Continuing Professional Development For Social Workers
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Continuing Professional Development For Social Workers

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“One Day All Social Care Professionals Will Have Access To Their Own Personal Training Unit”

“One Day All Social Care Professionals Will Have Access To Their Own Personal Training Unit”

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    Continuing Professional Development For Social Workers Continuing Professional Development For Social Workers Document Transcript

    • E Continuing Professional Development For Social Workers Elevate Training & Development Ltd www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk May,06 2011
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukTable of Contents1. Continuing Professional Development ............................................................................. 3 1.1 CPD Activities .................................................................................................................................... 3 1.2 Developing CPD ................................................................................................................................. 42. CPD for Social Workers .................................................................................................... 5 2.1 General Social Care Council .............................................................................................................. 6 2.2 National Occupational Standards ...................................................................................................... 6 2.3 Relationship between Law and Practice ........................................................................................... 9 2.3.1 Legal Framework of Social Work ............................................................................................................ 10 2.3.2 Key Legislation on Social Work Practice and Defining Service User Groups ............................................ 10 2.4 The Regulatory Cycle ....................................................................................................................... 14 2.4.1 Risk Management and Regulation of Social Work Education ................................................................. 14 2.4.2 Risk Framework ..................................................................................................................................... 15 2.5 Requirements for Training and Assessment .................................................................................... 16 2.5.1 A) Entry Requirements .......................................................................................................................... 16 2.5.1 B) Teaching, Learning and Assessment .................................................................................................. 17 2.5.2 Requirements for Social Work Training ................................................................................................. 183. Children’s Workforce Development Council ................................................................... 19 3.1 Model for Structuring & Professionalisation of the Children’s Social Care Workforce ................... 19 3.1.1 Staff Groups .......................................................................................................................................... 19 3.1.2 Related Knowledge, Skills and Experience ............................................................................................. 19 3.1.3 Harmonising Graduate Preparation ....................................................................................................... 21 3.1.4 Pathways ............................................................................................................................................... 21 3.1.5 Interaction with other parts of the Workforce ....................................................................................... 21 Page | 2For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk1. Continuing Professional Development1Continuing Professional Development defined as planned learning and development activitythat develops, maintains or extends knowledge, skills, understanding or performance. It caninclude a wide range of activity designed to equip a worker to provide quality social care and/orto support their career development. It is relevant to workers in organisations of all types andsizes, including micro employers and those who manage their own services.CPD is therefore:- Central to developing and improving services- Essential for good people management- Key to improving recruitment and retention- Applicable to all workers, volunteers and managers- A shared responsibility between workers, managers and employers1.1 CPD ActivitiesThe learning and development could take a number of different forms, including:  induction and legally-required training  learning through supervision and other opportunities supported and provided at work, such as in-house courses, job-shadowing, secondment, mentoring and coaching  qualifications required for social worker registration or to meet care service inspection requirements  post-registration training and learning (PRTL) as required for social workers to maintain their professional registration  post-qualifying training for social workers, which may change as part of social work reform1 Source: http://www.skillsforcare.org.uk/ Page | 3For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk  formal learning leading to Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) recognised awards, certificates and diplomas, or higher education qualifications  informal learning and learning through experience in life and work  reflecting on what you have learned from planned and unplanned experiences at work.It is important that you review any CPD activity with your supervisor to ensure that it hasachieved what you expected and that you can apply the learning to your work1.2 Developing CPD2The need for a workforce that is flexible and equipped to meet the ever-increasing challengesinvolved in providing personalised services is in demand. This includes the growth in thenumber of micro employers and people managing their own services. Significant efforts aremade to harmonise various initiatives and policy developments with improved outcomes forthe people, which also stress the importance of CPD in bringing about the changes required andin supporting the drive for consistently high quality services with improved outcomes.The integrated approach takes account of key stakeholders and recognises that a number ofdifferent elements need to come together for successful implementation. The followingdiagram shows the application of a model to the CPD framework.2 Source: http://www.skillsforcare.org.uk/ Page | 4For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk Fig 1- CPD Framework2. CPD for Social Workers3The principles and basic components of CPD for social workers are the same as for all othermembers of the social care workforce. In March 2010, the government announced a number ofspecific developments that will create additional frameworks and requirements. They acceptedthe social work taskforce recommendations for protected arrangements for newly qualifiedsocial workers through the introduction of an assessed first year in employment (to be fully inplace by 2016), and the creation of a more coherent and effective national framework for thecontinuing professional development of all social workers.3 Source: http://www.gscc.org.uk/http://www.skillsforcare.org.uk/ Page | 5For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukThe proposed reform of social work will encourage a shift in culture, which raises expectationsof an entitlement to ongoing learning and development, a single nationally recognised careerstructure, the introduction of a licence to practice, and a National College of Social Work.2.1 General Social Care CouncilThe General Social Care Council (GSCC) is the regulator of the social work profession and socialwork education. It protects the public by requiring high standards of education, conduct andpractice of all social workers. The GSCC has a risk-focused approach to regulating social workeducation.For the moment, the existing registration arrangements through GSCC will continue and theseinclude specific requirements to evidence CPD through a post-registration training and learning(PRTL) record. Registered social workers are required to keep their training and learning up-to-date in order to re-register with the GSCC after the initial three-year period. This can includemany different sorts of learning, such as reading, attending conferences, training courses, orgaining a post-qualifying award. It is an offence for a person to use the title ‘social worker’ orimply that he is a qualified social worker if he is not registered with the General Social CareCouncil2.2 National Occupational Standards4TOPSS, the Social Care Workforce Strategy Body (England), which produced NationalOccupational Standards for Social Work, became ‘Skills for Care’ in April 2005. The focus ofSkills for Care is primarily concerned with adult social care, and the new Children’s WorkforceDevelopment Council will focus on the strategy for the children’s services workforce. TheNational Occupational Standards for Social Work are organised around areas of competence, orkey roles of social workers. For each of the key roles, there is a requirement to ‘understand,4 Source: www.doh.gov.uk/swqualification Page | 6For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukcritically analyse, evaluate, and apply knowledge’ of the legal, social, economic and ecologicalcontext of social work practice, country, UK, EU legislation, statutory codes, standards,frameworks and guidance relevant to social work practice and related fields, including multi-disciplinary and multi-organisational practice, data protection and confidentiality ofinformation. The key roles are:Key Role 1: Prepare for, and work with individuals, families, carers, groups and communities toassess their needs and circumstances.  Prepare for social work contact and involvement  Work with individuals, families, carers, groups and communities to help them make informed decisions  Assess needs and options to recommend a course of actionKey Role 2: Plan, carry out, review and evaluate social work practice, with individuals, families,carers, groups, communities and other professionals.  Respond to crisis situations  Interact with individuals, families, carers, groups and communities to achieve change and development and to improve life opportunities  Prepare, produce, implement and evaluate plans with individuals, families, carers, groups, communities and professional colleagues  Support the development of networks to meet assessed needs and planned outcomes  Work with groups to promote individual growth, development and independence  Address behaviour which presents a risk to individuals, families, carers, groups, communitiesKey Role 3: Support individuals to represent their needs, views and circumstances.  