Firo b

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  • I changed this slightly from the one given to you in January.
  • Overhead with history timeline 1958 development of theory by Schutz, but remember that we do not want to emphasize him during the presentation as he now publishes and markets another instrument which he claims is better (and newer) than the FIRO-B, called “Elements ofAwareness”. Both UK and US users have told us that the Elements tests are much more difficult both for counselors to interpret and for clients to understand 1978 publication of manual by CPP 1996 resurge of research and development of product due to customer feedback of usefulness in corporations; translations in Japanese, French, and extensive use in the United Kingdom. We are alsoconducting a large scale norming study this summer/fall to collect a nationally representative sample of over 4000 (along with MBTI data and demographic data such as their opinion on stress, values, etc)
  • Janet did this slide for you this summer and I put it at the beginning of the presentation to help you set a context for your participants. This is also the main theme behind our promotional piece on the FIRO-B.
  • Janet did this slide for you this summer and I put it at the beginning of the presentation to help you set a context for your participants. This is also the main theme behind our promotional piece on the FIRO-B.
  • Janet did this slide for you this summer and I put it at the beginning of the presentation to help you set a context for your participants. This is also the main theme behind our promotional piece on the FIRO-B.
  • Janet did this slide for you this summer and I put it at the beginning of the presentation to help you set a context for your participants. This is also the main theme behind our promotional piece on the FIRO-B.
  • Cindee and I decided to name this slide “learning objectives” as you need that terminology if CEU credits are to be given. In any case, it can serve as your agenda and you can re-name this if it makes you more comfortable.
  • Al explains the Guttman scoring method as follows: Not an easy question, but here is the Cliff notes version. Basically it is a scoring method that assumes that items can be ordered from most to least difficult, or in the case of the FIRO from most to least endorsed. The more questions that you answer as you move along the order for a given scale, the more of that behavior you should manifest. It also means that although there are six response options for each FIRO item, the items are scored 0 or 1. For example, item #16 is “I try to participate in group activities” is scored on eI. If the person answers Usually, he/she gets one point for eI. If, however, he/she gives any other answer, he/she gets 0 points for eI. Because the items says “try” and the kind of group is left vague, only a “usually” response indicates eI. In contrast, however, is item #3 which says “I join social groups” which is more definite in two ways: it doesn’t say “try” and it specifies the kind of group. So, if the person says occasionally, sometimes often or usually, they get 1 point for eI. If they say rarely or never they get 0 points. Item #3 is more indicative of eI and so more responses are scored. How this is all arrived, I’m not sure I know.
  • Steve suggested this overhead from the presentation he did in early October.
  • This slide is designed to emphasize the similarity of items which will diffuse complaints about redundancy. Al suggested you give the FIRO-B at the beginning of the session and then take the participants through the history and theory information.
  • These scores are best explained in relation to one another, since they explain the general pattern of how you go about satisfying interpersonal needs. For example, when Expressed needs are greater, you may keep others at a distance in order to avoid receiving unwanted behaviors. When Wanted needs are greater, you may feel inhibited or be dissatisfied that you are not getting what you want from others. When the needs are equal , you may be cautious about expressing a behaviour before you are sure how the person will respond. This information is from page 8 of Introduction to FIRO-B in Organizations .
  • These scores are best explained in relation to one another, since they explain the general pattern of how you go about satisfying interpersonal needs. For example, when Expressed needs are greater, you may keep others at a distance in order to avoid receiving unwanted behaviors. When Wanted needs are greater, you may feel inhibited or be dissatisfied that you are not getting what you want from others. When the needs are equal , you may be cautious about expressing a behaviour before you are sure how the person will respond. This information is from page 8 of Introduction to FIRO-B in Organizations .
  • These scores are best explained in relation to one another, since they explain the general pattern of how you go about satisfying interpersonal needs. For example, when Expressed needs are greater, you may keep others at a distance in order to avoid receiving unwanted behaviors. When Wanted needs are greater, you may feel inhibited or be dissatisfied that you are not getting what you want from others. When the needs are equal , you may be cautious about expressing a behaviour before you are sure how the person will respond. This information is from page 8 of Introduction to FIRO-B in Organizations .
  • Steve also added this slide after presenting to a group.
