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Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
Week 5: Dataveillance
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Week 5: Dataveillance

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Slides to accompany a course on New Media

Slides to accompany a course on New Media

Published in: Technology
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  • Talked through how you might try to capitalise on a successful meme and shape it to your marcoms purposes The shift from Lifecasting to Awareness-casting – everyone remember the difference? And the motto of all things to do with cybercultures, web 2.0, etc – Be honest and transparent. Don’t lie and don’t try to fake it.
  • Google Analytics is the industry standard web usage analysis tool. [look at referring websites, geographical map of users, most popular pages, Adwords account details are tom+1@stopclimatechaos.org pw: December5 Search Term Aggregation: In November 2008, Google announced a new web tool that may make it possible to detect flu outbreaks before they might otherwise be reported. Google Flu Trends relies on individual search terms, such as "flu symptoms," provided by Internet users. Google has said that it will only reveal aggregate data, but there are no clear legal or technological privacy safeguards to prevent the disclosure of individual search histories concerning the flu, or related medical concerns, such as "AIDS symptoms," "ritalin," or "Paxil." Privacy and medical groups have urged Google to be more transparent and publish the algorithm on which Flu Trends data is based so that the public can determine whether the privacy safeguards are adequate. BUZZ Streetview: Google’s latest project is crowd-sourcing live traffic information for it’s Google Maps application (they’ve just launched this in the US). By taking your location and your average speed of travel, they’re working out how fast traffic is moving on city streets. The mission statement of Google’s Data Liberation Front is: Users should be able to control the data they store in any of Google's products.  Our team's goal is to make it easier to move data in and out. [Run through the 3 questions you should ask yourself before signing up to a service.] The Washington Post said “Google, still reeling from the sophisticated cyber-attack that allegedly prompted a rethink of its activities in China, had turned to the US National Security Agency for help”. It then reported that, there are delicate talks on teaming up with the spooks with the goal of "fortifying Google's defences against the kind of espionage-oriented hacking attacks launched from China against it and dozens of other US companies in December"
  • It goes on to say; One bone of contention is social networks’ reluctance to draw attention to their privacy statements. A study published last year by two researchers at Cambridge University, Joseph Bonneau and Sören Preibusch, looked at 45 networks and found that many of them buried their privacy statements in obscure corners of their sites. Speculating about the reason for this, the researchers thought it might be concern about “privacy salience”: the worry that alerting people to privacy as a potential issue will make them less inclined to share things, even if robust privacy controls are available.
  • With more than 400 million users, Facebook advertising reaches a broad and relatively diverse audience. By contrast GoogleMail has about 36 million users and Twitter about 18 million. Fairly representative of the cross-section of use in this room as well. Virgin Media: Virgin Media is planning to use software called Cview which would allow them to see all of the traffic to and from their customer’s computers. They claim it’s to try and catch it’s customers who are downloading music illegally. Privacy International a human rights organisation have already criticised the plans, and have asked the European Commission to investigate. To put a little more context on this, less than a year ago Virgin Media teamed up with Universal Music to offer a subscription music download service offered at a monthly fee (and not launched yet). OpenID now used by AOL, BBC, Google, IBM, Microsoft, MySpace, Orange, PayPal, VeriSign, LiveJournal, Yandex, Ustream and Yahoo! OAuth allows a program like Flickr to issue a token of identity for use with another site. i.e. say you wanted to post your photos to Facebook, rather than having to give Facebook complete access to everything on your Flickr account, you would be able to create a token that Facebook could use for a limited time period purely to access the photos you have selected. Google & Yahoo both use it. Our nomorebadnews blog uses this as well. Identity 2.0 is the collective term for this new model of using the web. It’s frequently compared to real life forms of ID like a drivers license etc, but for web. On Wednesday, Peter Horrocks the Director of Global News at the BBC has said: It’s important for editorial staff to make better use of social media and become more collaborative in producing stories. "This isn't just a kind of fad from someone who's an enthusiast of technology. I'm afraid you're not doing your job if you can't do those things. It's not discretionary", he is quoted as saying in the BBC in-house weekly Ariel. For BBC news editors, Twitter and RSS readers are to become essential tools. Aggregating and curating content with attribution should become part of a BBC journalist's assignment; and BBC's journalists have to integrate and listen to feedback for a better understanding of how the audience is relating to the BBC brand. In a recent Lifehacker poll, 78% of the website’s users thought you shouldn’t have to find the setting page to make your profile private. Data Privacy Day meant some of the larger companies launched the results of studies they’d run into issues of privacy online. Microsoft published a paper that stated 64% of HR managers think it’s perfectly ok to evaluate candidates based on what they can find about them online. Apparently it’s Safer Internet Day today. [NEXT SLIDE IS GUARDIAN’S PRIVACY RULES]
