AACSB Cross Campus Collaborations
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The George Washington University is committed to sustainability and “envisions a future with resource systems that are healthy and thriving for all.” GW has devoted considerable effort to ...

The George Washington University is committed to sustainability and “envisions a future with resource systems that are healthy and thriving for all.” GW has devoted considerable effort to sustainability research and education, with a comprehensive program of undergraduate and graduate academic offerings from the Columbian College of Arts & Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the Elliott School of International Affairs, the Law School, the College of Professional Studies, the School of Public Health & Health Services, and the School of Business.

The School of Business recognizes that the incredibly broad scope of sustainability requires the cooperation and collaboration of the entire University, and indeed, all of society. If they are to be effectively applied in business, sustainable concepts and practices must be developed with the input of scientific, technical, legal, public policy and planning expertise.

GWSB is particularly proud of the part it plays in coordination with all of GW’s colleges and schools in this critical field. On June 24, GWSB had the opportunity to share its research and report on its efforts at an Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) conference on sustainability, in Washington, D.C.

At the conference, Dean Doug Guthrie moderated a panel on “Fostering the Social Impacts of B-Schools.” The highlight of the panel discussion was a presentation delivered by George Coehlo, MBA, ’77, GW trustee and member of the GWSB Board of Advisors. The chairman of GW’s Sustainability Committee, Coehlo is managing director of Good Energies, LLP and has an extensive background in finance, technology, and clean energies.

In his presentation, “Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability” (a copy of his PowerPoint deck is posted here), Coehlo provided a detailed overview of global trends in markets and sustainability, trends in clean energy investment, and GWSB’s extensive efforts in sustainability research and education.

We are fortunate to have such a knowledgeable, experienced, and driven individual helping to guide GW’s important work in a field that is absolutely vital to the future of the earth. GWSB thanks George Coehlo for all that he does for the University, the School of Business, and the planet, and looks forward to continuing to work with him.

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  • I would like to take us through what is really a business plan. I am just a businessman, not an academic. So I am focused on and outcome of what sustainable education can do eventually for the student‘s future career. While there is a lot happening in Sustainability at GW, my goal is to take you through what we have, what we have done and what we plan to do in both the Business School and the University as a whole. And finally the bottom line is to get a job. So I will go from the rather general given this is a Plenary session to the fairly specific, since as a businessman I always try to focus on a particular business outcome. Hopefully this will be of some use to you.
  • First of all am I credible to talk about this area. Understand the energy and power businesses and am active in it. KKG is a Swiss-based Listed Water/Solar and Wind Utility. Quadia is an Impact investor based in Geneva and active in Sustainable agriculture, forestry and consumer products.
  • Good Energies pioneered Solar PV investment 10 years ago. The founder saw the future in clean power. 2 of the biggest VC exits ever in Europe. Met them in 2008. Thought they were crazy. A year later I joined them.Enecsys is a spin-out of Cambridge’s Power Lab. Alta comes out of Caltech and Cal Berkeley Porfessors.
  • Talking PointsThe George Washington University was created in 1821 through an Act of Congress, fulfilling George Washington’s vision of an institution in the nation’s capital dedicated to educating and preparing future leaders.Today, GW is the largest institution of higher education in the District of Columbia. We have more than 20,000 students—from all 50 states, the District and more than 130 countries—studying a rich range of disciplines: from forensic science and creative writing to international affairs and computer engineering, as well as medicine, public health, the law and public policy.GW comprises three campuses—Foggy Bottom and Mount Vernon in Washington, D.C., and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Va.—as well as several graduate education centers in the metropolitan area and Hampton Roads, Va.Background10,000 Approximate number of total undergraduate students enrolled at all locations14,000 Approximate number of total graduate students enrolled at all locations1,000 Approximate number of total non-degree students2,000,000+ Number of volumes in GW’s library system1,174 Total full time faculty3 Campuses172,000,000 Dollars of research funding450+ Number of student organizations250,000+ Alumni worldwide
  • We had a retreat in 2010. After the workshops I was asked to give a speech on Sustainability. I decided to throw caution to winds and give the elements of a business plan, in terms of a challenge.The Special Committee usually includes the Provost, Deans, powerful Professors, Trustees and Senior Staff including the Director of Sustainability and the Treasurer.I have little doubt that I was recruited to the Board as someone who was actively involved in Sustainability and Globalization as one of the early international VC investors. This was an application-specific recruitment and I was destined for involvement in something like this.
  • Sustainability refers to creating systems that are healthy and thriving for allQuality of life across the globe and across generations Sustainability is the balance of Environmental resourcesSocial equityEconomic prosperityGW can leverage tools to contribute to sustainabilityScientific understanding and technological solutionsInsight on effective policy and governance structuresBehavioral practice and cultural endorsement in our campus activities
  • Talking PointsLet’s take a step back and look at the context – global trends show a changing world and how business schools need to position to address these changes.Half of humanity – 3.5 billion people – live in cities today.By 2030, almost 60 per cent of the world’s population will live in urban areas.95 per cent of urban expansion in the next decades will take place in developing world.828 million people live in slums today and the number keeps rising.The world’s cities occupy just 2 per cent of the Earth’s land, but account for 60-80 per cent of energy consumption and 75 per cent of carbon emissions.Rapid urbanization is exerting pressure on fresh water supplies, sewage, the living environment, and public health.But the high density of cities can bring efficiency gains and technological innovation while reducing resource and energy consumption.It is not urbanization itself but, rather, higher levels of income that drive the higher GHG emissions we see in cities today. Urban densities yield many opportunities for low carbon living. Cities are economic powerhouses and account for about 70% of global GDP.BackgroundBuildings have inefficient heating and cooling, lighting, and refrigeration systems ‐‐ their walls, windows and roofs leak heat in the winter and cold in the summer. • Solid waste landfills release methane – a greenhouse gas agent 23 times more potent than CO2 – as garbage decays. • Most of the energy used for outdoor lighting becomes waste heat rather than producing light. • Heavy traffic congestion in cities generates significant emissions and reduces worker productivity. • Most water systems waste significant water and energy as a result of leaks and losses. The share of poverty in the developing world that is located in urban areas has jumped from 17% to 28% in the past 10 years. In eastern Asia, nearly half of all poverty is found in urban locations (pdf), while in sub-Saharan Africa the urban share of poverty is 25%.So what? Well, urban poverty challenges the development community in several ways. For a start, most development professionals have been trained in rural development and rural livelihoods. As we are so fond of saying, context is everything; whether we are equipped to face the different challenges of urban contexts is another question.So how is urban development different? There's not enough research to be definitive, but there are plenty of plausible hypotheses.One is that urban areas capture wide extremes of wealth and poverty, which often exist cheek by jowl. Urban averages hide deprivation on a scale rarely seen in rural areas.Access to services may appear enhanced in urban areas, but often their quality is uneven and the competition for them is intense. And here's one more change since then: Urbanization is now good news. Expert opinion has shifted profoundly in the past decade or two. Though slums as appalling as Victorian London's are now widespread, and the Victorian fear of cities lives on, cancer no longer seems the right metaphor. On the contrary: With Earth's population headed toward nine or ten billion, dense cities are looking more like a cure—the best hope for lifting people out of poverty without wrecking the planet.One evening last March, Harvard economist Edward Glaeser appeared at the London School of Economics to promote this point of view, along with his new book,Triumph of the City. Glaeser, who grew up in New York City and talks extremely fast, came heavily armed with anecdotes and data. "There's no such thing as a poor urbanized country; there's no such thing as a rich rural country," he said. A cloud of country names, each plotted by GDP and urbanization rate, flashed on the screen behind him. Poor people flock to cities because that's where the money is, he said, and cities produce more because "the absence of space between people" reduces the cost of transporting goods, people, and ideas. Historically, cities were built on rivers or natural harbors to ease the flow of goods. But these days, since shipping costs have declined and service industries have risen, what counts most is the flow of ideas.In cities with higher average education, even the uneducated earn higher wages; that's evidence of "human capital spillover.“Cities allow half of humanity to live on around 4 percent of the arable land, leaving more space for open country.Per capita, city dwellers tread more lightly in other ways as well, as David Owen explains in Green Metropolis. Their roads, sewers, and power lines are shorter and so use fewer resources. Their apartments take less energy to heat, cool, and light than do houses. Most important, people in dense cities drive less. Their destinations are close enough to walk to, and enough people are going to the same places to make public transit practical. In cities like New York, per capita energy use and carbon emissions are much lower than the national average.http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/12/city-solutions/kunzig-text/1Cities in developing countries are even denser and use far fewer resources. But that's mostly because poor people don't consume a lot. Dharavi may be a "model of low emissions," says David Satterthwaite of London's International Institute for Environment and Development, but its residents lack safe water, toilets, and garbage collection. With climate change discussions stagnating at national and international levels, cities are taking the lead in fostering solutions to environmental problems
