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SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b
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SEKENDIZ-An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia-ID1187-IDRC2014_b

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5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice 24-28 August 2014 in Davos, Switzerland

5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice 24-28 August 2014 in Davos, Switzerland

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  • Developed based on primary research using nominal group technique (focus groups conducted nationally, n=58),
    45 items on a 6-point Likert scale
    Administered over seven weeks from 6 May 2013 to 21 April 2013 through social media and direct e-marketing (8).
    All data were maintained anonymous with no IP addresses of the respondents collected. Overall, 1178 fitness industry professionals (mean age=39.9) who were mostly registered with the industry peak body (95.2%) participated in the national survey. Survey items related to emergency plans and procedures were included in this study.
  • The observational audit was developed in a checklist-style and consisted of 83 items under six main sections to assess the health and safety conditions of fitness facilities. The audits were conducted by five members of the AFIRM Project team in a total of 11 regional and metropolitan fitness facilities in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. The nine audit items under the “Emergency Situations” section were included in this study. Each item was answered by ticking the corresponding “Yes” or “No” box
  • All data were analysed using descriptive statistics with IBM SPSS Statistics 20. Data cleaning and recoding of some of the demographic industry profile variables was undertaken prior to analysis to better reflect the distribution of responses. The percentage, frequency and cross-tabulations of responses to each of the Likert items were calculated by combining the responses at the upper (positive) and lower (negative) end of the scale.
  • Our findings showed that most of the fitness professionals (68.1%) rated the emergency evacuation plans and other emergency procedures in their facilities as extremely/very good (n=640). Yet, more than one fourth (27.4%) of fitness professionals were somewhat aware (n=152), somewhat unaware (n=46) or very unaware/not at all aware (n=49) of the emergency evacuation plans and other emergency procedures in their facilities (Table 1).
  • The observational audits showed that most of the fitness facilities did not clearly display their emergency response plans (73%, n=8), emergency evacuation procedures (55%, n=6) or emergency telephone numbers (91%, n=10). Many fitness facilities (36.4%, n=4) did not have an appropriate first aid kit accessible by all staff (Figure 1).
  • The lowest level of the pyramid involves an approach which is employed most frequently by the regulators, often in combination with other tools, to assist duty holders achieve compliance.
  • Transcript

