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Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan - Phase I
 

Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan - Phase I

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Presentation shown at Ash Creek Conservation Association event on December 5, 2012

Presentation shown at Ash Creek Conservation Association event on December 5, 2012

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    Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan - Phase I Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan - Phase I Presentation Transcript

    • Master PlanAsh Creek Conservation Association, Inc.
    • “Despite all the benefits provided by wetlands, the United States loses about 60,000 acres each year.” United States Environmental Protection AgencyAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 2
    • ASH CREEK ESTUARY MASTER PLAN ASH CREEK CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION, INC. ∙ DECEMBER 2012 THE IMAGES AND INFORMATION CONTAINED HERE ARE MASTER PLAN CONCEPTS AND ARE INTENDED FOR GENERAL REFERENCE PURPOSES ONLY; THEY DO NOT REPRESENT AN APPROVED DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR THE ESTUARY OR ANY PART THEREOF AND ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. THIS MATERIAL, AND THE INFORMATION CONTAIND HERE, DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN OFFER OR COMMITMENT TO PURCHASE, MODIFY, OR SELL PROPERTY.3Ash Creek Estuary Master Plan 3
    • PRESENTATION OVERVIEW1. Introduction2. Methodology3. Study Area A: Upper Creek 4. Study Area B: Lower Creek5. Study Area C: Tidal Inlet6. Study Area D:Turney Creek7. Study Area E: Riverside Creek8. RecommendationsWRITTEN BY ONE NATURE AND STEVEN DANZER,PHD & ASSOCIATES.FUNDING SUPPORT FROM THE FAIRFIELD COUNTYCOMMUNITY FOUNDATION, AND PRO-BONOCONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE AUTHORS.FUNDING SUPPORT ALSO PROVIDED BY THEWATERSHED ASSISTANCE SMALL GRANTSPROGRAM, CONDUCTED IN ASSOCIATION WITHTHE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY &ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION UNDER SECTION319 OF THE CLEAN WATER ACT. THE SMALLGRANTS PROGRAM IS ADMINISTERED BY RIVERSALLIANCE OF CONNECTICUT.Ash Creek Estuary Master Plan 4
    • INTRODUCTION "Next to • The goal of this study is to establish a tropical framework. rainforests, • Ash Creek is a rare example of atidal wetlands are the most relatively healthy urban estuary. biologically • The estuary provides many important productive ecological services. resource in the world." • The estuary is an important part of the Connecticut Department region’s cultural heritage. of Energy & Environmental Protection • Thank you to FCCF and Rivers Alliance.Ash Creek Estuary Master Plan 5
    • SITE INTRODUCTIONAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 6
    • UPLAND MEADOW I - 95 MUDFLAT BREWSTER MARITIME FOREST STREET BRIDGE FRESHWATER WETLAND COMBINED HIGH MARSH SEWER OVERFLOW LOW MARSH BACKDUNE NEW PARK (NOT SHOWN) FOREDUNE PUBLIC BEACH ACCESS FAIRFIELD AVENUE BRIDGE PUBLIC ACCESS WATERFRONT TURNEY SIDEWALK CREEK TIDE GATES OYSTER REEF RIVERSIDE CREEK GREAT PUBLIC MARSH OPEN SPACE ISLAND BENSON GROVERS HILL MARINA ARTIFICIAL WATERFRONT PENNINSUAL SIDEWALK TIDE GATE CAPOZZI PARK BARRIER SPIT ST. MARY’S BY-THE-SEA LINEAR PARK JENNINGS BEACH EXISTING CONDITIONS EXISTING CONDITIONS EXISTING HABITAT TYPES EXISTING HABITAT TYPES INTRODUCTIONAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 7 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° N
    • 1934 AERIAL 1990 AERIAL 2010 AERIAL 2010 AERIAL INTRODUCTIONAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 8 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° 0 250 500 1,000 Feet °
    • t 1895 USGS MAP 1895 USGS MAP 1997 USGS MAP 1997 INTRODUCTION USGS MAPAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 9 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° 0 250 500 1,000 Feet °
    • 1880’S WETLANDS 1880’s WETLAND AND COASTLINE 1990 WETLANDS 1990’s WETLAND INTRODUCTIONAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 10 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° 0 250 500 1,000 Feet °
    • Category 4 Category 3 Category 2 Category 1 FEMA FLOOD MAP FLOOD HAZARD MAP FEMA HURRICANE SURGE MODEL SURGE MODELS HURRICANE INTRODUCTIONAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 11 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° 0 250 500 1,000 Feet °
    • QUALITATIVE ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY • We performed the majority of our field work in August, 2012. AREA A UPPER CREEK • We divided the study area into five geographic units for assessment. • The boundary of each unit was AREA D TURNEY CREEK AREA B LOWER determined by topography, cultural CREEK features, and the shape of the estuary. AREA E RIVERSIDE • We visited each unit, made field notes, CREEK AREA C and performed remote desktop analysis TIDAL INLET to document significant features. STUDY AREASAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 12 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° N