  • Talking PointsThough many old school CEO’s may think so, sustainability is not an add-on. In fact, companies that see that it is integrated into core business are on the competitive edge. It is a challenge to integrate natural resource and sustainable development issues into the core of business, but it must be done to meet the demands of tomorrow’s markets.- The biggest challenge facing businesses today is the integration of sustainability into core business functions.- Top corporate sustainability focus areas for the next year include human rights, workers’ rights, climate change and water availability.- Energy management in operations is overwhelmingly seen as the main priority in carbon reduction strategies.- Companies believe that increasing transparency, demonstrating positive environmental and social impacts, and innovating for sustainability will help them earn the public’s trust.Sourcehttp://www.triplepundit.com/2012/10/bsr-sustainability-business-trends/?utm_source=Triggermail&utm_medium=email&utm_term=newsalert&utm_campaign=Weekly%20CSRwire%20Alert
  • Talking PointsCompanies are receiving an increase in the number of sustainability-related inquiries from investors and shareholders over the past 12 months. That underscores growing interest, particularly by institutional investors, many of which now view corporate sustainability issues as material to shareholder value.At the top of the list of shareholder proposals are those focusing on companies’ efforts to reduce energy consumption, an acknowledgment that energy efficiency not only increases competitiveness, but also reduces risks associated with volatile energy prices, as well as carbon taxes or other regulatory schemes. Second highest on the list are proposals addressing greenhouse gas emissions reductions or adoption of quantitative greenhouse gas goals.BackgroundThis is based on a survey conducted by Ernst & Young in 2012 of 282 companies. Fully half reported that they are receiving an increase in the number of sustainability-related inquiries from investors and shareholders over the past 12 months. That underscores growing interest, particularly by institutional investors, many of which now view corporate sustainability issues as material to shareholder value.As demands for disclosure on environmental and social impacts increase so does the number of surveys, questionnaires and queries to companies. They come from many and diverse directions: institutional investors, customers, media, industry analysts, communities, regulatory and non-regulatory government bodies (at the local, national and international levels), activist groups and various others. Each seems to want more or different data than the others, or may pose the same questions in slightly different ways. The resulting tsunami has overwhelmed many companies’ ability to cope. As noted in the 2012 piece by Ernst & Young, entitled Shareholders press boards on social and environmental riskes: is your board prepared?, the growth of queries also mirrors the growth of shareholder proposals on social and environmental issues, which now account for 40% of all shareholder proposals. Support for those proposals is growing, too: The average proposal received 21% of investors’ votes in 2011, up from 10% in 2005, reflecting a relatively high level of interest and support.At the top of the list of shareholder proposals are those focusing on companies’ efforts to reduce energy consumption, an acknowledgment that energy efficiency not only increases competitiveness, but also reduces risks associated with volatile energy prices, as well as carbon taxes or other regulatory schemes. Second highest on the list are proposals addressing greenhouse gas emissions reductions or adoption of quantitative greenhouse gas goals.Climate and energy will likely remain front and center for shareholders. At the institutional level, investors are getting increasingly organized around these topics. For example, the Investor network on Climate risk is a network of 100 institutional investors representing more than US$10 trillion in assets “committed to addressing the risks and seizing the opportunities resulting from climate change and other sustainability challenges.” Groups like this are working feverishly behind the scenes, not just to push shareholder resolutions, but also to press for policy changes, increased voluntary disclosure, and adoption of climate disclosure practices by stock exchanges.Source: Ernst & Young 2013 Six Growing Trends in Corporate Sustainability
  • Talking PointsCompanies are finding that in order to grow in emerging markets, it is essential to partner with socially minded organizations, regulators, and non-profits. This is not about philanthropy or public relations, but rather about developing trusted partnerships with stakeholders. Trusted partnerships help companies to pre-empt social issues, and also to better understand current and future markets.Background“The development community must step out of its comfort zone and imagine new linkages with private sector firms. I’m not talking about partnership for partnerships sake. I’m not talking about Corporate Social Responsibility or charity work. I’m not talking about photo opportunities. I’m talking about helping support the work of markets that can deliver profits and create opportunities for women, minorities and the poor. We must partner with the private sector much more deeply from the start, instead of treating companies as just another funding source for our development work. In short, we must embrace a new wave of creative, enlightened capitalism.” Rajiv ShahUSAID AdministratorGlobal Alliance for Clean Cookstoves:The Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves is a new public-private partnership to save lives, improve livelihoods, empower women, and combat climate change by creating a thriving global market for clean and efficient household cooking solutions. The Alliance’s ‘100 by ’20’ goal calls for 100 million homes to adopt clean and efficient stoves and fuels by 2020. The Alliance will work with public, private, and non-profit partners to help overcome the market barriers that currently impede the production, deployment, and use of clean cookstoves in the developing world.mHealth Alliance:The mHealth Alliance (mHA) is positioned at the leading edge of the mHealth ecosystem as a convener to unite existing mHealth projects and guide governments, NGOs, and mobile firms to deliver innovative and interoperable solutions in this exploding field.Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases:The Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases raises the profile of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) and builds support for control and elimination activities through our efforts to educate, advocate, catalyze, and convene. They highlight efforts underway in the field, and connect global players and afflicted communities to increase access to vital medicines that can stop these illnesses and lift the world’s poorest people out of poverty . GAIN: The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) is an alliance driven by the vision of a world without malnutrition. Created in 2002 at a Special Session of the UN General Assembly on Children, GAIN supports public-private partnerships to increase access to the missing nutrients in diets necessary for people, communities and economies to be stronger and healthier. The Rainforest Alliance: The Rainforest Alliance works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods by transforming land-use practices, business practices and consumer behavior. The Rainforest Alliance believe that the best way to keep forests standing is by ensuring that it is profitable for businesses and communities to do so. That means helping farmers, forest managers and tourism businesses realize greater economic benefits by ensuring ecosystems within and around their operations are protected, and that their workers are well-trained and enjoy safe conditions, proper sanitation, health care and housing. Once businesses meet certain environmental and social standards, they are linked up to the global marketplace where demand for sustainable goods and services is on the rise.Every Woman Every Child:It is an unprecedented global effort that mobilizes and intensifies international and national action by governments, multilaterals, the private sector and civil society to address the major health challenges facing women and children around the world. The effort puts into action the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, which presents a roadmap on how to enhance financing, strengthen policy and improve service on the ground for the most vulnerable women and children.HERProjectHERproject catalyzes global partnerships and local networks in emerging economies to improve female workers’ general and reproductive health. Partners include eight multinational companies, 30 factories, eight local organizations, and multiple clinics, hospitals, and public-sector population and health departments. Extractive Industries Transparency InitiativeThe Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) is a coalition of governments, companies, civil society groups, investors and international organizations that aims to improve transparency and accountability in the extractives sector. EITI supports improved governance in resource-rich countries through the verification and full publication of company payments to and government revenues from the oil, gas and mining sectors. 
