2014 Consumer Trends

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GSW teamed up with the Health Experience Project to identify the 8 trends that are changing consumer expectations. …

GSW teamed up with the Health Experience Project to identify the 8 trends that are changing consumer expectations.

We're calling 2014 the year of "Make way for my way." Consumer are becoming more community and family oriented at the exact moment that we’re blowing up the definitions of those very things with new values, new behaviors and new expectations. We’re following eight trends that show the key shifts to “my way”:

You'll never be normal again
And, not instead
Sharing is the new satisfaction
Talk to the handheld
Get with the wabi-sabi
It's all about beating the Joneses
The end of eye contact
Mortar or mastery

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  • 1. 8
  • 2. In partnership with the Health Experience Project, GSW has expanded its fourth-annual trends report to include a broader look at the shifts that are changing healthcare marketing.
  • 3. 2014 TRENDS Consumer Marketing Digital Healthcare Overview Do you ever get the feeling that healthcare and people are just missing each other? Healthcare is full of “do this” and “take that” directives. And, people… well, people 
 are full of good intentions, everyday missteps, and hope that it will get better. The kinds of experiences we need to build today – 
 to get people off the sidelines, to change behavior, to earn commitment – aren’t healthcare-marketing-as-usual. Instead, they’re innovative approaches that engage 
 people in new ways. Here’s the real challenge, though: We live in a world of rapidly changing expectations. But, our approval processes aren’t as fast. They’re long and rely more on insulating risk than innovating experience. The opportunity is finding the smart risks, the ones that can truly change our marketplaces. To prepare for where the world is going – not just respond to where it’s been. That’s where trends come in.
  • 4. We look at trends to understand our customers’ new expectations for brand interactions. The ones built on their day-to-day experiences with technology, culture, and media.   This year, we’ve uncovered actionable trends in
 four key areas: consumer, digital, marketing and 
 healthcare. We’ll use those trends to systematically point to new opportunities for healthcare marketers and spur innovation. 
 We’ll ask, “What Could Be?” for healthcare brands 
 and customers. And deliver bold new solutions that change that business-as-usual game. Leigh Householder Chief Innovation Officer GSW Core Contributors Abigail Schmelzer 
 Alex Bragg
 Alex Brock 
 Amanda Joly 
 Bruce Rooke 
 Eduardo Menendez
 Jason Sankey
 Jeffrey Giermek
 Joel Gerber
 Joy Hart Kathryn Bernish-Fisher Mark Stinson Matt Cash Michael Donahoe
 Nick Bartlett
 Rupert Dooley
 Ryan Deshazer
 Shawn Mullings 
 Tyler Durbin
  • 5. 1. YOU’LL NEVER BE “NORMAL” AGAIN In Short Today, what’s uber popular in one group is likely to go virtually unnoticed by others.
  • 6. 1. YOU’LL NEVER BE “NORMAL” AGAIN Did you know? Women represent a greater portion of the game-playing population (31%) than boys age 17 or younger (19%). In Short In Short Today, what’s uber popular in one group is Today, what’s uber popular in one group is likely to go virtually unnoticed by others. likely to go virtually unnoticed by others.
  • 7. It’s Time Familying With nearly limitless options in 
 consumption, our individual 
 experiences of “normal” tend to 
 diverge dramatically from one
 another. The iconic picture of the traditional American family has been 
 fading over the last decade due to major population and behavioral shifts. We’re choosing our own unique definitions of what it means 
 to “family” (now a verb!). Figuring out what was popular used to be easy. We had chart 
 toppers and Nielsen householders and #1 best sellers. But, the proliferation of channels and media has created a new 
 reality: we no longer experience cultures as one big, homogeneous mass. Ignoring Milestones People are increasingly delaying or outright skipping - the traditional milestones of adulthood. Married Multi-Generational Same Sex In the last ten years, we’ve seen the number of same sex households double, a surge in multi-generational families, and a drop in the number of married households to just 51%.
  • 8. It’s Time Familying With nearly limitless options in 
 consumption, our individual 
 experiences of “normal” tend to 
 diverge dramatically from one
 another. The iconic picture of the traditional American family has been 
 fading over the last decade due to major population and behavioral shifts. We’re choosing our own unique definitions of what it means 
 to “family” (now a verb!). Married Ignoring Milestones Ignoring Milestones Multi-Generational Same Sex In the last ten years, we’ve seen the number of same sex households From buying a house to getting hitched, double, a surge in multi-generational families, and a drop in the number of married households to just 51%. People are increasingly delaying to starting a career, the new normal is or whateverskipping - the traditional outright the individual says it is. milestones of adulthood.