    • UNIT A. UPPER CREEK 1934 AERIAL 2010 AERIALAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 13
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT A. UPPER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 14
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT A. UPPER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 15
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT A. UPPER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 16
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT A. UPPER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 17
    • Existing Conditions • Aesthetic • Carbon Storage • Flood Protection • Habitat and Biodiversity • Hydrologic, Biogeochemical, and Ecological Functions of the Tidal Ecosystem • Recreation • Water Quality Potential Threats • Erosion • Phragmites • Water Quality • Stormwater Outflows • Failed/Stalled Construction • Proposed Bridge Crossing • Potential Ecotoxic Substances • Sea Level Rise UNIT A. UPPER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 18
    • Potential Improvements 1. Enhance native vegetation throughout the study area. 2. Monitor progress at Train Station restoration site. 3. Improve vistas across the study area through planting, placement of benches, and pathway alignment. 4. Install aesthetically pleasing dune fencing according along topographic contours; 5. Improve and create street end access and gathering spaces. 6. Reclaim upland lots with non-water dependent uses for ecological restoration purposes; 7. Ensure Pedestrian footbridge becomes aesthetic asset to community. 8. Promote stormwater capture technologies including bioswales, vegetative buffer strips, rain barrel use, and permeable paving throughout the drainage area. 9. Alter street ends to create views of water. 10. Create custom signage and educational kiosks to be used throughout the Ash Creek estuary that establish a local feeling respectful of cultural and ecological conditions. 11. Encourage the creation of high marsh plants besides Phragmites; 12. Educate local property owners about the value and importance of native plant species; 13. Supplemental spot planting and seeding to encourage specific native species wherever possible; and, 14. Develop forest management plan for forested edges. 15. Generally encourage the restoration of native plant materials. 16. Monitor all design and construction activities to reduce use of heavy equipment or building materials with high carbon footprints. 17. Use pedestrian footbridge as an opportunity to create and improve habitat; 18. Discourage Phragmites colonization. 19. Create green spaces at street ends. 20. Perform feasibility study to examine options to daylight the creek north of the Old Post Road. 21. Reclaim land from adjacent low lying areas currently used for non-water dependent purposes. 22. Convert public and private lawn spaces to native vegetation. 23. Define public access points and encourage ADA accessibility. 24. Develop bikeway and pedestrian routes with location of new pedestrian bridge. 25. Install blinds for bird watchers. 26. Develop and implement a green infrastructure plan that specifically addresses street ends runoff, residential properties, and permeable pavement conversion. 27. Map and monitor all outfalls. 28. Perform regular testing to quantify upstream pollutant contribution. 29. Coordinate with upstream Rooster River watershed planning efforts to identify specific water quality improvement projects. UNIT A. UPPER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 19
    • UNIT B. LOWER CREEK 1934 AERIAL 2010 AERIALAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 20
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT B. LOWER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 21
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT B. LOWER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 22
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT B. LOWER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 23
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT B. LOWER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 24
    • Existing Conditions • Aesthetic • Carbon Storage • Flood Protection • Habitat and Biodiversity • Hydrologic, Biogeochemical, and Ecological Functions of the Tidal Ecosystem • Water Quality • Recreation Potential Threats • CT DEEP Water Quality Assessment • Phragmites • Gillman Street Stormwater Outfalls • Decayed Phragmites • Tide Gates • Buffer Condition on East Side • Rip-Rapped Peninsula • Motorized Watercraft • Waterfront Access from the Peninsula • Sea Level Rise • Dog Use UNIT B. LOWER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 25
