Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Lean Strategies For Injection Molding 3 Hour E Learning

12,505

Published on

RJG is offering our Strategies for Successful Tool Transfers class as an e-Learning event. …

RJG is offering our Strategies for Successful Tool Transfers class as an e-Learning event.
PM session: June 1-5, 2009
AM session: June 15-19, 2009

Published in: Business
29 Comments
30 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
12,505
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
29
Likes
30
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Lean Strategies for Injection Molders 1 - Lean
  • 2. Questions How do I know if the molder is giving the mold a chance to perform? How do I know if the processor has the mold in the correct machine? How do I know if this machine is even capable? Why, when we adjust the tool steel to meet the dimensions, are they not correct the next time they try it out? We have modified this mold six times and it still is not correct! They got good parts out of this mold at the other molder, why can’t you? It fits between the tie bars and you have enough shot size, so what is the problem? These are a small sampling of questions that cause process problems and cost money. With increasing pressure from a global economy and local competition we need to be more thorough in bringing the mold to production either as a new production or a tool that has been transferred from another molder. 2 - Lean
  • 3. Start-Up Companies Domestic & Foreign Investment Groups Your Company Your Competitors  Your Building  Their Building  Your Equipment  Their Equipment  Your Employees  Their Employees  Your Customers  Seeking Your Customers What sets you apart from your competitors? KNOWLEDGE! And how you use it 3 - Lean
  • 4. Systematic Molding Defined Making operational decisions based on data and analysis as opposed to only intuition, opinions and politics to achieve optimal results. Using monitoring, containment and control to achieve a level of quality always exceeding the customer’s expectation. 4 - Lean
  • 5. “Progress Always Involves Risk. You can’t steal second base and keep your foot on first base.” Frederick Wilcox 5 - Lean
  • 6. Part Design 6 - Lean
  • 7. Request for Quote The part: AB Switch Housing Material: Polypropylene MFI 4 Quantity: 100,000 annually Cost: $$$$$$ per number of parts or per part Time: Six weeks to production Tooling Budget: $$$$$ Quality: First Article or PPAP Gate Location: Cosmetic concerns 7 - Lean
  • 8. 8 - Lean
  • 9. Potential Problem Areas  How can we fix this?  How do we communicate this to the customer?  Will the customer allow a design change? 9 - Lean
  • 10. PART RELEASE As plastic parts cool and shrink in the mold they:  Pull away from the cavity  Draw down tightly onto the core Since the part must slide out of the mold without distortion, draft angles parallel to. Part release are necessary on all draw surfaces. The degree of draft required is a function of:  Material shrinkage rate and abrasiveness  Part surface requirements  Uniformity of wall thickness  Depth of draw Any draft is better than none. Specify the largest that the functional requirements of the part will allow. 10 - Lean
  • 11. Validating Draft for Part Release If we cannot have draft our strategy must change to remove the part from the mold (mechanically) and cavity pressures may need to be kept low (process), therefore shrink rates go up. 11 - Lean
  • 12. RADIUS  In the design of the injection-molded parts, sharp corners should always be avoided  Inside corners on the molded parts are highly stressed and have historically been the highest single cause of part failure  Outside corners are difficult to fill and trap air and gas, which creates burn marks  Generally desirable to be greater than 25% of the wall thickness  Sufficient Radii  Distribute stress  Improve flow  It is rare when one size is best for all  Promote uniform shrinkage corners  Reduce sink, voids and  There may be locations (such as parting warpage line) where radius is impractical  Eliminate trapped air 12 - Lean
  • 13. Adding Radius What are some problems associated with lack of radius? 13 - Lean
  • 14. Wall thickness If the functional requirements of a part require a departure from nominal wall, the designer must visualize how plastic flow and shrinkage will interact with the design to affect properties.  Wall thickness changes should be minimal and gradual  As a general guideline, wall thickness changes should be less than 25% of the nominal. This is more important with semi-crystalline plastics  Lack of uniform nominal wall thickness is the single most troublesome problem encountered relative to part design 14 - Lean
  • 15. Constant Wall Thickness 15 - Lean
  • 16. Additions & Subtractions  Additions are part features that present a non-linear extension of the wall  Ribs  Bosses  Gussets  Raised areas  All have much in common from a design point of view  The design issues relate to:  Shape  Spacing  SHAPE  The primary goal is to reduce the effect of modifying the constant wall thickness by keeping the base as small as possible  Generally, around 1/2 the wall thickness (50% of the wall thickness)  Projections on parts are formed by depressions in the mold  Those depressed areas are difficult to fill and vent  To minimize the effect, projections should be kept as short as possible (generally less than three times the wall thickness)  Shrinkage of plastic between vertical projections can cause stresses, particularly at the corners  To minimize this effect, projections should not be placed too close together (generally not closer than two times the wall thickness) 16 - Lean
  • 17. Modified Part Geometry for Wall Thickness 17 - Lean
  • 18. There is Still a Problem  Depressions into the wall to create holes  Through  Blind  Round  Square  Irregular  Slots  Grooves  Threads (inside and outside)  Square or irregular holes with sharp corners create stresses which can cause cracks in parts as they shrink or during ejection  To minimize this effect, radius corners as much as the functional requirements of the part will allow  The part will be less stressed and progressively stronger as radius is increased 18 - Lean
  • 19. Cutaway of Another Addition to the Wall 19 - Lean
  • 20. A Hidden Thick Section 20 - Lean
  • 21. Modified Part 21 - Lean
  • 22. Gate and Location  What type of gate would we use?  Benefits  Concerns  Where would the gate be placed?  What quality issues might we have?  What if the budget for the mold was a concern or limited, what options do we have?  Should I be concerned with gate seal time at this time?  What information do I need to make a decision on gate size?  Where the knit line be? 22 - Lean
  • 23. Developing a Setup Sheet Prior to Cutting Steel Measuring Risk of Producing this Product. 23 - Lean
