Innovation for Healthcare Marketing

4,180 views

Published on

Published in: Art & Photos, Business
0 Comments
8 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,180
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
162
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
234
Comments
0
Likes
8
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • No bean bags
  • We tend to think creativity is about special peopleWho wear baseball caps upside downAnd work at R&D labsOr in special rooms painted different colors, with maybe bean bag chairsTheir innovations are funneled into a pipeline that takes the ideas to the customersWho can decide if they want it or notBut that’s not the way real change happensThe next best idea that can and will change your company, can come from anywhere
  • We like to think that invention is a moment of creationA moment of birthThe truth is that most creativity is cumulative and collaborativeLike wikipedia it develops over a long period of time
  • 12 million$500 >> $50
  • If you want to find the big new ideas, it’s difficult to find them in main street markets in big organizationsDo you go into your board and say – I’ve got a fantastic idea for a totally new product in a marginal market with consumers we’ve never dealt with before – and it might not work, but if it does, the payoff will be hugeNo, what you say is I’ve got an idea for an incremental innovation to an existing product that we sell through existing channels to existing consumers with this guaranteed return.  
  • •Microsoft began developing Xbox at a time when gamers were mad•The new PlayStation had changed the industry – erasing everything they new about creating games
  • They established a commission structure. The sales reps figured out how to game that system by pushing sales into the time period most advantageous for them, by underselling one month to show a bigger gain the following month, and so on. All the natural human response.So, the management made the commissions more complex. The sales reps figured it out again. They made it more complex… you get the idea. Eventually, both the management team and the sales force seemed more focused on the compensation system than on making great software and selling it to customers who needed it.Neil Davidson, one of the founders, approached his sales team with the bizarre idea of getting rid fo sales commissions altogether and simply paying people a healthy flat salary. The response surprised him. The salespeople thought the move was a good one, but that other salespeople wouldn’t.Pink said, Davidson explained it to Tom [not his real name] who said, “It sounds like a really good idea. But James would never like it. Remove the commission and he’ll leave.” James said, “Sounds great. But it will never work with Tom.”Not only were commissioned sales not leading to better performance, it wasn’t even the arrangement salespeople themselves preferred.In the absence of commissions, Red Gate’s total sales have increased. And while two salespeople left the company – uncomfortable with the new regime – most stayed and are thriving – including our heroes Tom and James.
  • If I were to ask you what kind of coffee you like, most of you would say – a rich, hearty roast. I like a rich, hearty roast.But, research shows, only 25-27% of you really like a rich, hearty roastMost of you like weak, milky coffeeThe mind cannot say what the mouth desiresWe’re not great reporters of our own motivationsThat’s why listening becomes so important
  • The siteoffered young people discounts to travel site Expedia Inc. (EXPE ) and retailer Best Buy Co. (BBY ) and the ability to deposit tax refunds directly into prepaid Visa cards issued by hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons."We did very few returns" through the site, says Rick Jensen, vice-president for product management at Intuit's consumer tax group. "It was almost a rounding error." Through a postmortem process, the team that developed the campaign documented its insights, such as the fact that Gen Yers don't visit destination Web sites that feel too much like advertising.
  • If you want to find the big new ideas, it’s difficult to find them in main street markets in big organizationsDo you go into your board and say – I’ve got a fantastic idea for a totally new product in a marginal market with consumers we’ve never dealt with before – and it might not work, but if it does, the payoff will be hugeNo, what you say is I’ve got an idea for an incremental innovation to an existing product that we sell through existing channels to existing consumers with this guaranteed return.  
  • If you want to find the big new ideas, it’s difficult to find them in main street markets in big organizationsDo you go into your board and say – I’ve got a fantastic idea for a totally new product in a marginal market with consumers we’ve never dealt with before – and it might not work, but if it does, the payoff will be hugeNo, what you say is I’ve got an idea for an incremental innovation to an existing product that we sell through existing channels to existing consumers with this guaranteed return.  
  • If you want to find the big new ideas, it’s difficult to find them in main street markets in big organizationsDo you go into your board and say – I’ve got a fantastic idea for a totally new product in a marginal market with consumers we’ve never dealt with before – and it might not work, but if it does, the payoff will be hugeNo, what you say is I’ve got an idea for an incremental innovation to an existing product that we sell through existing channels to existing consumers with this guaranteed return.  
