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5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice 24-28 August 2014 in Davos, Switzerland

5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice 24-28 August 2014 in Davos, Switzerland

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  • A community cyber-platform founded on open-source principles.

    KEY FEATURES

    1. Community resilience is founded upon understanding coastal hazards and predicting their impacts accurately for a wide range of scenarios. Notre Dame sits at the cutting edge of characterizing the hazards posed by wind, wave and surge to provide reliable and actionable information to decision makers charged with ensuring the safety of our communities in the face of approaching hurricanes.

    2. Post-disaster field reconnaissance represents one of the most valuable data sources to enhance community resilience; however, these activities are often poorly coordinated with multiple parties executing independent surveys using different data gathering instruments and no centralized repository for that data nor tools to aid in its curation and discovery. Notre Dame’s rare open repository for hurricane event and reconnaissance data now enables the community to learn from the past as we build a more resilient future.

    3. The computational demands of high-fidelity models for wind, wave and surge caused by hurricanes are significant, posing a major dilemma for stakeholders who must consider thousands of potential scenarios for future planning or must make a decision on the order of minutes as a hurricane is approaching. Notre Dame’s advances in surrogate modeling now enable simulations that previously took hundreds of hours to be executable in mere minutes using any device, including a SmartPhone.

    4. During post-disaster field reconnaissance, teams acquire thousands of precious images and forensic assessments that must be painstakingly organized and curated afterward. Valuable data is often lost, misclassified and siloed by individuals, never reaching a wider community needing this information to improve coastal construction practices. Notre Dame is leading a Digital Reconnaissance movement with new apps that provide users with customizable damage inventory forms that can be automatically uploaded to the CyberEye data warehouse for visualization and discovery.
  • Adopted a modular approach for a platform called whose capabilities can be easily expanded in time

    Initial focus on supporting two distinct work flows central to hurricane risk assessment and mitigation: high-fidelity Rapid Risk Assessment (RRA) and robust Data Intake and Discovery (DID) to better enable the use of data to inform and validate models used in hurricane risk assessment

    workflows are wrapped in a customizable dashboard that supports collaboration among authorized users through a rich geospatial environment all within an internet browser

    Such a transition to web-services not only removes the barrier that the user’s computational resources may present, but also enables the seamless dissemination of risk information to key stakeholders
  • Rapid Risk Assessment has a variety of applications both in developing general emergency management and response plans

    CyberEye’s RRA was developed specifically for use by emergency response managers in Hawaii and was later adopted by the Pacific Disaster Center

    Its power lies in the fact that it overcomes the limitations of current approaches to accurately evaluating the inundation caused by a scenario. Normally such assessments are executed using various physics-based models, which require a high level of user sophistication and computational expense (approx. 1500 CPU hours per scenario run).

    These cannot be easily executed in real-time by non-experts to support decision making, particularly through web interfaces, nor are these feasible to evaluate a wide range of scenarios required for a full probabilistic assessment.

    As such, the Rapid Risk Assessment in CyberEye is the only web-based tool that supports, high-fidelity, real-time probabilistic assessments for arbitrary, user-specified scenarios, including the effects of both waves and surge, to support both emergency management planning and response activities.
  • conventional approaches to hurricane risk assessment are based on analysis of data from historical storms and from simulation of design events or by adopting low-fidelity numerical models to predict hurricane/typhoon responses

    RRA relies on surrogate modeling for efficient prediction of maximum wave and surge heights for any arbitrary scenario, thus providing a single tool for both historical and non-historical event analysis.

    foundation of RRA is the simplified description of each hurricane/typhoon in the backside database of existing high-fidelity ADCIRC+ SWAN simulations through a small number of model parameters, corresponding to its characteristics at landfall

    A surrogate model is then built from this data to efficiently predict the response for any new scenario whose parameters lie within the range of its backside database.

    This capability readily facilitates highly efficient risk quantification/assessment achieved by characterizing the uncertainty in the hurricane/typhoon parameters through appropriate probability. This risk is ultimately estimated using Monte Carlo simulation relying on the developed surrogate model for efficient implementation.
  • results for a Category III hurricane impacting Honolulu, Hawaii that were obtained after only a few minutes of computational time.

    Moreover, the extensibility of this framework has particular significance for the modularization of risk assessment within CyberEye to encourage users to contribute and expand the available databases in the RRA going forward. By generalizing this surrogate modelling approach, users can then select their desired parameter space and upload their own databases of high fidelity surge and wave responses for a given geographic region and have surrogate models automatically created and made available for use within the CyberEye visualization environment.