  • 24. Solid Model Key Information from Solid Model Cubic inch volume of the solid model is 5.09 Sprue / Runner volume is 2.73 cubic inches Square inches at the parting line is 7.99 Key Information from Flow Analysis Fill Time is .95 seconds Pressure near gate is 12,000 ppsi Pressure at end of part 2,600 ppsi Average pressure in the mold to produce a good part is 7300ppsi Tons per square inch is 3.65 Cooling Time 16 seconds Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370ppsi Set up Sheet We can establish a shot size, transfer position and cushion from the volume. We can establish the clamp force needed based on the square inches and the average cavity pressure. 24 - Lean
  • 25. Measuring Risk of Potential Problem Areas  Square corners equals risk of 5  Additions to walls equals risk of 5  Change in wall thickness equals risk of 5 if gate location is on opposing end of part 25 - Lean
  • 26. Modified Part High Risk Part Design Low Risk Part Design Square corners equals risk of 5 Square corners equals risk of 2 Additions to walls equals risk of 5 Additions to walls equals risk of 5 Change in wall thickness equals risk of 5 if gate location is on opposing end of part Change in wall thickness equals risk of 3 26 - Lean
  • 27. Selected Number of Cavities Risk Runner layout: a risk of 2 Gate location: a risk of 5 Gate Type: a risk of 3 Balance of Fill 3 Risk of cold slug well/puller design 5 27 - Lean
  • 28. Flow Analysis Risk of Balance 5 28 - Lean
  • 29. Our Potential Molding Machine  220 ton clamp force  1.77 in diameter screw  2600 psi hydraulic pump  12.2:1 Intensification Ratio  Maximum Plastic pressure generated is 31,720 ppsi  General Purpose Screw with a compression ration of 2.0  L/D of 20:1  Square pitch flight pattern of 10/5/5  12 inch linear shot capability  Maximum Injection Speed 10.2 29 - Lean
  • 30. Decoupled II Pre Process Setup Sheet Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 10.668 inches Transfer Position 1.454 inches Cushion .969 inches Decompress .312 inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 72.07 grams Clamp Force Clamp Force 136 Tons 30 - Lean
  • 31. 31 - Lean
  • 32. Decoupled II Pre Process Setup Sheet Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 10.668 inches Transfer Position 1.454 inches Cushion .969 inches Decompress .312 inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 72.07 grams Clamp Force Clamp Force 136 Tons Plastic Temperature Melt Temperature 412.5 degrees Back Pressure 61.5psi RPM 75 Nozzle 412.5 degrees Front Zone 412.5 degrees Middle Zone 412.5 degrees Rear Zone 412.5 degrees Plastic Pressure Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi Full Part Weight 75.87 grams Gate Seal Yes Plastic Cooling Cooling Timer 16 seconds Mold Temperature 120 degrees 32 - Lean
  • 33. Measuring the Risk of the Setup Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 10.668 inches5 Transfer Position 1.454 inches1 Cushion .969 inches1 Decompress .312inches1 Fill Time .95 seconds5 Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second5 Fill Only Part Weight 72.07 grams1 Clamp Force Clamp Force 136 Tons3 Plastic Temperature Melt Temperature 412.5 degrees2 Back Pressure 61.5ps1 RPM 751 Nozzle 412.5 degrees1 Front Zone 412.5 degrees1 Middle Zone 412.5 degrees1 Rear Zone 412.5 degrees1 Plastic Pressure Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds1 Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi1 Full Part Weight 75.87 grams1 Gate Seal Yes Plastic Cooling Cooling Timer 16 seconds1 Mold Temperature 120 degrees1 33 - Lean
  • 34. The Risk The Process Shot Size 10.668 inches5 Transfer Position 1.454 inches1 Cushion .969 inches1 Decompress .312inches1 Fill Time .95 seconds5 Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second5 Fill Only Part Weight 72.07 grams1 Clamp Force 136 Tons3 Back Pressure 61.5ps1 RPM 751 Melt Temperature 412.5 degrees2 Nozzle 412.5 degrees1 Front Zone 412.5 degrees1 Middle Zone 412.5 degrees1 Rear Zone 412.5 degrees1 Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds1 Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi1 Full Part Weight 75.87 grams1 Gate Seal 1 Cooling Timer 16 seconds1 Mold Temperature 120 degrees1 The Part Square corners equals risk of 5 Additions to walls equals risk of 5 Change in wall thickness equals risk of 5 Cavity Layout Runner layout: a risk of 5 Gate location: a risk of 5 Gate Type: a risk of 3 Balance of Fill 5 Risk of cold slug well/puller design 5 Potential Total Risk of 29 topics at a Our Risk of Producing this Product is 74 which is a severe rating of 5 equals very average part to produce 145 74 34 - Lean
  • 35. Systematic Tool Transfers Defined Systematic Tool Transfer uses information from all available sources and data from sensors to establish a normalized setup which can be recreated with a high degree of certainty on other correct and capable machines. 35 - Lean
  • 36. Reasons for tool transfers  New Tool Launch with tryout at tool builders facility  Intra company tool transfers  Reorganization  Reduction (manpower, Building usage, Consolidation)  Outside Tool Transfer (Some may be Hostile)  Lack of Profits  Poor repeatable quality from production  Poor tool quality  Better Logistics In this seminar will focus on Intra and Outside Tool Transfers. 36 - Lean
  • 37. Tool Transfer Methodology Step 1: Risk Analysis Step 2: Risk Mitigation (Transfer Strategy) Step 3: Implementation Traditional Start Over Transfer Build New Process Transfer Process Paper Setup Sheet (Med-High Risk) Re-Build Process Tool Transfer Machine Strategy Normalized Transfer Process Graphical Machine Data (Med-Low Risk) Re-Build Process Transfer Process Cavity Pressure Re-Build Process 37 - Lean
  • 38. Step 1: Risk Analysis  Properly size mold to machine (on sending and receiving side)  Max shot capacity and % of shot capacity actually used  Maximum injection pressure capacity and max injection pressure setting used (Ri) – must accommodate 20% viscosity shift  Maximum injection speed capacity and injection speed used  Tie bar spacing and actual size of the mold  Clamp tonnage capacity and actual clamp tonnage used  Clamp design (toggle vs.. hydraulic)  Thermolator flow and temperature capability  Drier throughput  Screw type 38 - Lean
  • 39. Step 1: Risk Analysis Cont.  Press Performance (sending and receiving)  Pressure response  Optional:  Injection Speed Linearity  Pressure Response  Load Sensitivity  Check-ring Study  Maximum Plastic Pressure 39 - Lean
  • 40. Step 1: Risk Analysis Cont.  Part Design  Uniform wall  Radiusing  Part Thickness Better Candidate for a transfer.  Pressure loss or study (can get from flow analysis)  Solid Model Information  Part Draft  Weld Line Concerns Transferring a poorly designed part will not fix it. 40 - Lean
