Risk and Disaster - Challenge from a Global Perspective

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Overview on risks and disasters from a holistic perspective. How to cope with risks? The GRF Davos integral risk reduction and disaster management approach

Overview on risks and disasters from a holistic perspective. How to cope with risks? The GRF Davos integral risk reduction and disaster management approach

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  • Why the variation in estimates? Different estimation methods used Variations in environmental degradation scenarios Lack of precise definitions about who the migrants are
  • Desertification is the degradation of land in arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid areas. It is caused primarily by human activities and climatic variations .“ Desertification does not refer to the expansion of existing deserts . It occurs because dryland ecosystems [...] are extremely vulnerable to over-exploitation and inappropriate land use. Dryland ecosystems cover over one third of the world‘s land area. Over 250 million people are directly affected by desertification , and about one billion people in over one hundred countries are at risk . Combating desertification is essential to ensuring the long-term productivity of inhabited drylands. Unfortunately, past efforts have too often failed , and around the world the problem of land degradation continues to worsen.
  • Aral Sea, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan The name “ Aral Sea “ comes from the word “aral” meaning island. The sea’s name reflects the fact that it is a vast basin that lies as an island among waterless deserts. The Aral Sea was once the world’s fourth-largest inland sea. Its problems began in the 1960s and 1970s with the diversion of the main rivers that feed it to provide for cotton cultivation in arid Soviet Central Asia. The surface of the Aral Sea once measured 66 100 km2 (25 521 square miles). By 1987, about 60 per cent of the Aral Sea’s volume had been lost, its depth had declined by 14 m (45 feet), and its salt concentration had doubled, killing the commercial fi shing trade. Wind storms became toxic, carrying fi ne grains of clay and salts deposited on exposed sea floor. Life expectancies in the districts near the sea are significantly lower than in surrounding areas. The sea is now a quarter of the size it was 50 years ago and has broken into two parts, the North Aral Sea and the South Aral Sea. Re-engineering along the Syr Darya River delta in the north will retain water in the North Aral Sea, thereby drying the South Aral Sea completely, perhaps within 15 years.
  • L AKE C HAD, A FRICA Lake Chad, located at the junction of Nigeria, Niger, Chad, and Cameroon was once the sixth-largest lake in the world. Persistent droughts have shrunk it to about a tenth of its former size. The lake has a large drainage basin—1.5 million km2 (0.6 million square miles)—but almost no water flows in from the dry north. Ninety per cent of lake’s water fl ows in from the Chari River. The lakebed is flat and shallow; even before the drought, the lake was no more than 5-8 m (16-26 ft) deep. Considered a deep wetland, Lake Chad was once the second largest wetland in Africa, highly productive, and supporting a diversity of wildlife. The lake is very responsive to changes in rainfall. When rains fail, the lake drops rapidly because annual infl ow is 20-85 per cent of the lake’s volume. Human diversion from the lake and from the Chari River may be significant at times of low flow, but rainfall is still the determining factor in lake level. This image set displays a continued decline in lake surface area from 22 902 km2 (8 843 square miles) in 1963 to a meager 304 km2 (117 square miles) in 2001.
  • Genfer Konvention: - ausserhalb des Landes Begründete Furcht vor Verfolgung Verfolgung aufgrund von Rasse, Nationalität, Religion, Zugehörigkeit zu einer bestimmtenSozialen oder Politischen Meinung 1951 Geneva Convention on the Status of Refugees> the person must be outside their country of nationality or former habitual residence; the person must fear persecution ; The fear of persecution must be for reasons of one of the five convention grounds ( race, nationality, religion, membership of a particular social group or political opinion ); and the fear must be well-founded . Many variations of El-Hinnawi’s definition since 1985 e.g. Jacobson 1988, Myers 1993 Definitions with respect to “environmental refugees” generally have in common the fact that they do not distinguish whether the persons migrating or fleeing have crossed an international border. However, other than this commonality, definitions vary greatly, including whether displacement of environmental refugees is temporary or permanent in nature.