  • I would like to talk to you about the biggest Global Industry, Energy. Fundamental to just about everything. Highly regulated and both investor and government owned. The reason I am going to show you this material is that it represents a great opportunity for Universities and particularly business tools on a huge scale. Energy is going through a radical transformation. There‘s not enough of it, there are growing demands on it and it is going from a central distribution platform to a non-centralized model, where everyone can produce, buy and sell energy, just like what happened to the computer industry. And it is one area where GW‘s business school has been active in both the teaching and in placing of students in jobs.Why energy? Well being in a town with a University which has many of the levers to affect this business, regulatory, funding policy, tax, pricing,emissions.Dean Guthrie and I figured out pretty early that this was a place we could really play. And Univertities and Business schools in particular, need to pick where to play. So this is part of our plan.And remember that power generation is the single bîggest source of carbon emissions, in the US and China.These slides are courtesy of my friend at Bloomberg New Energy Finance.He wasa dot com investor before. Then I saw him talking about clean energy. I was stunned to see how he had retooled himself for an even bigger opportunity. The business was sold to Bloomberg a few years back.
  • GOOD
  • ML – is this how you wanted the click through? I can re-work it in the morning if not.
  • Talking PointsThe demand for academic offerings in sustainability is clear…(read slide)My colleagues on campusesare confident from the messages that students are sending, that the demand is ripe on campuses.
  • Talking PointsThe sustainability profession has grown in the past 50 years alone, and will continue to increase in more exponential way.Background“As part of a recent GreenBiz Intelligence Panel survey, we asked what year companies created their first full-time sustainability position. Figure 2 shows a rise in the number of companies adding full-time sustainability roles.On the surface, this appears to be an encouraging sign — the classic “hockey stick” of accelerating growth. It took eight years between 1995 and 2003 for the number of companies with a full-time sustainability resource to double (from 30 to 60). It took fewer than five years to double again to 120 by 2008, the first year the Carbon Disclosure Project published corporate emissions data for more than 1,500 global companies. Two years later, more than 240 companies dedicated at least one person to focus full time on sustainability.Like entrepreneurial presentations to venture capitalists, hockey-stick graphs don’t always tell the full story.” Source: GreenBiz State of the Profession 2013
  • Talking PointsAmong the sustainability jobs, energy is a particular focus area. You can see here that across all industries, there is an opinion that energy managers are critical to their operations. These people need to understand energy markets, energy engineering, and business operations. Background“Corporations increasingly recognize the business need to more proactively manage their energy consumption, as well as to ensure reliable access to energy markets over the short to mid term. The number of companies that have a dedicated energy manager rose from 48 percent in 2011 to 52 percent in 2012. Figure 10 calls out which industries are dedicating resources to energy management. According to a recent report from Groom Energy, multiple factors are driving the need for companies to better manage their purchase and use of energy in their businesses. These include:1. large energy consumption and its relationship to utility peak usage, 2. pressure by customers and other stakeholders for reduced carbon emissions, and3. the need to identify no-cost behavior change energy savings opportunities as a means of improving operating performance.” Source: GreenBiz State of the Profession 2013
  • Talking PointsIt is clear that higher education – and business schools in particular - need to step up to the plate and deliver on the skills that employers need from graduates. If a graduate is going to work for (like Wal-Mart), consult (like Delloitte and Touche), or supply (like Unilever) a company that values sustainability, these are the skills they will need: This is according to senior sustainability executives in 33 multi-national companies.Background“Sustainability has been adopted by a number of organizations across the public, private and non-profit sectors. Candidates for these positions come from diverse educational and professional backgrounds including, but not limited to the humanities, social sciences, applied science, engineering, business, and health services. The common characteristic for sustainability professionals is that they tend to be disciplinary experts with interdisciplinary knowledge and cross-cutting skills in communication, problem-solving and leadership. To meet this rising demand, universities must prepare their students with the core sustainability skills and competencies required by these employers. This means that universities can no longer teach sustainability in the context of the 1987 Brundtland Commission Report, and must adapt to meet the needs of the marketplace. A report by the Center for Corporate Citizenship identified eight leadership competencies exhibited by successful sustainability practitioners - team-oriented, determined commitment, peripheral vision, strategic thinker, systems perspective, collaborative networker, influential communicator and change driver.” Center for Corporate Citizenship (2010). Leadership Competencies for Corporate Citizenship: Getting to the Roots of Success. Carroll School of Management, Boston College. “According to a survey of senior sustainability executives in 33 multi-national companies, professionals working in this field need to develop relevant skills and knowledge to make sound decisions at the intersection of business, environment and society. Apart from this, they also need to be able to influence without authority i.e. to communicate between stakeholders and translate knowledge into the language that is relevant to each unique audience. This requires 3 types of skills4:Inside out skills which refer to the conceptual, technical and behavioral skills necessary for success in day-to-day business management. These include business relevant technical competencies such as an understanding of business planning & project management, risk mitigation, accounting & finance, marketing, etc.Outside in skills assist an organization in understanding the major external factors that can currently impact or reshape its business strategy and operations. These include knowledge of global trends and public policy drivers, cultural understanding, improved listening and communication, etc.Traversing skills include a greater knowledge of the management of organizational and societal complexity, systems thinking, communication and negotiation skills, ability to create and manage social networks, etc. To help develop these skills, sustainability executives suggested action-based and applied learning experiences, as well as interdisciplinary teaching with collaborations between business, social science, science, design, and engineering programs as an important tool for helping students understand the implementation of sustainable development in business. The group also recommended that universities work with corporate advisors to further integrate sustainability into the curriculum4.” World Environment Center & Net Impact (2011). Business Skills for a Changing World: An Assessment of What Global Companies Need from Business Schools. World Environment Center.
  • Talking PointsGWSB alumni are working in jobs related to sustainability across various sectors. Some of these roles rely heavily on finance, others on marketing, and others on entrepreneurship.GE (In 2012, GWSB placed 6 students in GE’s sustainability group.)HSBCMars IncWal-MartEco LivingOPowerBackgroundOthers:Amy Skoczlas Cole, Vice President, Corporate Citizenship at Pentair Ltd. (http://www.sustainablebrands.com/digital_learning/event-video/making-reuse-cool-creating-abundant-and-sustainable-future)Angela Atherton, Vice President, Risk Management at Calvert Social Investment Foundation, IncSarah Truitt, Technology Deployment Manager Laboratory, National Renewable EnergySyed Abbas, Consultant,Sustainable Business Advisory - IFC, World Bank Group
  • This is my general list for an MBA student to be prepared to work in the Energy sector, based on experience of hiring and training people as well as current market demands. Again, this requires cross disciplinary and cross school work at GWU. All the pieces cannot be found just in the business school. And findig top professionals in these areas is somewhat difficult, even in Energy.