  • 41. Step 1: Risk Analysis Cont.  Runner Layout  Naturally Balanced vs.. Imbalanced  Measurement of actual balance  Hot vs. Cold Runner  Pressure losses (actual measurements)  Family Tool?  Gate and Gate Type  Gate Type  Gate Location  Weld Line Concerns 41 - Lean
  • 42. Step 1: Risk Analysis Cont.  Material  Viscosity (amount and consistency)  Injection Grade vs.. Extrusion Grade  Wide Spec Material  Uncontrolled Regrind  Screw design appropriate?  Material Delivery System  Dryer Capability  Validation of Material Conditions 42 - Lean
  • 43. Step 1: Risk Analysis Cont. Decoupled II, 2-Stage Molding Process Sheet  Setup Sheet from Mold #: Trim RH Footwell Template Name: Cycle Time: Under 90 sec Material Information Current Process Resin Type: Solvay 2420 TPO Nozzle Type: Straight Inject Color: Dk Gray Dk Taupe Color %: Blowing Agent: n/a B/A %: n/a Dryer Temp: 100 °F GAS psi: n/a Nozzle Tip Size: record for us  Material Processing Plastic Temperature Guide 30/30: 440 Charge Time: 2 to 4 seconds Plastic Flow Rate BP (ppsi): 800-1000 plastic pressure Fill Time: 3.5 seconds Part(s) weight: 2.16 lbs Inject Delay: n/a Peak Plastic Pressure/Mold: 10,381 ppsi Air: record this for us Plastic Pressure Pack/Hold Time: 15.5 seconds Inject Timer: Toshiba setting n/a F&P Part(s) weight: 2.275 lbs Hold Time: 15.5 seconds Hold Plastic psi: 6229 ppsi Gate Seal: yes Final part weight: 2.275 lbs Plasitc Cooling Cooling timer: 60 seconds Coolant: A Temp(in) 80 °F Temp(out) +/- 5 °F Flow: B Temp(in) 80 °F Temp(out) +/- 5 °F Clamp Force: 1052 tons Gate 1 open: n/a Gate 2 open: n/a Type: record this Gate 1 closed: n/a Gate 2 closed: n/a toggle/hydr Gate 3 open: n/a Gate 4 open: n/a Gate 3 closed: n/a Gate 4 closed: n/a 43 - Lean
  • 44. Step 1: Risk Analysis Cont.  Does Mold Currently Make Good Parts Consistently?  Tool Condition  Is it in the Correct Machine Now?  Any Deviations  First Article or PPAP 44 - Lean
  • 45. Step 1: Risk Analysis Cont.  Graphical Process Data  eDART™  Cavity Pressure Curves  Temperature Sensors  Delta Pressure for cooling  Appropriate Machine Signals/Triggers 45 - Lean
  • 46. Tool Transfer Methodology Step 1: Risk Analysis Step 2: Risk Mitigation (Transfer Strategy) Step 3: Implementation Traditional Start Over Transfer Build New Process Transfer Process Paper Setup Sheet (Med-High Risk) Re-Build Process Tool Transfer Machine Strategy Normalized Transfer Process Graphical Machine Data (Med-Low Risk) Re-Build Process Transfer Process Cavity Pressure Re-Build Process 46 - Lean
  • 47. Step 2: Risk Mitigation Runner Layout (Transfer Strategy) Naturally Balanced vs. Graphical Process Data Imbalanced eDART™ Measurement of actual Cavity Pressure Curves balance Part Design Temperature Sensors Hot vs. Cold Runner Uniform wall Delta Pressure for cooling Pressure losses (actual Radiusing Appropriate Machine measurements) Part Thickness Signals/Triggers Family Tool? Pressure loss or study (can get from Gate and Gate Type flow analysis) Press Performance (sending and Gate Type Solid Model Information receiving) Gate Location Part Draft Pressure response Weld Line Concerns Weld Line Concerns Optional: Injection Speed Properly size mold to machine (on sending and receiving side) Linearity Max shot capacity and % of shot capacity actually used Pressure Maximum injection pressure capacity and max injection Response pressure setting used (Ri) – must accommodate 20% viscosity Load Sensitivity shift Check-ring Study Maximum injection speed capacity and injection speed used Maximum Plastic Tie bar spacing and actual size of the mold Pressure Clamp tonnage capacity and actual clamp tonnage used Setup Sheet from Current Process Clamp design (toggle vs. hydraulic) Material Processing Guide Thermolator flow and temperature capability Drier throughput Material Does Mold Currently Make Good Parts Screw type Viscosity (amount and Consistently? consistency) Tool Condition Injection Grade vs.. Is it in the Correct Machine Now? Extrusion Grade Any Deviations Wide Spec Material First Article or PPAP Uncontrolled Regrind Screw design appropriate? Material Delivery System Dryer Capability Validation of Material Conditions The more information missing, the higher the RISK 47 - Lean
  • 48. Three types of Tool Transfers  High Risk  Tool Shows up with no parts, prints and no setup sheet  Middle Risk  Mold shows up with a prints, a part and setup sheet from prior process  Low Risk  We have Prints, short shots, full shot and setup sheet  We have their machine evaluations  We have all graphical data from the process with cavity curves 48 - Lean
  • 49. Tool Transfer Methodology Traditional High Risk Start Over Transfer Build New Process Middle Risk Transfer Process Paper Setup Sheet (Med-High Risk) Re-Build Process Tool Transfer Machine Strategy Normalized Transfer Process Graphical Machine Data (Med-Low Risk) Re-Build Process Low Risk Transfer Process Cavity Pressure Re-Build Process 49 - Lean
  • 50. What is a High Risk Tool Transfer Traditional High Risk Start Over Transfer Build New Process Middle Risk Transfer Process Paper Setup Sheet (Med-High Risk) Re-Build Process Tool Transfer Machine Strategy Normalized Transfer Process Graphical Machine Data (Med-Low Risk) Re-Build Process Low Risk Transfer Process Cavity Pressure Re-Build Process 50 - Lean
  • 51. Items Transferred  Mold  How was the water lines installed during production?  Was the clamp forced optimized or set at maximum?  Traditional Setup Sheet (maybe)  Could the machine actually go that many inches per second?  What screw diameter did they use?  How full was the part at transfer or was it a pressure limited process?  How do I convert these pressures, not knowing the intensification ratio?  Parts (maybe)  Are these the parts that they ran before sending the mold or are these when the mold was new?  For the Receiving Machine this is a Mystery Tool There is no plan for success with this (lack of) information. 51 - Lean
  • 52. Tool Transfer Methodology Traditional High Risk Start Over Transfer Build New Process Middle Risk Transfer Process Paper Setup Sheet (Med-High Risk) Re-Build Process Tool Transfer Machine Strategy Normalized Transfer Process Graphical Machine Data (Med-Low Risk) Re-Build Process Low Risk Transfer Process Cavity Pressure Re-Build Process 52 - Lean
  • 53. Middle Risk  With setup sheet (higher risk than using data acquisition)  Transfer a GOOD PROCESS (based on risk assessment)  Sprue Orifice Diameter  Clamp Force (may depend on tie bar spacing due to platen deflection)  Fill Time (must be consistent measurement – includes decomp or not?)  Fill Only Part Weight (consistent fill only part measurement strategy)  Hold Pressure (plastic)  Hold Time  Screw Run Time  Back Pressure (plastic)  Mold Clamped Time (ideally)  Cycle Time  Temperature Map (understanding challenges) – including temp in/out  Better: Water Temp in/out and volumetric water flow  Melt Temperature: 30/30  Better: Thin wire temperature probe  Cushion: 5-10% of shot size (not ¼” everywhere)  Decompression: Just over check ring throw  Have all process testing information  Have all machine testing information  Have Graphical Data for Machine Injection and Screw Run 53 - Lean
