• Save
Practical Experiences from Vietnam
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Practical Experiences from Vietnam

on

  • 543 views

Chu Van Chuong

Chu Van Chuong
chuongcv.htqt@mard.go.vn
IDRC Davos, 30th August, 2012

Statistics

Views

Total Views
543
Views on SlideShare
537
Embed Views
6

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 6

http://conftool.grforum.net 6

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Practical Experiences from Vietnam Practical Experiences from Vietnam Presentation Transcript

  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 2012 “Making the Connection”Linking Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) & Ecosystem ManagementPractical Experiences from Vietnam Chu Van Chuong chuongcv.htqt@mard.go.vn IDRC Davos, 30th August, 2012
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 2012Structure1. Background2. Institutional framework3. Case study of Soc Trang4. The approach5. Challenges6. Experience and the way forward
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 2012 I. Background • 333.000 km2 natural area and 3200km long coastline. • One of the most disaster-prone countries and is one of 5 most vulnerable to climate change countries. • Susceptibility to almost every type of hazards (approx. 6-8 typhoons or tropical storms , 400 deaths and economic loss between 1-1.5% of GDP per year) • If sea level rises by 1m: 39% land area in Mekong Delta, 11% Red River Delta, 3% lowland of coastal provinces, including 20% of HCM City will be flooded; 10- 12%population will be affected and economic losses equal to 10% GDP.
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 20122. Institutional FrameworkInstitutional responsibility:• At provincial and local level: CCA, DRR and environment management is the responsibility of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD)Institutional establishments:• National Steering Committee on CC (lead by Prime Minister);• Central Committee on Flood & Storm Control lead by MARD’s Minister.Strategies and Plans:• National strategy for disaster prevention, response & mitigation until 2020• On-going development of law on disaster risk management• National Strategy response to CC promulgated in 2011• CC action plan framework of different line ministries and provinces. (MARD’s CC action plan available in 2008)
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 20123. Case study from Soc TrangThe project is testinginnovative approaches tothe integratedmanagement of themangrove forestecosystem for improvedClimate Change Adaptation(CCA) and Disaster RiskReduction (DRR). http://czm-soctrang.org.vn
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 201 Mangroves provide many ecosystem services. For CCA and DRR the following are particularly relevant:• Mangroves protect the coast from erosion (e.g. 1.1 Mio USD for Mangrove rehabilitation saved 7.3 Mio USD annually for dyke maintenance), flooding and storms.• 75% of tropical commercial fish spent part of their lives in the mangroves; i.e. each ha of mangrove destroyed is a loss 1.08 tonnes of fish per year
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 2012The Situation in Soc Trang• The coast is only protected by a narrow belt of mangroves.• The protection function of the mangrove belt is threatened by: • human impacts • the impacts of climate change such as more intense and frequent storms (i.e. more erosion), flooding, saline intrusion and rising sea levels.
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 20124. The Project’s ApproachAim: protect and sustainably use the coastal wetlandsfor the benefit of the local populationBUT: Planting alone is of little use! Newly plantedmangroves must also be protected from human impacts,like destructive fishing or resource collection methods→ Testing new approaches to mangrove management and protection (including “Co- Management”)
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 2012 Mangrove rehabilitation• Mimic natural regeneration through dense planting close to established trees• Mangroves can only be planted in erosion sites after barriers have reduced the erosion and stimulated sedimentation• Bamboo wave breakers and T-shaped fences have been constructed based on numeric modeling to minimize downdrift erosion
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 2012 Mangrove rehabilitationCo-management approachhas resulted in:• Sustainable use of natural resources,• An increase of natural regeneration,• Better collaboration between the local people and local authorities and• An increase in income
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 2012Concrete Results• More than 210 ha of mangrove forest are now under sustainable management;• In 2007 average per-capita income was USD 0.9 per day; it is now USD 2.5.• As a result of the introduction of woodsaving stoves, the need for firewood has been reduced by 50 per cent.• Rights of land use have been granted, protected zones have been designated and wood extraction has been limited to dead wood.• Fishing is now regulated: closed seasons have been introduced and only specific fishing methods are permitted.• Replication of the approach by other provinces and up- scale through additional funding
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 2012Lessons from the case study:Mangrove rehabilitation and managementmust be part of an integrated approach tocoastal area managementCo-management is an effective way ofmaintaining and enhancing the protectionfunction of the mangrove forest belt and at thesame time providing livelihood for localcommunities
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 20125. ChallengesCentral level:• Diversion view on CC (long-term vision) and DRR (short and medium term) and resources allocation among Gov. Agencies;• Lack of capacity and coordinationProject level:• Inconsistent database• Insufficient resources (facilities, technology, human & financial resources, etc.)• Resistance to change – it takes time to convince people to accept new forms of mangrove management, particularly if they are participatory and part of an integrated approach• Sustainable financing
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 20126. Experience and Way ForwardDisaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation andenvironmental management are naturally connectedMangrove re-habitation, conservation is cheap andeffective measure to protect land and see dike fromerosion, storm and salinity invasion and is a naturalways to link CCA, DRR and protection of eco-systems.The results of the project will be replicated in otherareas of the country!
  • 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference – IDRC Davos 2012 Wetland Forest Dike Road Inner canal Outer canal Buffer zoneA typical wetland conservation in the Mekong Delta