  • I spend a lot of time at other Universities, including Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial, UCL, etc., both looking at spinoffs but working with faculty and students in these areas. So I have a good idea about what others are doing.Everyone is trying to figure this out. At Oxford, my friend Martin Smith launched the Smith Scool of Enterprise and the Environment with Sir David King as the first head. Enterprise and the Environment since if Enterprise is not part of it, first, it is hardly sustainable, according to Martin Smith.For GW‘s Business School we figured out that a Business School lacks certain pieces to fully teach sutainability the way we think it should be taught. It might need some engineering courses, legal, urban planning, Intenational affairs, health sciences, even geography. The only way to do this is on a multidisciplinary basis. So that‘s how we will play things for the foreseeable future. We will work cross campus to build the courses we need to suit the demands of a truly relevant business enducation.
  • Talking PointsIn efforts to get recruits with the skills they need, companies are pushing for integration of sustainability into higher education. John Viera, the Director of Sustainable Business Strategies at Ford Motor Company, blogged on the needs. (John was appointed director of Sustainable Business Strategies in January 2007. Viera's prior position was chief engineer, Expedition and Navigator programs.) According to Bureau of Labor Statistics, environmental science jobs are expected to increase around 28 percent by 2018, and environmental engineering jobs are expected to grow 31 percent during the same period. This is because as companies like Ford set ambitious environmental goals and targets for their operations, it affects the workforce and the economy at large.At Ford, more than 1,000 engineers and PhDs are working on electrification, alternative fuels, sustainable materials, and other green facets of the industry – many of these jobs didn’t exist a decade ago.Additionally, Ford continues to invest billions in research, both in university funding and in its own research, to develop new fuel-efficient products, engines, transmissions and electrified vehicles. As these investments mature, green employment opportunities will only continue to grow, both in the auto-sector and across the economy at large.BackgroundOver the last decade, high school students enrolled in advanced placement environmental science courses has skyrocketed 426 percent nationally, more than four times the average increase of all advanced placement courses. The figures are similar in higher education. On average, the number of academic papers on sustainability has doubled every 8.3 years since 1974, according to a recent study from Indiana University.It’s not by accident that we’re finding heightened environmental literacy among recent graduates. It’s been 22 years since the passage of The National Environmental Education Act, which empowered the EPA to build environmental education initiatives. The first waves of students who have experienced these programs throughout the entirety of their educational career are just now entering the workforce.There’s also been a concerted push to further integrate sustainable development and environmental literacy in primary and higher education internationally. In the run up to the Rio+20 Summit, The UN is working with university leaders to establish a Declaration of Commitment to Sustainable Practices of Higher Education Institutions, which helps incorporate sustainable development concepts into core curriculums.Such programs couldn’t come at a better time. While the economy is stronger than it’s been in the past few years, it’s still hard to come by jobs that are both fulfilling and pay the bills; but those with a background in environmental studies are well positioned to find one. According to Bureau of Labor Statistics, environmental science jobs are expected to increase around 28 percent by 2018, and environmental engineering jobs are expected to grow 31 percent during the same period.Again, I see these numbers reflected on factory and lab floors. While automotive engineers still focus on performance, capability and driving fun, an engine’s defining feature is now the distance it can go on a tank of gas rather than the power it can unleash on an open track. By 2020, Ford expects 10 to 25 percent of its global sales to be derived from electrified vehicles (hybrids, plug-in hybrids and full electric vehicles). Already, around one-third of Ford’s vehicle lines offer a model with 40 miles per gallon or better.When businesses set goals around sustainability, the impacts extend beyond the environment: they change the contrast of the workforce and economy at large. At Ford, more than 1,000 engineers and PhDs are working on electrification, alternative fuels, sustainable materials, and other green facets of the industry – many of these jobs didn’t exist a decade ago.Additionally, Ford continues to invest billions in research, both in university funding and in its own research, to develop new fuel-efficient products, engines, transmissions and electrified vehicles. As these investments mature, green employment opportunities will only continue to grow, both in the auto-sector and across the economy at large.While a company’s green product offerings are usually what gain the most attention, they’re only made possible by culture shifts at the corporate level. This is why I’m pleased to meet, with increasing frequency, MBA students with a more holistic perspective of business. Net Impact, a leading association of sustainability professionals, released a report titled Business as Unusual, which serves as a guide to green MBAs across the country. The report noted that 83 percent of students who attended these programs felt prepared to pursue their interest in social/environmental issues and responsible leadership.Certainly, our educational system requires serious work and additional support, but let’s gives credit where it’s due: Our schools and teachers have instilled in younger generations an unprecedented appreciation for the environment. This is good news for several reasons: companies working to green their business and capitalize on the opportunities afforded by the green economy have access to a growing pool of qualified candidates. But most importantly, a sustainable future will only be possible as new generations understand the complexities of sustainable business.
  • Talking PointsA few institutions have degree offerings in sustainability…Example - ASU: The School of Sustainability offers bachelors, masters and PhDs in Sustainability.Warwick – Offers an Energy MBA…However, most institutions offer interdisciplinary programs through joint/dual degree offerings.Example - UMich: The Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise offers the dual MBA/MS Program in Global Sustainable Enterprise together with the Ross School of Business and the School of Natural Resources and the Environment.Example - Stanford: The Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources offers two degrees: the PhD in Environment and Resources and the Joint Masters of Science in Environment and Resources. The Joint MS is an option exclusively for students currently accepted to or enrolled in a professional degree program in the Graduate School of Business, Stanford Law School, or School of Medicine. Most universities do not actually offer sustainability degree programs through the sustainability institutes. However, the institutes serve as the online clearinghouse for all sustainability related courses offered throughout the university. All sustainability related courses are branded through the institutes, which increases the visibility of these courses.Example - Cornell: The David R. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future provides a comprehensive and updated list of sustainability courses offered across the university Example – UMich: The Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute states on its website that one of its goals is “to increase student awareness of sustainability related courses.” It offers a searchable database of all sustainability-related courses offered across the university.We had to figure out where the university could play and how. Do we do a aschool? If so what does it teach? Do we work cross campus in an interdisciplinary fashion.Can we get some options to do this and then maybe something bigger as we figure it all out?Take advantage of our location, connections with Government and previous work in the area.
  • Talking PointsSustainability is about sustaining resources for the long-term. These global trends forecast a changing worldGW is positioned to help address the long-term viability of our world and its resources even more effectively. We are looking to provide: Better training for our students, More cutting-edge research, Actions on campus that are aligned with our vision, and To share this knowledge with practitioners through outreach
  • Talking PointsIn its day-to-day practice, GW is making strategic commitment to address its own footprint. GW is deploying energy efficiency and renewable energy solutions to reach carbon neutrality.The university is also managing its water (both consumption and urban rain water run-off) with a watershed approach.Finally, the university has issued commitments to help enhance local and global ecosystems ranging from gardens on campus to sustainable paper procurement.
  • Talking PointsGW has a strong track record of translating knowledge into policy and solutionsPlanet Forward – led by Frank Sesno in our School of Media and Public Affairs – provides innovative media coverage of sustainability solutions with contributions from citizens around the country and the worldGW will be hosting the Clinton Global Initiative University this spring, bringing together students from around the world to address global challengesGW hosted the first GreenGov symposium to green the federal government and our faculty were key contributors. We are looking to raise all boats in our local region and in our country. GW partners with local government to strengthen our city’s sustainability, and thus our own, e.g. Policy GreenhouseGoing forward, GW will focus on informing policy with sustainability solutionsBackgroundPlanet Forward points:Final count shows 3 million impressions of Twitter hashtag #gwmoving during April 2012 GW Innovation Summit (for context, a National Press Club event featuring Alec Baldwin had 400,000 impressions).Planet Forward continues to provide weekly features on Bloomberg West profiling innovators in the sustainability sector, featuring GW faculty and branding.  GW with Arent Fox co-hosted an Energy Policy Forum in June 2012 featuring U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar.In September 2012 Planet Forward hosted a salon on hydraulic fracturing in partnership with GW School of Public Health and GW Law School.  PlanetForward.org has 50,000 average monthly views for FY12, more than double that of FY11. The site now has 8,000 members and has collected 1,500 sustainability ideas.
