Indigenous Australians and
Pacific Islanders
By Carley, Lyn, Nerida, Edie and Gabby
HISTORICAL FACTORS THAT HAVE IMPACTED
UPON THE HEALTH OF INDIGENOUS
AUSTRALIANS
Indigenous people
generally experienced
be...
Land, language, law and lore of the Indigenous
were affected.
New diseases were introduced, i.e. small pox.
Resulted in de...
Stolen generation.
Experience barriers when accessing health care,
due to racism or feeling unwanted.
Segregation and inte...
Indigenous life expectancy is approx. 17 years
lower than non-Indigenous people within Australia.
Two times more infant de...
When the body has insufficient amounts of glucose.
Diabetes and high sugar were more common in remote areas (1 in 11) than...
CLINICAL/PROFESSIONAL SKILLS REQUIRED
TO MEET THESE NEEDS
DIABETES CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
Client empowerment
Effective hea...
EXPERIENCES OF INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS
WHEN USING HEALTH SERVICES
Culture shock
Language barriers
Non-verbal barriers
WHAT ...
“Real life problem with real life consequences”
Being admitted to hospital, unaware of the type of medical treatment the
p...
Aboriginals described
mainstream health
services as not
welcoming, sites of
discrimination and can
be isolating...
ABORIGI...
HEALTH NEEDS OF PACIFIC
ISLANDERS
Assessments from five Pacific Islander communities:
M ori, Samoan, Papua New Guineanā an...
DIABETES STATS
The prevalence of diabetes or high
blood sugar in 1997 and 1998 was 5%
for people born in the South Pacific...
HEALTH NEEDS OF PACIFIC
ISLANDERS
Assessments from five Pacific Islander communities:
M ori, Samoan, Papua New Guineanā an...
SPECIFIC, RELEVANT AND DIVERSE EXPEREICNES
OF PACIFIC ISLANDER PEOPLES WHEN ACCESSING
HEALTH SERVICES
Low health literacy ...
SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE
HEALTH EXPERIENCES OF INDIGENOUS
AUSTRALIANS AND CALD AUSTRALIANS
SIMILARITIES DI...
OUR STRATEGY
As a group we are establishing a community
centre within areas highly populated by
Aboriginals.
Our purpose i...
STRATEGY CONT.
Our holistic strategy identifies the
interdependent determinants of health that
can be improved to overcome...
OUR AIM
Our strategy aims to work in association with the
“Closing the Gap” campaign, with the intention of
heping to reac...
REFERENCES
Australian Human Rights Commission. (2008). A statistical overview of Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander peo...
REFERENCES CONT.
Queensland Health. (2011). The health of Queensland’s Fijian population 2009. Retrieved
from http://www.h...
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Assessment 1 oral presentation - Culture, diversity & health

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Assessment 1 oral presentation - Culture, diversity & health

  1. 1. Indigenous Australians and Pacific Islanders By Carley, Lyn, Nerida, Edie and Gabby
  2. 2. HISTORICAL FACTORS THAT HAVE IMPACTED UPON THE HEALTH OF INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS Indigenous people generally experienced better health. They didn’t suffer from diseases such as influenza and tuberculosis. BEFORE COLONISATION
  3. 3. Land, language, law and lore of the Indigenous were affected. New diseases were introduced, i.e. small pox. Resulted in depopulation. DURING COLONISATION
  4. 4. Stolen generation. Experience barriers when accessing health care, due to racism or feeling unwanted. Segregation and integration. Physical, social, emotional and spiritual wellbeing affected negatively. AFTER COLONISATION
  5. 5. Indigenous life expectancy is approx. 17 years lower than non-Indigenous people within Australia. Two times more infant deaths. Five times more likely to be teenage mothers. Two times more likely to smoke cigarettes. In 2006, 45% of Aboriginals over the age of 15 were unemployed (Australian Human Rights Commission, 2008). https://www.humanrights.gov.au/publications/statistical-overview-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-peoples-australia-social (T.Dune, personal communication, March 5th, 2014) STATISTICS
  6. 6. When the body has insufficient amounts of glucose. Diabetes and high sugar were more common in remote areas (1 in 11) than in urban areas (1 in 20). HEALTH NEEDS OF INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS Diabetes A group of diseases that affect the heart and circulatory system (heart attacks, stroke, heart failure, high blood pressure). Such as coronary heart diseases, hypertensive diseases, strokes and rheumatic heart diseases. Cardiovascular disease Similar causes for both Unhealthy diet, no exercise, obesity, smoking and alcohol consumption, poor housing environment and poor hygiene.
