#G4C12: Game Design Workshop

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In this workshop, veteran game designer Nicholas Fortugno introduces the core idea of serious game design: using game mechanics and play to communicate, teach, or persuade. The workshop gives a definition of games that provides tools to think about the underlying systems that make them work, and then shows how those systems can be constructed to lead to specific play patterns. Examples are shown from successful serious games of the relationship between the game mechanics and the serious content. Participants then take part in a hands-on analog game design exercise to put these lessons to work by making a prototypes of a game for a pre-selected issue. The goal of the workshop is to give participants direct experience thinking in game design terms and trying to apply game design in an instrumental way. No previous game design experience required.

PARTICIPANTS:
Nick Fortugno, Co-Founder and Chief Creative Officer, Playmatics

Published in: Entertainment & Humor, Design
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#G4C12: Game Design Workshop

  1. 1. Game Design Workshop Nicholas Fortugno Playmatics
  2. 2. Game Design Basics
  3. 3. Game Design Basics• Games have goals that the player tries to reach in order to win.
  4. 4. Game Design Basics• Games have goals that the player tries to reach in order to win.• A game’s rules are constraints on the player’s ability to reach the goal.
  5. 5. Game Design Basics• Games have goals that the player tries to reach in order to win.• A game’s rules are constraints on the player’s ability to reach the goal.• The combination of goals and rules forms a set of incentives that guide player choices and behavior.
  6. 6. nti
  7. 7. Game Design Basics• Games have goals that the player tries to reach in order to win.• A game’s rules are constraints on the player’s ability to reach the goal.• The combination of goals and rules forms a set of incentives that guide player choices and behavior.• This is what creates fun and the other emotions and messages games produce.
  8. 8. Using Games for Serious Purposes
  9. 9. Using Games for Serious Purposes• The key to using a game for a message or lesson is to embody the message in the play.
  10. 10. Using Games for Serious Purposes• The key to using a game for a message or lesson is to embody the message in the play.• The player has to engage with the message by playing, meaning through the action of making choices in the game system.
  11. 11. Examples of Embodied Play
  12. 12. Examples of Embodied Play• Games as modeling
  13. 13. Examples of Embodied Play HD Lab, Playmatics
  14. 14. Examples of Embodied Play The Redistricting Game, USC Game Innovation Lab
  15. 15. Examples of Embodied Play• Games as modeling• Games as simulation
  16. 16. Examples of Embodied Play Peacemaker, Impact Games
  17. 17. Examples of Embodied Play Ayiti: The Cost of Life, gameLab, Global Kids
  18. 18. Examples of Embodied Play Hustlin’ Healthcare, Clay Ewing
  19. 19. Examples of Embodied Play• Games as modeling• Games as simulation• Games as abstract representation
  20. 20. Examples of Embodied Play Humans vs. Mosquitos, Mohini Dutta, Ben Norskov, Lien Tran, and Eulani Labay
  21. 21. Examples of Embodied Play• Games as modeling• Games as simulation• Games as abstract representation• Gamification of the method of change
  22. 22. Examples of Embodied Play Commons: The Game, Suzanne Kirkpatrick, Nien Lam, Jamie Lin
  23. 23. Workshop Exercise• Create a prototype – A very crude, very broken, first pass at a game• The goal is to have the core interactivity of the game (e.g. the players’ choice) embody the lesson or system you want the players to learn.
  24. 24. Questions?nick@playmatics.com Design | Innovation | Engagement www.Playmatics.com

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