  • 54. Middle Risk Cont.  Transfer a MOLD with a POOR PROCESS (re-establish process)  Have most of process/machine tests  We can’t run to that speed because our machine is out of tune.  Our machine has never been squared and leveled.  Our screw is worn out.  Check-ring leaks bad so we use a large cushion.  Have no way of validating the material moisture.  We use Maximum clamp force because we always have.  The shot size is only 14% of the barrel capacity. 54 - Lean
  • 55. Tool Transfer Methodology Traditional High Risk Start Over Transfer Build New Process Middle Risk Transfer Process Paper Setup Sheet (Med-High Risk) Re-Build Process Tool Transfer Machine Strategy Normalized Transfer Process Graphical Machine Data (Med-Low Risk) Re-Build Process Low Risk Transfer Process Cavity Pressure Re-Build Process 55 - Lean
  • 56. Low Risk  Transfer a MOLD with a POOR PROCESS and Graphical Data (re- establish process)  Shot size less than 20% or more than 80%  Clamp force set less than 50%  Mold covers less than 60% of the platens.  Wrong screw design 56 - Lean
  • 57. Low Risk Cont. With eDART™ (volume and plastic injection pressure data) – lower risk than just normalized setup sheet  Transfer a GOOD PROCESS (based on risk assessment)  Sprue Orifice Diameter and length known  Clamp Force (may depend on tie bar spacing due to platen deflection)  Fill Time (volumetric flow rate)  Fill Only Part Weight (maybe match relative shape of injection volume curve)  Hold Pressure (plastic)  Hold Time  Screw Run Time  Back Pressure (plastic)  Mold Clamped Time (ideally)  Cycle Time  Temperature Map (understanding challenges) – including temp in/out  Better: Water Temp in/out and volumetric water flow  Melt Temperature: 30/30  Better: Thin wire temperature probe  Cushion: 5-10% of shot size (not ¼” everywhere)  Decompression: Just over check ring throw  Possibly a Decoupled III process Process Match has high potential success. 57 - Lean
  • 58. Lowest Risk  Low Risk (With Cavity Pressure, and ideally Cavity Temperature)  Ideally (but not mandatory) have information about processing window (rheology curve, flow simulation, solid model, etc)  For some applications (e.g. thick walled crystalline parts), cavity temperature may be more important than cavity pressure  MATCH 4 PLASTICS VARIABLES This process has the best opportunity for a match. 58 - Lean
  • 59. Implementation for Success Tool Transfers Now we start building the recipe for success! 59 - Lean
  • 60. The Five Core Phases 60 - Lean
  • 61. Process control involves reduction of normal variation of all primary variables during all phases of the cycle  Drying the plastic  Melting the plastic  Filling the mold  Packing  Holding  Cooling rate and time  Releasing the part 61 - Lean
  • 62. Are You Lost in the Variable Maze? res s PLASTIC CONDITIONS ture flow ssu pera tion pera ture hea m tica pre l te tem we mp rate re s nt bar pla nme t ex igh er lic nviro v (fill rau s e cha hydr oil leak t te aulic alv dim tion tim mold hyd flow e nge wear rates x ing wea cool en le) i ess os i im t atu i sio warp time r rs ol m kp ity re in ns rs swi mid tim lyc s anl ille ture c f ing g u consistency -ba era tch th ne cle erro n me sur ate r yle emp k PID oil t erro eth suc oil on fac gr tun vir olin ing r en orc e ef inis co FINISHED PART PROPERTIES f ol regrind t h p h ro rans ngt c lam water le d p age fg r r e e stre crew run tim e flow n ozz slip nin spo s crew d tu nse MACHINE CONDITIONS s r-dampe scr osc illati colo r ad e wa ew on di undco ter pos pre ssu scr tives nta tem iti ew mi pe mold on re gra rpm na rat nts ure deflectio die nt n 62 - Lean
  • 63. Understanding the Risk of Producing this Product 63 - Lean
  • 64. First Scenario  Non-Instrumented Tool Transfer  No eDART™ Graphical Data 64 - Lean
  • 65. A Tool Transfer is Information from many Sources Inputs Flow Analysis Outputs Fill only short shot Machine Sizing Current Setup Sheet Machine Performance Evaluations Part Prints or Solid Model Full shot (parts and runner) Transfer Mold To Material Processing Guide Machine Performance Evaluations Quality Inspections and Deviations Graphical Cycle Data from Sensored Mold with Cavity Pressure As more information is missing, the RISK of the transfer rises. 65 - Lean
  • 66. Robust Molds “Poor tool maintenance - easily tolerated in the old batch system - repeatedly stopped the whole cell.” “Our tools had deteriorated to a shocking extent without the management ever realizing what was happening.” Tool audits and maintenance are a Key Part of Lean. 66 - Lean
  • 67. Robust Machines  Always reliable and ready to produce on demand  Robust Preventive maintenance is essential 67 - Lean
  • 68. High Risk Mold is delivered with a part print only. With only this information, I can only establish what my tie bar spacing should be. (mold is 14in x 14in) I will have to guess at shot size, transfer, cushion, injection speed, rpm, back pressure and many more attributes to the process. Which means potentially I will not duplicate the same shear rates in the cavity so the part will not be the same. This effects the following:  Pressure distribution in the cavity.  Temperature distribution across the mold and part.  Shrink rates across the part. 68 - Lean
  • 69. 220 ton clamp force 250 Ton clamp force 200 Ton clamp force  1.77 in diameter screw  2.0in diameter screw  1.625 diameter screw  2600 psi hydraulic pump  2150 psi pump  1800 psi pump  12.2:1 Intensification Ratio  11.2 Intensification Ratio  10.2 Intensification Ratio  Maximum Plastic pressure 31,720  Maximum Plastic Pressure 24,080  Maximum Plastic Pressure ppsi ppsi 18,360 ppsi  General Purpose Screw  General purpose screw  General Purpose Screw  12 inch linear shot capability  12.5 in linear shot capability  11.1 linear shot capacity  Maximum Injection Speed 10.2  Maximum injection speed 8.6  Maximum injection speed in/sec in/sec 10.5 in/sec  Utilization is at 85%  Utilization is at 46%  Utilization is at 67%  Tie Bar Spacing is 17in x 17in  Tie bar spacing is 20in x 20in  Tie bar spacing is 15in x 15in Based on our High Risk Tool Transfer, What Molding Machine would you chose? 69 - Lean
  • 70. Normalization of Machines Make all machines interchangeable from The Plastic’s Point of View Starts with an Audit 70 - Lean
  • 71. We will be guessing on what is going on with our tool transfer especially if the wrong machine is chosen. We were told this mold made great parts, what’s the problem?!?!? 71 - Lean