  7. 7. CLINICAL/PROFESSIONAL SKILLS REQUIRED TO MEET THESE NEEDS DIABETES CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Client empowerment Effective health plans Appoint expert diabetes mentors Technology and research Support Provide medicine/medical needs •Reduce alcohol use •Hygiene •Nutrition and dieting plans/guides: From 2004-05, NATSIHS found that most Indigenous people ate fruit (86%) and vegetables (95%) everyday, due to its availability and cost in non-remote areas Physical activity guides/routines Reduce tobacco use: There has been a reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked daily by Indigenous people between 1994 and 2008; two out of three Indigenous current daily smokers has tried to quit in the pervious years
  8. 8. EXPERIENCES OF INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS WHEN USING HEALTH SERVICES Culture shock Language barriers Non-verbal barriers WHAT ARE THE EXPERIENCES?
  9. 9. “Real life problem with real life consequences” Being admitted to hospital, unaware of the type of medical treatment the patient was to receive. Receiving medical treatment without consent. Being mistaken for other hospital patients and receiving inappropriate treatment. Being returned home with a serious condition. Patients undergoing treatment at odds with their cultural beliefs. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS OF THESE EXPERIENCES IN HEALTH SERVICES?
  10. 10. Aboriginals described mainstream health services as not welcoming, sites of discrimination and can be isolating... ABORIGINAL STORIES OF EXPERIENCE
  11. 11. HEALTH NEEDS OF PACIFIC ISLANDERS Assessments from five Pacific Islander communities: M ori, Samoan, Papua New Guineanā and Fijian (indigenous Fijian and Fiji Indian). Main health needs include: psychological and mental health (stress, depression, suicide) and diabetes (physical activity, dietary behaviours, obesity). Other health needs: coronary heart disease, cancer, cardiovascular disease
  12. 12. DIABETES STATS The prevalence of diabetes or high blood sugar in 1997 and 1998 was 5% for people born in the South Pacific. The rate of hospitalisations for diabetes complications in 1995-96 to 1999-00 was statistically higher at over five times the rate for Australian-born people. The incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in 1999-2001 was higher for females born in the South Pacific and New Zealand, than for the Australian-born females, but no differences were observed for males. Diabetes-related mortality rates in 1997- 2000 and hospitalisation rates in 1999-00 for immigrants from the South Pacific were higher than those for the Australian- born population.
  13. 13. HEALTH NEEDS OF PACIFIC ISLANDERS Assessments from five Pacific Islander communities: M ori, Samoan, Papua New Guineanā and Fijian (indigenous Fijian and Fiji Indian). Main health needs include: psychological and mental health (stress, depression, suicide) and diabetes (physical activity, dietary behaviours, obesity). Other health needs: coronary heart disease, cancer, cardiovascular disease
  14. 14. SPECIFIC, RELEVANT AND DIVERSE EXPEREICNES OF PACIFIC ISLANDER PEOPLES WHEN ACCESSING HEALTH SERVICES Low health literacy - lack of knowledge of health issues and available health services Lack of culturally tailored health promotion - Australian methods of health care “pushed” upon them. Lack of understanding or acceptance of traditional healing methods. Communication barriers - difficulty in understanding medical terminology and jargon. Health service professionals unable to guarantee comprehension. Economic barriers - general cost of healthcare. Lower average weekly income than Australian-born (Census, 2006).
  15. 15. SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE HEALTH EXPERIENCES OF INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS AND CALD AUSTRALIANS SIMILARITIES DIFFERENCES Language Non-verbal communication - staring, where to look Communication - low health literacy Family in decision making process/distances needed to travel - need to be close to family at all times Economic More media attention focused on health outcomes of A&TSI - Pacific Islanders seen as more of a minority Cultural tailored health promotion Discrimination
  16. 16. OUR STRATEGY As a group we are establishing a community centre within areas highly populated by Aboriginals. Our purpose is to improve health through raising awareness and educating both the community and Aboriginal peoples. Our four professions include sport and exercise science, podiatry, health promotion and theraputic recreation.