  • (Need to add in that – say your role piece here in the voiceover)
  • Innovation for Healthcare Marketing

    1. 1. Segue :brand story and toolkit<br />Innovation Lab<br />Inspiring game-changing ideas<br />
    2. 2. POP QUIZ<br />What companies do you think of as innovative?(no wrong answer!)<br />
    3. 3. Facebook<br />Amazon<br />Apple<br />Google<br />Huawei<br />First Solar<br />PG&E<br />Novartis<br />Walmart<br />HP<br />Hulu<br />Netflix<br />Nike<br />Intel<br />Spotify<br />BYD<br />Cisco<br />IBM<br />GE<br />Disney<br />The world’s most innovative companies have one thing in common.<br />
    4. 4.
    5. 5. They know innovationcan come from anywhereNot just from special people in special rooms<br />
    6. 6. Innovation can’t be created by any one person or discipline<br />INNOVATION<br />is the laying, incubation and hatching of that egg<br />INVENTION<br />is the laying of the egg<br />
    7. 7. Segue :brand story and toolkit<br />Meet us.<br />iQ, the digital lab of GSW Worldwide<br />
    8. 8. Across GSW’s<br /> global network, hundreds of digital specialists solve client problems with imagination, insight and – ultimately – innovation. Often their ideas point not just to solutions, but to new opportunities. <br />
    9. 9. That’s where iQ comes in<br />“<br />We're a lab where digital experimentation becomes marketing innovation. <br />
    10. 10. iQ’s mission is<br />to bring bold, break-through innovations to our clients in fast-changing areas like mobile, social and tablet computing. Through big ideas, tangible prototypes and easy-to-share concepts, we bring new kinds of competitive advantage to healthcare marketing. <br />
    11. 11. We share our ideas in three ways:<br />Every quarter we rapid prototype some of our best new ideas into tangible examples of what could change healthcare marketing<br />Innovation theaters<br />New products and services<br />Once an innovation is proven and piloted, we help make it turnkey so that getting started is just a phone call away<br />Workshops and thought leadership<br />We share our perspectives on what’s next and why it matters in our blog, research and 101 technology sessions<br />
    12. 12. Segue :brand story and toolkit<br />Why innovation matters<br />The creative imperative<br />
    13. 13. Why innovate?<br />
    14. 14. “<br />No matter what anybody else tells you: corporations achieve competitive advantage through acts of innovation. PETER DRUCKER <br />
    15. 15. +<br />Innovation helps us combat the four growing problems that sap the hard-won advantages we have today<br />SETH AND LEIGH<br />
    16. 16. 1. The India Problem.Or: How to compete against a billion people<br />
    17. 17. 15%<br />If just 15% of its population is talented, ambitious, college-educated<br />That’s more than the entire population of the 2nd largest economy<br />It’s larger than the working population of the world’s largest economy<br />If 85% of India is left behind, they will still have more talented, ambitious, upper class citizens than the U.S. has workers<br />
    18. 18. 2. Race to the Price Bottom.Or: A bigger problem than India<br />
    19. 19. Any task that is routine can be outsourced<br />><br />and many can be automated<br />
    20. 20.
    21. 21. 3. The Abundance Problem.Or: Selling in an age of comfort<br />
    22. 22. 98%<br />Of American households have a color television – this despite a persistent 13% - 17% poverty rate.<br />88%<br />Have cell phones - each one holding more computing power than existed in the world when my grandparents were my age.<br />
    23. 23. Enter: The<br />
    24. 24. 2 million<br />Number sold in the first 60 days:<br />Number of people who knew they were missing one 6 months ago:<br />zero<br />
    25. 25. 4. More incremental change.Or: continuous cannibalization<br />
    26. 26. “<br />When man or nature or Gillette has not yet found a good solution to a problem, we tend to stick closely to whatever looks even marginally plausible ADAM GOPNIK<br />
    27. 27. Introducing: that 5th blade you’ve always wanted<br />(But still no whole new way to <br />eliminate unwanted hair)<br />
    28. 28. Overcoming these challenges<br /> to create growth takes artistic, cognitive skill. Bold, innovative acts. Today, value is created when we give people something they always needed, but never knew to ask for.<br />
    29. 29. Segue :brand story and toolkit<br />Innovation in practice<br />How 8 companies are actively fostering innovation<br />
    30. 30. 1<br />At Microsoft, the gamers build the gamesBlur the line between us and them<br /><ul><li>When it comes to gaming, Microsoft believes empathy = growth