    This submission process initiates an automated, offline registration process consisting of: (1) appropriate database correction to address existence of dry nodes for some events, (2) dimensional reduction (exploiting correlation of the data) to reduce memory requirements in the computational environment, and (3) tuning of the Kriging model. While this off-line registration may take hours, once completed, the data set would appear in the RRA menu of supported basins and facilities rapid risk assessment for arbitrary scenarios in minutes
  • Investigators generally supervise their own data curation, at best publishing their databases on personal websites with varying standards and completeness, though most reconnaissance databases remain offline.

    While there are isolated examples of websites that provide a clearinghouse where compiled data can be accessed, the sites are generally static, do not directly support individual user contributions, and possess limited to no ability to query the data.

    Thus CyberEye’s DID provides a rare open repository for hurricane/typhoon reconnaissance, with a wide variety of supported fields and dynamic visualization and querying capabilities.
  • The DID workflow is primarily enabled by the CyberEye Data Warehouse, a PostGIS spatial database that houses both these user-supplied entries as well as outputs of other modules, e.g., RRA runs.

    By creating one centralized data repository, users have the ability to execute robust searches over the entirety of the Data Warehouse, including any attached metadata and descriptions of the event/scenario as well as the data items themselves (individual measurements or observations).

    The platform enables searches to be executed using a joint combination of Standard Filters (logical operators) or Spatial Filters (bounding boxes – shown here).

    More importantly, the platform has the flexibility to interface with customizable applications on mobile platforms. This readily supports field reconnaissance teams in dynamically creating customized reconnaissance forms on their iPads or Tablets, acquiring all image and location data directly through their devices, and then having all this data and the generated reports curated and stored on the device and batch uploaded to the CyberEye data warehouse when connectivity is available.

    Thus these Apps and the end to end services provided by the DID workflow within the CyberEye website enable efficient, reliable digital reconnaissance that is already home to valuable data from Hurricane Ike, Superstorm Sandy and Typhoon Haiyan.
  • Creation of such a flexible environment to accommodate the diverse data types generated in hurricane/typhoon field reconnaissance and hincasting creates a particular challenge for robust query and integration with other major repositories.

    Compounded by the fact that the we chose not to impose, a priori, a rigid standard, i.e., supporting a limited number of data fields to incentivize information sharing within the community
    Large database of attributes from established field reconnaissance instruments were assembled to allow users to select subsets of these attributes to map to the fields in their personal database when they supply their data to the Data Warehouse, instead of forcing them to completely reformat their databases to match some rigid standard.

    Available data fields are organized into eleven major categories, e.g., Demographics, Basic Structural Information, Structural Details (I-III), Site Inventory, Hazard Characterization, and Damage (I-IV). The database was designed to allow users to attach models, data (field observations and measurements) or URLs to their reports, and backside file naming conventions allow users to attach notes and images to any of the individual categories in the database. This then ensures that all data is cataloged and attached to the correct database entry and even sub-category within that entry.

    This flexible approach to reconnaissance data curation also enables users to create and save their own customized damage reporting forms with fields selected from the available major categories or to use pre-defined forms generated by other members of the community.
  • Transition to next slide: This creates a vehicle to achieving Hyogo priorities to assess risk and use innovation in knowledge dissemination to build a culture of safety and resilience at all levels
  • Strategic Activities and Planning Committee of the University of Notre Dame for seed funding
    US Army Corp of Engineers for funding the RRA prototype
    Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) for the Geoanalytics framework
    Efforts of Affiliated research groups and graduate students in Hazards Hub at University of Notre Dame

