Greenpeace

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Greenpeace

  1. 1. GREENPEACE<br />GROUP 3<br />Cassandra Perey<br />Regina Timan<br />
  2. 2. The<br />History <br />Of <br />Greenpeace<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4. In 1971, motivated by their vision of a green and peaceful world, a small team of activists set sail from Vancouver, Canada, in an old fishing boat. These activists, the founders of Greenpeace, believed a few individuals could make a difference. <br />
  5. 5. <ul><li>Their mission was to "bear witness" to US underground nuclear testing at Amchitka, a tiny island off the West Coast of Alaska, which is one of the world's most earthquake-prone regions.
  6. 6. Even though their old boat, the Phyllis Cormack, was intercepted before it got to Amchitka, the journey sparked a flurry of public interest.
  7. 7. The US still detonated the bomb, but the voice of reason had been heard. Nuclear testing on Amchitka ended that same year, and the island was later declared a bird sanctuary.
  8. 8. The Amchitka mission cemented the activists group’s new name, Greenpeace, It is said to have been Bill Darnell who said, “Let’s make it a Green Peace.” Jim Bohlen’s son, Paul, had trouble making the words fit on a button, so he linked them together and formed the word “Greenpeace,” and it stuck. (Greenpeace) </li></li></ul><li>Greenpeace Founders<br />Jim Bohlen-a former deep-sea diver and radar operator in the US Navy.<br />
  9. 9. Greenpeace Founders<br />Paul Cote- a law student at the University of British Columbia .<br />Jim Bohlen-a former deep-sea diver and radar operator in the US Navy.<br />
  10. 10. Greenpeace Founders<br />Irving Stowe- a Quaker and Yale-educated lawyer  <br />Paul Cote- a law student at the University of British Columbia .<br />Jim Bohlen-a former deep-sea diver and radar operator in the US Navy.<br />
  11. 11. Bill Darnell- a social worker. (Greenpeace) <br />
  12. 12. Bill Darnell- a social worker. (Greenpeace) <br />Patrick Moore- an ecology student at the University of British Columbia  <br />
  13. 13. OBJECTIVES<br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. Protect Ancient Forests is a cause that Greenpeace International focuses on to protect the forests and its wildlife. Plants, animals, and cultures of forest people are being seriously threatened. (Greenpeace) <br />
  16. 16. Protect Ancient Forests is a cause that Greenpeace International focuses on to protect the forests and its wildlife. Plants, animals, and cultures of forest people are being seriously threatened. (Greenpeace) <br />
  17. 17. Protect Ancient Forests is a cause that Greenpeace International focuses on to protect the forests and its wildlife. Plants, animals, and cultures of forest people are being seriously threatened. (Greenpeace) <br />Save Our Seas is a large part of Greenpeace International’s mission. Marine life has been and continues to be threatened by the following key components: industrial fishing, bycatch, unfair fisheries, fish farming, global warming and pollution. Greenpeace calls for change in the way that our oceans are managed. (Greenpeace) <br />
  18. 18.
  19. 19. Stop the Climate Change is Greenpeace International’s mission to phase out fossil fuels and replace them with reusable energy in order to stop climate change. (Greenpeace)<br />
  20. 20. Stop the Climate Change is Greenpeace International’s mission to phase out fossil fuels and replace them with reusable energy in order to stop climate change. (Greenpeace)<br />
  21. 21. Stop the Climate Change is Greenpeace International’s mission to phase out fossil fuels and replace them with reusable energy in order to stop climate change. (Greenpeace)<br />Toxic Chemicals harm our rivers, lakes, oceans, and air, as well as human health. Greenpeace International works to educate and eliminate these toxic chemicals from production, trade, and use. It suggests substituting the toxic chemicals with safer, alternative materials in order to keep our world cleaner and healthier. (Greenpeace) <br />
  22. 22. ACTIVITIES & BENEFICIARIES<br />
  23. 23.