    • Potential Improvements 1. Enhance native vegetation throughout the study area. 2. Improve vistas across the study area through planting, placement of benches, and pathway alignment. 3. Improve existing overlook area on Bridgeport side at the terminus of the promenade. 4. Work with adjacent property owners to integrate native plants into their landscape design choices. 5. Work with local stakeholders post-Sandy reconstruction efforts to integrate native plants into redevelopment plans. 6. Promote stormwater capture technologies including bioswales, vegetative buffer strips, rain barrel use, and permeable paving throughout the drainage area. 7. Create custom signage and educational kiosks to be used throughout the Ash Creek estuary that establish a local feeling respectful of cultural and ecological conditions. 8. Improve signage at Fairfield Avenue Bridge. 9. Identify newest stands of Phragmites for removal. 10. Encourage the creation of high marsh plants. 11. Educate local property owners about the value and importance of native plant species. 12. Supplemental spot planting and seeding to encourage specific native species wherever possible. 13. Develop forest management plan for forested edges. 14. Generally encourage the restoration of native plant materials. 15. Monitor all design and construction activities to reduce use of heavy equipment or building materials with high carbon footprints. 16. Create a more robust native plant community along the Bridgeport side. Phase out all non-native plantings. 17. Encourage soft edge retrofits for hardened shorelines. 18. Discourage Phragmites colonization. 19. Reclaim land from adjacent low lying land currently used for non-water dependent purposes. 20. Convert mown lawn on Bridgeport side walkway to native shrubs and grasses. 21. Convert public and private lawn spaces to native vegetation. 22. Link bikeway and pedestrian routes with other sections of the estuary and Jennings Beach. 23. Install educational signage and kiosks in high traffic areas. 24. Develop and implement a green infrastructure plan that specifically addresses street end runoff, residential properties, and permeable pavement conversion. 25. Rethink road drainage on Bridgeport side to reduce flooding and runoff contamination. 26. Identify runoff pollution sources such as fertilizer, pesticide, and other potentially harmful substances. UNIT B. LOWER CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 26
    • UNIT C. TIDAL INLET 1934 AERIAL 2010 AERIAL 0 250 500 1,000Ash Creek Estuary Master Plan 27 Feet
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT C. TIDAL INLETAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 28
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT C. TIDAL INLETAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 29
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT C. TIDAL INLETAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 30
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT C. TIDAL INLETAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 31
    • Existing Conditions • Aesthetic • Carbon Storage • Flood Protection • Habitat and Biodiversity • Hydrologic, Biogeochemical, and Ecological Functions of the Tidal Ecosystem • Recreation • Water Quality Potential Threats • Erosion/Deposition • Invasive Species • Dog Use • Storm Events • Jurisdictional Ovelap • Motorized watercraft • Sea Level Rise • Overuse UNIT C. TIDAL INLETAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 32
    • Potential Improvements 1. Enhance native vegetation throughout the study area. 2. Improve vistas across the lower creek and the sound through planting, placement of benches, and pathway alignment. 3. Install aesthetically pleasing dune fencing according along topographic contours. 4. Improve gathering spaces through use of permeable pavers, fill placement, and historically appropriate site furnishing. 5. Create custom signage and educational kiosks to be used throughout the Ash Creek estuary to establish a local feeling respectful of cultural and ecological conditions. 6. Protect large sections of the barrier spit from dogs and foot traffic. 7. Supplemental spot planting to encourage specific species. 8. Develop forest management plan for Capozzi Park. Thin trees and control invasive species to create greater plant diversity. 9. Generally encourage the restoration of native plant materials. 10. Monitor all design and construction activities to reduce use of heavy equipment or building materials with high carbon footprints. 11. Manage the Bird Sanctuary to promote more standing and ground sequestered biomass. Expand the forest farther west. 12. Convert all lawn spaces to native coastal vegetation. 13. Restore tidal salt marsh and riparian zones on the northeast side of the barrier spit. 14. Bring back coastal meadow and shrub habitat on the southwest edge of the Bird Sanctuary. 15. Convert mown lawn on promenade walkway to native shrubs and grasses. 16. Better define access points to the barrier spit to avoid trampling native plants. 17. Install bike racks. 18. Construct new pathways through the Bird Sanctuary to counter the dominance of the road on visitor experience and to provide access to additional environmental education. 19. Temporary toilets should be removed, added, better maintained, or replaced with permanent bathrooms. 20. Design and install a defined bikeway and sidewalk system that would create a safer and more accessible experience. UNIT C. TIDAL INLETAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 33
    • UNIT D. TURNEY CREEK 1934 AERIAL 2010 AERIALAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 34