  • 72. Middle Risk  Mold is delivered with Part prints  Received setup sheets from different machines. (none like ours)  Received a set of parts (hopefully the last shot) Four of these, no runner Would we still choose the same machine? 72 - Lean
  • 73. Setup Sheet from Old Process Plastic Flow Rate If we don’t know screw diameter we can not calculate any of these. Shot Size 8.33 inches Transfer Position 1.097 inches Cushion .73 inches Decompress .250 inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 7.6 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 78.90 grams Clamp Force If we don’t know the Intensification Ratio Without knowing the machines Clamp Force 250 Tons We can not convert the back pressure Clamp force we don’t know if Or Pack/Hold Settings. optimized or set at max. Plastic Temperature Melt Temperature 412.5 degrees Back Pressure 66.45 psi RPM 60 Nozzle 450.5 degrees Front Zone 420 degrees Middle Zone 425 degrees Rear Zone 430 degrees Don’t know if this is a general purpose screw or High compression for Polypro, so we can not Plastic Pressure trust these settings. Pack/Hold Time 8 seconds Pack/Hold Pressure 1500 psi Full Part Weight 82.57 grams Gate Seal Yes How do I know that the part is Plastic Cooling not over-packed? Cooling Timer 18 seconds This sheet does not tell us how the mold was Mold Temperature 120 degrees plumbed nor how well it was performing. Without any information from the prior molding machine we can not do much with this information to create a new setup for our new process. 73 - Lean
  • 74. Low Risk  Mold arrives with the following:  Part prints, solid model, flow analysis  Quality inspections including any deviations  Setup sheets  Short shot at transfer  Full shot including the runner  Fully sensored mold with graphical data for cavity pressure.  Machine evaluations 74 - Lean
  • 75. Do you practice a need for Absolutely Capable Process?  IQ - Installation Qualification: quot;Did you put the thing together right?quot;  OQ - Operational Qualification: Create a good process and define the process limits  PQ - Performance Qualification: Make sure good parts can be made over time using an extended run 75 - Lean
  • 76. IQ - Installation Qualification:  IQ has nothing to do with your intelligence (or lack thereof). Instead, IQ asks one basic question: quot;Did you put the thing together rightquot;. In the case of an injection molding process, that can refer to the machine, the mold, or the auxiliaries. Did the steel get cut right? Are the water lines hooked up correctly? Is the mold sized correctly for the machine it is in? Is the equipment properly calibrated? The list can get pretty long, but the point is doing your home work up front so you don't overlook something simple. The Items Needed:  Solid Model  Flow Analysis  Machine sizing information (coming from and going to)  Performance information of both machines 76 - Lean
  • 77. Actual Machine Evaluation Testing Data Machine Testing:  Injection Speed Linearity  Load Sensitivity  Pressure Response  Check Ring Study  Repeatability 77 - Lean
  • 78. Injection Speed Linearity Stroke (include decompression): 270.97 mm 10.67 1st-2nd Position Transfer: 36.83 mm 1.45 MAX MACHINE VELOCITY IN/SEC 10.2 in/sec Actual MACHINE SET Machine Set Machine Expected Fill VELOCITY % Velocity IN/SEC Fill Time Velocity Time % Difference 99 10.00 1.45 6.36 0.92 -57.3% 89 9.00 1.49 6.19 1.02 -45.5% 79 8.00 1.73 5.33 1.15 -50.1% 69 7.00 1.89 4.88 1.32 -43.5% 59 6.00 1.98 4.66 1.54 -28.9% 49 5.00 2.15 4.29 1.84 -16.6% 39 4.00 2.50 3.69 2.30 -8.5% 29 3.00 3.15 2.93 3.07 -2.5% 19 2.00 5.75 1.60 4.61 -24.8% 9 1.00 12.44 0.74 9.22 -35.0% Average % Difference: -31% This machine can not achieve the desired fill time the flow analysis suggested, therefore it will be impossible to achieve the desired shear rates. This would get a high risk of 5 for this test. 78 - Lean
  • 79. Load Sensitivity Choose Type of Pressure Fill Time (mold) 1.45 sec X Fill Time (air) 1.03 sec Peak Pressure (mold) 15,256 PSI Peak Pressure (air) 5,245 PSI *Fill in highlighted Areas* Actual Test % 2.89% Acceptable Range: 3% This machine is not sensitive to a load change therefore receiving a risk of 2. 79 - Lean
  • 80. Pressure Response X Time 1 1.5600 sec Pressure 1 15256.00 ppsi Time 2 1.7600 sec Pressure 2 14370.00 ppsi Actual Response Time: 2.257336343 Acceptable Response Time: <0.2 sec/1000 psi Pressure Response is somewhat challenged with a risk of 4. 80 - Lean
  • 81. Measuring the Risk of Potential Problem Areas  Square corners equals risk of 5  Additions to walls equals risk of 5  Change in wall thickness equals risk of 5 if gate location is on opposing end of part We have either blue prints and/or solid model 81 - Lean information
  • 82. Information from Solid Model and Flow Analysis Key Information from Solid Model Cubic inch volume of the solid model is 5.09 Sprue / Runner volume is 2.73 cubic inches Square inches at the parting line is 7.99 Key Information from Flow Analysis Fill Time is .95 seconds Pressure near gate is 12,000 ppsi Pressure at end of part 2,600 ppsi Average pressure in the mold to produce a good part is 7300ppsi Tons per square inch is 3.65 Cooling Time 16 seconds Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds Development of Set up Sheet Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370ppsi We can establish a shot size, transfer position and cushion from the volume based on screw diameter. We can establish the clamp force needed based on the square inches and the average cavity pressure. 82 - Lean
  • 83. Decoupled II Pre Process Setup Sheet Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 10.7 inches Transfer Position 1.5 inches Cushion 1 inch Decompress .31inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 72.1 grams Clamp Force Clamp Force 136 Tons These can be calculated based on our transfer machine information. From the flow analysis Weighing parts or flow analysis can give us this information. Reduce the amount of guessing during the startup of your transfer tool. 83 - Lean
  • 84. Selected Number of Cavities Risk Runner layout: a risk of 2 Gate location: a risk of 5 Gate Type: a risk of 3 Balance of Fill 3 Risk of cold slug well/puller design 5 84 - Lean
  • 85. If we have the short shot, we can see potential problems. Risk of Balance 5 Flow Analysis can also give us a snapshot of this problem. 85 - Lean
  • 86. Material Processing Guide 86 - Lean
  • 87. Cycle from the Plastics’ Point of View Heat it up Flow it Pressurize it Cool it The rest are details: The devil’s in those details! 87 - Lean
  • 88. A Strategy Based on the 4 Plastics’ Variables “Helps Injection Molders Succeed”  Temperature  Flow Rate  Pressure  Cooling 88 - Lean
