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THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT
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THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT

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THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT

THE METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN OF THE POST WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE RAPID NEEDS ASSESSMENT

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    • 1. The post Wenchuan Rapid Needs Assessment: Methodology and design
    • 2. Needs assessment and natural disasters
      • Types of disasters
        • Chronic slow onset disasters
          • Epidemics, civil wars, droughts
        • Acute Rapid onset disasters
          • Earthquakes, typhoons, floods
        • Needs assessments most common in chronic slow onset disasters
    • 3. Styles of assessments and methods
        • Different styles have different policy purposes and considerations
        • Assessments of basic needs
        • Assessments of damage and need for reconstruction
        • Rights based approaches
      • Methods partly reflect style
        • Secondary sources for finding situation before the disaster
        • Interviews with key informants
        • Focus groups
        • Participatory approaches
        • Surveys
          • Community
          • Household
    • 4. The post Wenchuan Rapid Needs Assessment
      • Two things that it was NOT:
        • Did not attempt to determine immediate humanitarian needs
        • Did not try to explore macro economic issues or disruption of major, large scale infrastructure
      • Three things that it was:
        • Considered opinions, attitudes, hopes and perceptions of the stricken population
        • Coached in a living conditions framework
          • Resources, arenas choices
        • Covered a large geographical area with a large population
          • A representative survey based on probability sampling
    • 5. The questionnaire
      • Household
        • Housing, infrastructure and amenities
        • Mortality in the earthquake and characteristics of the deceased
        • Basic demographic information including age, gender, ethnicity, marital status
        • Education, current enrollment and attendance
        • Health situation including injuries due to the earthquake
        • Work and relation to the labour market before and after the earthquake
        • Household economy, economic activities and agriculture
        • Economic support in the aftermath of the earthquake
        • Migration and plans to move
        • Social network
      • Randomly Selected Individual
        • A 12 item psychological distress scale, CHQ-12 (Yang, Huang, & Wu, 2003)
        • Participation in rescue activities
        • Trust in persons and institutions
        • Attitudes to various forms of assistance to earthquake victims
        • Satisfaction with services/assistance
    • 6. Questionnaire
      • Community
        • Demographic information
        • Economic situation of the community
        • Damages due to the earthquake on land, agricultural infrastructure (irrigation), houses, transportation infrastructure, schools/kindergartens.
        • Rescue: If rescue efforts were mounted in the community, and perception of the quality of the rescue effort. Character of locally organized rescue.
        • Whether reconstruction work has started
        • Receipt of aid/assistance
        • Perception of main problems facing community
        • Input from different sources received during questionnaire construction
    • 7. Challenges
      • Questionnaire needed to be finished in a very short time
        • Research team previously worked in Sichuan
        • CASTED researcher did fieldwork while questionnaire was being developed
        • Questionnaire was designed to be compatible with the previous survey to the extent possible
      • Difficult to find sampling frames that can be used
        • Compilation of information from many sources
      • Very large homogeneity in sample clusters (matters because it reduces precision)
        • Increased number of clusters
      • Large scale populations movements (often disregarded in humanitarian surveys)
        • Sampling took into account actual inclusion probabilities
    • 8. Sample:
      • Two stage cluster sample
      • 144 clusters
      • Stratified by type of area
      • Reported by
        • Very seriously affected
        • Seriously affected
        • Camps
