Do it-yourself energy efficient projects
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Do it-yourself energy efficient projects

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    Do it-yourself energy efficient projects Do it-yourself energy efficient projects Presentation Transcript

    • Adriana Galue Wolfgang Custom Finishes 2008
    • HOME ENERGY STATS  Biggest energy consumers  Space heating – 34%  Appliances and lighting – 34%  Refrigerator – 8%  Water Heating – 13%  Electric A/C – 11%
    • Energy Losses  Conduction loss through solid materials  Wet ground increases conductive loss (water great conductor of heat)  Conduction and radiation loss through framing and window frames  Convection forces air out roof (light fixtures, ceiling fans, etc)
    • First Step – Gather Info  Home Energy Audit  Figure out where energy is being wasted ($300 - $500)  Look at utility bills  Ask about your concerns, comfort issues  Visual inspection (top to bottom)  look for leaks, Check for insulation, Inspect windows, Inspect appliances  Perform blower door test / IR – how leaky is the house  A good rating is 1000 – 1500 CFM  Perform Duct blast test -  May lose 35% of heat through ducts  Make recommendations and hire professional retrofitters
    • Second Step - Weatherize  Seal leaks  Caulk all leaks / Seal windows and doors, outlets, plumbing penetrations  Seal ceiling penetration (recessed lighting, attic access doors)  HOW TO SEAL  Large leaks use backer rod (larger than 3/8”)  Liquid foam (window and door installation, gaps and cracks 1/8” – ½”, Big Gap – ½” – 1”)  Caulk – Silicone is the best  Weather stripping – many types depending on application  Light switch / outlet cover gaskets  Door Sweeps  Seal HVAC Ducts with Mastic sealant
    • Third Step - Insulate  ONLY INSULATE AFTER SEALING AND INSTALL CORRECTLY  Reduce heat loss - Attic 30%, Walls 16-20%, Floors 5-15%, Foundation, Windows  Call building department for code and increase by 30%  Call local builders, check EPA energy star  Where to use  Attics – loose fill, blankets, liquid foam  Walls – loose fill, blankets (if new), liquid foam  Floors – Blankets (moisture barrier against floor) and liquid foam  Foundations – rigid board rated for burial  Exterior sheathing – roofs and exterior walls
    • Fourth Step - Windows  Plastic window coverings –reduce air infiltration  Internal and external storm windows – made of plastic or glass  Insulate - Create an airspace between window and storm window  Window replacement - Very expensive  Casement windows best option  Want  Low U factor - reciprocal of R value, want 0.3 or lower  double pane better to reduce conductivity of heat  low-e coating (low emissivity) – microscopically thin layer of tin of metallic oxide that reduces heat flow  gas filled (argon or krypton) – increase R-value by 0.5  type of sash (not metal, want wood, vinyl, or fiberglass)  warm edge space to insulate edge of class  heat mirror film (like a third pane)  low infiltration (air-tight) - Want under 0.3  Want higher condensation rating (between 0-100)  heat gain coefficient to match application - want 0.4 to 0.55 or higher in intermediate climates  good visible transmittance (clear glass = 90%), want over 60%  energy star qualified
    • Fifth Step - Other  Energy Star appliances (water heater first)  Minimize lighting –CFL’s, LED’s  Behavioral changes (hand-wash dishes, clothes line)  Use radiant barriers / window shades  Natural ventilation  Utilize fans to cool vs mechanical cooling  Programmable thermostat  Reduce Phantom loads
    • Conclusion  Always go for energy efficiency prior to renewable energy technologies  Simple projects can add up to great savings  Look at projects that can do on own with simple materials and a little labor