  • 89. Decoupled II Pre Process Setup Sheet for the 220 Ton Machine Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 10.7 inches Transfer Position 1.5 inches Cushion 1 inch Decompress .3 inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 72.1 grams Clamp Force Information From material Clamp Force 136 Tons processing guide Plastic Temperature Melt Temperature 412 degrees Back Pressure 61psi RPM 75 Nozzle 412 degrees Front Zone 412 degrees Middle Zone 412 degrees Rear Zone 412 degrees Plastic Pressure Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi Full Part Weight 75.87 grams Gate Seal Yes Peak at Transfer 15,256ppsi Plastic Cooling Cooling Timer 16 seconds Mold Temperature 120 degrees This information could be gathered from Could weigh the parts you a former setup sheet or flow analysis. received with your mold or ask 89 - Lean the flow analysis
  • 90. Only Choice 220 ton clamp force 250 Ton clamp force 200 Ton clamp force  1.77 in diameter screw  2.0in diameter screw  1.625 diameter screw  2600 psi hydraulic pump  2150 psi pump  1800 psi pump  12.2:1 Intensification Ratio  11.2 Intensification Ratio  10.2 Intensification Ratio  Maximum Plastic pressure 31,720  Maximum Plastic Pressure 24,080  Maximum Plastic Pressure ppsi ppsi 18,360 ppsi  General Purpose Screw  General purpose screw  General Purpose Screw  12 inch linear shot capability  12.5 in linear shot capability  11.1 linear shot capacity  Maximum Injection Speed 10.2  Maximum injection speed 7.6  Maximum injection speed in/sec in/sec 10.5 in/sec  Utilization is at 85%  Utilization is at 46%  Utilization is at 67%  Tie Bar Spacing is 17in x 17in  Tie bar spacing is 20in x 20in  Tie bar spacing is 15in x 15in This machine would fail due From our selection of machines, this This machine would fail due to lack of Max. Plastic is the only machine that is capable to lack of injection speed of making the same part. capability, I could not Pressure, it would become pressure limited when the duplicate the same shear viscosity changed. rates. 90 - Lean
  • 91. Setup Sheet from Old Process for the 250 Ton Molding Machine Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 8.33 inches Transfer Position 1.097 inches Cushion .73 inches Decompress .250 inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 7.6 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 72.1 grams Fill Time will be impossible to meet Clamp Force Injection Speed is maxed OUT Clamp Force 136 Tons Only using 54% of Clamp Force Plastic Temperature Melt Temperature 412.5 degrees Back Pressure 66.45 psi RPM 60 Nozzle 412 degrees Front Zone 412 degrees Middle Zone 412 degrees Rear Zone 412 degrees Plastic Pressure Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi Full Part Weight 75.87 grams Gate Seal Yes Plastic Cooling Cooling Timer 16 seconds Mold Temperature 120 degrees Putting the Mold in this Machine Would be Extremely High Risk as we can not achieve the Shear rates due to the fact it will need to be slowed down. 91 - Lean
  • 92. Setup Sheet from Old Process for the 200 Ton Molding Machine Max Linear Shot for this Machine is 11.1 We can not achieve the volume Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 12.5 inches Transfer Position 1.66 inches Cushion 1.1 inches Decompress .250 inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 11.4 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 72.1 grams Clamp Force Max Injection Speed is only 10.5 in/sec Fill time can not be Reached Clamp Force 136 Tons We can not achieve the Shear Rates for the Plastic Plastic Temperature Melt Temperature 412.5 degrees Back Pressure 66.45 psi RPM 60 Nozzle 412 degrees Front Zone 412 degrees Middle Zone 412 degrees Rear Zone 412 degrees Plastic Pressure Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi Full Part Weight 75.87 grams Gate Seal Yes Plastic Cooling Cooling Timer 16 seconds Mold Temperature 120 degrees Putting the Mold in this Machine Would be a Disaster as we can not achieve the Shear rates nor do we have enough volume of 92 - Lean plastic in our shot.
  • 93. OQ - Operational Qualification:  OQ is quot;the heart of validationquot;. This is where the process is created. Bottom line is, make sure the process is a good one. Here is where we can really help molders. Make sure the melt temperature is at the manufacturer's midrange. Set a fill speed based on your rheology curve. Transfer when the part is 95-98% full. Sound familiar? 93 - Lean
  • 94. RIGOROUS MOLD Transfer (Rigorous: Severe; Logical; Uncompromising) OBJECTIVES: Challenge a mold early and hard so that it’s weaknesses can be quickly defined and corrected before it must produce parts in a production environment. “NEVER AGAIN PUT A BAD TRANSFER MOLD INTO PRODUCTION” Develop, refine and center machine independent process conditions for optimum product quality.  During successive tryouts, parts made under the same plastic processing conditions can be compared to evaluate mold rework Establish alarm limits for ongoing process monitoring and automatic suspect part containment.  Production launch can be machine independent with predictable results 94 - Lean
  • 95. But OQ goes one step further.  In addition to building and documenting a good process, OQ requires that the molder quot;define the key processing parameters and their associated rangesquot;. Or, in simple terms, what press settings have an impact on part quality? How much can the operator adjust these settings and still make a good part? For example, the target fill speed might be 5 inches per second, but how much faster or slower is acceptable? The example below shows the target with the max and min settings. Press Setting Min Target Max Fill Speed 4.5 in/s 5 in/s 5.5 in/s This is OK, but is useless if the mold is transferred to another press. The mold would have to be validated every time the mold is moved to a different machine! A better approach is to document the process settings and ranges in quot;Machine Independentquot; terms based on the 4 Plastics Variables. Instead of fill speed, the FILL TIME should be used. Here's an example of the same process setting from above: Press Setting Min Target Max Fill Time 0.55 sec 0.6 sec 0.7 sec Using a Machine Independent Process Setup Sheet, the OQ stage can usually be avoided (or at least greatly reduced), saving the molder lots of time and money. 95 - Lean
  • 96. Using Data to Verify Process Parameter Plastic Effective Shot Fill Time 1/t Pressure Viscosity 30000 1 0.20 8720 5.0 1,744 10 27000 2 0.22 8160 4.55 1,795 3 0.30 5440 3.33 1,632 24000 4 0.62 4640 1.61 2,877 9 21000 5 1.47 2969 .68 4,364 6 1.52 2960 .65 4,499 18000 8 7 1.92 6260 .52 12,019 15000 8 2.13 8160 .47 17,381 9 2.52 8560 .40 21,571 12000 7 10 3.31 8360 .30 27,672 9000 6000 6 5 4 3000 3 2 1 4.0 .50 4.5 2.0 2.5 1.5 3.0 1.0 3.5 5.0 96 - Lean
  • 97. Cavity Balance Study Fast inj Speed Med Inj Speed Slow Inj Speed 1. 72.1g weight 66.9 49.6 2. 71.5 66.1 43.4 3. 71.9 65.4 41.2 4. 70.9 64.0 42.3 Balance 1.94% 4.33% 16.94% 97 - Lean