  24. 24. Climate and energy<br />Currently Greenpeace considers global warming to be the greatest environmental problem facing the Earth. Greenpeace calls for global greenhouse gas emissions to peak in 2015 and to decrease as close to zero as possible by 2050.<br />
  25. 25. The Kingsnorth court case<br />
  26. 26. The Kingsnorth court case<br /><ul><li>In October 2007, six Greenpeace protesters were arrested for breaking in to the Kingsnorth power station, climbing the 200 metre smokestack, painting the name Gordon on the chimney, and causing an estimated £30,000 damage. At their subsequent trial they admitted trying to shut the station down, but argued that they were legally justified because they were trying to prevent climate change from causing greater damage to property elsewhere around the world.</li></li></ul><li>The Kingsnorth court case<br /><ul><li>In October 2007, six Greenpeace protesters were arrested for breaking in to the Kingsnorth power station, climbing the 200 metre smokestack, painting the name Gordon on the chimney, and causing an estimated £30,000 damage. At their subsequent trial they admitted trying to shut the station down, but argued that they were legally justified because they were trying to prevent climate change from causing greater damage to property elsewhere around the world.</li></ul>"Go Beyond Oil"<br />
  27. 27. The Kingsnorth court case<br /><ul><li>In October 2007, six Greenpeace protesters were arrested for breaking in to the Kingsnorth power station, climbing the 200 metre smokestack, painting the name Gordon on the chimney, and causing an estimated £30,000 damage. At their subsequent trial they admitted trying to shut the station down, but argued that they were legally justified because they were trying to prevent climate change from causing greater damage to property elsewhere around the world.</li></ul>"Go Beyond Oil"<br /><ul><li>The "Go Beyond Oil" campaign also involves applying political pressure on the governments who allow oil exploration in their territories; with the group stating that one of the key aims of the "Go Beyond Oil" campaign is to "work to expose the lengths the oil industry is willing to go to squeeze the last barrels out of the ground and put pressure on industry and governments to move beyond oil.</li></li></ul><li>Nuclear power<br />
  28. 28. Nuclear power<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace views nuclear power as a relatively minor industry with major problems, such as environmental damage and risks from uranium mining, nuclear weapons proliferation, and unresolved questions concerning nuclear waste. The organization argues that the potential of nuclear power to mitigate global warming is marginal, referring to the IEA energy scenario where an increase in world's nuclear capacity from 2608 TWh in 2007 to 9857 TWh by 2050 would cut global greenhouse gas emissions less than 5% and at require 32 nuclear reactor units of 1000MW capacity built per year until 2050.</li></li></ul><li>Nuclear power<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace views nuclear power as a relatively minor industry with major problems, such as environmental damage and risks from uranium mining, nuclear weapons proliferation, and unresolved questions concerning nuclear waste. The organization argues that the potential of nuclear power to mitigate global warming is marginal, referring to the IEA energy scenario where an increase in world's nuclear capacity from 2608 TWh in 2007 to 9857 TWh by 2050 would cut global greenhouse gas emissions less than 5% and at require 32 nuclear reactor units of 1000MW capacity built per year until 2050.
  29. 29. Anti-nuclear advertisement</li></li></ul><li>Nuclear power<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace views nuclear power as a relatively minor industry with major problems, such as environmental damage and risks from uranium mining, nuclear weapons proliferation, and unresolved questions concerning nuclear waste. The organization argues that the potential of nuclear power to mitigate global warming is marginal, referring to the IEA energy scenario where an increase in world's nuclear capacity from 2608 TWh in 2007 to 9857 TWh by 2050 would cut global greenhouse gas emissions less than 5% and at require 32 nuclear reactor units of 1000MW capacity built per year until 2050.
  30. 30. Anti-nuclear advertisement
  31. 31. In 1994, Greenpeace published an anti-nuclear newspaper advert which included a claim that nuclear facilities Sellafield would kill 2000 people in the next 10 years, and an image of a hydrocephalus-affected child said to be a victim of nuclear weapons testing in Kazakhstan. </li></li></ul><li>Forest campaign<br />
  32. 32. Forest campaign<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace aims at protecting intact primary forests from deforestation and degradation with the target of zero deforestation by 2020. Greenpeace, together with other environmental NGOs, also campaigned for ten years for the EU to ban import of illegal timber.</li></li></ul><li>Forest campaign<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace aims at protecting intact primary forests from deforestation and degradation with the target of zero deforestation by 2020. Greenpeace, together with other environmental NGOs, also campaigned for ten years for the EU to ban import of illegal timber.