    31. 31. They want every employee to have a gut-level intuition for the people who buy their products
    32. 32. So they hire them. Hardcore gamers developed their first console
    33. 33. Those gamers successfully navigated the tradeoffs and compromises of the development process to create a system people like them would want to play
    34. 34. “The big difference between Xbox and Zune was the customer target. With Zune, we didn’t know who we were building it for. With Xbox, we knew those guys. Hell, we were those guys.”— Xbox team member</li></ul>“<br />
    35. 35. 2<br />Atlassian sponsors FedEx daysMake time for innovation<br /><ul><li>This Australian software company does something unusual once each quarter: they tell their software developers to work on anything they want, any way they want, with whomever they want
    36. 36. They just have to show the results to the rest of the company at the end of 24 hours
    37. 37. They call these "FedEx days," because you have to deliver something overnight
    38. 38. That one day of intense creation has produced a whole array of software fixes, ideas for new products, and upgrades for existing products.</li></li></ul><li>3<br />Best Buy’s biggest idea started under a deskEmpower and elevate skunk works<br /><ul><li>Best Buy’s Gary Koelling and Steve Bendt had a fundamentally simple idea: Use technology to enable employees to share their perspectives
    39. 39. Their mission: a covert one to find out what life in the stores was really like
    40. 40. The real moment of innovation:When their boss elevated their work
    41. 41. What they created was the now famous: Blue Shirt Nation, an internal communications platform that generates thousands of conversations across the company
    42. 42. The result, more information, more issues, more solutions, more ideas, more impact — and a corporate culture that is beginning to appreciate that buy-in brings out the best in employees</li></li></ul><li>4<br />Exxon worked for 20years on a problem an outsider cracked in 24 hoursKnow when to be a solution finder<br /><ul><li>As information becomes richer and challenges become more discreet, no one will be able to solve every problem
    43. 43. Twenty years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, there was still a lot of oil on the ocean floor
    44. 44. After decades of working on the problem, Exxon decided to look outside its walls for help. Not to another consultant or expert, but to the crowd
    45. 45. Within 24 hours, an Illinois chemist from the concrete industry realized he knew the answer. He faxed in the answer and a day later was talking with the people who – with him – could restore the ocean floor</li></li></ul><li>5<br />Red Gate Software found that the hardest part is the askChallenge the orthodoxy<br /><ul><li>You don’t know until you ask
    46. 46. Redgate’s sales team was compensated on a typical commission structure
    47. 47. It wasn’t working for anyone – sales people gamed it; execs micromanaged it
    48. 48. One of the founders had the radical idea of getting rid of it and just paying people a fair wage
    49. 49. Each sales leader liked it, but said the others wouldn’t go for it
    50. 50. In the end – everyone wanted the same thing, but no one wanted to be the one to ask
    51. 51. Sales, collaboration and morale have all gone up since the change</li></li></ul><li>6<br />Bayer figured out what was in hand and used itApply the three-minute rule<br /><ul><li>What is your customer doing three minutes immediately before and three minutes after he uses your product or service
    52. 52. The idea for Didget came from a parent (Paul Wessel) of a child with diabetes
    53. 53. Paul’s son was constantly losing his blood glucose meter, he could always find his Game Boy
    54. 54. That insight led him to create a device that would help his son manage his diabetes
    55. 55. A first-of-its-kind blood glucose meter that connects directly to Nintendo DS™ gaming systems to help kids manage their diabetes by rewarding them for consistent testing habits</li></li></ul><li>7<br />Memorial Sloan Kettering found answers in what people said to each otherDon’t ask, listen<br /><ul><li>When Ellen Sonet, VP of marketing at Sloan-Kettering, was faced with the challenge of how to market the new cancer center, she turned to the people
    56. 56. Through a partnership with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) she was able to host a private community on Communispace
    57. 57. There, they listened while the members talked about how they made their decisions about where to receive care
    58. 58. The answers changed their marketing. From patient-focused to primary-care physician focused. From print to search-rich online.