  17. 17. STRATEGY CONT. Our holistic strategy identifies the interdependent determinants of health that can be improved to overcome Indigenous disadvantage, while also being applicable for use with our CALD group, Pacific Islanders. - achieves this by focusing on each specific community involved. The main feature of our strategy is the notion of interconnectedness and autonomy.
  18. 18. OUR AIM Our strategy aims to work in association with the “Closing the Gap” campaign, with the intention of heping to reach the following CTG targets: ‣ Closing the life expectancy gap within the decade ‣ Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade ‣ Halve the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 attainment rates ‣ Halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non- Indigenous Australians within a decade
  19. 19. REFERENCES Australian Human Rights Commission. (2008). A statistical overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia: Social justice report 2008. Retrieved from https://www.humanrights.gov.au/publications/statistical-overview-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-peoples-australia-social Australian Indigenous Health Info Net. (15th May 2012) Summary of australian indigenous health. Australian Government Department of Health. Retrieved March 17, 2014, from http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/health-facts/summary#fnl-23 Cortis, N., Sawrikar, P. & Muir, K. (2008). Participation in sport and recreation by culturally and linguistically diverse women. Retrieved March 25th, 2014, from https://www.sprc.unsw.edu.au/media/SPRCFile/Report8_08_CALD_Women_in_sport.pdf Dunbar, T. (2011. Aboriginal people’s experiences of health and family services in the Northern Territory. International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies, 4(2), 1-15. Retrieved from http://www.isrn.qut.edu.au/publications/internationaljournal/documents/Final_Dunbar_IJCIS.pdf Henry, B., Houston, S. & Mooney, G. (2004). Institutional racism in Australian healthcare: A plea for decency. Fairness and compassion are the basis for improving Aboriginal health, 180(10), 517-520. Retrieved from https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2004/180/10/institutional-racism-australian-healthcare-plea-decency Muecke, A., Lenthall, S. & Lindeman, M. (n.d.). Culture shock and healthcare workers in remote Indigenous communities of Australia: What do we know and how can we measure it? Rural and Remote Health. Retrieved from http://www.rrh.org.au Queensland Health. (2010). Engaging culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) Queenslanders in physical activity: Findings of the CALD physical activity mapping project. Retrieved from http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/cald-pa-map-proj.pdf
  20. 20. REFERENCES CONT. Queensland Health. (2011). The health of Queensland’s Fijian population 2009. Retrieved from http://www.health.qld.gov.au/multicultural/health_workers/health-data-fijian.pdf Queensland Health. (2011). The health of Queensland’s Māori population 2009. Retrieved from http://www.health.qld.gov.au/multicultural/health_workers/health-data-maori.pdf Queensland Health. (2011). The health of Queensland’s Papua New Guinean population 2009. Retrieved from http://www.health.qld.gov.au/multicultural/health_workers/health-data-png.pdf Queensland Health. (2011). The health of Queensland’s Samoan population 2009. Retrieved from http://www.health.qld.gov.au/multicultural/health_workers/health-data-samoan.pdf Queensland Health. (2011). Queensland Health’s response to Pacific Islander and Māori health needs assessment. Retrieved from http://www.health.qld.gov.au/multicultural/health_workers/qh-response-data.pdf Rolls, M. & Johnson, M. (2010). Historical dictionary of Australian Aborigines. Retrieved from http://lib.myilibrary.com/ProductDetail.aspx?id=297534 Throw, A.M. & Waters, A.M. (2005). Diabetes in culturally and linguistically diverse Australians: Identification of communities at high risk. Retrieved March 25th, 2014, from https://www.aihw.gov.au/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=6442454961 Walton, S. (2001). Communication and cultural knowledge in Aboriginal health care. Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal and Tropical Health, 1(1), 1-45. Retrieved from http://www.lowitja.org.au/sites/default/files/docs/Communication_and_Cultural.pdf

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