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT D. TURNEY CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 35
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT D. TURNEY CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 36
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT D. TURNEY CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 37
    • Existing Conditions • Aesthetic • Carbon Storage • Flood Protection • Habitat and Biodiversity • Hydrologic, Biogeochemical, and Ecological Functions of the Tidal Ecosystem • Recreation • Saline/Fresh Water Exchange • Water Quality Potential Threats • Erosion/Deposition • Invasive Species • Dog Use • Storm Events • Jurisdictional Ovelap • Motorized watercraft • Sea Level Rise • Overuse UNIT D. TURNEY CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 38
    • Potential Improvements 1. Enhance native vegetation throughout the study area. 2. Improve vistas across the study area through planting, placement of benches, and pathway alignment. 3. Work with adjacent property owners to integrate native plants into their landscape design choices. 4. Improve and create street end access and gathering spaces. 5. Examine potential for removing fill form adjacent land to increase tidal marsh habitat, perhaps in coordination with flood mitigation efforts. 6. Work with Fairfield post-Sandy reconstruction efforts to integrate native plants into redevelopment plans. 7. Promote stormwater capture technologies including bioswales, vegetative buffer strips, rain barrel use, and permeable paving throughout the drainage area. 8. Integrate restoration with Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts. 9. Alter street ends to create views of water. 10. Create custom signage and educational kiosks to be used throughout the Ash Creek estuary that establish a local feeling respectful of cultural and ecological conditions. 11. Encourage the creation of high marsh plant. 12. Educate local property owners about the value and importance of native plant species. 13. Supplemental spot planting and seeding to encourage specific native species wherever possible; and, 14. Develop forest management plan for forested edges. 15. Improve tidal gates to allow more tidal flushing, thereby reducing methane and nitrous oxide releases (both greenhouse gases). 16. Create more wetlands. 17. Generally encourage the restoration of native plant materials. 18. Monitor all design and construction activities to reduce use of heavy equipment or building materials with high carbon footprints. 19. Increase intertidal marsh areas through reclaiming vacant propterties. 20. Discourage Phragmites colonization. 21. Create green spaces at the end of street ends. 22. Reclaim land from adjacent low lying land currently used for non-water dependent purposes. UNIT D. TURNEY CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 39
    • UNIT E. RIVERSIDE CREEK 0 250 500 1,000 Feet 1934 AERIAL 2010 AERIALAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 1934 AERIAL 40 Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT E. RIVERSIDE CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 41
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT E. RIVERSIDE CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 42
    • 2010 AERIAL Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° UNIT E. RIVERSIDE CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 43
    • Existing Conditions • Aesthetic • Carbon Storage • Flood Protection • Habitat and Biodiversity • Hydrologic, Biogeochemical, and Ecological Functions of the Tidal Ecosystem • Recreation • Water Quality Potential Threats • Erosion/Deposition • Invasive species • Upland Buffer • Fire • Impervious Surfaces • Marina Boat Basin • CT DEEP Water Quality assessment • Sea level rise UNIT E. RIVERSIDE CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 44 2010 AERIAL
    • Potential Improvements 1. Enhance native vegetation throughout the study area. 2. Improve entryway to public open space at the Marina. 3. The bench at the end of the peninsula faces the backside of the sign and should be re-oriented. In general, vistas should be improved across the study area through planting, placement of benches, and pathway alignment. 4. Work with adjacent property owners to integrate native plants into their landscape design choices. 5. Improve and create street end access and gathering spaces. 6. Examine potential for removing fill form adjacent land to increase tidal marsh habitat, perhaps in coordination with flood mitigation efforts. 7. Work with Fairfield post-Sandy reconstruction efforts to integrate native plants into redevelopment plans. 8. Promote stormwater capture technologies including bioswales, vegetative buffer strips, rain barrel use, and permeable paving throughout the drainage area. 9. Integrate restoration with Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts. 10. Add native vegetation to parking islands near the public open space at the peninsula. 11. Alter street ends to create views of water. 