    59. 59. They also made marketing a go-to resource to execs and docs alike</li></li></ul><li>8<br />RockYourRefunddoesn’t rock the bottom lineEmbrace failure<br /><ul><li>TurboTax needed to attract more young users
    60. 60. Its ill-fated RockYourRefund campaign tried to combine tax-filing drudgery with hip-hop style
    61. 61. Learnings from the flop entirely changed the way Intiutmarkets to 20-somethings
    62. 62. The case was profiled in one of their "When Learning Hurts” sessions and received an award from the CEO for being a learn-worthy flop</li></li></ul><li>Segue :brand story and toolkit<br />Innovation Case Studies<br />Practicing what we preach<br />
    63. 63. WHERE WE LOOK<br />Innovation happens at the intersection of insight and invention<br />Consumer<br />Culture<br />Category<br />Company<br />
    64. 64. WE START WITHA multidisciplinary team of collaborators<br />Dedicated lab resources with healthcare experience and technology know how:<br />PLANNERS<br />STRATEGISTS<br />DESIGNERS<br />ENGINEERS<br />
    65. 65. WE ASK OURSELVESWhat new kinds of opportunities can technology create for healthcare marketing?<br />We follow a repeatable process in search of new kinds of competitive advantage:<br />EXPLORE<br />New technologies and trends<br />CONCEPT<br />Prototype new products and services<br />CHALLENGE<br />How every concept works and adds value<br />SHARE<br />The best ideas with our peers and clients<br />
    66. 66. What makes all the difference?<br />STIMULUS<br />(It turns a brainstorm into a strategy session)<br />
    67. 67. What makes all the difference?<br />STIMULUS<br />SPECIFIC PROBLEM<br />NEW EXPERIENCE<br />UNApPLIEDTOOL OR IDEACUSTOMER PERSPECTIVE<br />GREAT EXAMPle<br />OUT-oF-CATEGORY TOOLS<br />COMPETITIVE CHANGE<br />
    68. 68. 1<br />Start with the ideal solution<br />(and don’t back down)<br />STIMULUS<br />
    69. 69. Too much innovating<br />Thousands of sales reps at a global pharma company had the shared the same problem:<br />Since they started carrying tablets, every product brand had developed great new applications and tools for them<br /> <br />Unfortunately, those cool tools also created some challenges:<br /> <br /><ul><li>Fall-flat experiences
    70. 70. Competing platforms
    71. 71. Slow, impersonal presentations</li></ul> <br />Bottom line: they couldn’t run their sales calls effectively<br />
    72. 72. So we asked:Shouldn’t it all work on one seamless system? <br />
    73. 73. turning content into conversation<br />
    74. 74. It’s harder than ever<br /> for sales reps to connect with prescribers<br />Last year, the number of docs who would see most reps dropped significantly and the number who refused to see most reps increased by half. That means 8 million planned sales calls were nearly impossible to complete.<br />Rep-Inaccessible docs<br />Rep-accessible docs<br />50%<br />20%<br />AccessMonitor™, a report from global consulting firm ZS Associates, 5/2010<br />
    75. 75. Too much innovating<br />Thousands of sales reps at a global pharma company had the shared the same problem:<br />Since they started carrying tablets, every product brand had developed great new applications and tools for them<br /> <br />Unfortunately, those cool tools and platforms also created some challenges:<br /><ul><li> Fall-flat experiences
    76. 76. Competing platforms
    77. 77. Slow, impersonal presentations
    78. 78. Costly investment
    79. 79. Cumbersome Implementation
    80. 80. Proprietary technologies
    81. 81. inflexible formats</li></ul>Bottom line: they couldn’t run their sales calls effectively<br />
    82. 82. One reason: physicians don’t get the value they want out of most sales calls<br />Impersonal, irrelevant presentations<br />Inflexible, slow moving systems and tools<br />Unresponsive, locked down storytelling<br />
    83. 83. That’s where comes in<br />Segue is a simple, effective content delivery system that<br />INTO<br />powerful, personal conversations<br />TURNS<br />secure brand content<br />
    84. 84.
    85. 85. WHAT IT DELIVERSMore relevant sales calls<br />Customize every call with <br />pre-planning tools<br />
    86. 86. WHAT IT DELIVERSSecure, effective brand management<br />=<br />Better brand management<br />Open, adaptable design<br />It’s designed to protect your brand and your team. <br />Your brand story will be delivered in tools that are relevant to how HCPs work today, but every presentation has assured compliance – with both required messaging and linked content built in.<br />Segue features an open, adaptable design that uses your rules-based communication framework to seamlessly deliver content to laptops, tablets, and mobile devices – like smart phones. <br />
    87. 87. WHAT IT DELIVERSCompelling, immediate ROI<br />=<br />Business results<br />Fast-start system<br />Segue is less expensive than other tablet-friendly content delivery systems. Add those savings to its quick rollout and you’ll start seeing results immediately.<br />Segue’s optional metrics also give you new kinds of insight into how your story is really told on the front lines.<br />Because Segue is small and self-contained, it can be up and running almost immediately, without time-consuming integrations. <br />Its intuitive interface and self-guided training help your salesforce feel confident onday one.<br />
    88. 88. WHAT IT DELIVERSCompelling, immediate ROI<br />See what happened with optional analytics<br />
    89. 89. 2<br />Borrow generously<br />Think about what you have now that could be used in new and unexpected ways<br />STIMULUS<br />
    90. 90. After a doctor diagnoses someone with cancer, the nurses step in to help that person figure out what to do next. <br /><ul><li>They copy articles
    91. 91. Pull patient education materials
    92. 92. Print out treatment plans
    93. 93. Etc. </li></ul> <br />From paper files and ad hoc tools nurses cobble together the plan that will let you be a powerful advocate for your own care.<br />
    94. 94. So we asked:What if nurses could easily assemble personal care plans for each patient – digitally?<br />
    95. 95. patient care, simply shared.<br />
    96. 96.