  • Firo b

    1. 1. FIRO-B Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation Behavior BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    2. 2. History  1958 Will Schutz, Ph.D. Submarine Personnel  1978 Consulting Psychologists Press  1996 Revised Self-Scorable BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    3. 3. Self-Awareness = Key  Personal/Professional Development  Employee/Management Relations  Career Development  Team Building  Leadership Development  Emotional Intelligence BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    4. 4. FIRO-B  The Six Basics: Expressed Inclusion (eI) Wanted Inclusion (wI) Expressed Control (eC) Wanted Control (wC) Expressed Affection (eA) Wanted Affection (wA) BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    5. 5. Your FIRO-B Results: How to Score the Self-Scorable Inclusion Control Affection • recognition • influence • closeness • belonging • leading • warmth • participation • responsibility • sensitivityExpressedBehavior eI eC eA TOTAL• what I prefer to do EXPRESSED• how much I initiate eI+eC+eA• observable actionWanted wI wC wA TOTALBehavior WANTED• how much I want others to initiate wI+wC+wA• how much I prefer to be the recipient TOTAL TOTAL TOTAL OVERALL INCLUSION CONTROL AFFECTION expressed + eI+wI eC+wC eA+wA wanted BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    6. 6. How Others May See You Inclusion High Wanted Inclusion 1. May take rejection as devastating. 2. May think being away is missing the action. 3. May take lack of acknowledgment as negative BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    7. 7. How Others May See You Inclusion Low Wanted Inclusion 1. May feel invitations are obligations. 2. May not want to be singled out. 3. May consider group time wasteful. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    8. 8. How Others May See You Affection High Wanted Affection 1. May find a lack of concern as insensitive 2. May need continuous feedback. 3. May find distance from others a personal loss. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    9. 9. How Others May See You Affection Low Wanted Affection 1. May find reassurances as superficial 2. May become offended by personal questions. 3. May find emotions as distracting - even your own. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    10. 10. How Others May See You Control High Wanted Control 1. May perceive any structuring as inadequate 2. May consider standard procedures as important 3. May take sole responsibility as burdensome BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    11. 11. How Others May See You Control Low Wanted Control 1. May not want any control. 2. May feel pressured by plans and stressed by structure. 3. May find competitive behavior annoying. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    12. 12. FIRO-B  An instrument for emotional intelligence awareness  Self-Awareness  Communication  Building Relationships  Conflict Management BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    13. 13. FIRO-B  What it does: Aids in understanding one’s behavior and its effect on others Increases your awareness of your natural strengths and weaknesses Suggests possibilities for improving the way you relate to others BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    14. 14. FIRO-B  When to use it: Almost anytime - It is short, quick to take and score, and surprisingly insightful. It is often used to compliment other instruments. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    15. 15. Learning Objectives  History  Theory  FIRO-B Model  Administration & Interpretation Guidelines results = strengths patterns  Application Exercises BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    16. 16. Learning Objectives (cont.)  Case Studies  personal relationship growth  team building  career development  management development  Research  organizational  correlations with the MBTI®  Tools for Interpretation BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    17. 17. Theory  Individual Motivated by THREE Interpersonal Needs  Inclusion: the amount of belonging, attention, and recognition desired in social settings.  Control: the level of influence, structure, and responsibility desired.  Affection: the level of rapport, warmth, and support desired. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    18. 18. Theory  The FIRO-B helps give insight into a client’s degree of interpersonal understanding on several levels:  Inclusion: The willingness to include others or be included.  Control:The willingness to manage and be managed.  Affection: The willingness to express and receive affection  The Flexibility to know when to call these things into play. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    19. 19. Theory Group Development Inclusion Issues Control Issues Affection Issues BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    20. 20. Theory Group Development Should I go for a boat ride? Who is running the motor? What is my relationship to others on the boat? Self-Awareness BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    21. 21. The FIRO-B Model: Page 4 Introduction to FIRO-B in Organizations INCLUSION (I) CONTROL (C) AFFECTION (A)Expressed(e)Wanted(w) BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    22. 22. The FIRO-B Model INCLUSION (I) CONTROL (C) AFFECTION (A) Expressed I make an effort to include others in my activities. I try I try to exert control and influence over things. I enjoy I make an effort to get close to people. I am comfortable (e) to belong, to join social organizing things and expressing personal feelings groups— to be with people directing others. and I try to be supportive of as much as possible. others. Wanted (w) BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    23. 23. The FIRO-B Model INCLUSION (I) CONTROL (C) AFFECTION (A) Expressed (e) I want other people to invite I feel most comfortable I want others to act warmly me to belong. I enjoy it when working in well-defined toward me. I enjoy it when others notice me. situations. I try to get clear people share their feelings expectations and instructions. with me and when they Wanted encourage my efforts. (w) BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    24. 