    • 1. An evaluation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia: implications for policy 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org and practice B. Sekendiz1, K. Norton2, P. Keyzer3, J. Dietrich4, I.R. Coyle5, V. Jones4, C.F. Finch6 1School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Australia. E-mail: b.sekendiz@cqu.edu.au 2School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia. E-mail: Kevin.Norton@unisa.edu.au 3School of Law, La Trobe University, Victoria. E-mail: p.keyzer@latrobe.edu.au 4Faculty of Law, Bond University, Australia. E-mail: jdietric@bond.edu.au 5Centre for Law Governance and Public Policy, Bond University; Department of Psychology, University of Southern Queensland; School of Psychology, Deakin University; Australian Forensic and Personal Injury Consultants Pty Ltd. E-mail: safetysearch2001@yahoo.com.au 6Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Federation University Australia. E-mail: c.finch@federation.edu.au
    • 2. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org OUTLINE 1. Background 2. Aims 3. Methods 4. Results 5. Discussion 6. Added value for the post 2015 framework for disaster risk reduction 7. Acknowledgements
    • 3. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org 1. Background • Australian fitness industry is an important contributor to the Government`s national preventive health strategy (5). • In 2007-08, fitness facilities contributed $872.9 million to the Australian economy and provided savings in direct health care costs estimated up to $107.9 million(7). • In 2009-10 and 2011-12, fitness gym activities were the second most popular physical activity and approximately one in four Australian adults (>15 years of age) used sports or fitness facilities (2).
    • 4. • Despite the growth and popularity of the fitness industry, research showed low compliance with emergency plans (16, 17) and safety practices(8) in fitness facilities. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org • Under Work Health and Safety (WHS) Regulations s43: – Fitness facility operators must ensure that an emergency plan is prepared and maintained for the workplace to be implemented in the event of an emergency – the types of emergencies to plan for may include fire, explosion, medical emergency, rescues, incidents with hazardous chemicals, bomb threats, armed confrontations and natural disasters (14).
    • 5. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org 2. Aims • To analyse the utilisation of emergency plans and procedures in fitness facilities in Australia: – To offer sustainable changes to Australian regulation for effective risk management in the health and fitness industry
    • 6. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org 3. Methods • Data were collected using: (a) a nationwide online survey, and (b) an observational audit. • This study and the instruments were developed and conducted as part of the Australian Fitness Industry Risk Management (AFIRM) Project (LP120100275) that was funded by an Australian Research Council Linkage Project Grant in conjunction with Fitness Australia and Sports Medicine Australia. • The study was approved by the Bond University Human Research Ethics Committee (RO:1676).
    • 7. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org (a) The AFIRM Questionnaire • Developed by nominal group technique (focus groups conducted nationally, n=58) (9). • 45 x 6-point Likert scale items • Administered over seven weeks (6 May - 21 April 2013) • No identifiers collected, anonymous • Survey items related to emergency plans and procedures were included in this study.
    • 8. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Profile of survey respondents • n = 1178 • Mean age = 39.9 years • Gender = 62% females • Registered with the major industry body (96%) • Mostly operate/work in small to medium sized facilities: – >500 m2 (41.8%) – 500-999 m2 (19.4) – 1000-3000 m2 (19.1%) 20.5% 32.5% 7.4% 9.7% 1.1% 24.7% 2.8% 1.3%
    • 9. (b)The AFIRM Project Observational Audit Tool • Six sections, 83 items • Auditors: five trained members of the South Australia (n=2) 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org AFIRM Project team. • N=11 – Regional and metropolitan fitness facilities – Randomly selected, voluntary participation Queensland (n=4) New South Wales (n=2) Victoria (n=3)
    • 10. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org • Data analysis: – Descriptive statistics with IBM SPSS Statistics 20 – Data cleaning and recoding prior to analysis – Percentage, frequency and cross-tabulations
    • 11. Table 1: Responses to Survey Items Related to Emergency Plans and Procedures 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org RESULTS Survey Items n M (SD) 95% CI How aware are you of the emergency evacuation plans and other emergency procedures in your facility? 902 4.95 (1.198) [4.88, 5.03] How would you rate the emergency evacuation plans and other emergency procedures in your facility? 940 4.78 (1.105) [4.71, 4.85] Note. The questionnaire items were answered on a 6-point Likert scale. The closer the mean value to 6, the stronger is the agreement with the particular item. CI = confidence interval; M = Mean; n = Number; SD = Standard deviation.
    • 12. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Fig. 1: Results of observational audits for Emergency Situations
    • 13. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org DISCUSSION • The findings of our study show that fitness facilities in Australia are not well prepared for emergency response. • The need for proper emergency plans and safety procedures were similarly highlighted in earlier studies in Queensland (16, 17) and Victoria (8). • Emergency response capability is crucial for fitness facility operators to satisfy their duty of care not only to manage risks of medical emergencies, but disasters such as fire, explosion, or floods.