  • Temporär oder Permanent Interne oder über Nationale Grenzen gehend Freiwillig oder unfreiwillig Aufgrund von plötzlichen oder schleichenden Naturgefahren This definition s eeks to encompass population movement or displacement: Temporary or permanent; internal or cross-border Regardless of whether voluntary or involuntary Due to sudden or gradual environmental change
  • Why the variation in estimates? Different estimation methods used Variations in environmental degradation scenarios Lack of precise definitions about who the migrants are
  • Our future includes: More remotely sensed data Landsat 7 management Integrated data National Atlas What we did in response to Hurricane Mitch Applications with other natural sciences Mining our data holdings (Urban retrospectives)

Transcript

  • 1. www.grforum.org Risks and disasters – Challenges from a global perspective Walter J. Ammann, President and CEO Global Risk Forum GRF Davos, Davos
  • 2. Overview
    • Overview on risks and disasters from a holistic perspective
    • How to cope with risks? The GRF Davos integral risk reduction and disaster management approach
    • Who is GRF Davos?
  • 3. Multi hazard/ multi risk approach needed FLOODS SEVERE WINDSTORMS EARTHQUAKES/ TSUNAMIS DROUGHTS, DESERTIFICATION LANDSLIDES WILDFIRES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS TECHNOLOGICAL HAZARDS GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE TERRORISM LAND DEGRADATION PANDEMICS FINANCIAL CRISES BIOLOGICAL THREATS
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8. Natural disasters: Losses Source: Figure and text: Munich Re Topics Geo 2007
  • 9. Mean annual losses
    • 100‘000 deaths
    • 150 bn US $
    • Gap between industrialized and developing countries
  • 10. Social Injustice Climate change will worsen the situation
  • 11. Heatwave 2003 in Switzerland
    • Number of deaths: approx. 1 000
    • Economic damage due to a bad harvest: approx. 500 million CHF
    Source: sc l nat Pro Clim – Forum for Climate and Global Change report Hitzesommer 2003 - Synthesebericht C. Braun-Fahrländer, University of Basel Day/Month Number of deaths per day
    • Europe 2003
    • 35‘000 deaths
    • 10 bn EURO
  • 12. Pandemics: Number of worldwide deaths
    • Spanish Influenza Pandemic (1918-1920) deaths: ca. 50 millions ( Johnson, Niall P. A. S. / Mueller, Juergen D. „Updating the Accounts: Global Mortality of the 1918-1920 „Spanish“ Influenza Pandemic“, Bulletin of the History of Medicine Volume 76, Number 1, Spring 2002, p . 105–115 )
    • Asian Flu (1957-1958) deaths: ca. 1 - 2 millions
    • Hong Kong Flu (1968-1970) deaths: ca. 800
    • Swine flu deaths (April 2009-?): >6100 (from 7 November 2009; WHO)
  • 13. Seasonal Influenza: Number of deaths
    • Worldwide: 250 000 – 500 000 (WHO)
    • Europe: 40 000 in a moderate season (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm)
  • 14. Vector-borne diseases - Facts
    • Deaths from Malaria, Dengue fever etc.:
    Source: WHO
    • Malaria : 1.2 million deaths/ yr ( mostly African children under the age of five, 90% of malaria cases occur in Sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Dengue fever : w orld's fastest growing vector borne disease ( found in tropic and subtropic regions).
  • 15. Technical disaster: Bhopal
    • When and where?
    • 3 Dezember 1984 in Bhopal, India
    • What?
    • Industrial disaster at a Union Carbide pesticide plant
    • More than 40t methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas leaked .
    • Number of Deaths?
    • At least 3 .800 people were killed immediately.
    • With 15 . 000 to 20 . 000 premature deaths reportedly occurring in the subsequent two decades
    • Health effects?
    • c ausing significant morbidity and premature death for many thousands more
    • 50.000 injured people
    • 200.000 people were evacuated
    Source: E. Broughton (2005). The Bhopal disaster and its aftermath: a review , Environ Health. , 4: 6. UNEP Disasters Database
  • 16. Technical disaster: Seveso
    • When and where?
    • 10 July 19 76 in Seveso, Italy
    • What?
    • Industrial disaster at a chemical plant, manufacturing pesticides and herbicides.
    • „ A dense vapour cloud containing tetrachlorodibenzoparadioxin (TCDD) was released from a reactor, used for the production of trichlorofenol .“
    • Number of Deaths?
    • -
    • Health effects?
    • 2 . 000 were treated for dioxin poisoning
    • 200 injured people
    • 730 people were evacuated
    • A n immediate contamination of some ten square miles of land and vegetation resulted.
    Source: European Civil Protection UNEP Disasters Database
  • 17.
    • When and where?
    • 26 April 198 6 in Chernobyl, Ukraine
    • What?