  • 98. Part of process control involves knowing if and when gate seal occurs on all cavities for all molds. Without Instrumentation we use part weight study With instrumentation we use post gate psi curve including hold time Gate Seal = Best Dimensional Control Allowing discharge or backflow out of the gate after a set period of time:  Can reduce compressive stresses near the gate  Can affect pressure gradient caused warpage 98 - Lean
  • 99. Pressure Loss Study 15,256 ppsi 9,628 ppsi 8,343 ppsi What happens if the viscosity changes? 5,245ppsi 99 - Lean
  • 100. How do we know how much RISK we are taking to mold these products? Example: The shot size for this process is 10.668 linear inches.  The molding machine’s maximum stroke is 12 inches. You are using 88.9% of the barrel capacity, 80% is the maximum usage which gives us a rating of 5. NOTE:  1 is a low risk condition  3 is an average amount of risk  5 is high risk and could result in process challenges 100 - Lean
  • 101. The Risk including the Machine Performance The Process Shot Size 10.7 inches5 Transfer Position 1.5 inches1 Cushion 1 inch1 Decompress .3 inches1 Fill Time .95 seconds5 Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second5 Fill Only Part Weight 72.1 grams1 Clamp Force 136 Tons3 Back Pressure 62 ps1 RPM 751 Melt Temperature 412 degrees2 Nozzle 412 degrees1 Front Zone 412 degrees1 Middle Zone 412 degrees1 Rear Zone 412 degrees1 Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds1 Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi1 Full Part Weight 75.87 grams1 Gate Seal 1 Cooling Timer 16 seconds1 Mold Temperature 120 degrees1 The Part Square corners equals risk of 5 Additions to walls equals risk of 5 Change in wall thickness equals risk of 5 Cavity Layout Runner layout: a risk of 5 Gate location: a risk of 5 Gate Type: a risk of 3 Balance of Fill 5 Risk of cold slug well/puller design 5 Machine Performance Injection Speed Linearity 5 Pressure Response 4 Load Sensitivity 2 Potential Total Risk of 32 topics at a Our Risk of Producing this Product is 85 severe rating of 5 equals which is a very average part to produce 160 85 101 - Lean
  • 102. Only Choice 220 ton clamp force 250 Ton clamp force 200 Ton clamp force  1.77 in diameter screw  2.0in diameter screw  1.625 diameter screw  2600 psi hydraulic pump  2150 psi pump  1800 psi pump  12.2:1 Intensification Ratio  11.2 Intensification Ratio  10.2 Intensification Ratio  Maximum Plastic pressure 31,720  Maximum Plastic Pressure 24,080  Maximum Plastic Pressure ppsi ppsi 18,360 ppsi  General Purpose Screw  General purpose screw  General Purpose Screw  12 inch linear shot capability  12.5 in linear shot capability  11.1 linear shot capacity  Maximum Injection Speed 10.2  Maximum injection speed 7.6  Maximum injection speed in/sec in/sec 10.5 in/sec  Utilization is at 85%  Utilization is at 46%  Utilization is at 67%  Tie Bar Spacing is 17in x 17in  Tie bar spacing is 20in x 20in  Tie bar spacing is 15in x 15in This machine would fail due From our selection of machines, this This machine would fail due to lack of Max. Plastic is the only machine that is capable to lack of injection speed of making the same part. capability, I could not Pressure, it would become pressure limited when the duplicate the same shear viscosity changed. rates. 102 - Lean
  • 103. Other Items to Consider Viscosity shift should also be considered. Our average maximum pressure at the parting line without flashing is: Clamp force in pounds (440,000) divided by the total square inches of (32.96 sq/in) equals a pressure of 13,349ppsi in the cavity. A good part requires an average pressure of 7,300ppsi (from flow analysis) which provides a nice process window. If 20% viscosity shift or regrind is used our good part may require 7,300 times 1.2 (1 = part, .2 = viscosity shift) which equates to a new average pressure for a good part of 8,760ppsi in the cavity. Many times looking at the risk of utilizing regrind is never considered and could cause a pressure limit condition be default. Another risk factor that could be considered. 103 - Lean
  • 104. Does the Molding Machine Have enough Performance when Viscosity Changes? Peak pressure at transfer was 15,256ppsi (from Flow Analysis). 220 ton clamp force 1.77 in diameter screw If viscosity goes up 20% 2600 psi hydraulic pump 12.2:1 Intensification Ratio our new peak pressure at Maximum Plastic pressure 31,720 ppsi transfer would be General Purpose Screw 12 inch linear shot capability 18,307ppsi Maximum Injection Speed 10.2 in/sec Utilization is at 85% Tie Bar Spacing is 17in x 17in This would be Low Risk 104 - Lean
  • 105. How much will your dimensions change over time? Note: The longer a flow Post Gate control transducer @ front has to travel the 12,000 psi more pressure loss that will exist. Pressure Loss 10,000psi .500 post detail with a tolerance of ± .002 EOC monitor transducer @ 2000 psi Calculation for Dimensional Change Using Actual Data  Peak End of Cavity Pressure  Peak End of Cavity Pressure Low    x Compressib ility  x Dimension  % of dimension change  1000psi  *amorphous .005 .5% = .005 amorphous per 1000 psi .75% = .0025 low crystalline per 1000 psi .1% = .01 high crystalline per 1000 psi 105 - Lean
  • 106. PQ - Performance Qualification: The objective of PQ is to show that good parts can be made over time. In PQ, the process is run for an extended period (24 hours is not uncommon) and parts are monitored carefully to make sure they are acceptable. Parts are inspected regularly, and some parts will usually be sent off for functional testing (putting the parts into a final assembly to make sure they actually work!) During PQ, the process is often quot;challengedquot; by throwing in common sources of variation to make sure that parts still come out good. For example, the fill speed might be adjusted from the high to the low range settings (using our example from above). The point is to try to catch problems that might not be caught in a short term run. Note that practices here vary. Some customers quot;challengequot; the process during PQ, some during OQ 106 - Lean
  • 107. Changes in Dimensions?  Why do part dimensions vary???  Over time?  Shot to shot?  During startups? 107 - Lean
  • 108. 2nd Scenario  A Fully Instrumented Mold Transfer  Using eDART™ Graphical Data 108 - Lean
  • 109. Data Analysis A. B. A. Summary Screen: Displays summary data values in a running bar chart for analyzing trends over time. B. Cycle Graph Screen: Displays each cycle versus time as a graphical waveform. 109 - Lean
  • 110. Typical Cycle Graph 10,000 Plastic Injection Shot Volume PRESSURE (PSI) Pressure Gate End Mold Pressure End of Cavity Mold Pressure 0 TIME 16 (SECONDS) 110 - Lean
  • 111. End of Cavity Pressure 20,000  Most Variable  Best For Monitoring PRESSURE (PSIP)  Contain Short Shots!! Peak PSI Cooling Rate No Dynamic PSI Part is Full Pack Rate 0 TIME (SECONDS) 15 111 - Lean