12. Create custom signage and educational kiosks to be used throughout the Ash Creek estuary that establish a local feeling respectful of cultural and ecological conditions. 13. Encourage the creation of high marsh plants. 14. Educate local property owners about the value and importance of native plant species. 15. Increase salinity in tidal creeks. 16. Supplemental spot planting and seeding to encourage specific native species wherever possible. 17. Develop forest management plan for forested edges. 18. Improve tidal gates to allow more tidal flushing, thereby reducing methane and nitrous oxide releases (both greenhouse gases). 19. Create more wetlands. 20. Generally encourage the restoration of native plant materials. 21. Monitor all design and construction activities to reduce use of heavy equipment or building materials with high carbon footprints. 22. Increase intertidal marsh areas through reclaiming vacant properties. 23. Discourage Phragmites colonization. 24. Create green spaces at the end of street ends. 25. Reclaim land from adjacent low lying land currently used for non-water dependent purposes. 26. Convert mown lawn on promenade walkway to native shrubs and grasses. 27. Convert public and private lawn spaces to native vegetation. 28. Define public access points. 29. Link bikeway and pedestrian routes with other sections of the estuary and Jennings Beach. 30. Install educational signage and kiosks in high traffic areas. 31. Improve ADA access to waterfront views. 32. Develop and implement a green infrastructure plan that specifically addresses street ends runoff, residential properties, and permeable pavement conversion. 33. Study the function and design of all tide gates and culverts. 34. Identify runoff pollution sources such as fertilizer, pesticide, and other potentially harmful substances. UNIT E. RIVERSIDE CREEKAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 45 2010 AERIAL
    • ONE SYSTEM, MANY PARTS NOTES: 1. PROMOTE NATIVE SPECIES, GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE AND ORGANIC LANDSCAPE STEWARDSHIP THROUGHOUT ENTIRE DRAINAGE BASIN; EDUCATIONAL SIGNAGE MONITOR AND COMPLETE WALKING/BIKING ROUTE 2. ALL RECOMEMNDATIONS MADE IN THIS PLAN MUST BE VERIFIED ONGOING THROUGH FURTHER STUDY, STAKEHOLDER COORDINATION, AND RESTORATION DESIGN DEVELOPMENT PRIOR TO IMPLIMENTATION; AND, PROJECT 3. NEW TRAIN STATION DEVELOPMENT IS NOT SHOWN IN THIS 2010 STUDY AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH. COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE CREATE USE PLANNED REPAIR LANDING STREETEND PEDESTRIAN RIPARIAN PARK FOOTBRIDGE BUFFER AND TO RESTORE GREEN HABITAT STREET ENDS IMPROVE PARKING REPAIR AREA RIPARIAN CONSIDER BUFFER AND POTENTIAL ECO- GREEN TOXICOLOGY STREET ENDS ISSUES INVESTIGATE TURNEY CREEK CREATE DAYLIGHTING SEATING AREA EXPAND OYSTER POPULATION IMPROVE OPEN SPACE IMPROVE TRAIL DEVELOP PLACE INVASIVE SPECIES BIRD MANAGEMENT BLIND RECONSTRUCT PLANS. REVIEW REPAIR SIDEWALK TIDE GATES. RIPARIAN WITH GREEN BUFFER INFRASTRUCTURE ENHANCE TECHNOLOGIES MEADOW AND WOODLAND ENHANCE BUILD SALT MARSH PUBLIC DEVELOP BATHROOMS REDESIGN INVASIVE SPECIES LOOKOUT MANAGEMENT BUILD IMPROVE AREA PLAN. REVIEW NEW PATH TIDE GATE. WOODLAND SYSTEM RESTORE COORDINATE MEADOW DREDGING RESTORE WITH DUNE DUNE STEWARDSHIP INSTALL EXPLORE WAVE PROTECTIVE ATTENUATION DUNE PRACTICES FENCING RESTORATION PLANRESTORATION PLAN POTENTIAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION PLAN EDUCATION AND CIRCULATION PLAN Ash Creek Ecological Master Plan Ash Creek Ecological Master PlanAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° N 0 250 500 1,000 Feet ° N 46
    • RECOMMENDED NEXT STEPS1. Work with stakeholders to prioritize aboverecommendations.2. Continue this report’s Phase 1 efforts towardsdeveloping a Phase 2 comprehensive EcologicalRestoration Plan.3. Integrate recommendations with post-Sandyrecovery efforts.4. Perform community outreach to improve citizenunderstanding and stewardship of the estuary.5. Investigate wetland mitigation opportunities.6. Implement wayfinding, environmental kiosks, andsignage.7. Perform engineering review of tide gates.8. Develop a green infrastructure plan.Ash Creek Estuary Master Plan 47
    • 9. Investigate whether a River Commission ora Harbor Management Plan for Ash Creek is anappropriate approach to protecting the Ash Creektidal estuary.10. Continue to work with the City of Bridgeportto enhance their capabilities to manage the estuaryfrom an ecological perspective.11. Continue to work with the Town of Fairfield toenhance their capabilities to manage the estuaryfrom an ecological perspective.12. Develop planting specifications and designalternatives for the St. Mary’s Sand Spit.13. Encourage land-use practices that protect,maintain, and enhance the sand dunes on the St.Marys Sand Spit.14. Coordinate with Rooster River Watershed Plan.15. Investigate restoration opportunities in upperreaches of Turney Creek.16. Re-enforce and develop more extensiverelationships with environmental educationorganizations, including local school districts. RECOMMENDED NEXT STEPSAsh Creek Estuary Master Plan 48
    • THANK YOU! QUESTIONS?Ash Creek Estuary Master Plan 49
    • Ash Creek Estuary Master Plan 50