    • Nuclear accident at a nuclear power plant
    • A s team explosion and fires released at least 5% of the radioactive reactor core into the atmosphere and downwind
    • Number of Deaths?
    • 31 (actual number unlikely to be ever known)
    • Health effects?
    • Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) diagnosed in on-site people (47 deaths)
    • „ A large proportion of childhood thyroid cancers diagnosed since the accident is likely to be due to intake of radioactive iodine fallout from off-site children.“
    • 299 injured people
    • 135.000 people were evacuated
    Technical disaster: Chernobyl Source:World Nuclear Association UNEP Disasters Database
  • 18. Space objects - historical comparison Pre-1957 2005
  • 19. Climate Change
    • Climate change :
    • attributed directly or indirectly to human activity that alters the composition of the global atmosphere
    • in addition to natural climate variability observed over comparable time periods.
    Source: Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Article 1 (1992) (http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/convkp/conveng.pdf): Source Google Images: http://disastermanagement786.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/climate-change.jpg
  • 20.
    • “ AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH HAS BECOME AN UNFORTUNATE REALITY”
    • “ GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE IS AS BAD AS WAR”
    • “ GLOBAL WARMING WILL ALTER ALL LIFE ON PLANET EARTH”
    • UN SG Ban Ki-Moon
  • 21. CO 2 -Emissions rise faster than in the business as usual scenario (A1FI) Raupbach 2009 CO 2 -emissions [G tons CO 2 / year] 21 25 29 33 37
  • 22. How climate change impacts people today and in the future
    • „ Climate change is already impacting 325 million people today“
    • Today more than 300 000 die due to climate change every year.”
    • „ Over 4 billion people – 60% of the world‘s population – are vulnerable to climate change.“
    • „ The impact of climate change is accelerating over the next 20 years.”
    Source: Climate Change – The Anatomy of a Silent Crisis, Global Humanitarian Forum 2009, Geneva
    • Climate change is already impacting 325 million people today
    • Today more than 300 000 die due to climate change every year.
    • Over 4 billion people – 60% of the world‘s population – are vulnerable to climate change.
    • The impact of climate change is accelerating over the next 20 years
  • 23. Climate Change – Outlook 2030
    • Worldwide deaths will reach 500 000 per year
    • People affected by climate change annually expected to rise to over 600 million
    • Annual economic cost to increase to around $300 billion
    • Climate displaced people to increase to over 70 million
    Source: W. Fust (2009), What will it take? Mitigation of Climate Change, talk at Global Humanitarian Forum, October 2009, Geneva
  • 24. Climate Change - Outlook
    • Africa , Increased water shortages (up to 250 million people in Africa at increased risk of water stress in 2020) ;
    • Small Island Developing States , Sea-level rise is likely to exacerbate inundation, storm surge, erosion and other coastal hazards, thus threatening vital infrastructure that supports the socio-economic well-being of island communities.
    • Asian megadeltas , such as the Ganges-Brahmaputra and the Zhujiang: Large populations and high exposure to sea-level rise, storm surge and river flooding
    Source: UNFCCC Factsheet: Climate change science - Regions that will be especially affected
  • 25. Climate Change - Outlook
    • The Arctic
    Source: UNFCCC Factsheet: Climate change science - Regions that will be especially affected 1979 2003
  • 26. Climate Change - Impact Source: W. Fust (2009), What will it take? Mitigation of Climate Change, talk at Global Humanitarian Forum, October 2009, Geneva
  • 27. Land Degradation – Facts
    • The dry land belt encompasses 41 percent of the world’s landmass including the Sahara, the Middle East and Central Asia, and is to home over 2.3 billion people
    Source: UNCCD thematic fact sheet series No. 1 Climate change and desertification The dry land belt encompasses 41 percent of the world’s landmass including the Sahara, the Middle East and Central Asia, and is to home over 2.3 billion people From W. Fust (2009), What will it take? Mitigation of Climate Change, talk at Global Humanitarian Forum,Geneva
  • 28. Land Degradation – Desertification
      • degradation of land primarily caused by human activities and climatic variations
      • dryland ecosystems are extremely vulnerable to over-exploitation and inappropriate land use
      • over 250 million people are directly affected
      • about 1billion people in over 100 countries are at risk
    Source: UNCCD http://www.unccd.int/convention/text/leaflet.php
  • 29. Aral Sea Kazakhstan Uzbekistan Land degradation affects the quantity and quality of freshwater supplies. Contributes significantly to water scarcity, food crisis, and internal displacement of people, mass migration, and social breakdown.