  • 9. It’s Time Familying With nearly limitless options in 
 consumption, our individual 
 experiences of “normal” tend to 
 diverge dramatically from one
 another. The iconic picture of the traditional American family has been 
 fading over the last decade due to major population and behavioral shifts. We’re choosing our own unique definitions of what it means 
 to “family” (now a verb!). Figuring out what was popular used to be easy. We had chart 
 toppers and Nielsen householders and #1 best sellers. 34 % But, the proliferation of channels and media has created a new 
 reality: we no longer experience cultures as one big, homogeneous mass. Ignoring Milestones People are increasingly delaying or outright skipping - the traditional milestones of adulthood. 34% of millennials (18 to 32) are still living at home. Married Multi-Generational Same Sex In the last ten years, we’ve seen the number of same sex households double, a surge in multi-generational families, and a drop in the number of married households to just 51%.
  • 10. 2. AND, 
 NOT
 INSTEAD In Short Twenty-four-seven entertainment on as many screens as we can hold.
  • 11. All You Can See Second Screen Our headline in the history books just might be “The Great Media Binge.” Advances in technology have created so many new things to enjoy – without actually reducing our love of the old ones. 
 The vast majority of consumers are 
 using a device to augment or distract from traditional media. They call it a “second screen. That’s left us doubling and tripling
 up on our media preferences, even doubling and tripling up on the 
 media we’re actually consuming at any one moment. ”It’s a small glowing screen in your hand used in front of the large 
 glowing screen on your wall. Over 80% of mobile users do it.“ The interesting trend is in their 
 convergence: one-sixth of viewers are engaging with each other on the web around TV content.
  • 12. All You Can See All You Can See Our headline in the history books Our headline in the history books just might be “The Great Media just might be “The Great Media Binge.” Advances in technology have Binge.” Advances in technology have created so many new things to enjoy created so many new things to enjoy – without actually reducing our love – without actually reducing our love of the old ones. 
 of the old ones. 
 Which Book? That’s left us doubling and tripling
 That’s left of e-book readers continue to Nearly 90%us doubling and tripling
 up on our media preferences, even up physical volumes. media preferences, forms seem read on ourand tripling Theon the 
 two even doubling up doubling and tripling up on the 
 to serve we’re actually consuming at media different purposes. media we’re actually consuming at any one moment. Second Screen The vast majority of consumers are 
 using a device to augment or distract from traditional media. They call it a “second screen. ”It’s a small glowing screen in your hand used in front of the large 
 glowing screen on your wall. Over 80% of mobile users do it.” The interesting trend is in their 
 convergence: one-sixth of viewers are engaging with each other on the web around TV content.
  • 13. All You Can See Second Screen Our headline in the history books just might be “The Great Media Binge.” Advances in technology have created so many new things to enjoy – without actually reducing our love of the old ones. 
 The vast majority of consumers are 
 using a device to augment or distract from traditional media. They call it a “second screen. That’s left us doubling and tripling
 up on our media preferences, even doubling and tripling up on the 
 media we’re actually consuming at any one moment. ”It’s a small glowing screen in your hand used in front of the large 
 glowing screen on your wall. Over 80% of mobile Convergence users do it. The interesting trend is in their convergence: The interesting trend is in their 
 one-sixth of viewers are engaging with each convergence: one-sixth of viewers are other on the web around TV content. Among engaging with each other on the web those under 35, more than half do so. around TV content.
  • 14. 40 % As many as 40% of
 all tweets at peak time 
 are about programs on TV at the time, behavior which is actively 
 promoted by programs like #HIGNFY, #BBCQT or #XFACTOR. Behind the Scenes The new cocktail party question–“What are you binge watching?” Netflix, Amazon.com, Hulu and others have given viewers the chance to catch up on shows they may have missed the first time around. Add in the number of homes that have digital video recorders, almost 
 half (up from 19% is 2008) and you have an audience completely 
 untethered from a linear television schedule, but still addicted to the magic of television drama. In the lull after Breaking Bad and Orange is the New Black, Netflix addicts are going old school, dialing up Twin Peaks and Dr. Who while waiting for new seasons of House of Cards and Downton Abbey.
