs will have changed by then. This update won’t even be relevant by that point!” Technology “You want it to be stable, don’t you??” 5 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • What’s the Problem?? “Can I get some Agility with that Stability?” Business “That depends…. Exactly what parts do you want to change? And to what extent do you need to vary it?” 6 Technology © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • The Solution: Controlled Flexibility Business “We need to agree in advance what the business can and can’t change. And we need to build and test everything ahead of time so the system remains stable.” Technology “We need to track and monitor who changed what. And we need a review process before changes go live.” 7 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Genesys Conversation Manager Context Services Rules System Understand the Conversation Take Action Track Control Share Speed Makes context from across data systems and channels readily accessible Allows business to create timely differentiated customer experiences independent of channels 8 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Rules-Based Solutions GVP App Routing Logic Attached Data Skills Customer Age: 45 CD: $5,000 Associate REST Interface Genesys Rules Development Tool Genesys Rules Engine Developer Genesys Rules Authoring Tool Manager Role Based Access Genesys Framework 9 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… Directly make changes to customer service experience. 10 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… View and manage certain customer service strategies through a Business User Interface written in plain language (not code). 11 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… Edit or create business rules through modular Conditions and Actions (if… then…). Conditions Actions 12 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… Define parameters within limits (pick lists, values, ranges). 13 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… Manage business rules across channels (voice + digital). 14 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… Create test sets to validate rules. 15 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… Schedule deployments of rules. 16 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… Track and monitor changes (who changed what). 17 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… Report on results. 18 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Business needs ability to… • Directly make changes to customer service experience. • View and manage certain customer service strategies through a Business User Interface written in plain language (not code). • Edit or create business rules through modular Conditions and Actions (if… then…). • Define parameters within limits (pick lists, values, ranges). • Manage business rules across channels (voice + digital). • Create test sets to validate the behavior of rules. • Schedule deployments of rules. • Track and monitor changes (who changed what). • Report on results. 19 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager meets unique users’ needs Technology needs ability to… Develop core customer service capabilities as they do today (IVR, Routing, Screen-pop, Reporting, Digital channels, etc.). 20 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager meets unique users’ needs Technology needs ability to… Take business logic that is normally embedded in application code (e.g. VXML or SCXML applications) and externalize it (across channels). 21 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager meets unique users’ needs Technology needs ability to… Create a library of business rule templates (Conditions and Actions) written in plain language (not code) Examples of Conditions  *If+ Channel is…  *If+ Product is…  *If+ Priority is…  *If+ Task is overdue… Examples of Actions  [Then] Set Priority to…  [Then] Increase Priority by…  [Then] Reprioritize after…  [Then] Request agent skill… 22 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Technology needs ability to… Constrain pick-lists, values, or ranges the Business User can enter. 23 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager meets unique users’ needs Technology needs ability to… Test individual elements (‘facts’) used within rule templates. 24 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Technology needs ability to… Administer who has access to which rules (role-based permission). 25 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Technology needs ability to… Review updates, control deployments, and roll back changes. 26 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Conversation Manager Meets Unique Users’ Needs Technology needs ability to… • Develop core customer service capabilities as they do today (IVR, Routing, Screen-pop, Reporting, Digital channels, etc.). • Take business logic that is normally embedded in application code (e.g. VXML or SCXML applications) and externalize it (across channels). • Create a library of business rule templates (Conditions and Actions) written in plain language (not code). • Constrain pick-lists, values, or ranges the Business User can enter. • Test individual elements (‘facts’) used within rule templates. • Administer who has access to which rules (role-based permission). • Review updates, control deployments, and roll back changes. 27 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • What’s the Best Approach? The New Normal The Only Constant is Change 28 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Business Rules Lifecycle Develop Audit Author Execute Validate Deploy Rules Development Tool • Development • Publishing Template Rules Authoring Tool • • • • Authoring Validation Deployment Auditing 29 Package Rules Engine • Validation • Evaluation © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Champion / Challenger Champion: Existing Rule Which rule is best? Deploy both & compare Challenger: Updated / New Rule 30 Select winner; Becomes next Champion © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 80/20 Rule Business “Not everything, but it will give you more flexibility than you have today. If you need to make changes on a frequent or predictable basis, we can add those into your business rules.” “Is this going to cover all of the changes we need to make?” 31 Technology © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Key Takeaways Drive a better customer experience Connect conversations across channels Utilize resources more efficiently Increase business agility Ensure system stability Reduce TCO Enable continuous improvement Centrally manage business rules Improve Business-IT collaboration 32 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Ask the Experts! Lizanne Kaiser Michael Carpenter For more information, please visit www.genesys.com Email us: enterprise.programs@genesys.com 33 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Upcoming and On Demand Webinars Upcoming Webinar Six Sigma: 8 Types of “waste” in Customer Service Wednesday July 10 On Demand Webinars One-to-One Customer Service Best Practice #1: Maximizing Customer Value One-to-One Customer Service Best Practice #2: One-to-One Routing 34 © 2013, Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Thank You for participating! For more information, please visit www.genesys.com Email us: enterprise.programs@genesys.com