  • 30. Land Degradation – Facts & Explanations
    • Soil carbon sequestration is an important and immediate sink for removing atmospheric carbon dioxide and mitigating global warming and climate change.
    Source: UNCCD thematic fact sheet series No. 1 Climate change and desertification
  • 31. Land Degradation – Facts & Explanations
    • Where soil is depleted, soil carbon sequestration is switched OFF .
    • Imperative to make concerted efforts to put land and soil as major themes in the climate change negotiations, something that has so far been hardly considered by expert negotiations.
    Source: UNCCD thematic fact sheet series No. 1 Climate change and desertification
  • 32. Land Degradation - Outlook
    • desertification is projected to accelerate with 40 percent of the earth’s land becoming dry or semi-arid regions which is detrimental given that arid and semi-arid climates comprise over one quarter of the land area of earth. “
    Source: Climate Change – The Anatomy of a Silent Crisis, Global Humanitarian Forum 2009, Geneva
  • 33. Lake Chad Africa
  • 34. Environmentally induced migration Environmental Refugees
    • 1985 El-Hinnawi UNEP:
    • "……those people who have been forced to leave their traditional habitat, temporarily or permanently, because of a marked environmental disruption . . . that jeopardised their existence and/or seriously affected the quality of their life……."
  • 35. Definitions Environmentally induced migration
    • IOM Working definition
    • “ Environmental migrants are persons or groups of persons who, for compelling reasons of sudden or progressive change in the environment that adversely affects their lives or living conditions, are obliged to leave their habitual homes , or choose to do so, either temporarily or permanently, and who move either within their country or abroad ” (IOM 2007).
  • 36. Environmentally induced migration Source: WBGU 2007
  • 37. How many environmentally induced migrants?
    • Today: 24 million environmentally induced migrants worldwide (UNHCR 2002).
    • By 2010: 50 million (Myers 2005)
    • By 2030: 70 million (IOM 2008)
    • By 2050: Estimates vary widely, 200 million becoming a widely cited estimate (IOM 2008)
    • After 2050: Up to 700 million environmental migrants (Christian Aid 2007)
  • 38. Environmental Migration Conclusions
    • Environmental signatures in the act of migration are visible
    • Environmental degradation is with us for the foreseeable future
    • Need to de-emphasise the negative connotation associated with migration and emphasise adaptation
    Source: UNU-EHS
  • 39. Climate Justice – Facts & Explanations Source: W. Fust (2009), What will it take? Mitigation of Climate Change, talk at Global Humanitarian Forum, October 2009, Geneva
  • 40. Poverty - Facts
    • The majority of people suffering from the impacts of climate change are already extremely poor .
    • about 2.6 billion people — two thirds of them women — live in poverty (below $2 a day)
    • almost 1 billion living in extreme poverty (less than $1 a day).
    Source: Climate Change – The Anatomy of a Silent Crisis, Global Humanitarian Forum 2009, Geneva Sheila B. Catedral, 23 years, Iloilo City, Philippines
  • 41. Climate Justice – Facts
    • „ Poor countries suffer the vast majority of the human impact of climate change:“
    Source: W. Fust (2009), What will it take? Mitigation of Climate Change, talk at Global Humanitarian Forum, October 2009, Geneva
  • 42. Climate Justice – Facts & Explanations
    • Grave global justice concern that those who suffer most from climate change have done the least to cause it.
    • The 50 Least Developed Countries contribute less than 1 percent of global carbon emissions.
    • Climate change exacerbates existing inequalities faced by vulnerable groups particularly women, children and elderly .“
    Source: Climate Change – The Anatomy of a Silent Crisis, Global Humanitarian Forum 2009, Geneva
  • 43. Hunger - Facts
    • Over 1 bn people are chronically hungry today —many of them due to climate change .
    • In 2008, the FAO estimated that more than 900 million are afflicted with hunger, or about 13 percent of the global population .
    • 94% live in developing nations . (subsistence farmers, landless families, people working in fishery or forestry. The remainder live in shanty towns on the fringes of urban areas. A quarter of the hungry are children)
    Source: Climate Change – The Anatomy of a Silent Crisis, Global Humanitarian Forum 2009, Geneva
  • 44. Hunger - Facts Source: Food and Agriculture Organisation United Nations:
  • 45. Hunger - Facts Source: Food and Agriculture Organisation United Nations:
  • 46. Financial losses
    • 2007-2009 World Financial Crisis
    Source: Wikipedia 36‘000 bn US $
  • 47. Megacities – Facts & Explanations
    • 1950: 2 mega-cities with 10 million or more inhabitants .