  • 15. 3. SHARING 
 IS THE NEW 
 SATISFACTION In Short You’re a narcissist. You’re a luddite. Look at my baby. I’m tired of your baby. Oooh, the great debate of 
 privacy, sharing, and attention is heating up.
  • 16. Like Unlike We’re increasingly experiencing our lives through the lenses of our outstretched camera phones. Not to save it – but to share it. It’s more than a habit, it’s a new kind of satisfaction. For many, an 
 experience just isn’t complete without sharing what we saw, heard, learned, or tasted. There’s passion in that pass along. If you’ve seen one baby / back-to-school / engagement photo, you’ve seen them all. Everything from fears about privacy to a 
 feeling of overexposure, to angst about whether their own lives measure up to the Facebook Dream, to just plain boredom is causing a big backlash against the 
 share-everything social world. 40 % Forty percent of adult internet users surveyed manage multiple social networking profiles 50 % 50 percent of users surveyed have either taken or have considered taking a break from social networking
  • 17. Like Unlike We’re increasingly experiencing our lives through the lenses of our outstretched camera phones. Not to save it – but to share it. It’s more than a habit, it’s a new kind of satisfaction. For many, an 
 experience just isn’t complete without sharing what we saw, heard, learned, or tasted. There’s passion in that pass If you’ve seen one baby / back-to-school / engagement photo, you’ve seen them all. Everything from fears about privacy to a 
 feeling of overexposure, to angst about whether their own lives measure up to the Facebook Dream, to just plain boredom is causing a big backlash against the 
 share-everything social world. 40 % Social Clash 50 % The debate really heats up when super sharers and 
 real timers are together, the sharers want to instagram Forty percent of adultlive tweet from the concert, and instantly review of users surveyed have either 50 percent dinner, internet users surveyedthe movie. manage multiple taken or have considered taking a break social networking profiles from social networking And, the real timers want to have a real conversation and a great meal without the ubiquitous typing and texting.
  • 18. 4. TALK 
 TO 
 THE 
 HANDHELD In Short The best way to end an argument? Google it.
  • 19. Impatience Culture Debate Ender Our smartphones have set an expectation for instant gratification. We can get sports scores, dinner reservations, and answers to almost any question with a few touches. The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project found that the hyper-connected lives of people under the age of 35 are
 suffering from a “need for instant gratification and loss of patience.” Ouch. What was the name of that movie with that guy? Our impatience culture is increasingly turning to our life augmenting screen to 
 answer just that question. More and more, we’re turning those little screens around to make them a personal presentation tool, one that uncovers answers our memories cannot and proves once and for all that “I’m right and you’re wrong.” Life Augmented It’s not just remembering. A savvy user can digitally enhance her experience of almost anything. She can pull up a map, find an 
 out-of-the-way restaurant, and identify the architect who designed the building at the corner. And, she can definitely explain how the chef is preparing that rare dish her 
 father just ordered. 1 in 4 Americans already report using their cell phones to win arguments
  • 20. Impatience Culture Debate Ender Our smartphones have set an expectation for instant gratification. We can get sports scores, dinner reservations, and answers to almost any Prediction question with a few touches. The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American The percent of Americans using Life Project found that the hyper-connected their cell phones to win arguments lives of people under the age of 35 are
 2014. will double in the year suffering from a “need for instant gratification and loss of patience.” Ouch. What was the name of that movie with that guy? Our impatience culture is increasingly turning to our life augmenting screen to 
 answer just that question. More and more, we’re turning those little screens around to make them a personal presentation tool, one that uncovers answers our memories cannot and proves once and for all that “I’m right and you’re wrong.” Life Augmented It’s not just remembering. A savvy user can digitally enhance her experience of almost anything. She can pull up a map, find an 
 out-of-the-way restaurant, and identify the architect who designed the building at the corner. And, she can definitely explain how the chef is preparing that rare dish her 
 father just ordered. 1 in 4 Americans already report using their cell phones to win arguments
  • 21. 5. GET WITH THE WABI-SABI In Short In this new age of sincerity, people expect companies to get real.