  • The EU for example brought in the 1995 EU Information Directive and then in 2002 the Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications affirm that EU residents are entitled to privacy rights online. There is also the right to be left alone, i.e. not be exposed to unwanted marketing solicitations like pop-ups, and the right to avoid cookies and other data-mining practices. Consumer privacy is defined in 1991 as: The consumer’s ability to control (a) presence of other people in the environment during a market transaction or consumption behaviour and (b) dissemination of information related to or provided during such transactions or behaviours to those who were not present.
  • The state of the internet image
  • William Gibson coined the phrase ‘cyberspace’ in 1981, and is best known for his cyberpunk & steampunk novels like Necromancer & Pattern Recognition. The access to these new technologies is an interesting aspect to factor in when thinking about internet data. All the data that is collected, processed and used to produce stats indicating behaviour, etc, etc, are based only on the people who actually have access and can afford the time to use the world wide web.
  • Pros and cons of linked computers – “distributed computing” - Zombie machines (blame normally laid at the feet of Russian gangs) - Stanford are running a project where as your computer goes into screen saver mode, it can start helping them process data in an effort to understand folding proteins and ultimately, hopefully cure Alzheimers, ALS, Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, and many cancers.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Unit 1.2 New Media & Technology Unit Leader: Tom Allen
    • 2. Week 5 Dataveillance
    • 3. Last week <ul><li>How virals and memes can be usefully deployed for marcoms </li></ul><ul><li>Shift from Lifecasting to Awareness-casting </li></ul><ul><li>“ Be honest and transparent” </li></ul>
    • 4. Google <ul><li>Analytics </li></ul><ul><li>Webmaster Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Adwords </li></ul><ul><li>Google Dashboard </li></ul><ul><li>Search term aggregation (eg. Flu) </li></ul><ul><li>Buzz? </li></ul><ul><li>Streetview ( snowmobile & live traffic ) </li></ul><ul><li>The Data Liberation Front at Google </li></ul><ul><li>Now working with National Security Agency </li></ul>
    • 5. Privacy 2.0 from The Economist <ul><li>“ In order to attract users, sites need to offer ways for members to restrict the information about themselves that gets shared with a wider public. Without effective controls people would be reluctant to sign up. But if a site allows members to keep too much of their information private, there will be less traffic that can be turned into profit through advertising and various other means, so the network’s business will suffer.” </li></ul>
    • 6. More monitoring <ul><li>Facebook ads – reach 400m users </li></ul><ul><li>ISPs (eg. Virgin Media) </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Social web’: OpenID, OAuth, Identity 2.0, etc </li></ul><ul><li>BBC told to use social media as primary source of information by Director of Global News </li></ul><ul><li>78% think internet should be ‘private by default’ </li></ul><ul><li>28 th Jan is ‘Data Privacy Day’ </li></ul>
    • 7. The Guardian’s 5 privacy rules <ul><li>Don't drink and type! </li></ul><ul><li>Use best friends and good old phone to let off steam. Or at least make sure you don't have to work for the person you just insulted publicly. </li></ul><ul><li>Unless you aren't a c-list celebrity or in the nudey business, always keep your t-shirt and pants on outside. </li></ul><ul><li>In case you missed 1, 2 or 3 feel ashamed. Then remove or ask for removal of information you would prefer to not be posted. If not possible, say you are terribly sorry. </li></ul><ul><li>Want the old nerd days back where you could speak freely to your geek friends? Simply create an information elite around you, and choose whom you share information with. </li></ul>
    • 8. The Law <ul><li>Self-regulation: The US has a market-driven policy for protection of personal information, only accords limited statutory and common law rights to information privacy. </li></ul><ul><li>Legislated: The EU requires each Member State to have comprehensive protection for citizens </li></ul>
    • 9. Data visualisation <ul><li>Making data more accessible </li></ul><ul><ul><li>UK flights </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>State of the internet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stream graphs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>RSS readers like Voyage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Search engines like Spezify </li></ul></ul>
    • 10. William Gibson (Author) <ul><li>“ The future is already here. It's just not very evenly distributed.” </li></ul>
    • 11. Web 3.0 – linked data? <ul><li>Ted talk by Tim Berners-Lee </li></ul><ul><li>Linked computers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Zombies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Science </li></ul></ul>
    • 12. Seminar <ul><li>What can we use location based web for? </li></ul><ul><li>Will people share more or less data in the future? </li></ul><ul><li>Chat about Tim B-L Ted Talk </li></ul><ul><li>Augmented reality demo (finally!) </li></ul><ul><li>Uploading to the blog – choose an academic paper </li></ul>

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