    • 2005: 20 mega-cities
    • 2015 : 22 mega-cities
    Source: World Urbanization Prospects: The 2005 Revision
  • 48. Megacities - Outlook Source: „ The world's largest cities and urban areas in 2006 and 2020 “, Tann vom Hove , CityMayors
  • 49. Urban Growth – Baltimore/Washington
  • 50. Megacities – Facts & Explanations
    • In 2005 more than half of the world population lived in cities . 72% in Europe
      • 84% in North America
      • 78% in Latin America, Caribbean
      • 40% in Asia and Africa
    • In 2030: in Africa 51% and in Asia 54% of the population will live in cities. The growth in population will therefore be a growth of population living in cities.
    Source: World Urbanization Prospects: The 2005 Revision
  • 51. Civil Wars in Africa - Facts Source: OMNIA Verlag „Welt im Wandel“ -Wars and armed conflicts 2006-: Wars and armed conflicts 2006:
    • Democratic Republic of the Kongo: ca. 5.4 million deaths until 1999
    • Ruanda (April-July 1994): ca. 800 000 – 1 million (ge nocid e)
    • Liberia (1989-2003): ca. 300 000 deaths
    • Algeria (1992-2002): ca. 200 000 deaths
  • 52. Terrorism
    • Terrorism is a criminal act that influences an audience beyond the immediate victim.
    • Number of terrorism incidents:
    Source: Figure: Global Terrorism Database (GTD) Definition: International Terrorism and Security Research Worldwide
  • 53. Terrorism
    • Number of terrorism incidents:
    Source: Figure: Global Terrorism Database (GTD) Western Europe Eastern Europe
  • 54. How to cope with all these risks and disasters
      • Integral risk reduction and disaster mangemenet approach needed
      • Vulnerability reduction
      • Resilience increase
    Source: World Urbanization Prospects: The 2005 Revision
  • 55. Multi hazard/ multi risk approach needed FLOODS SEVERE WINDSTORMS EARTHQUAKES/ TSUNAMIS DROUGHTS, DESERTIFICATION LANDSLIDES WILDFIRES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS TECHNOLOGICAL HAZARDS GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE TERRORISM LAND DEGRADATION PANDEMICS FINANCIAL CRISES BIOLOGICAL THREATS IT - Security
  • 56. Multi sectors and disciplines approach Natural Disaster Reduction TECHNICAL SOCIAL POLITICAL ECONOMIC LEGAL ADMINISTRATIVE Scientific to be considered in its widest sense to include the natural, environmental, social, economic, health & engineering sciences Technical to include relevant matters of technology, engineering practice & implementation Interdisciplinarity & transdisciplinarity needed
  • 57. Multi stakeholder approach in problem solving
    • Science
    • Education and training
    • Technology
    • Politics
    • Governments, Administration
    • UN Organisations
    • NGOs
    • Private sector (Public-private partnership)
    • Practitioners
    • Public, society as a whole.