  • Talking PointsGW is looking to build on its current strengths (law, governance, health, solar, urban sustainability), foster collaboration internally amongst researchers in different disciplines, and build out new offerings in emerging areas (food, water, ecosystems, technology)We think the key to competitiveness is to focus 20% of our resources on creating new sustainable technologies, and 80% of our resources on translating science into solutions and policyBackgroundGW Solar InstitutePremier research facility focused on the economic, technical, and public policy issues associated with the development and deployment of solar energy to meet global energy needs and environmental challengesLegal framework for solar energy - LeRoy Paddock, Law SchoolEconomic incentives of government and private sector investors in deployment of solar energy infrastructure – Ken Zweibel, Columbian College of Arts and SciencesUrban SustainabilityThe intersection of urban ecology, engineering, and environmental policy and planning to identify trends in in green-building policy – Melissa Keeley, GeographyWater and Decision MakingEvaluate the influence of preferences concerning adoption of low-impact development on reduction of stormwater runoff – Royce Francis, EngineeringPublic HealthEnvironmental health risks and solutions including impact of environmental contaminants on male reproductive function – Melissa Perry, School of Public Health and Health Services
  • Talking PointsGW has evaluated the opportunity to develop sustainability as a discipline (e.g. as a school), or not. We have decided it best to support and enhance the sustainability offerings throughout the traditional disciplines, because sustainability is an interdisciplinary topic. We decided strategically to infuse it across the different disciplines.GW offers undergraduate degrees that related to and/or focus on sustainability…
  • Talking Points…(continued from previous slide) and graduate degrees that relate to and/or focus on sustainability.
  • Talking PointsAs a result, we are building pan-university curriculum that will enable any student from any disciplines to learn about sustainability.GW is well-positioned to offer second degrees for both undergraduates and graduates in all schools, through an exciting trans-disciplinary, pan-university approach.The second degree is available to anyone at GW and will encourage sustainability “literacy” throughout the schools.In Fall 2012, GW launched a new 18-credit Undergraduate Minor in Sustainability, which begins with a groundbreaking interdisciplinary, team-taught introductory course, and culminates in an experiential learning experience such as field work, an internship and so on.We will be offering other “second degrees” in the future.BackgroundGW students with any major can choose to enroll in a new undergraduate sustainability minor starting fall 2012.200 students attending the Sustainability 1001 class68 of which are declared minorsMore than 100 undergraduate green leaf courses
  • Talking PointsThe GW School of Business provides curricular opportunities for students to add sustainability to their business education. GWSB provides concentrations, certificates, and specific degrees related to sustainability and responsible management. Additionally, GWSB students can build on these concentrations in sustainability with joint degrees. Such jointmasters degrees offer opportunities in sustainability by allowing students to complement their MBA with interdisciplinary study.There are 3 dual degree programs within GWSB itself.GWSB also offers 1 dual degree program with GW’s Law School (which offers a concentration in environmental law), and dual degree options with all 10 Masters programs offered by the Elliott School of International Affairs.
  • Talking PointsNot only do we provide opportunities for MBA to have joint-curricular experiences, but we have experts in the business school who help us hone in on specific sustainability focus areas.Dr. Griffin’s research interests include global and multi-domestic CSR, industry-level CSR, stakeholder strategies and managerial discretion.
  • Talking PointsNot only do we provide opportunities for MBA to have joint-curricular experiences, but we have experts in the business school who help us hone in on specific sustainability focus areas.Dr. Rivera’s current research interests focus on the relationship between business and the natural environment, business responses to environmental policy in the US and developing countries, and the drivers of environmental technology innovation.
  • Talking PointsNot only do we provide opportunities for MBA to have joint-curricular experiences, but we have experts in the business school who help us hone in on specific sustainability focus areas.Dr. Forrer’s area of expertise includes Corporate Responsibility and Global Governance, Public-Private Partnerships, Governance Networks , Globalization, Business and Peace.Recent Presentations:“A Path to Conflict-Free Chocolate” ICR Live Webcast, April 26, 2013“Tackling Global Food Crises” The World on a Plate, April 23, 2013, George Washington University.“Repositioning P3 Financing for Public Infrastructure” Meeting of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE), National Academy of Sciences, April 16, 2013“Global Governance Networks” Uncommon Alliances, Conference co-sponsored by U.S. Department of State, June 15, 2012.“The Power of Collaborative Partnerships” United Nations Youth Assembly, United Nations, December 7, 2012
  • Talking PointsThe Global Solutions Partnerships (GSP) model was developed at the Institute for Corporate Responsibility (ICR) at the George Washington University to facilitate multisector collaborations.  It was developed to facilitate a partnership between Ford Motor Company and the US Department of State. GWSB’s Institute of Corporate Responsibility has spent the last several years engaged in a deep relationship with the Ford Motor Corporation on designing its strategy for sustainability in emerging markets. The key test case has been rural India, where Ford launched a project using its vehicles to sustainably deliver medical care for rural citizens.
  • Talking PointsGWSB’s Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis (CRUEA) is also focused on sustainability—in the area of urban development. Professor Chris Leinberger, Director for CRUEA is a former Brookings Senior Research Fellow and expert in sustainable urban development. His studies of walkable urban development in Washington DC and Atlanta have garnered media attention from the New York Times, Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal.
  • Talking PointsWe have also spent a significant amount of time building our relationships with key corporations around the world. The Ford case has already been mentioned. We have also build a deep relationship with GE and have become one of the target recruitment schools for GE’s sustainability track. In 1012, GWSB placed 6 students in GE’s sustainability group. DuPont Fabros is one of the most important data center companies in the world, and deeply engaged with GWSB on its development strategy. DuPont has also been connected to GWSB, as former Chairman and CEO, Chad Holiday, spent a year as Executive in Residence at GWSB in 2010-11.
  • Talking PointsGWSB has also laid out an ambitious China strategy, which involves a major deal with the Suzhou Industrial Park Commission, one of the most environmentally conscious industrial areas in China. GW was also recently named as the inaugural educational partner in the Fortune Global Summit, held in Chengdu in 2013.What are companies doing in China? China growth – energy, urbanization, environmental degradation, focus on cleantech, sustainable development, investments in africa, corporate responsibility requirements for Chinese companies outside of ChinaPartnership with other International Universities, e.g. Urban Sustainability in Capital Cities.
  • Talking PointsSeveral George Washington M.B.A. students have played an integral role in helping Mayor Vincent Gray deliver a five-year economic plan that is expected to create 100,000 new jobs and rake in $1 billion in new revenue for the District. 7 students from GWSB conducted interviews and analyses to aid in developing a five-year plan for the District’s growth. The plan focuses on six visions: Creating a business-friendly economy; Growing the largest technology center on the East Coast; Being the nation’s “destination of choice;” Ending retail leakage, or when District residents spend money outside the District; Developing a global medical center; and Becoming the top North American destination for foreign investors, businesses and tourists. 
  • My ideas of the plan.For us , Energy, Urban Sustainability are areas where we can play given who we are. Obviously we are not going to play well in Forestry or advanced PV research.