  33. 33. Removal of ancient tree</li></li></ul><li>Forest campaign<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace aims at protecting intact primary forests from deforestation and degradation with the target of zero deforestation by 2020. Greenpeace, together with other environmental NGOs, also campaigned for ten years for the EU to ban import of illegal timber.
  34. 34. Removal of ancient tree
  35. 35. In June 1995, Greenpeace took a trunk of a tree from the forests of the proposed national park of Koitajoki[72] in Ilomantsi, Finland and put it on display at exhibitions held in Austria and Germany. Greenpeace said in a press conference that the tree was originally from a logged area in the ancient forest which was supposed to be protected</li></li></ul><li>Forest campaign<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace aims at protecting intact primary forests from deforestation and degradation with the target of zero deforestation by 2020. Greenpeace, together with other environmental NGOs, also campaigned for ten years for the EU to ban import of illegal timber.
  36. 36. Removal of ancient tree
  37. 37. In June 1995, Greenpeace took a trunk of a tree from the forests of the proposed national park of Koitajoki[72] in Ilomantsi, Finland and put it on display at exhibitions held in Austria and Germany. Greenpeace said in a press conference that the tree was originally from a logged area in the ancient forest which was supposed to be protected</li></ul>The 'Tokyo Two'<br />
  38. 38. Forest campaign<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace aims at protecting intact primary forests from deforestation and degradation with the target of zero deforestation by 2020. Greenpeace, together with other environmental NGOs, also campaigned for ten years for the EU to ban import of illegal timber.
  39. 39. Removal of ancient tree
  40. 40. In June 1995, Greenpeace took a trunk of a tree from the forests of the proposed national park of Koitajoki[72] in Ilomantsi, Finland and put it on display at exhibitions held in Austria and Germany. Greenpeace said in a press conference that the tree was originally from a logged area in the ancient forest which was supposed to be protected</li></ul>The 'Tokyo Two'<br /><ul><li>In 2008, two Greenpeace anti-whaling activists, Junichi Sato and Toru Suzuki, stole a case of whale meat from a delivery depot in Aomori prefecture, Japan. Their intention was to expose what they considered embezzlement of the meat collected during whale hunts. After a brief investigation of their allegations was ended, Sato and Suzuki were arrested and charged with theft and trespass.</li></li></ul><li>Genetically modified organisms (GMOs)<br />
  41. 41. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs)<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace has also supported the rejection of GM food from the US in famine-stricken Zambia as long as supplies of non-genetically engineered grain exist, stating that the US "should follow in the European Union's footsteps and allow aid recipients to choose their food aid, buying it locally if they wish. This practise can stimulate developing economies and creates more robust food security", adding that, "if Africans truly have no other alternative, the controversial GE maize should be milled so it can't be planted. </li></li></ul><li>Greenpeace on golden rice<br />
  42. 42. Greenpeace on golden rice<br /><ul><li>Greenpeace opposes the planned use of golden rice, a variety of Oryza sativa rice produced through genetic engineering to biosynthesize beta-carotene, a precursor of pro-vitamin A in the edible parts of rice. According to Greenpeace, golden rice has not managed to do anything about malnutrition for 10 years during which alternative methods are already tackling malnutrition. The alternative proposed by Greenpeace is to discourage mono-cropping and to increase production of crops which are naturally nutrient-rich (containing other nutrients not found in golden rice in addition to beta-carotene). Greenpeace argues that resources should be spent on programs that are already working and helping to relieve malnutrition. The Golden Rice Project acknowledges that, "While the most desirable option is a varied and sufficient diet, this goal is not always achievable, at least not in the short term</li></li></ul><li>NEEDED DONATION<br />
  43. 43.
  44. 44. Make a donation<br />Support our work today! Greenpeace is an independent organization that does not take money from corporations or government. We rely on individual donations from people just like you to do the work we do.<br />
  45. 45. CONTACT INFORMATION<br />Room 301 JGS Building, #30 Scout Tuason Street,1103 Quezon City, the Philippines<br />tel: +63-2-3321807<br />fax:+63-2-332-1806<br />email: info.ph@greenpeace.org<br />

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