  • 22. Sincerely Yours Wabi-sabi (noun) : [Japanese] A philosophy of aesthetics that emphasizes the beauty of the imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete It’s difficult to disappoint a cynic. They already expect the worst in people and situations, so reality rarely lets them down. But we’re at a new transition point in culture, one that swings away from the 
 decades of post-Vietnam, Cold War irony to a new kind of sincerity. Authenticity Now People are looking for more real, honest connections with other
 people and communities. It’s that same spirit that’s leading them to
 expect a new level of authenticity from brands. It’s not enough for 
 companies to say they have nothing to hide, today’s consumers expect them to prove it with their actions and openness. 68 % 68% of consumers trust 
 reviews more when they see both good and bad scores 30 % 30% suspect censorship or faked reviews if there aren’t any negative comments
  • 23. Wabi-sabi (noun) : [Japanese] People will be more attracted and loyal to brands that have a little wabi-sabi. It’s the flaws that make something desirable. The authenticity of imperfection. McDonald’s P&G McDonalds developed a YouTube video featuring the Director of 
 Marketing for Canada, Hope
 Bagozzi, that places an actual, 
 store-bought quarter pounder side-by-side with a “hero” quarter pounder used in a McDonald’s photo shoot to explain why the two look different and, as importantly, how they’re the same. P&G actively recruits moms to
 moderate their individual facebook pages for brands such as Tide and Downy, even giving them latitude to share some details of their 
 personal lives and carry on 
 genuine , unscripted, dialog with others who have liked the brand page and have it in their stream. View >
  • 24. 6. IT’S ALL 
 ABOUT 
 BEATING THE JONESES In Short Comparative data is the new context that drives our sense of failure or accomplishment.
  • 25. Expectation Explosion People Proof Adult life, it turns out, is full of lots of things you should do. But what do people like you actually do? Social scientists have found that seeing comparative data is a more effective route to behavior change than making more rules. It’s called social proof.
 When people are uncertain about a course of action, they tend to look outside of themselves and to other people around them to guide their decisions & actions. Fitting In That’s where comparative data comes in. 
 An electric bill might show your home’s power usage vs. the neighbors. An app might display your relative time on a run around the park. We’re desiring more and more of these clues that show us where we fit in and what counts as good (enough) behavior. After all, the goal isn’t to be perfect, it’s just to better than most. In one experiment, a simple sign telling people that “most people in this hotel reuse their towels at least once during their stay” increased reuse rates by 26%. + Without Sign 26 % With Sign
  • 26. Expectation Explosion People Proof Adult life, it turns out, is full of lots of things you should do. But what do people like you actually do? Social scientists have found that seeing comparative data is a more effective route to behavior change than making more rules. It’s called social proof.
 When people are uncertain about a course of action, they tend to look outside of themselves and to other people around them to guide their decisions & actions. Fitting In That’s where comparative data comes in. 
 An electric bill might show your home’s power usage vs. the neighbors. An app might display your relative time on a run around the park. We’re desiring more and more of these clues that show us where we fit in and what counts as good (enough) behavior. After all, the goal isn’t to be perfect, it’s just to better than most. In one experiment, a simple sign telling people that “most people in this hotel reuse their towels Expectations at least once during their stay” increased reuse Work out 30 (now 60??) minutes/day. rates by 26%. Save 10%. Eat dark, leafy greens. + Without Sign 26 % With Sign
  • 27. 7. THE END OF EYE 
 CONTACT In Short In the world of constant partial attention, eye contact is the next human connection to be left behind.
  • 28. The Stare F.O.M.O Between staring at computers during the work day and regularly gazing down at our phones, people are spending more time with their eyes glued to their screens than ever before. Do you have it? We might. It’s fear of missing out. And, it drives constant checking of the little screen. For Millenials – the most effected – it’s become
 culturally acceptable to answer the phone during dinner or to glance down at texts. There are two groups particularly who are making even less eye contact: doctors (because electronic health records demand so much of their in-exam attention), and Millennials (because of FOMO). The Stare That lack of eye 
 contact is having a big impact on human connections. It’s way more than a habit. These hyper-connected twenty- and thirty somethings feel compelled to check mobile gadgets repeatedly to see what social opportunities they are missing. Typical Required
  • 29. The Stare F.O.M.O Between staring at computers during the work day and regularly gazing down at our phones, people are spending more time with their eyes glued to their screens than ever before. Do you have it? We might. It’s fear of missing out. And, it drives constant checking of the little screen. For Millenials – the most effected – it’s become
 culturally acceptable to answer the phone during dinner or to glance down at texts. There are two groups particularly who are making even less eye contact: doctors (because electronic health records demand so much of their in-exam attention) and Millennials (because of FOMO). It’s way more than a habit. These hyper-connected twenty- and thirty somethings feel compelled to check mobile gadgets repeatedly to see what social opportunities they are missing. Emotional Disconnect Today, adults make eye contact between 
 30-60% of the time in a typical conversation, The Stare but emotional connection is built when eye contact eye 
 That lack ofis made during 60-70% percent 
 of a is having a contact conversation. big impact on human connections. Typical Required
  • 30. 8. MORTAR OR 
 MASTERY In Short Traditional education is being challenged by people who believe what you know is way more important than how you learned it.