  • My report card

AACSB Cross Campus Collaborations Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business June 24, 2013
  • 2. Outline • George Coelho • The Board Mission • Global Trends in Markets and Sustainability • Trends in Clean Energy Investments • Demand for Sustainability Education • Integrating Sustainability into Higher Education June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 2
  • 3. Disclaimer • Views may reflect some of the policies and strategy of GWU in some cases • Not the views of Good Energies • Views will often be my own 3 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 4. George Coelho • 24 years Technology VC experience in 20 countries • PCCW, Broadcom, Citrix, Trend, Wonga, Betfair • Intel, Benchmark Europe, Good Energies • Financed Airlines, Utilities, Nuclear, Oil & Gas, Coal, Renewables, Recycling • Board of Advisors GW School of Business, Trustee and Chair of Sustainability Committee • KKB AG and Quadia SA 4 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 5. Good Energies • Pioneering Global Renewables investor • Mission driven • Chair for Management of Renewable Energies at St Gallen University • Major impact on Solar PV industry and finance for Renewables • Upstream and Downstream • Q-Cells, REC, Trina, Solarfun • Board activities: Tendril, Enecsys, Power Assure, Alta Devices 5 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 6. About us The George Washington University • Founded in 1821 • Largest institution of higher education in the District of Columbia • One of the largest private employers in the District of Columbia • More than 20,000 students • 10 distinct schools including medicine, law & public health • Focused on sustainability since 2008 The George Washington University envisions a future with resource systems that are healthy and thriving for all. Our mission is to be the premier university on policy and governance for sustainable systems through practice, teaching, research, and outreach. June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 6
  • 7. The Board Mission • Leadership Retreat 2010 • Workshops on Energy • Speech to Leadership • Sustainability education – Students will want it – Parents will demand it – Employers will require it – Donors will need it • Call from Chairman • Special Committee was Launched!* 7 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 8. GWU Sustainability Definition The George Washington University envisions a future with resource systems that are healthy and thriving for all 8 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 9. GLOBAL TRENDS IN MARKETS & SUSTAINABILITY 9 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 10. Urbanization & Cities Cities will drive sustainable development 10 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 For the first time in history, more than half of humanity - 3.5 billionpeople live in cities. 95% of urban expansion in the next decades will take place in developing world. Cities are economic powerhouses and account for about 70% of global GDP. However, urban averages hide deprivation. Cities capture wide extremes of wealth and poverty - serving as home to 828 million slum dwellers. More than 200 million urban residents in developing countries gained access to either improved water sources, sanitation facilities, or durable housing in the past 12 years. Cities account for 3/4th of the world’s carbon emissions. But, on average city dwellers have a relatively lower environmental footprint. Urban densities yield many opportunities for low carbon living. Cities are at the front lines of climate change - for example, 75% of urban settlements are located in coastal areas at risk from sea‐level rise. With stagnation of international climate change discussions, mayors are taking the lead in fostering solutions to environmental problems Source: National Geographic, World Bank, United Nations Millennium Development Report 2012, UNEP. C40
  • 11. Corporate Sustainability Integrating sustainability into core business is key Top corporate sustainability focus areas for the next year include human rights, workers’ rights, climate change and water availability. Operational energy management is a priority Earning the public’s trust is a key motivator 11 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Source: BSR/Globescan State of Sustainable Business 2012
  • 12. 12 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Corporate Sustainability Most frequent investor inquiries around sustainability Source: Ernst & Young 2013 Six Growing Trends in Corporate Sustainability
  • 13. Partnerships Rise of coordinated multi-sectoral solutions 13 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 “We must partner with the private sector much more deeply from the start, instead of treating companies as just another funding source for our development work. In short, we must embrace a new wave of creative, enlightened capitalism.” - Rajiv Shah USAID Administrator
  • 14. TRENDS IN CLEAN ENERGY INVESTMENT 14 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 15. Investment Activity Global Total New Investment in Clean Energy Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance Note: Includes corporate and government R&D, and small distributed capacity. Adjusted for re-invested equity. Does not include proceeds from acquisition transactios. $54bn $80bn $114bn $164bn $191bn $187bn $251bn $302bn $269bn 48% 43% 45% 16% -2% 34% 20% -11% 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 15 2004-12 ($bn)
  • 16. Investment Activity Clean vs. Fossil-Based Generating Capacity Investment Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance, EIANote: Clean energy total excludes large hydro. Fossil fuel is investment on coal and gas capacity. We assume capacity retirement of 3.3%/yr for coal and 4%/yr for gas. Clean energy Fossil fuel 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 16 2006–12 ($bn)
  • 17. Investment Activity New Investment in Clean Energy by Sector Source: Bloomberg New Energy FinanceNote: Total values include estimates for undisclosed deals. Excludes corporate and government R&D. Includes small distributed capacity & adjustment for re-invested equity. 8.6 8.4 7.8 9.5 11.5 16.5 12.9 18.4 19.7 21.7 21.6 34.0 24.9 28.4 33.7 46.2 34.0 45.9 41.0 43.1 26.2 45.745.5 42.7 46.5 52.2 55.5 63.3 53.9 71.8 70.7 58.0 48.0 59.6 56.6 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Wind Solar Biofuels Other June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 17 Q1 2004–Q3 2012 ($bn)
  • 18. Recent Developments China’s air quality Beijing 12 Jan 2013 993 World Health Organisation Guideline 25 Picture credit: Feng Li/Getty Images June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 18 PM2.5 microgrammes per cubic meter
  • 19. Recent Developments Top 15 Countries for New Investment in Clean Energy in 2012 and % Change on 2011 ($bn) Source: Bloomberg New Energy FinanceNote: Excludes corporate and government R&D 2.95 3.42 4.05 4.31 4.41 5.34 5.46 6.19 6.85 8.34 14.71 16.28 22.80 35.58 65.13 -68% 179% 11% -34% -23% -32% 20563% 40% -45% -17% -51% 75% -27% -37% 20% Spain Greece Belgium France Canada Brazil South Africa Australia India United Kingdom Italy Japan Germany United States China June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 19
  • 20. 0.1 1 10 100 1 10 100 1,000 10,000 100,000 1,000,000 historic prices (Maycock) experience curve Chinese c-Si module prices (BNEF) Thin-film experience curve First Solar thin-film module cost 1976 1985 2003 2006 2012 2012 Trends by Sector PV Experience Curve, 1976-2012 (2012 $/W) Source: Paul Maycock, Bloomberg New Energy Finance Note: Prices inflation indexed to US PPI. MW PV MODULE PRICES HAVE FALLEN 80% SINCE 2008 20% IN 2012 ALONE June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 20
  • 21. Trends by Sector EU Net Capacity Additions (in GW) Source: EWEA, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Other Gas PV Wind June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 21