    • 9. Allocation of the sample Stratum Population size Number of PSUs Selected PSUs Reporting domain Very seriously affected area 3,666,220 3,038 110 Very seriously affected Seriously affected area 7,976,816 5,365 40 Seriously affected Margin of seriously affected area 1,437,349 1660 10 Seriously affected Deyang city camps 142,943 166 5 Camps Mianyang camps 182,390 18 5 Camps Guangyuan camps 42,244 19 5 Camps Chengdu camps 103,905 15 5 Camps
    • 10. The sample selection and non-response
      • Selection of the households in the selected PSUs
        • Random linear systematic sampling from the list provided by the communities
        • Random walk
      • Selection of the respondent to the individual questionnaire (RSI)
      • None response
        • In total 4526 households were sampled
        • 3652 or 80.7 percent of the households were completed
        • The main reason for non-interview was no contact (14.5 percent)
        • Refusals were 20 households
        • Non response rate 15.8 percent (Hidiroglou, Drew & Gray, 1993)
        • Sampling weight was adjusted, based on “adjustment cell method” (Lehtonen & Pahkinen, 1995)
    • 11.
      • Personnel
        • 80 interviewers and supervisors from Mianyang Normal University and Sichuan University
        • Recalled to the university
      • Equipment
        • 80 Eee-pc sub-notebook computer running Windows XP and Blaise 4.8 as a computer aided interviewing data entry tool
      • Interviewing process
        • Pilot survey
        • Training: interviewer, sampler
        • Interviewing: all teams carried out interview first in Deyang, and then allocated to other regions
        • Data analysis and report: First stage 7 th to 14 th July, and second stage until 18 th July
      • Several tasks at the same time
        • Computer aided interview facilitated the survey and allowed for continuous tabulation and quality control while the survey was on-going
      实地调查 Field work
    • 12. intervie Field work process for the first survey
      • 400-500 interviews daily, 5.2 interviews per interviewer per day
    • 13.
    • 14.
    • 15.
    • 16.
      • Field work 17 th July to 2 nd Aug, 2009
      • Follow the design of the first survey
      • Questionnaire modified in a way that the questions directly related to the immediate consequences of the disaster removed, and questions related to the reconstruction added. However, the same formulations applied for the questions to be compared.
      • The second survey used exactly the same sample as the first survey, thus creating a panel. The only exceptions are those in the camps.
      Second survey
    • 17.
      • Possible to conduct a relatively large and complex household and community survey using probability sampling in very short time after large acute natural disaster
      • The training consumed 5 days out of total 17 days, or 30 percent of the field work time, but worthwhile
      • Computer aided interviewing data cleaning, feedback and correction were done in the field
      Lessons learned from the rapid need assessment survey
    • 18. Lessons learned from the rapid need assessment survey (2)
      • Challenges for the sampling of the post-disaster survey:
        • A good sampling frame difficult to get, centrally located and easily available lists of communities and camps would have greatly facilitated the work
        • Large standard errors and design effects, relatively high sample size needed for adequate precision
        • Community interviews are more cost effective for some indicators such as infrastructure, but not for some others, such as trust, attitudes, satisfaction and etc.
    • 19. Estimates, standard errors and design effects for selected indicators Indicator Estimate (%) Standard error 95% CI Low 95% CI High DEFF Coefficient of variation Living in tent 32.1 2.7 26.9 37.7 12.6 8.4 Temporary self built dwelling 6.5 1.1 4.7 8.9 6.7 16.9 Mobile house 2.1 1.0 0.8 5.5 18.9 47.6 Bungalow 30.1 2.5 25.4 35.3 11.0 8.3 Apartment 7.0 2.0 3.9 12.2 22.6 28.6 Other building 15.0 1.6 12.0 18.6 7.8 10.7 Other 7.2 1.2 5.1 9.9 7.7 16.7 No completed education 18.0 0.8 16.5 19.7 5.6 4.5 Primary education 39.9 1.0 38.0 41.8 4.8 2.4 Secondary 29.6 0.8 28.0 31.2 3.9 2.8 Higher 12.5 1.0 10.7 14.5 10.7 7.8 Very satisfied with current life 16.2 1.2 14.0 18.8 3.8 7.4 Somewhat satisfied with current life 65.3 2.0 61.2 69.2 6.4 3.1 Somewhat unsatisfied with current life 14.8 1.3 12.4 17.5 4.7 8.7 Very unsatisfied with current life 3.7 0.6 2.7 5.1 3.7 16.4
    • 20. To be continued….
      • We are going to carry out third follow-up survey on restoration and reconstruction in the earthquake area next year
    • 21.
      • Thank you!
      • [email_address] & [email_address]

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