Transcript

  • 1. CyberEye: an integrated cyber-infrastructure to support rapid risk assessment, post-disaster 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org reconnaissance and data discovery Tracy Kijewski-Correa, Alexandros Taflanidis, Andrew Kennedy, Nathan Smith, Markus Krusche, Cheng Liu, Charles Vardeman II University of Notre Dame, USA
  • 2. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Living in the Eye of the Storm Challenge: Increased urbanization and climate change have intensified the need for more effective hurricane/typhoon risk assessment and mitigation Opportunity: leverage latest developments in hazard characterization and its impacts on built environments to enhance community resilience Solution: Virtual environments that enable community to integrate existing data, models and simulation tools into collaborative environment Impact: Framework supporting decision making that is accessible, scalable and extendable to other hazards
  • 3. CyberEye: A Cyber-Collaboratory (founded on open source principles) for Risk Modelling and Assessment to Mitigate the Impacts of Hurricanes in a Changing Climate 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org High Fidelity Hazard Characterization Disaster Data Curation Efficient Decision-Maker Interfacing Digital Reconnaissance Tools (cybereye.nd.edu)
  • 4. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Breakthrough Technology: Customizable user dashboards on CyberEye’s secure website enable sharing and exchange of rich, geospatial information within collaborative groups. Workflow 1: Rapid Risk Assessment: Powerful environment to support hurricane scenario evaluation for emergency management and planning Workflow II: Data Intake and Discovery: An integrated environment to upload, curate, query and visualize diverse stores of precious field measurements, damage reports and observations from historical hurricanes.
  • 5. Clesafety.com Current State-of-the-Art: Decision makers rely on web tools that visualize archived simulations & historical events or display current situational data with limited to no predictive/forecasting capabilities  CyberEye Advancement: Rapid Risk Assessment (RRA) workflow supports, high-fidelity, real-time probabilistic assessments for arbitrary, user-specified hurricane/typhoon scenarios to support both emergency management planning and response activities 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org
  • 6. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Breakthrough Technology: Use of surrogate modeling enables high-fidelity, probabilistic assessments of wave and surge hazards in minutes (vs. 1000+ hours normally required); generalized framework allows surrogate models to be efficiently generated for any existing database through a simple upload process New Developments: Integrated wind hazard model and infrastructure digitizer to allow report cards assessing risk to individual structures
  • 7. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Breakthrough Technology: Use of surrogate modeling enables high-fidelity, probabilistic assessments of wave and surge hazards in minutes (vs. 1000+ hours normally required); generalized framework allows surrogate models to be efficiently generated for any existing database through a simple upload process New Developments: Integrated wind hazard model and infrastructure digitizer to allow report cards assessing risk to individual structures
  • 8. Current State-of-the-Art: Post-disaster field reconnaissance represents one of the most valuable data sources to enhance resilience; however, these activities are often poorly coordinated with multiple parties executing independent surveys using different data gathering instruments and no centralized repository for that data nor tools to aid in its curation and discovery  CyberEye Advancement: Data Intake and Discovery (DID) workflow provides open repository for field reconnaissance data, with variety of supported fields and dynamic data visualization and discovery tools 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org
  • 9. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Breakthrough Technology: Development of a robust geospatial environment to visualize and query data that is curated using a flexible schema that supports user customized surveys and wide ranging data types and formats. New Developments: User-friendly, customizable App allows fully digital reconnaissance and seamless ingestion directly into the CyberEye Data Warehouse; new capabilities for Automated Damage Assessment from aerial images.
  • 10. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Breakthrough Technology: Development of a robust geospatial environment to visualize and query data that is curated using a flexible schema that supports user customized surveys and wide ranging data types and formats. New Developments: User-friendly, customizable App allows fully digital reconnaissance and seamless ingestion directly into the CyberEye Data Warehouse; new capabilities for Automated Damage Assessment from aerial images.
  • 11. http:cybereye.nd.edu 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org
  • 12. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Conclusions • Population shifts toward coastal areas enhances urgency to assess and mitigate coastal hazards • Collective knowledge is often not effectively integrated by established, stand-alone frameworks for risk assessment • Propose transition to web-based platforms overcomes that harness this knowledge and allow seamless dissemination of risk information to key stakeholders • CyberEye (cybereye.nd.edu) is web-based collaboration space providing users with a customizable dashboard • Two distinct workflows were demonstrated for this environment: Rapid Risk Assessment (RRA) and Data Intake & Discovery (DID) • Platform will continue to be expanded with other data, tolls and capabilities • Better inform decision making by stakeholders in coastal regions, even in near-real time as these storms approach. • Framework is readily extensible to other types of hazards for which rapid risk assessment and data curation, visualization and discovery is needed
  • 13. Added value for the Post 2015 Framework for 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Disaster Risk Reduction • How did your work support the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action: – Ability to identify, assess and monitor disaster risks and enhance early warning can be dramatically advanced through the use of efficient web platforms like CyberEye (Priority 2) – By virtualizing the capacity for reliable and near-real time decision making through simplified and efficient web-tools, CyberEye has already facilitated the transformation of knowledge into action for decision makers in high risk areas, enabling individual as well as collective actions to reduce risk and build resilience (Priority 3) • From your perspective what are the main gaps, needs and further steps to be addressed in the Post 2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in – Research: Developing simulation tools that more effectively assess risk in complex, interconnected urban environments but have low barriers to adoption – Education & Training: Programming to support practitioners and decision makers in the adoption of and contributions toward development of innovative tools and platforms for risk assessment and mitigation – Implementation & Practice: Centralizing data and simulation tools within an organization that can assure long term support and community stewardship – Policy: Incentivize open data initiatives to provide the critical information necessary to driven next generation simulation tools to support decision makers
  • 14. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Acknowledgements http:cybereye.nd.edu