  • 31. Information Everywhere MOOC-ing In our changing economy where you can get information anywhere, a person’s degree of mastery for a subject is becoming more valuable than his master’s degree. MOOCs, or massive open online courses, are part of that major 
 disruption to how we think about what it means to be educated.
 That trend becomes even more prevalent in industries that are in rapid transformation, where it’s 
 critical to have access to the latest ideas and approaches. MOOCs put lecture videos and interactive course work on the web 
 making it possible for education to reach more students and allow for
 different styles of learning.
 Top-notch universities like Stanford and Harvard and leading employers like AT&T and Google are creating their own “degree of mastery” online programs to let self-motivated learners learn for little or no cost. 50 % 50.2% of schools are adding a MOOC 37 % 37% of schools
 already have a MOOC
  • 32. Information Everywhere MOOC-ing In our changing economy where Khan Academy or massive open online courses, are part of that major 
 MOOCs, you can get information anywhere, disruption to how we think about what it means to be educated.
 a person’s degree of mastery for a Salman Khan has delivered over 240 million 
 subject is becoming more valuable lessons on Khan Academy. Hisvideos and interactive course work on the web 
 MOOCs put lecture memorable, short 
 videos include more than 4,000 education to reach more students and allow for
 than his master’s degree. making it possible for micro lectures in mathematics, history, healthcare, medicine, finance, different styles of learning.
 physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy, economics, That trend becomes even more prevalent in industries that are in cosmology, organic chemistry, American civics, artHarvard and leading employers Top-notch universities like Stanford and history, macroeconomics, microeconomics, and own “degree of mastery” online rapid transformation, where it’s 
 like AT&T and Google are creating their science. critical to have access to the latest computerprograms to let self-motivated learners learn for little or no cost. ideas and approaches. 50 % 50.2% of schools are adding a MOOC 37 % 37% of schools
 already have a MOOC
  • 33. Information Everywhere MOOC-ing In our changing economy where you can get information anywhere, a person’s degree of mastery for a subject is becoming more valuable than his master’s degree. MOOCs, or massive open online courses, are part of that major 
 disruption to how we think about what it means to be educated.
 That trend becomes even more prevalent in industries that are in rapid transformation, where it’s 
 critical to have access to the latest ideas and approaches. MOOCs put lecture videos and interactive course work on the web 
 making it possible for education to reach more students and allow for
 different styles of learning.
 Top-notch universities like Stanford and Harvard and leading employers like AT&T and Google are creating their own “degree of mastery” online programs to let self-motivated learners learn for little or no cost. $63,000 to $0 50 37 Cost% tuition and expenses for one of person to attend one year at Harvard: $63,000. 
 % Cost to the almost 5 million people who’ve attended the famous “Justice”schools
 50.2% of schools 37% of course at Harvard online: $0. already have a MOOC are adding a MOOC
  • 34. Voluntary Homework 2.5 million have participated in a MOOC since 2011. They’ve taken on the voluntary homework for learning without limitations. The latest platforms have created an opportunity for a classroom community – connecting thousands of people around the world with one syllabus and one big conversation. In 2011, nearly 7 million students had taken at least one online course. 2011 2002 Number of Students Taking at Least One Online Course
  • 35. Voluntary Homework 2.5 million have participated in a MOOC since 2011. They’ve taken on the voluntary homework for learning without limitations. The latest platforms have created an opportunity for a classroom community – connecting thousands of people around the world with one syllabus and one big conversation. In 2011, nearly 7 million students had taken at least one online course. 2011 2002 Number of Students Taking at Least One Online Course 6,714,792
  • 36. To discuss this report live, request another module, or 
 schedule a presentation of trends, please contact Leigh Householder at 614-543-6496 or leigh.householder@gsw-w.com Sources
 U.S. Census, 2010, ESA, 2013, Pew Research 2013, Motorola, 2013, Reevoo.com, January 2012, MyLife.com 2013, Quantified Impressions, Changing Course, 2013