  • 22. Trends by Sector Clean Energy Cost Competitiveness - Africa Picture Credit: SolarSister Note: Illustrative figures for cost of 2 lamps plus mobile phone charging, Kenya, 2012 Kerosene $4 per week Solar PV $1 per week June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 22
  • 23. Trends by Sector Average Levelised Cost of Onshore Wind, 1984-2012 14% 1984 1990 2000 2004 2012 10 50 100 500 100 1,000 10,000 100,000 1,000,000 MWNote: Learning curve (blue line) is least square regression: R2 = 0.88 and 14% learning rate. WIND TURBINE PRICES HAVE FALLEN 29% SINCE 2008 Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance, ExTool June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 23 (€/mwh)
  • 24. Trends by Sector Evolution of Wind Power Tehachapi Pass Wind Farm Early 1980s Post Rock Wind Farm 2012 Photos: Wiki Commons June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 24
  • 25. Trends by Sector Improvements in Turbine Technology Hub height Blade length, blade design Improved component parts Siting Turbine Control Software Improved Availability 25 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 26. Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance = Natural Gas at $6/MMBtu = New coal Best Wind Trends by Sector Grid-Competitive Clean Energy 26 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 27. Trends by Sector $3 Natural Gas, USA 2013 Picture credits: Tod Baker via Creative Commons; NASA, NOAA, CERES June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 27
  • 28. You know, we’re making no money. It’s all in the red. Rex Tillerson CEO, Exxon Trends by Sector US Natural Gas, 2012 28 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 29. Trends by Sector Lithium-ion Battery Experience Curve EV BATTERY PRICES HAVE FALLEN 40% SINCE 2010 Source: Battery University, MIIT, IIT, Bloomberg New Energy Finance June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 29
  • 30. Trends by Sector Numbers of Smart Meters Worldwide Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 30 (in Millions)
  • 31. Trends by Sector China Power Capacity Additions by Technology 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2020e2030e Solar Biomass & WtE Wind Hydro Nuclear Natural Gas Coal Historic Forecast 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2020e2030e Solar Biomass & WtE Wind Hydro Nuclear Natural Gas Coal Historic Forecast 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2020e2030e Solar Biomass & WtE Wind Hydro Nuclear Natural Gas Coal Historic Forecast 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2020e2030e Solar Biomass & WtE Wind Hydro Nuclear Natural Gas Coal Historic Forecast Source: China Electricity Council, Bloomberg New Energy FinanceNote: Net additions for coal capacity. 2020 and 2030 forecasts are from BNEF’s Global Renewable Energy Market Outlook (GREMO). June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 31 2001-12, 2020e & 2030E (GW)
  • 32. Trends by Sector Levelised Cost of Energy Q4 2011 ($/mWh) Carbon from the BNEF European Carbon Model with an average price of $43/tCO2 to 2020, driven by the rising cost of abatement (largely due to less cheap fuel-switching potential) in Phase IV. Coal and natural gas capex from the US Department of Energy EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2011 and recently announced plants.. US gas: Henry Hub, Japanese: imported LNG, EU: German/UK gas. Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance 0 100 200 300 400 500 Coal fired Natural gas CCGT - US Natural gas CCGT - Europe Natural gas CCGT - Japan Nuclear Small hydro Large hydro Geothermal - flash plant Municipal solid waste Landfill gas Wind - onshore Biomass - incineration Geothermal - binary plant PV - thin film Biomass - gasification PV - c-Si tracking Biomass - anaerobic digestion PV - c-Si STEG - tower & heliostat w/storage STEG - parabolic trough Wind - offshore STEG - parabolic trough + storage STEG - tower & heliostat STEG - LFR Marine - tidal Marine - wave Fossil fuelledFossil fuelled w/CO2 Competitive clean energyBNEF 2011 EUA forecast Excludes impact of fossil fuel subsidies, health, defence, environmental impacts, jobs, etc June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 32
  • 33. Implications 1 Fundamental re-engineering of the world’s energy sector around a more distributed, lower carbon, more secure architecture • Will cost trillions of dollars • Will take decades • Will be supported by government actions • Will be funded largely by capital markets • Will create great opportunities and jobs 33 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 34. Implications 2 Entering a period of unusual risk, which has to be managed by investors, policy-makers & corporates: • Rapid technological change • Old-school utility model is dead • Policy risk due to fiscal pressures, politics & incumbent capture • Trade tensions & geopolitics • Capital markets in flux post crisis; new investors • Climate as a wild card 34 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 35. Implications Capital requirement to 2030 (in $bn) 35 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020 2022 2024 2026 2028 2030 Source: New Energy Finance Global Futures 2008, Bloomberg New Energy Finance
  • 36. DEMAND FOR SUSTAINABILITY EDUCATION 36 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 37. Higher Education & Careers Demand for sustainability education is growing 37 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 In a survey of more than 1,300 business professionals conducted by the National Environmental Education Foundation, it emerged that 65% of respondents see environment and sustainability knowledge as valuable, especially in new hires. Source: Gullo, K., & Haygood, L. (2010). The business case for environmental and sustainability employee education. National Environmental Education Foundation. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the demand for graduates educated in concentrations related to sustainability is expected to increase at least 20% between 2008 and 2018. Source: Hanover Research. (2011). Embedding sustainability into university curricula. Washington, D.C.: Hanover Research. In 2009 alone, more than 100 majors, minors or certificates were created in the field of energy and sustainability in colleges across the US, up from just 3 new programs in 2005. Source: Schmit, J. (2009, December 28). As colleges add green majors and minors, classes fill up. USA Today, Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/environment/2009-12-27-green-colleges_N.htm
  • 38. Higher Education & Careers Increasing number of full-time sustainability managers 38 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Number of companies with full-time sustainability positions Source: GreenBiz State of the Profession 2013 1970 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established 1982 United Nations publishes Brundtland Commission report 1992 UN Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill 1997 Kyoto Protocol adopted 2005 Walmart announces sustainability goals
  • 39. Higher Education & Careers Energy managers play an important role 39 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Source: GreenBiz State of the Profession 2013 % of companies within industry that view energy managers as critical
  • 40. Higher Education & Careers Skills students need to be prepared for sustainable business Team-oriented Determined commitment Peripheral vision Strategic thinker Systems perspective Collaborative networker Influential communicator Change driver 40 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Source: Center for Corporate Citizenship (2010). Leadership Competencies for Corporate Citizenship: Getting to the Roots of Success. Carroll School of Management, Boston College. Senior sustainability executives in 33 multi-national companies agree on the core leadership competencies for sustainability.
