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GRF One Health Summit 2012, Davos: Presentation by Alistair Ross Gordon HUMPHREY, New Zealand Ministry of Health, New Zealand

GRF One Health Summit 2012, Davos: Presentation by Alistair Ross Gordon HUMPHREY, New Zealand Ministry of Health, New Zealand

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  • First experiences – what is all this muddy sand everywhere? Everyone knows the term liquefaction now!
  • No branding. Took CEOs foreward and hid it in the back. But retained a mention of health in all policies…we want to work in this way.

Transcript

  • 1. GRF One Health Summit, Davos 2012 Health Risk Communication and Governance Tuesday 21st February 2:45pm - 4:15pm TU 4.2: The Integrated Recovery Guide: A tool to facilitate multi-agency collaboration in disaster recovery, with a focus on the health and well-being of affected communities. Alistair Humphrey 1 , Anna Stevenson, Lee Tuki 1 Medical Officer of Health for Canterbury, New Zealand Ministry of Health [email_address]
  • 2. New Zealand
    • South Pacific nation
    • Population 4,409,224
    • Area 270,534 km 2
  • 3. Canterbury (and the West Coast) District Area (KM 2 ) Population Public Health Staff Canterbury 45,346 468,000 104 South Canterbury 13,623 54,000 25 West Coast 23,000 31,000 15
  • 4. The Darfield Earthquake (7.1) – 4 th September 2010, 4.35am
    • Time of day (0435)
    • Epicentre away from city
    • Rigorous building codes adhered to
    Why no deaths?
  • 5. 22 nd February 2011 12.51pm Plus more than 8000 other palpable aftershocks…
  • 6. The Christchurch Earthquake
    • 6.3 magnitude earthquake
    • Modified Mercalli up to 10 (2.24G Peak ground acceleration)
    • 182 Confirmed fatalities (2 later)
    • 12 amputees among other trauma
    • 1368 residential properties “red stickered”
    • 1359 Commercial properties red stickered (including public health unit)
    • 90,000 people displaced initially
    • 55,000 people not working from city
    • Extensive damage to infrastructure:
      • Power (generally not phones)
      • Roads
      • Bridges
      • Reticulation system
      • Sewerage
  • 7. Immediate Local, Regional and National response
    • Establish Emergency Operations Centres
    • USAR
    • Building inspection
    • Establish electricity
    • Cordon/security
    • Welfare centres
    • Boil water notice
    • Water tankers
    • Portaloos
    National civil defence emergency declared on 23 rd Feb 2011
  • 8. CTV building 115/182 deaths
  • 9. Lateral spreading (by the rivers)
  • 10. Liquefaction damage
    • Kaiapoi - September 2010
  • 11. Red zones declared uninhabitable
  • 12. The Loss of Eastern Suburbs
  • 13. Demolition in the city as of December 2011
  • 14. Christchurch Earthquake: The Recovery
    • Legislation:
      • The Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Act 2011
    • Administration:
      • The Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority
    • Consultation:
      • Share an idea
    • Collaboration:
      • The Integrated Recovery Planning Guide
  • 15. A Structural Model for Earthquake Recovery
  • 16. Share an Idea
    • Community consultation
      • Online
      • In person
      • Organised by
      • Christchurch City Council
    • 106,000 ideas
  • 17. Enormous Community Response
  • 18. The Themes of the Public Response
  • 19. The Categorization of the Public Response Complete Physical, Mental and Social Well Being?
    • Green City
      • Clean air, water
      • Gardens and parks
    • Transport choice
      • Bicycles and walkways
      • Public transport
    • City life
      • Active and healthy
    • Distinctive city
      • Culture
      • Low rise
    • Market city
      • Business, broadband
  • 20. The Draft Christchurch Central City Plan
    • Built on Intersectoral goodwill
    • Interagency collaboration to avoid "silo-ing"
    • Health is everybody's business
  • 21. Human ecology model of a settlement Barton H et al. Health Promot. Int. 2009;24:i91-i99 © The Author (2009). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org
  • 22. HPSTED
    • Relationship between health and local government fostered over a Health Impact Assessment informing the Greater Christchurch Urban Development Strategy (UDS)
    • HPSTED describes the relationship between health, sustainability and urban design
    • A modified "manual" from HPSTED was developed to assist with earthquake recovery by local government and public health staff
  • 23. Integrated Recovery Planning Guide http://www.cph.co.nz/Files/IntegratedRecoveryGuideV2-Jun11.pdf
    • He aha te mea nui o te ao?
    • What is the most important thing
    • in the world?
    • He tangata! He tangata! He tangata!
    • It is people! It is people! It is people!
  • 24. Self care first:
    • INTEGRATED RECOVERY PLANNING GUIDE
    • VERSION 2.0 ¦ JUNE 2011
    • Help yourself
    • to help others
      • Take time to talk
        • spend time with family and friends
      • Eat well
      • Make time to exercise and to rest
      • Get sufficient sleep
      • Plan for some fun and laughter
    • We hope this Guide will make a positive difference for you, your recovery work and ultimately for the wider community.
    • What you are doing is important and will make
    • a difference.
    • From the outset, do look after yourself, so that you
    • can help others:
      • Take time to talk – spend time with
      • family and friends
      • Eat well
      • Make time to exercise and to rest
      • Get sufficient sleep
      • Plan for some fun and laughter
    ISBN 978-0-9582578-2-4
  • 25. An Indigenous Model of Health Promotion: Te Pae Mahutonga*
    • Community leadership
      • Ng ā manukura
    • Environmental protection
      • Waiora
    • Community & culture
      • Mauriora
    • Healthy lifestyles
      • Toiora
    • Participation in society
      • Te Oranga
    • Community ownership
      • Te Mana Whakahaere
    * Professor Sir Mason Durie ‘Te Pae Mahutonga: a model for Mäori health promotion’, Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand Newsletter 49, 2-5 December 1999
  • 26. A Thinking Tool for Earthquake Recovery
  • 27. Use of Integrated Recovery Guide
    • Multi-discipline, multi-agency
    • Determinants (of health) approach
    • Central City Plan – and other projects
    • Health as a focus of everyone's work
  • 28. Reflections/Conclusions
    • Unprecedented opportunity to influence health determinants
    • Partnerships are central to success
    • Health is central not only to planning & response, but also to recovery
  • 29. What is recovery/resilience?
  • 30. The One Health Approach
    • Emergency risk management, emergency response and emergency recovery are most effective with the engagement of all agencies and the communities these agencies serve.
  • 31. With Thanks:
    • Nicola Laurie Community & Public Health, Canterbury District Health Board
    • Karen Banwell Christchurch City council
    • Adair Bruorton Christchurch City Council
    http://www.cph.co.nz/Files/IntegratedRecoveryGuideV2-Jun11.pdf