Advocate with and on behalf of, individuals, families, carers, groups and communities  Prepare for, and participate in decision making forums Page | 7For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukKey Role 4: Manage risk to individuals, families, carers, groups, communities, self andcolleagues.  Assess and manage risks to individuals, families, carers, groups and communities  Assess, minimise and manage risk to self and colleaguesKey Role 5: Manage and be accountable, with supervision and support, for your own socialwork practice within your organisation.  Manage and be accountable for your own work  Contribute to the management of resources and services  Manage, present and share records and reports  Work within multi-disciplinary and multi-organisational teams, networks and systemsKey Role 6: Demonstrate professional competence in social work practice.  Research, analyse, evaluate, and use current knowledge of best social work practice  Work within agreed standards of social work practice and ensure own professional development  Manage complex ethical issues, dilemmas and conflicts  Contribute to the promotion of best social work practiceRoles of stakeholders in Programme design and DeliveryThe diagram below shows the different kind of roles of the stakeholders such as employers,students, service users, external examiners, GSCC in Social Work training. Page | 8For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk Fig 2 –Roles of Stakeholders in program Design & delivery2.3 Relationship between Law and Practice5The relationship between law and social work practice and the place of law as an element intaught social work programmes continues to be the subject of ongoing debate. Polarised viewshave developed. However, law clearly plays an important role in social work practice today.Substantial legislation has been passed in recent years which has a profound effect on socialwork practice, notably the Children Acts of 1989 and 2004, the National Health Service andCommunity Care Act 1990, the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, the Adoption and Children Act2002 and the Mental Capacity Act 2005. The understanding of law underpins and provides5 Source: www.gscc.org.ukwww.basw.co.uk Page | 9For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukduties and powers for social work and understanding the statutory and legal requirements isessential for effective and fair social work practice.2.3.1 Legal Framework of Social Work6The social work is provided by the Local Authority Social Services Act 1970 (LASSA) as amended.Section 1 establishes the authorities which have social services functions as county councils,metropolitan and London boroughs and unitary authorities, but not district councils.Sections 2–5 of the LASSA are repealed by the Children Act 2004 to give effect to theorganizational changes.The Children Act 2004 amends personnel requirements specified by the LASSA. The duty toappoint a Director of Social Services is removed and replaced by a requirement to appoint aDirector of Children’s Services for each children’s services authority, and a Director of AdultSocial Services. The Director of Children’s Services is appointed for the purpose of prescribedfunctions including those exercisable by the LEA: social services that relate to children; childrenleaving local authority care; the children’s services authority for cooperation, safeguarding andpromoting the welfare of children and information databases; and any health services forchildren that are transferred to the local authority. Recently, in some areas children’s andadults’ services have merged back into a new single department to be led by a single director.Section 7 of the LASSA 1970 contains a number of important provisions. It provides for theSecretary of State to produce directions for the exercise of social services establishescomplaints procedures contains the power for the Secretary of State to require an inquiry intosocial services functions and provides for the default powers of the Secretary of State. The2.3.2 Key Legislation on Social Work Practice and Defining Service User GroupsThe legislations used for social work practice varies in different sections. The summary belowdoes not include all legislation which a social worker may encounter in everyday practice. It is,however, a selection of some of the more important pieces of legislation that directly impact on6 Source: www.direct.gov.uk Page | 10For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uksocial work practice. There are also areas of overlap as some pieces of legislation could apply,for example, to children and adults, e.g. the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970,though it tends to be associated more with adult service users.General Equal Pay Act 1970 Local Authority Social Services Act 1970 Local Government Act 1972 Sex Discrimination Act 1975 Race Relations Act 1976 Interpretation Act 1978 Disability Discrimination Act 1995 Housing Act 1996 Data Protection Act 1998 Human Rights Act 1998 Access to Justice Act 1999 Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 Public Interest Disclosure Act 1999 Freedom of Information Act 2000 Local Government Act 2000 Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000 Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 Homelessness Act 2002 Housing Act 2004 Civil Partnership Act 2004 Gender Recognition Act 2004 Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 Disability Discrimination Act 2005 Equality Act 2006 Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 Page | 11For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk Health and Social Care Act 2008Legislation relating to Children and Young Persons Children and Young Persons Acts 1963 and 1969 Family Law Reform Act 1969 Child Abduction Act 1984 Children Act 1989 Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 Child Support Act 1991 Education Act 1996 Family Law Act 1996 Protection of Children Act 1999 Children (Leaving Care) Act 2000 Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001 Adoption and Children Act 2002 Children Act 2004 Children and Adoption Act 2006 Childcare Act 2006 Children and Young Persons Act 2008Legislation relating to Adults’ Services National Assistance Act 1948 National Assistance (Amendment) Act 1951 Health Services and Public Health Act 1968 Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970 Mental Health Act 1983 Disabled Persons (Services, Consultation and Representation) Act 1986 National Health Service and Community Care Act 1990 Carers (Recognition and Services) Act 1995 Page | 12For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk Disability Discrimination Act 1995 Community Care (Direct Payments) Act 1996 Care Standards Act 2000 Carers and Disabled Children Act 2000 Community Care (Delayed Discharges etc.) Act 2003 Carers (Equal Opportunities) Act 2004 Mental Capacity Act 2005 National Health Service Act 2006 Mental Health Act 2007Criminal justice legislation Bail Act 1976 Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 Public Order Act 1986 Criminal Justice Act 1991 Probation Service Act 1993 Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 Sex Offenders Act 1997 Protection from Harassment Act 1997 Crime and Disorder Act 1998 Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000 Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000 Sexual Offences Act 2003 Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003 Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 Page | 13For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk2.4 The Regulatory Cycle7GSCC continuously monitors the social work education by the receipt of annual reports fromuniversities and institutes confirming quality assurance processes, approved by the GSCC, toensure that the courses continue to meet the requirements and criteria. In addition toinformation provided by universities in relation to course approval and monitoring, otherinstitution specific information from a range of sources including other regulators reports, QAAaudits, stakeholder feedback, EE feedback and audits specifically relation to complaints. Allinformation received in relation to approved social work courses is analysed and risk assessedto provide intelligence for the monitoring and approval of social work courses.2.4.1 Risk Management and Regulation of Social Work EducationThe General Social Care Council (GSCC) under the Care Standards Act 2000 make rules underwhich social work training courses are approved and to produce lists of approved courses. TheCare Standards Act 2000 states:  ‘A course for persons who wish to become social workers shall not be approved under this section unless the Council considers that it is such as to enable persons completing it to attain the required standard of proficiency in relevant social work.’  The Approval of courses for the social work degree rules 2002 set out the legal basis for our approval of courses  The learning process for achieving the required standard of proficiency is the curriculum for the degree, which includes the National Occupational Standards for social work, the Quality Assurance Agency’s benchmark statement for social work degrees and the requirements for social work training issued by the Department of Health7 Source: www.gscc.org.uk Page | 14For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk  The degree in social work is a professional social work qualification for social workers in all settings (residential, field, day, domiciliary, healthcare and education) and sectors (statutory, voluntary and private).  Social work degrees may be at honours or masters level  The degree is an England qualification. The requirements for programmes leading to a degree provided in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland may be different to take account of differences in legislation, in language and in the ways that services are providedThis document details the risk assessment framework and the associated regulatoryinterventions that we will use to regulate the delivery of social work education and training.The framework is: based upon a transparent risk assessment framework which articulates and identifies risks to be reduced clearly identifies a robust range of regulatory interventions which will be enforceable targets intervention proportionately to risks being managed transparent and explicit about when and in what situations different regulatory interventions are triggered includes strategies to minimise risk occurrence and is compliance focused aims to reduce the effects of risk via knowledge generation and focused upon risks associated with individual providers, risks associated across all social work provision and risks associated with regulatory systems and processes2.4.2 Risk FrameworkThe management of risk is embedded in regulatory framework. The approach to risk isunderpinned by the principles in International Standard ISO 31000:2009. The diagram belowcaptures a cycle of regulatory risk assessment. Page | 15For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk Fig3 – Regulatory Risk Assessment CycleInformation comes into the risk assessment process from a number of sources, is analysedagainst risk indicators