    97. 97. Introducing:<br />DEEP CLINICAL EXPERTISE<br />recommendations & answers<br />VAST TREATMENTINFORMATION<br />literature & tools<br />Fluent is a web-based tool that lets treatment teams easily create a comprehensive, personal action plan for each patient<br />
    98. 98. How it works:<br />BRAND MGRS CREATE A SECURE Library<br />PATIENT EDUCATION<br />DISEASE STATE<br />TREATMENT TEAMS INSTANTLY REGISTER AND LOGIN<br />OTHER RESOURCES<br />CREATE<br />EDIT<br />FIND<br />THEY BUILD CUSTOM PLANS WITH DRAG-AND-DROP TOOLS<br />AND ADD IDEAS<br />DELIVER THEM TO PATIENTS<br />Recommend friends<br />Recommend content<br />
    99. 99. What it delivers<br /> FLUENT offers TREATMENT TEAMS three primary benefits:<br />Enhanced care planning<br /><ul><li>Customized to each patient
    100. 100. Comprehensive in one document
    101. 101. Convenient to create</li></ul>1<br />Increased patient confidence<br /><ul><li>Know what to do
    102. 102. Understand why it matters
    103. 103. See how to get started</li></ul>2<br />Added value for the practice brand<br /><ul><li>Innovative communications
    104. 104. Branded patient experience
    105. 105. Relationship-building tool</li></ul>3<br />
    106. 106. 3<br />Understand how your audience’s life has changed<br />(And, meet them where they are)<br />STIMULUS<br />
    107. 107. CHANGE OUR PERSPECTIVE<br />All we saw were closed doors<br />But they were looking at little screens<br />72%<br />of physicians use <br />smart phones<br />
    108. 108. So we asked:What if a sales rep’s business card was a portal to his on-demand office?<br />
    109. 109.
    110. 110. 4<br />Define the real problem<br />(strip out all the noise)<br />STIMULUS<br />
    111. 111. Physicians and patients have been battling over adherence for years<br />It turns out we rarely live up to the promises we make in the doctors office<br />Sometimes we choose to stop taking a Rx, but often we just forget to refill it<br />
    112. 112. So we asked:What if you could be reminded to refill when it was actually convenient?<br />
    113. 113.
    114. 114. 5<br />Apply an unapplied technologyWhat old problems can be fixed with new stuff?<br />STIMULUS<br />
    115. 115. iPadswere instantly filled with great consumer tools that made so many things easier or more fun<br />It’s a powerful technology, but one relatively unapplied in healthcare<br />We looked for problems the iPad could solve.<br />
    116. 116. LIKE THIS ONE:<br />But chronic disease and pain are a daily occurrence for many.<br />Office visits are infrequent<br />To create the best care plan, physicians need to understand that daily journey – both how the patient feels and what she’s doing for daily pain management<br />
    117. 117. So we asked:How could a patient with limited mobility easily give her treatment team a fuller view?<br />
    118. 118.
    119. 119. Segue :brand story and toolkit<br />Innovation in action<br />Workshopping a big idea<br />
    120. 120. OUR CHALLENGE<br />Let’s apply some innovation thinking5 teams + 25 minutes<br />
    121. 121. Start by introducing yourselfYour role: Job title<br /> Your role in innovation: Passion<br />
    122. 122. THEN, AS A TEAM:<br />Choose a process to brainstorm against<br />PICK A PROBLEM TO TACKLE<br />Find a new insight (C/C/C/C)<br />Name the ideal solution (pie in the sky!)<br />Determine what we can learn from what hasn’t worked<br />
    123. 123. What can we learn from what didn’t work?<br />use the innovation table topics cards to get brainstorming<br />
    124. 124. See what we’re up to>><br />Our blog: WhatsYourDigitaliQ.com<br />Our presentations: <br />Slideshare.net/iqLab<br />YouTube.com/GSWiQlab<br />Our tweets: Twitter.com/iqLab<br />
    125. 125. Segue :brand story and toolkit<br />SethQuillin<br />SVP, innovations<br />squillin@iq-w.com<br />614.778.8203<br />@squillin<br />Leigh Householder<br />Strategist<br />Leigh.householder@iq-w.com<br />614.218.9549<br />@leighhouse<br />

    ×