Working at the human-animal-ecosystem interfaces within the   framework of One Health:          The Importance for Health ...
One Health Grown to become a movement with appreciable  momentum Recognizes interconnections between the health of  huma...
One Health (2) "One Health" concept is necessarily broad and flexible     – Encompasses many varied facets of the relatio...
Why we need to work together? An estimated 60% of known infectious human diseases  have their source in animals The same...
Why we need to work together? (2) Many possibilities of inter-specific transmission:     – Food-borne (Mad cow disease, s...
Why we need to work together? (3) Economic impact:   – Can be disastrous, even if the risk is only perceived Impact on f...
WHOs Constitution"The objective of the World Health Organization shall be theattainment by all peoples of the highest poss...
WHOs Core Areas of Work Health development Health security Health systems and institutions Health trends and determina...
What is Health Security?        Health Security is the reduction of vulnerability and     protection of populations agains...
What is Health Security? (2) Global due to increased  inter-connectedness Four essential elements of  health security:  ...
Working together: The Tripartite FAO, OIE and WHO: working together to address issues at  the human-animal-ecosystem inte...
Tripartite and "One Health" Promoting and facilitating the cross-sectoral relationships  and collaborations to support an...
The Tripartite Concept Note Co-signed by the three  Executive Heads of FAO,  OIE and WHO in 2010 Complementary agenda  a...
The Tripartite Concept Note (2) Vision:"A world capable of preventing, detecting, containing,   eliminating, and respondi...
The Tripartite Concept Note                Strategic Alignment Promoting strong                            Promote colla...
Operationalizing the Concept Note "Action Plan" is being developed Key areas:     –   Disease surveillance     –   Capac...
Building on existing collaboration Understanding and reducing health risks from      – Zoonotic, emerging, re-emerging, a...
Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Antimicrobials are essential  medicines in human and  animal clinical practice that  ensur...
AMR: Benefits of intersectoral collaboration  Control of AMR requires   effective containment   strategies in both, anima...
AMR:Some challenges Lack of research No commitment Weak surveillance Poor Drug Quality Irrational drug use No infect...
AMR: Examples of ongoing tripartite              collaboration Tripartite consultative process on non-human use of  antim...
High Level Technical Meeting to Address Health Risks at the Human-Animal-Ecosystems Interface (HLTM)  Convened by the Gov...
HLTM: Outcomes Outlined:     – Cross-cutting “key elements” (including political will, trust and       financial support)...
HLTM: Key Messages High-level political will, trust among stakeholders, cultural  and behavioural changes, and financial ...
Outlook Health security is key to public health, global security and  economic development Working cross-/inter-sectoral...
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Working at the Human-Animal-Ecosystem Interfaces within the Framework of One Health: The Importance for Health Security

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GRF One Health Summit 2012, Davos: Presentation by Prof. Maged Younes - Director - Department of Food Safety - World Health Organization WHO

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  • monitoring, targeted prudent and rational use, quality assurance, preservation of essential antimicrobials)
  • Lack of Harmonized approaches to monitor AMR and antimicrobial usagesSurveillance data on both in human and animal health sectorsTechnical capacity, including for AMR risk assessmentResearch on new drugsAppropriate legislation, and governance covering all sectors related to authorization and use restriction
  • Working at the Human-Animal-Ecosystem Interfaces within the Framework of One Health: The Importance for Health Security