24. The FIRO-B Model INCLUSION (I) CONTROL (C) AFFECTION (A) I make an effort to include I try to exert control and I make an effort to get close Expressed others in my activities. I try influence over things. I enjoy to people. I am comfortable (e) to belong, to join social groups— to be with people organizing things and directing others. expressing personal feelings and I try to be supportive of as much as possible. others. I want other people to invite I feel most comfortable I want others to act warmly me to belong. I enjoy it when working in well-defined toward me. I enjoy it when others notice me. situations. I try to get clear people share their feelings expectations and instructions. with me and when they Wanted encourage my efforts. (w) BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    25. 25. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    26. 26. FIRO-B Administration- General  Average time = 10 minutes  54 Items  Six questions with nine variations  Group or individual administration  Guttman scoring method  Self-scorable/on-site scoring BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    27. 27. FIRO-B Administration- Specific  Establish a non-threatening atmosphere  Give an overview of the purpose  Emphasize non- judgmental/developmental  Repetitive items yet independent  Pass it out/others sit quietly  Prediction of scores before scoring BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    28. 28. Revised Self-Scorable (10 Minutes) “ Some items may seem similar to others. However, each item is different, so please answer each one without regard to the others or without trying to be consistent.” BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    29. 29. Two Dimensions of Interpersonal Needs Inclusion Control Affection • recognition • influence • closeness • belonging • leading • warmth • participation • responsibility • sensitivityExpressedBehavior• what I prefer to do• how much I initiate• observable action eI eC eAWantedBehavior• how much I want others to initiate• how much I prefer wI wC wA to be the recipient BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    30. 30. FIRO-B Individual Cell Scores: View Your Personal Cell Scores eI eC eA expresse expresse expresse d d d inclusio control affection n wI wC wA wanted wanted wanted inclusio control affection n  0, 1, 2 LOW Behaviors are rarely displayed by you  3, 4, 5, 6 MEDIUM Behaviors will be a noticeable characteristic of you, but only some of the time  7, 8, 9 HIGH Behaviors are a noticeable characteristic of you in most situations BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    31. 31. Strength of Your InterpersonalNeeds: Total Need Total Need Total Need for for for Inclusion Control AffectionLow = 0 to 5 Medium = 6 to 12 High = 13 to 18 Highest Score =  Most comfortable interpersonal area  Need area you will be the least willing to sacrifice in social situations  Situations that satisfy this need will be those you return to often BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    32. 32. Total Behavior: Expressed 0 to 7 (Low) 8 to 19 (Medium) 20 to 27 High BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    33. 33. Total Behavior: Wanted 0 to 7 (Low) 8 to 19 (Medium) 20 to 27 High BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    34. 34. Total Behavior Expressed Needs > Wanted Needs  keep others at a distance to avoid unwanted behaviors  only accept behaviors from particular people  mislead people making conclusions based on expressed behavior Expressed Needs < Wanted Needs  may feel inhibited  may be dissatisfied that you are not getting what you want  could grow attached to people who give you what you want Expressed = Wanted  may be cautious BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    35. 35. Strength of Your Interpersonal Needs:Overall Need Score (page 7) See Bottom Right-Hand Corner 0-15 LOW Involvement with others not primary source of need satisfaction. Intellectual stimulation or solitary pursuits predominate. 16-26 MEDIUM-LOW Involvement sometimes a source of satisfaction, depending on people and context. 27-38 MEDIUM-HIGH Involvement is usually source of satisfaction. 39-54 HIGH Involvement with others enjoyable and satisfying. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    36. 36. Patterns of Need Fulfillment-- Inclusion (page 10) High Expressed Inclusion (eI) Low Expressed Inclusion (eI) I include others and like to be included. I form relationships based on common I enjoy the opportunity to provide input. interests and skills.High Wanted I don’t like to get cut off from information I’d rather “play it safe” than let othersInclusion (wI) and updates. know that I want to be included. I wait for others to invite me to join them. I get many invitations but I often turn I prefer working with a small group of them down or don’t show up. people. I pick and choose which company social I avoid forming too many friendships atLow Wanted events to attend. work.Inclusion (wI) I have a select group of people that I enjoy I may discourage invitations to company working with. social events. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    37. 37. Patterns of Need Fulfillment-- Control (page 11) High Expressed Control (eC) Low Expressed Control (eC) I like to provide structure for others. I accept control from those in authority. I work very hard and then “kick back” and I am not interested in gaining influence. let others run the show. I am a loyal and cooperative follower.High Wanted I relate well to authorities in theControl (wC) organization. I enjoy taking control and being recognized. I prefer not to make important decisions. I am uncomfortable delegating I don’t want to be closely supervised. responsibility. I can be stubborn and rebellious.Low Wanted I can be very competitive and demandControl (wC) perfection from others. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press
    38. 38. Patterns of Need Fulfillment-- Affection (page 11) High Expressed Affection (eA) Low Expressed Affection (eA) I am friendly, open, and optimistic. I believe that too much self-disclosure is I value trustworthiness. unprofessional.High Wanted I have difficulty controlling interruptions I know more about colleagues than theyAffection (wA) at work. know about me. I may have difficulty saying “no” to requests to take on more work. I am generally friendly but I am selective I tend to be task-oriented and business- about close relationships. like. I use praise to motivate others but find it I feel uncomfortable with expressivenessLow Wanted unnecessary myself. or affection at work.Affection (wA) I limit close working relationships to a I enjoy my privacy. select few. BFIRO Consulting Psychologists Press

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