  • 112. Gate End Pressure 20,000  Best For Control  Fill Dynamics PRESSURE (PSIP)  Gate Seal Peak PSI Pack Rate Sudden Pressure Reduction due to Cooling Discharge Rate Full Packed 0 Cavity Fill Time TIME (SECONDS) 112 - Lean
  • 113. Cavity Pressure Integrals The most useful data for process monitoring is the end-of-cavity pressure. The area under this curve represents the packing of the mold to a peak pressure and then this time delay of pressure during cooling. Changes to the rate and degree of packing, or the rate of cooling affect the end-of-cavity cycle integral. PRESSURE (PSI) Pack & Hold End of Cavity Mold Pressure 0 Start Mold TIME (SECONDS) 16 Fill Time 113 - Lean
  • 114. Cavity Pressure Gate End Showing Discharge This is best detected by monitoring the integral Fill Pack Hold  A chart with two seconds less 2nd stage time is shown where plastic is allowed to run back out of the cavity, at point F D  This is called discharge or backflow PRESSURE (PSI)  Discharge is not always undesirable in molding  Many center gated parts, E especially ones where flatness is desirable, must be allowed to F discharge for correct part characteristics B C Gate End A Mold Pressure 0 Start Mold TIME (SECONDS) 15 Fill Time 114 - Lean
  • 115. Historical Data for Steady State 108 second stop 8 cycles Start of process Small Steel Mold 115 - Lean
  • 116. Before the Mold is Prepared for Transfer a Graphical Snap Shot of the Process is Taken 116 - Lean
  • 117. Problem Post Gate End of Cavity The original process traces are saved as dotted lines to become our template. It is imperative to match what goes on inside the cavity (Post Gate and End of Cavity). 117 - Lean
  • 118. Mold temperature was fluctuating About 10 degrees Thermal stability is challenged and will affect part quality. 118 - Lean
  • 119. Cushion Screw Trace Shot Size Transfer Position Decompress 119 - Lean
  • 120. Decoupled II Pre Process Setup Sheet for the 220 Ton Machine Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 10.7 inches Transfer Position 1.5 inches Cushion 1 inch Decompress .3 inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 72.1 grams Clamp Force This information can be found Clamp Force 136 Tons on the Screw Trace Plastic Temperature Melt Temperature 412 degrees Back Pressure 61psi RPM 75 Nozzle 412 degrees Front Zone 412 degrees Middle Zone 412 degrees Rear Zone 412 degrees Plastic Pressure Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi Full Part Weight 75.87 grams Gate Seal Yes Peak at Transfer 15,256ppsi Plastic Cooling Cooling Timer 16 seconds Mold Temperature 120 degrees 120 - Lean
  • 121. Peak Pressure at Transfer Injection Speed Pack and Hold Pressure Fill Time In Cavity Pack Time 121 - Lean
  • 122. Decoupled II Pre Process Setup Sheet for the 220 Ton Machine Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 10.7 inches Transfer Position 1.5 inches Cushion 1 inch Decompress .3 inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 72.1 grams Clamp Force From the Screw Trace From Graphical Data Clamp Force 136 Tons Turn Pack and Hold Off To Verify Plastic Temperature Melt Temperature 412 degrees Back Pressure 61psi RPM 75 Nozzle 412 degrees Front Zone 412 degrees Middle Zone 412 degrees Rear Zone 412 degrees Plastic Pressure Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi Full Part Weight 75.87 grams Gate Seal Yes Peak at Transfer 15,256ppsi From the Machine Pressure Trace Plastic Cooling Cooling Timer 16 seconds Mold Temperature 120 degrees 122 - Lean
  • 123. Temperature Information from Inside the Cavity Screw Run Information Back Pressure Pack and Hold Time 123 - Lean
  • 124. Decoupled II Pre Process Setup Sheet for the 220 Ton Machine Plastic Flow Rate Shot Size 10.7 inches Transfer Position 1.5 inches Cushion 1 inch Decompress .3 inches Fill Time .95 seconds Injection Speed 9.7 inches per second Fill Only Part Weight 72.1 grams Clamp Force From the Temperature Trace From the Screw Trace Inside the Cavity Clamp Force 136 Tons From the Machine Pressure Plastic Temperature Trace Melt Temperature 412 degrees Back Pressure 61psi RPM 75 Nozzle 412 degrees Front Zone 412 degrees Middle Zone 412 degrees Rear Zone 412 degrees Plastic Pressure Pack/Hold Time 7 seconds Pack/Hold Pressure 14,370 ppsi Full Part Weight 75.87 grams Gate Seal Yes Peak at Transfer 15,256ppsi From the Machine Pressure Trace Plastic Cooling Cooling Timer 16 seconds Mold Temperature 120 degrees 124 - Lean
  • 125. World Template with Mold Deflection Clamp Force could also be Duplicated What happens in the mold, stays in the part!! 125 - Lean
  • 126. Constant Machine Conditions: Are the parts the same? Visually these two parts are full and Appear to be the same REMEMBER: What happens in the cavity stays in the part! 126 - Lean
  • 127. Alarm Set-Points What values define “Bad” parts?  Observe data and look for lack of trends  Log Events (bad parts) and correlate to changes in measurements  Force changes until parts go short and set levels well inside that value 127 - Lean
  • 128. Abnormal Part Containment Do you have bad Part Traceability? 128 - Lean
  • 129. Summary Graph: Data Over Time 129 - Lean
  • 130. Determining Critical To Value Data A systems ability to collect and present information in a way that it can be easily used is the cornerstone of its successful implementation. Viscosity Mold pressure cycle integral 130 - Lean
  • 131. What and When is Steady State? Random Instability: changes in the process of making product that does not repeat. Pattern Instability: are changes in the process that repeat periodically. Normal Variation: is that which is expected such as viscosity change during production run. Abnormal Variation: is an unexpected occurrence at a unexpected time. These types of variables can be caused from machine performance, material performance, non-robust process, dryer performance, thermolater performance, process water, auxiliary equipment, etc. 131 - Lean
  • 132. Viscosity Variation 132 - Lean
  • 133. Hot Runner Variation 133 - Lean
  • 134. Trending Variation 134 - Lean
  • 135. You Can’t Manually Sort Your Way To World Class  4 sigma companies can produce 6 sigma products through enormous amounts of rework  They can’t raise their prices to recapture their costs because they must price their products competitively  Business quality is highest when cost is at its absolute lowest for both the producer and the consumer  Everyone MUST buy in 135 - Lean
  • 136. The End Result Knowing what your customers expectations are for mold performance can aide you in streamlining your tool transfer and manufacturing process and in turn speeds up the time it takes you to get your molds into production. This knowledge will increase the customers confidence in your abilities as a mold builder and helps to establish a partnership based relationship with them. 136 - Lean

×