    • 14. SANCTIONS Court sanctions: Criminal penalties, court orders Regular sanctions: Suspension, cancellation, revocation of authorisations etc. DIRECTING COMPLIANCE Improvement Notices Prohibition notices ENCOURAGING and ASSISTING COMPLIANCE Information, guidance, education & advice 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org DISCUSSION • This study has implications for industry peak bodies and the government agencies to collaborate in developing policies to educate and assist fitness facility managers utilize emergency plans as part of a comprehensive risk management program. Fig. 2: The compliance and enforcement tools in the National WHS Compliance and Enforcement Policy (2011)
    • 15. Added value for the Post 2015 Framework for 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Disaster Risk Reduction • How did your work support the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action: – Reducing disaster risks requires integration of sector wise strategies. – In Australia, implementation of emergency plans by public and private organisations is governed by the WHS Regulations. – Hence, our study shows a lack of emergency preparedness in the fitness industry. • From your perspective what are the main gaps, needs and further steps to be addressed in the Post 2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in – Research: the gap between policy and practice in WHS and emergency plans – Education & Training: revision and development of training programs and courses for industry professionals – Implementation & Practice: integrated registration systems by industry major bodies, comprehensive risk management audits by insurance companies – Policy: better utilisation of the National Work Health and Safety Compliance and Enforcement Policy by developing and promoting educational tools for the health and fitness industry
    • 16. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Acknowledgements • This study was conducted as part of the Australian Fitness Industry Risk Management Project (AFIRM). AFIRM Project was funded by an Australian Research Council Linkage Project Grant (LP:12010025) in partnership with Fitness Australia and Sports Medicine Australia. • Partner Universities: • Industry Partners:
    • 17. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Bibliography 1. Atkinson, B. (2011, January 6). All central Qld businesses affected by floods. ABC News. Available: http://www.abc.net.au 2. Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). (2012). Sport and Recreation: A Statistical Overview. Australia, 2011-12 [4156.0]. Available: http://www.abs.gov.au 3. Balady, G. J., Chaitman, B., Driscoll, D., Foster, C., Froelicher, E., Gordon, N., . . . Bazzarre, T. (1998). Recommendations for Cardiovascular Screening, Staffing, and Emergency Policies at Health/Fitness Facilities. Circulation, 97(22), 2283-2293 4. Basher, R. (2008). Disaster Impacts: Implications and Policy Responses. Social Research, 75(3), 937 5. Commonwealth of Australia. (2010). Taking Preventative Action - A response to Australia: The Healthiest Country by 2020 - The report of the National Preventative Health Taskforce. http://www.preventativehealth.org.au (Accessed 4 April 2014). 6. Cronstedt, M. (2002). Prevention, Preparedness, Response, Recovery - an Outdated Concept? Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 17(2), 10 7. Deloitte Access Economics & Fitness Australia. (2012). Fitness Industry Workforce Report: 2010 - 2020. Available: http://www.fitness.org.au 8. Finch, C., Donaldson, A., Mahoney, M, & Otago L. (2009). The safety policies and practices of community multi-purpose recreation facilities. Safety Science, 47, 1346-1350 9. Keyzer, P. Coyle, I.R., Dietrich, J., Norton, J.K., Sekendiz, B., Jones, V. and Finch, C.F. (2014). Legal risk management and injury in the fitness industry: The outcomes of focus group research and a national survey of fitness professionals. Journal of Law & Medicine, 21(4), 826-844 10. Lambeck, K. (2010).The Science of Climate Change. Available: http://www.climatechange.gov.au 11. Lewis, C. (2006). Risk Management and Prevention Strategies. Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 21(3), 47 12. National Governor`s Association. (1979). Emergency Preparedness Project Final Report. DCPA, Washington DC 13. Queensland Government. (2014). The PPRR risk management model. Available: http://www.business.qld.gov.au 14. Safe Work Australia. (2012a). Emergency Plans Fact Sheet. Available: http://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au 15. Safe Work Australia. (2012b). First Aid in the Workplace Code of Practice. Available: http://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au 16. Sekendiz, B. (2012). Emergency preparedness in the health and fitness facilities in Queensland. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15, Supplement 1(0), S109-S110 17. Sekendiz, B. (2014). Implementation and Perception of Risk Management Practices in Health/Fitness Facilities. International Journal of Business Continuity and Risk Management. In Press 18. Standards Australia. (2009). AS/NZS ISO31000:2009: Risk management-principles and guidelines. North Sydney, NSW. 19. UNISDR. (2005). Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015: Building the Resilience of Nations and Communities to Disasters. Available: http:// http://www.unisdr.org/we/inform/publications/1037

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