and evaluated against risk probabilities. Regulatory intervention is anoutcome of this cycle. Importantly, the risk assessment process allows for targeted inspectionactivity but also allows regulatory knowledge to be fed back to the regulated environment forthe purposes of enhancement and development.2.5 Requirements for Training and AssessmentThe Requirements for Social Work Training are organised in two sections, entry requirementsand teaching, learning and assessment requirements.2.5.1 A) Entry RequirementsThe Entry requirements must for all providers are: Page | 16For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk Satisfy themselves that all entrants have the capability to meet the required standards by the end of their training and that they possess appropriate personal and intellectual qualities to be social workers Ensure that, in addition to the university’s own admission requirements for the degree, all entrants have achieved at least Key Skills level 2 in English and mathematics. This would normally be equivalent to grade C in the GCSE examination in English and mathematics Satisfy themselves that all entrants can understand and make use of written material and are able to communicate clearly and accurately in spoken and written English Ensure that, as part of the selection procedures, all candidates admitted for training have taken part in an individual or group interview. Ensure that representatives of stakeholders, particularly service users and employers, are involved in the selection process2.5.1 B) Teaching, Learning and AssessmentThe requirements must for all providers are: Design the content, structure and delivery of the training to enable social work students to demonstrate that they have met the national occupational standards for social work and the social work benchmark statement and are suitable for admission to the General Social Care Council register of social workers Ensure that the teaching of theoretical knowledge, skills and values is based on their application in practice Ensure that students’ achievement against the required standards is regularly and accurately assessed, and confirm that all social work students have been assessed and have met all the standards before being awarded the degree in social work Ensure that the principles of valuing diversity and equalities awareness are integral to the teaching and learning of students• Ensure that all social work students spend at least 200 days gaining required experience and learning in practice settings Each student must have experience: Page | 17For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk  in at least two practice settings  of statutory social work tasks involving legal interventions  of providing services to at least two user groups (e.g. child care and mental health) Ensure that all students undergo assessed preparation for direct practice to ensure their safety to undertake practice learning in a service delivery setting. This preparation must include the opportunity to develop a greater understanding of the experience of service users and the opportunity to shadow an experienced social worker As well as providing teaching, learning and assessment across the full range of the occupational standards and benchmark statement, providers will have to demonstrate that all students undertake specific learning and assessment in the following key areas Human growth, development, mental health and disability2.5.2 Requirements for Social Work TrainingThe requirements are  Assessment, planning, intervention and review  Communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs  Law  Partnership working and information sharing across professional disciplines and agencies Ensure that the number of hours spent in structured academic learning under the direction of an educator is sufficient to ensure that students meet the required level of competence. This is expected to be at least 200 days or 1,200 hours Ensure that teaching and learning are continually updated to keep abreast of developments in legislation, Government policy and best practice Page | 18For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk3. Children’s Workforce Development CouncilThe Children’s Workforce Development Council (CWDC) leads change so that the thousands ofpeople and volunteers working with children and young people across England are able to dothe best job they possibly can. They advise and work in partnership with lots of differentorganisations and people who all want the lives of all children and young people to be healthy,happy and fulfilling. CWDC supports 2.6 million people who work with children, young peopleand their families, in sectors including early years, childcare, work with young people, educationwelfare, social work and social care.3.1 Model for Structuring & Professionalisation of the Children’s Social CareWorkforce3.1.1 Staff GroupsThe interviews, the survey and the events together indicated a number of areas of common andspecific knowledge and skill requirements across the three staff groups. These groupings areloose, with suggested likely constituents, but open to negotiated membership. Some staff workacross more than one group and must not be constrained to single “membership”. Such astructure must also avoid alienating workers who do not fall neatly into one of the groupings.Furthermore, the workforce is continually developing and changing, and any structure must beamenable to responsive development and change in its turn. Related knowledge, skills andexperience3.1.2 Related Knowledge, Skills and ExperienceEach of these groups has an