  • 58. Multi interface approach and underlaying factors Climate Change, Climate Variation Desertification, Land Degradation, Drought Continuous degradation of ecosystems Food, water, energy security, conflicts, migration Human Factors
  • 59. Multi Measures Approach Risk cascade in integral risk management Total original risk level Residual Risk Avoiding, eliminating risk situations (land-use planning) Risk reduction by preventive measures Early warning, Emergency Management Risk Transfer (Micro-) Insurance Self-Responsibility
  • 60. Multi Measures Approach along the risk cycle in integral risk management RECOVERY INTERVENTION PREVENTION Rehabilitation Insurance Technical measures Organisational measures Education Training Organisational measures Emergency/Crisis Management
  • 61. Schematic of Resilience Time Functionality 100% t event Recovery Time t recovery Loss in Functionality (Vulnerability) Robustness A Resilience is high if A is small Event
  • 62. Resilience Time Functionality, Service Level 100% t event Recovery Time t recovery Vulnerability Resilience
  • 63. Resilience Time Functionality 100% t event Recovery Time t recovery Vulnerability Minimize damage Improve building, systems and component performance Reduce the probability of and consequences at failure
  • 64. Resilience Time Functionality 100% t event Recovery Time Resilience t recovery Vulnerability Disaster response plan Repairability of structures, components Reduce the time to recovery
  • 65. Resilience Time Functionality 100% t event Recovery Time t recovery Vulnerability Holistic disaster prevention, response and recovery management
  • 66. Resilience. What can we do? Time Functionality 100% t event Recovery Time Resilience t recovery Vulnerability Robustness Prevention Building codes Micro-Zonation a Preparedness Seismic retrofitting Business continuity plans c b e f d Intervention Professional emergency management Rapid damage assessment Recovery Insurances Reconstruction plans Do it even better! Improve building codes Reconstruction at other places d to minimize Politically most sensible domain High visibility – high media coverages
  • 67. Risk reduction: needs assessment
    • The global community is experiencing increased vulnerability from traditional natural hazards, climate change and emerging risks
    • Lack of understanding of the substantial medium and long term benefits of effective risk reduction strategies
    • Lack of effective means of bringing together research and academics, private sector, administration, practitioners, society and other at-risk stakeholders to exchange experience and lessons learned in disaster risk management
  • 68. Conclusions
    • The poorest are hit the most
    • Integral disaster and risk reduction management is vulnerability reduction and resilience increase.
    • Organisational measures (emergency planning, training, leadership, experience and information management, etc.) are essential for resilience increase
    • Resilience measures for population and communities render social groups more adaptable to disasters.
  • 69. Conclusions
    • Resilience measures increase the capacity to reduce both direct and indirect economic losses resulting from disasters – most important for critical infrastructures.
    • Climate change adaptation CCA and risk reduction/ disaster management ( DRR ) to harmonize .
  • 70. Global Risk Forum GRF Davos Mission statement
    • “ GRF Davos through its various activities aims at serving as a Center of Excellence in knowledge and know-how exchange for the application of timely and appropriate risk management strategies, tools and practical solutions, thus reducing vulnerability for all types of risks and disasters to protect life, property, environment, critical infrastructure and all means of businesses for the world-wide community on a sustainable basis”.
    The Motto: ” From Thoughts to Action “ by closely linking practice, science, policy and decision making in the search for sustainable solutions. Knowledge alone does not lead to action!
  • 71. Global Risk Forum GRF Davos Main Goals
    • To bridge the gap between science and practice
    • To accellerate the transfer of scientific knowledge to applicable know how
    • To promote the worldwide exchange of know-how and experience, and to provide guidance to scientific and technical work to provide advice and to make recommendations on priorities for scientific and technical attention
    • To target solutions and promote good practice in integral risk management and climate change adaptation
    • To stimulate the dialogue & innovation including promotion of good practice by providing and manageing a network for decision-makers, academics, practitioners and experts
  • 72. The three pillars of the Global Risk Forum GRF GRF GLOBAL RISK FORUM DAVOS IDRC International Disaster & Risk Conference Risk Academy GRF Platform for Networks
  • 73. International Disaster & Risk Conference
    • platform for all stakeholders in disaster and risk management that meets alternatively in Davos and in another part of the world to promote inter- and trans- disciplinary exchanges.
    IDRC International Disaster & Risk Conference
  • 74. International Disaster & Risk Conference - IDRC Davos 2010 Call for Abstracts open until 13 December 2009 www.grforum.org May 30 – June 3, 2010
  • 75. Risk Academy
    • a think tank and a solution provider
    • a knowledge and know-how transfer instrument that provides continuous education courses, trainings, workshops for the fast dissemination of topical knowledge and new technologies.
    • A broker and facilitator for R&D-activities in international cooperation.
    Risk Academy
  • 76. IDRC Harbin 2007: Harbin Alliance
    • An alliance of 12 institutions (universities, NGOs, UN-Organisations) for the harmonisation of Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction
    • Lobbying the UN that climate change adaptation is the first and foremost strategy to address disaster risk reduction
    • Build up a critical mass of disaster risk reduction experts who understand climate change negotiations
  • 77. GRF Platform for Networks
    • web-based “professionals’ platform” where practitioners, experts, scientists & decision-makers have an opportunity to share their knowledge, experiences, projects, problems, ideas, etc. in specific circles.
    GRF Platform for Networks
  • 78.
    • „ From Thoughts to Action“
    • Thank you for your attention!
    • [email_address]
    www.grforum.org