  • 41. Alumni Spotlight 41 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Andrew Seal Renewable Energy Leadership Program - Associate GE Jen Boulden Eco Living Host, Sustainability Expert, Online Media Entrepreneur Heather Nesle First VP, Community & Philanthropic Services HSBC Rachel Goldstein Global Manager of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs for Sustainability Mars Incorporated Miranda Ballentine Director of Sustainability for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Buildings Wal-Mart David Kirkland Client Solutions Executive OPower
  • 42. What would I teach to Business Students? Energy, Water, Recycling, Food, Transport, Buildings, Urban Planning, Geography Legal and regulatory environment Capital Markets, Project Finance, Real Estate and PE/VC Supply Chain Technologies, Energy Efficiency/Green Buildings, LEED Climate Change theory Consumer trends and demand 42 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 43. Where are the jobs? • Finance – VC/PE – Infrastructure Funds – Investment Banks – Impact Investors • Start-ups • Corporates, MNCs and Utilities • NGOs • Governments 43 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 44. INTEGRATING SUSTAINABILITY INTO HIGHER EDUCATION 44 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 45. Higher Education & Careers Growing corporate interest in sustainability-related scholarship 45 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 46. 46 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 A few institutions have degree offerings in sustainability… Sustainability Degrees …Some institutions offer interdisciplinary programs through joint/dual degree offerings. Joint Degrees Most universities provide elective courses related to sustainability, and students can customize their degree programs. Only Electives Three paths for sustainability education
  • 47. Mission: To be the premier university on policy and governance for sustainable systems through research, teaching, practice, and outreach. Policy and governance for sustainable systems Curricula Research Practice Outreach Approach: Build content across disciplines and functions. Vision: The George Washington University envisions a future with resource systems that are healthy and thriving for all. Sustainability at GW Focus: Research, teach, and pilot solutions for urban sustainability. June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 47
  • 48. Practice Focus on Climate, Water & Ecosystems • Carbon neutrality in 2040 and a 40% reduction across all scopes by 2025 (from 2008 levels) • GW aims to reach neutrality by reducing its emissions by at least 80% and using credible offsets to negate the remaining emissions Climate • Achieve a 25% reduction in total potable water consumption over 10 years (from 2008 levels) • Water policy focus areas include potable water, rainfall capture, waste water and bottled water Water • Addresses GW’s impact and dependence on ecosystem services, and to mitigate risks and seize opportunities. • Focus areas include increase green space, zero waste, sustainable procurement, on-campus food production Ecosystems 48 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 49. Planet Forward •Final count shows 3 million impressions of Twitter hashtag #gwmoving during April 2012 GW Innovation Summit. •Co-hosted an Energy Policy Forum with Arent Fox in June 2012 featuring U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. Clinton Global Initiative U •GW hosted CGI-U in April 2012, bringing together more than 1,000 students representing 82 countries, and more than 300 universities •Provided a forum to engage both domestic and international students on the challenges facing the world today GreenGov •Hosted by GW in 2010 conjunction with the White House •Brought together various stakeholders to identify opportunities around greening the Federal Government Solar Institute •Provides technical advice to federal agencies & advances the conversation on solar investment vehicles •Hosts an Annual Solar Symposium every year featuring leading experts and policymakers Outreach Build on track record of connecting to GW June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 49
  • 50. Research Build content based on current strengths Climate & Energy Water Urban Sustainability Food Solar Energy Health and Healthcare Law & Governance Ecosystem Services Sustainable Technology 50 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 51. Curriculum Sustainability-related Undergraduate Offerings Columbian College of Arts & Sciences B.A. in Environmental Studies B.A. in Geography B.A. in Geology B.S. in Chemistry B.F.A. in Interior Design School of Engineering and Applied Sciences B.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering with a focus on: Environmental Engineering Geotechnical Engineering Infrastructure Engineering Solid Mechanics and Materials Engineering Structural Engineering Transportation Engineering Water Resources Engineering 51 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 52. Columbian College of Arts & Sciences M.S. in Chemistry M.S. in Economics M.A. in Geography M.A. in Hominid Paleobiology M.F.A. in Interior Design M.A. in Environmental and Resource Policy Ph.D. in Economics Ph.D. in Geography Ph.D. in Hominid Paleobiology Ph.D. in Chemistry Ph.D. in Systematics and Evolution School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Graduate Certificate in Energy Engineering and Management Graduate Certificate in Environmental Engineering Graduate Certificate in Geo-environmental Engineering M.S. in Environmental and Engineering Management M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering Dr.S. in Environmental and Engineering Management Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering Elliott School of International Affairs M.A. in International Development Studies (Sustainable Development Focus) School of Business Certificate Program in Responsible Management M.T.A. in Sustainable Tourism Destination Management M.B.A. in Environmental Policy and Management M.B.A. with emphasis in Sustainability and Corporate Responsibility Ph.D. in Business Administration with a specialty in: Strategic Management and Public Policy (with courses in environmental management and policy), Tourism and Hospitality Management (with courses in Sustainable Tourism Destination Management) Law School J.D. in Environmental Law L.L.M. in Environmental Law College of Professional Studies Certificate in Urban Sustainability Certificate in Sustainable Landscapes M.P.S. in Sustainable Urban Planning School of Public Health & Health Services M.P.H. in Environmental and Occupational Health M.P.H. in Environmental Health Science and Policy Dr. P.H. in Environmental and Occupational Health Curriculum Sustainability-related Graduate Offerings June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 52
  • 53. Curriculum Undergraduate Minor in Sustainability “The sustainability minor allows students to explore the challenges of sustainability and how it may be used to develop solutions to pressing issues at the local, regional and global scale. It can supplement any major at GW and is intended to help students develop an understanding about the sustainability of society and environment. We believe that any student can benefit from the sustainability minor.” - Dr. Lisa Benton-Short June 24, 2013 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability 53
  • 54. GWSB Philosophy • The field of sustainability is too broad for a business school to effectively teach it on its own. • In addition to the functional business areas that are necessary in the sustainability space, individuals also require technical skills from engineering and the sciences; legal knowledge from law and public policy; planning skills from the fields of architecture and design. • The GWSB philosophy is built around leveraging the rest of the university. It is through our collaborative ties with engineering, arts and sciences, law, and public policy, that we are best able to train students for future careers in sustainability. 54 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 55. Curriculum Partnerships GWSB Joint Degree Programs Students can take a number of degree programs along with the Masters of Business Administration across the university including: School of Business Master of Science in Finance Master of Science in Project Management Master of Science in Information Systems Technology Elliott School of International Affairs Master of Arts in Asian Studies Master of Arts in European and Eurasian Studies Master of Arts in Global Communication Master of Arts in International Affairs Master of Arts in International Development Studies Master of Arts in International Science and Technology Policy Master of Arts in International Trade and Investment Policy Master of Arts in Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Master of Arts in Middle East Studies Master of Arts in Security Policy Studies Law School Juris Doctor 55 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 56. GWSB Sustainability Experts Highlighted Projects: Dr. Griffin is one of the co-founders of the Fourth Capital Network, a consortium of universities, institutions, organizations, and businesses committed to advancing the fields of social entrepreneurship and corporate social responsibility in Egypt and the rest of the Middle East and North Africa. 56 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Dr. Jennifer J. Griffin Chair and Professor of Strategic Management and Public Policy
  • 57. Highlighted Projects: Dr. Rivera examines how participation in voluntary environmental certification initiatives is associated with business competitiveness and environmental performance, by studying the case of the Blue Flag Program in Costa Rica. 57 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Dr. Jorge E. Rivera Associate Professor of Strategic Management and Public Policy GWSB Sustainability Experts
  • 58. GWSB Sustainability Experts Highlighted Projects: Dr. Forrer co-directs the Task Force on Business and Peace with the United States Institute of Peace, which seeks to understand how the various policies, practices and future challenges facing the global business affect peace, and what the private sector can do to promote peace, and avoid fanning conflict. 58 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Dr. John Forrer Associate Research Professor of Strategic Management and Public Policy Associate Faculty, Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration
  • 59. Research Centers Institute for Corporate Responsibility 59 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013 Global Solution Partnerships Initiative
  • 60. Research Centers Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis 60 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 61. GWSB Sustainability & Corporate Responsibility Work with Major Corporations 61 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 62. GWSB Sustainability & Corporate Responsibility China Operations 62 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 63. GWSB Sustainability & Corporate Responsibility Partnership with the District of Columbia 63 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 64. Taking It Forward Make sure you “walk the talk” Host events and Galvanize the students Play to your strengths, pick your areas Get the Trustees/Administration/Schools on your side Have a Strategy and execute on it 64 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 65. GW Institute of Sustainability • Decided on a new GW Institute to bring together all of our various efforts • Fully Tenured professor with a start-up package • Director will have carte Blanche to create and take the University forward, no path foreclosed • Recruiting efforts launched 65 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 66. Report card • Good progress on Committee and Trustee/Administration/Deans support, goals • Undergraduate Minor fast launch and strong reception • More Multidisciplinary programs needed such as Business/Legal/Engineering • Disparate efforts urgently need to be brought together by new Director • Strong academics scarce in this field 66 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 67. Acknowledgements • Meghan Chapple-Brown • Doug Guthrie • Ridhima Kapur • Michael Liebreich/Bloomberg New Energy Finance 67 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013
  • 68. Q&A 68 Cross Campus Collaborations in Sustainability June 24, 2013