identity engendered by the specific demands of working withchildren in particular social and geographical circumstances. The children’s social careworkforce as a whole has much in common within itself and with the rest of the children’sworkforce, but each group also has knowledge and skills which are specific to working with a Page | 19For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukparticular service user group and/or location. Knowledge of child development, legal issues,safeguarding, and communication with children and young people were the most strongly andfrequently expressed common elements. Skills which were common to all includedpartnership/team working, analytical skills, self management, and support for others. A largenumber of common personal attributes were identified, particularly patience and empathy,integrity, being personable, problem-solving ability, leadership, and personal strength. Thesewould be expected in all practitioners across the children’s social care workforce. Knowledgeand skills specific to each staff group were also identified in the project. Fig 4- Model For Children’s Social Care Workforce Page | 20For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk3.1.3 Harmonising Graduate PreparationThe model is based on a traditional degree structure of core modules (60 credits at level 6) andoptional modules (60 credits at level 6). The undergraduate pathway is for those seeking agraduate role either from within the workforce or as a new recruit. However, the degreestructure is such that those within the workforce wishing to enhance their profile in a specificarea (without undertaking the whole programme) can access individual stand-alone modules,gaining recognised credit and undertaking quality-assured continuing professionaldevelopment. This is a means by which managers might assemble the required breadth ofexpertise in teams in response to new challenges or fields of work.Existing graduates, both within the workforce and joining it, would be able to select core oroptional modules (in negotiation with their manager) to fill gaps in their profile for the specifiedfield of work and role. Rather than amass additional level 6 credits, an existing graduate couldexpect to access the modules at level 7 (masters) with a view to progressing to postgraduatecertificate, postgraduate diploma, or masters degree. It is common for universities to providemodules with assessments at both level 6 and level 7.3.1.4 PathwaysIt is suggested that each staff group would have essential elements and optional elementswhich best match the needs of that part of the workforce. However, it is also envisaged thatmanagers will wish to establish a balance of skills and expertise in teams, so some variation isalso expected.3.1.5 Interaction with other parts of the WorkforceA clear identity and purpose, linked to supporting education and career pathways withinchildren’s social care should facilitate interaction with other groups. The enhanced identity andstatus which should follow educational progression and professionalisation will help to reversethe pervasive feelings of low status and lack of recognition by other professionals. Page | 21For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk Training Social Workers Across The World In UK Social Work Processes (CPD)Our Services ™Elevate Training and Development is a training company with many years experience offacilitating the training needs of workers in multi agency and social care & educational settings.Our training programmes are diverse and cover the range of essential training required to meetCWDC, Adult services and Continuing Professional Development standards and thoserequirements of OFSTEDWe have experience of facilitating the development training needs of workers across the UKand Ireland in Adult and Children’s & Families Teams and Private & Voluntary establishments,sometimes in conjunction with existing in- house programmes and including bespoke training atall levels.We are also instrumental in the training needs of new workers looking and coming to work inthe UK who require a good grounding in British social work processes.Our trainers are social worker professionals with qualifications in adult learning and experienceof direct work in all fields of social care, spanning many years and at all levels of social workprovision.Our training programmes reflect the current knowledge and practical application of current daysocial care legislation, our resources are focused on direct work with services users and weoffer live examples of every day work practice and issues to enhance the training anddevelopment of workers in the everyday jobs that they do. Page | 22For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukOur website is full of rich information and tools available for workers to download and withuseful exercises for workers to undertake. We also offer the ability to undertake webinars tofacilitate learning and offer this through our CPD programmes.We have managed training for large local authorities and provided comprehensive analysis oftraining needs and the impact of training for workers and managers to help meet the task ofproviding a workforce fit for purpose.In addition we facilitate large day conferences on topics such as “ Learning from Serious CaseReviews” “Appreciating social work” “Vicarious Trauma”Performance MonitoringElevate Training and Development Ltd has a quality assurance programme which we follow aspart of our core business: it includes QA of our facilitators, programmes and work withcommissioned authorities and individuals.All performance is monitored