Socio-economic Impacts of Land Degradation and the Need for Leadership for A Complex World: <br />A Case Study in Southern...
97% of Mexico’s Lands Are Experiencing Land Degradation<br />60% is Severely Degraded<br />2250 Sq. KM of Are Abandoned Ea...
Causes of Degradation<br /><ul><li>Clearing and cultivating lands unsuitable for agriculture/ inadequate precautions again...
Overgrazing lands
Exploiting forests and other vegetation for fuel, consumption, and sales
Adopting poor water management and irrigation practices
Urban expansion, mining, and public works.</li></li></ul><li>- HALF THE POPULATION IN MEXICO LIVES IN POVERTY, ONE FIFTH L...
WE NEED “BRUNDTLAND LEADERS”</li></li></ul><li>Example From<br />Chiapas and Sierra Madre Region<br />“The Pleistocene Ref...
Channelizing Waterways Chokes the Life From Estuaries and Ruins Fisheries<br />
Traditional Agriculture: Milpa – Mayan form of agriculture intercropping of maize, squash, legumes with rotation of forest...
International<br />Policy (Free <br />Trade, Migration<br />Drug)<br />Finance, <br />Investment,<br />Development<br />As...
A Systemic Approach: Creating A Generation of Leaders<br />Who Understand Complexity<br />“No one great leader can fix thi...
Conservation Leadership Through Learning<br />3 Main Components<br />(1) Integrated, Problem-based Education<br />    (2) ...
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Socio-economic Impacts of Land Degradation and the Need for Leadership for A Complex World: A Case Study in Southern Mexico by Michael J. Manfredo

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Socio-economic Impacts of Land Degradation and the Need for Leadership for A Complex World: A Case Study in Southern Mexico by Michael J. Manfredo Professor and Dept. Head, Colorado State University, USA; during the Special Event "The Socio-Economics of Desertification, Land Degradation and Drought" during the WEF Annual Meeting 2011 in Davos Switzerland

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Socio-economic Impacts of Land Degradation and the Need for Leadership for A Complex World: A Case Study in Southern Mexico by Michael J. Manfredo

  1. Socio-economic Impacts of Land Degradation and the Need for Leadership for A Complex World: <br />A Case Study in Southern Mexico <br />
  2. 97% of Mexico’s Lands Are Experiencing Land Degradation<br />60% is Severely Degraded<br />2250 Sq. KM of Are Abandoned Each Year<br />Land Degradation Key To Human Migration<br />Source: Risk of Human-Induced Desertification<br />http://soils.usda.gov/use/worldsoils/mapindex/dsrtrisk.html<br />
  3. Causes of Degradation<br /><ul><li>Clearing and cultivating lands unsuitable for agriculture/ inadequate precautions against erosion
  4. Overgrazing lands
  5. Exploiting forests and other vegetation for fuel, consumption, and sales
  6. Adopting poor water management and irrigation practices
  7. Urban expansion, mining, and public works.</li></li></ul><li>- HALF THE POPULATION IN MEXICO LIVES IN POVERTY, ONE FIFTH LIVES IN EXTREME POVERTY<br />- LAND DEGRADATION CONTRIBUTES SIGNIFICANLY TO THE 900,000 PERSON<br /> MIGRATION THAT OCCURS IN MEXICO ANNUALLY – (5.3 MILLION UNDOCUMENTED <br /> MEXICANS IN THE U.S.)<br /><ul><li>MIGRATION AND LAND DEGREDATION ARE PROBLEMS BORNE FROM MANY COMPLEX FORCES
  8. WE NEED “BRUNDTLAND LEADERS”</li></li></ul><li>Example From<br />Chiapas and Sierra Madre Region<br />“The Pleistocene Refuge”<br />Source: Risk of Human-Induced Desertification<br />http://soils.usda.gov/use/worldsoils/mapindex/dsrtrisk.html<br />
  9. Channelizing Waterways Chokes the Life From Estuaries and Ruins Fisheries<br />
  10. Traditional Agriculture: Milpa – Mayan form of agriculture intercropping of maize, squash, legumes with rotation of forest fallow.<br />Emerging Form: Procampo – Government policy gives subsides per hectare (867 pesos). Based on acres in production in 1993. Had to crop every year. Expanding agricultural area for staple crops. Leading to deforestation and degradation.<br />
  11. International<br />Policy (Free <br />Trade, Migration<br />Drug)<br />Finance, <br />Investment,<br />Development<br />Assistance<br />Global<br />Economic<br />Conditions,<br />Market Prices<br />Ebbs and<br />Flows of <br />Political<br />Response<br />Social and<br />Power<br />Resource<br />Imbalance<br />Agricultural<br />Policy of <br />(Price control to<br />Subsidies)<br />Individual<br />Conditions<br />Wealth<br />or poverty,<br />resources<br />and ability<br />Land <br />Tenure<br />And traditions<br />Specific<br />Land Use,<br />Livelihood<br />Decisions<br />Migration<br />Degradation<br />Ecological Changes Affecting Productivity and Sustainability<br />
  12. A Systemic Approach: Creating A Generation of Leaders<br />Who Understand Complexity<br />“No one great leader can fix this nest of problems…We need thousands of Susan B. Anthonys, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther Kings, CeasarChavezes, Franklin Roosevelts, Eleanor Roosevelts…<br />We will need champions by the truckload”. Van Jones 2008, The Green Collar Economy<br />Van Jones in The Green Collar Economy (2008)<br />
  13. Conservation Leadership Through Learning<br />3 Main Components<br />(1) Integrated, Problem-based Education<br /> (2) Learning Community<br /> (3)Multi-level Perspectives<br />
  14. We need leaders who…<br />think differently…<br />embrace complexity…<br />and see the human and environmental condition as one.<br />
  15. Synergistic Learning to Promote Systems Thinking in Action<br />4. Integrated systemsunderstanding<br />EnvironmentalProblems<br />1. Framing <br />the problem<br />5. Systems thinking drives solutions<br />6. Monitoring & evaluation<br />3. Bracketed relationships<br />2. Fundamentals<br />
  16. Conservation Leadership Specialization - HDNR<br />

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