    1. 1. Working at the human-animal-ecosystem interfaces within the framework of One Health: The Importance for Health Security Maged Younes Director Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses| One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    2. 2. One Health Grown to become a movement with appreciable momentum Recognizes interconnections between the health of humans, animals and ecosystems Involves applying coordinated, collaborative, multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral approaches at the human-animal-ecosystems interfaces (HAEI) | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    3. 3. One Health (2) "One Health" concept is necessarily broad and flexible – Encompasses many varied facets of the relationships between humans, animals, and their environments – Inclusively and holistically embraces a very broad scope including: • Technical and policy issues, including rural development, food security, ecosystem sustainability, biodiversity, endangered species and wildlife diseases • Sectors and partners; everyone involved in "One Health" work can identify their specific role within it. Recent emergence, recognition, increasing importance and global relevance of issues at the HAEI | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    4. 4. Why we need to work together? An estimated 60% of known infectious human diseases have their source in animals The same seems to apply to 75% of emerging human diseases and 80% of pathogens that are a potential threat to biosecurity | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    5. 5. Why we need to work together? (2) Many possibilities of inter-specific transmission: – Food-borne (Mad cow disease, salmonellosis) – Vector-borne (West Nile fever, Rift valley fever, tick-borne encephalitis) – Direct contact (rabies) Prevention and control require a collaborative approach of the human health and animal health sectors | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    6. 6. Why we need to work together? (3) Economic impact: – Can be disastrous, even if the risk is only perceived Impact on food security: – Food security, nutrition, and income of rural communities may be threatened in low-income countries Environmental relevance Societal aspects: – Rumours, loss of trust | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    7. 7. WHOs Constitution"The objective of the World Health Organization shall be theattainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health"  WHO‟s mandate – Covers provision of public health leadership, and the development of standards, and norms to help governments protect and improve health – Collaboration and promoting cooperation (among relevant agencies, scientific and professional groups contributing to health) are constitutionally mandated | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    8. 8. WHOs Core Areas of Work Health development Health security Health systems and institutions Health trends and determinants Convening for better health | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    9. 9. What is Health Security? Health Security is the reduction of vulnerability and protection of populations against high impact public health risks that endanger their health and wellbeing. A modern way to think about an old problem Preventing and mitigating health shocks that have an immediate impact on the whole of society | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    10. 10. What is Health Security? (2) Global due to increased inter-connectedness Four essential elements of health security: – Awareness – Readiness (or Preparedness) – Response – Resilience Working at the human- animal-ecosystems interfaces is vital | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    11. 11. Working together: The Tripartite FAO, OIE and WHO: working together to address issues at the human-animal-ecosystem interfaces Recognizes that the interaction between animals, humans, and ecosystems impacts, inter alia, public health and global health security Collaborative and complementary efforts | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    12. 12. Tripartite and "One Health" Promoting and facilitating the cross-sectoral relationships and collaborations to support animal and human health internationally and with Member States Supporting governance, and systems required for national (or regional) disease prevention, detection and control | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    13. 13. The Tripartite Concept Note Co-signed by the three Executive Heads of FAO, OIE and WHO in 2010 Complementary agenda and new synergies in: – Normative work – Public communication – Pathogen detection – Risk assessment and management – Technical capacity building – Research development | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    14. 14. The Tripartite Concept Note (2) Vision:"A world capable of preventing, detecting, containing, eliminating, and responding to animal and public health risks attributable to zoonoses and animal diseases with an impact on food security through multi-sectoral cooperation and strong partnerships" | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    15. 15. The Tripartite Concept Note Strategic Alignment Promoting strong  Promote collaboration to manage existing and novel partnerships diseases Coordination to avoid  Joint framework to address duplication of efforts gaps and strengthen collaboration in laboratory activities Strengthening animal and human health institutions  Alignment and coherence of global standard setting activities Improvement of governance, infrastructure  Effective strategies for and capacity building improving national, regional and community level pandemic preparedness and | response One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    16. 16. Operationalizing the Concept Note "Action Plan" is being developed Key areas: – Disease surveillance – Capacity building – Governance – Overall strengthening of public health systems Specific topics as models for addressing broader issues: – Antimicrobial resistance – Zoonotic influenza – Rabies | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    17. 17. Building on existing collaboration Understanding and reducing health risks from – Zoonotic, emerging, re-emerging, and neglected infectious diseases – antimicrobial resistance in pathogens Ensuring food security and safety along the food production chain – Codex Alimentarius – International Food Safety Authorities Network (INFOSAN) Early warning and communication – Global Early Warning System for Major Animal Diseases, including Zoonoses (GLEWS) Integrated risk assessment Capacity building – Global Foodborne Infections Network (GFN) | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    18. 18. Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Antimicrobials are essential medicines in human and animal clinical practice that ensure effective control of infectious diseases AMR is a global threat to health Preserving antimicrobial efficacy is essential to human and animal health and protecting livelihoods AMR containment requires elimination of inappropriate use of antimicrobials | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    19. 19. AMR: Benefits of intersectoral collaboration  Control of AMR requires effective containment strategies in both, animal and human health sectors  Management across ecosystems and geographic locations  Need for harmonization of legal requirements if veterinary and human medicines are managed by different entities | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    20. 20. AMR:Some challenges Lack of research No commitment Weak surveillance Poor Drug Quality Irrational drug use No infection control | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    21. 21. AMR: Examples of ongoing tripartite collaboration Tripartite consultative process on non-human use of antimicrobials and AMR initiated in 2003 Ad-hoc Inter-governmental Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance under the auspices of the Codex Alimentarius Commission Country projects (e.g. in Kenya) to strengthen national policies, capacities and systems for detection, monitoring, regulation and management of AMR (WHO/FAO) Pilot studies by the WHO Advisory Group on Integrated Surveillance of AMR (AGISAR) | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    22. 22. High Level Technical Meeting to Address Health Risks at the Human-Animal-Ecosystems Interface (HLTM)  Convened by the Government of Mexico, FAO, OIE and WHO (15-17 November 2011)  100 participants from the human and animal health, agriculture and environmental sectors, international technical experts, and regional and donor organisations and partners  AMR, zoonotic influenza, and rabies used as „entry points‟ for discussions  http://www.hltm.org/ | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    23. 23. HLTM: Outcomes Outlined: – Cross-cutting “key elements” (including political will, trust and financial support) – High priority technical actions – Practical next steps for moving forward on intersectoral collaboration, coordination and communication Broad consensus and commitment on intersectoral approaches Major next steps: – Translating technical outcomes into messages and actions for policy makers and political leaders – Alignment of technical outcomes with the broader political processes | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    24. 24. HLTM: Key Messages High-level political will, trust among stakeholders, cultural and behavioural changes, and financial support are needed to establish cross-sectoral approaches Strong governance structures and aligned legal frameworks, building on existing mechanisms, are essential to achieving effective disease surveillance and response Communication is crucial to ensuring cross-sectoral coordination Actions and activities must address institutions and infrastructure at local, national, regional and international levels | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012
    25. 25. Outlook Health security is key to public health, global security and economic development Working cross-/inter-sectorally to address risks at the human-animal-ecosystems interface within the framework of "One Health" is crucial to attaining health security WHO is committed to play an active and constructive role with all partners | One Health: The Importance for Health Security | 21 February 2012

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