using the agreed performance monitoring forms given toparticipants and with our own “Facilitator Feedback Form”. This also includes judgementsabout learning outcomes against agreed standards.Data protectionWe hold information about training event securely as per our privacy policy and will inform thecommissioning authority of any issues which may arise including inspections by our regulators.This also includes information on our website. Page | 23For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk Online Training Programme ™This takes place by sign up to our online training portal at www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk.Once signed up members have access to the full training program as specified on the website.This includes our online learning process called - “Read/ Listen/ Discuss/ Action/ Feedback”™  Read: Up to date legislation and case work examples – handouts, e-course (email) and reading list  Listen: Attendance at live/ replay online webinars hosted by an experienced trainer/ practitioner  Discuss: Phone in discussions with colleagues and trainers after webinar/ Website Forum  Action: Workers log book, reflection and evidence of application  Feedback: email questions to our full time training staff on core learning areasAccess to the self assessment tools – can be completed at anytimeCertificate for each area completed following evidence submissionDeliveryIndividual Training Needs AnalysisCore skills for children and adult social workers (helps to ascertain level of training and must becompleted prior to learning and submitted to trainer)E-courseBite size e-course is on personal self and development as a worker: As a practitioner, whattriggers them, dealing with stress, high workloads, conflict in the workplace, supervision, careerdevelopment. 1. Email 2. Video channel 3. Audio – iTunes downloadWorkers can choose which courses they can sign up for under personal development but mustdemonstrate in their logs how progress has been achieved. Page | 24For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukExamples: Diversity “Black Professionals - how to break the glass ceiling”Core training14 weeks of webinars on key training for adult and children’s social workers. Workers canphone in to join in the topic being discussedSpecialist training12 weeks of training on specialist areas for adult and children’s social workersHandoutsFully researched and sourced handouts which add to learning developmentLog bookIncludes: Test (write about a subject to which we will give you the title i.e. Ethical Dilemmas),evaluation and reflection, they must be completed after each module (4 weeks) and returnedCertificates12 certificates are available during the year, but they will only be given to workers whoevidence through their training logs that they have completed the tasks and reflected on theirworkers.Training DatesOur training is ongoing and workers are sent the dates of the training program when they signup to the site. We have a 52 week cycle and workers can join in at any stage of the cycle.All up dates are put on the site in the update area and workers have full access to ongoingtraining and updates to legislation and law, which is also sent to their personal email.Terms and ConditionsEvidence of completions: Workers must sign up to be members and attend and participate ineach training session before the certificate of attendance can be givenAdvice: It is not our intention to offer direct advice on casework in place of supervision fromline manager. Please read disclaimer on website Page | 25For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukConfidentiality: although cases are discussed names and details of services users ororganisations will not be used or disclosed by us. We ask workers to ensure confidentially isadhered to at all time.Due Diligence: Due to the nature of the discussions only vetted by application members areallowed to access the webinars. Pricing 2011/2012Individuals: £60 per year or £7.99 per month*Private Companies: £3000 for up to 100 workers or £60 per worker per yearVoluntary groups: £2500 for up to 100 workers or £55 per worker per yearPayment is in advance, monthly payments is accepted for individuals only*Individual application requires evidence of suitability due to the nature of the trainingLong arm supervision and mentoring service available on requestGradle Gardner MartinCQSW/DipSW Cert ManagementDirector Elevate Training & Development LtdTo Sign up for Elevate Training and Development CDP courses for social care professionalsplease visit www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.uk or ring us on 020 8469 0634 Page | 26For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright
    • www.SocialWorkProcesses.co.ukDisclaimer“The information contained in this document that includes text, graphics and links, are provided on an“as-is”, "with all faults" and "as available" basis and are without warranty of any kind. While we rely onsources that are believed to be reliable, it cannot rule out errors in judgment or application. Thedocument is intended for “information” and “general guidance” purposes only.”“Investment decisions and/or other decisions based on the conclusions and potential strategiesmentioned in the document are not necessarily endorsed by the Brickwork management. Brickwork doesnot represent or warrant that the information provided is accurate, complete or current and will not beheld liable for any damages of any kind arising from the use of this information.” Page | 27For the personal use of candidates only Elevate Training & Development Ltd copyright