Cultural and spiritual resilienceof religious communities in Sri Lanka after the 2004 Tsunami       Ted Yu Shen Chen PhD C...
My PhD• Comparison between housing RNGOs  religion > housing > resilience• RNGO reconstruction approaches:  material + soc...
2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami
Sri Lanka is religious70% Buddhist       15% Hindu       7.5% Christian 7.5% Muslim    Affected    areasSource: 2001 Censu...
Literature: religion & resilience            * Religious financial resources (Korf et al., 2010, TraDer-Leigh, 2008)Materi...
Question Do religious cultures make  a difference to people’s     disaster resilience?
Case studiesCommunity Location       Village        RNGOChristian   Moratuwa     Lanciyawatta   Habitat for               ...
Material              cope     Interviews                       Social       adapt      RELIGION                          ...
Material ResilienceReligious teaching derived attitudes towardcharitable giving  • Muslim ‘Zakat’ – obligatory, 2.5% of in...
Social ResilienceReligious leadership  • Buddhist monks / Catholic Fathers /Muslim Imams +    mosque committeeFamily organ...
Spiritual ResilienceRelationship to places of worship  • Buddhist monthly Vesak / Christian Sunday    congregations / Musl...
Conclusion               1) religious leadership               2) tradition of social work   Christian   3) financial and ...
ImplicationsSource: Gallup Poll - Importance of Religion (Crabtree and Pelham 2009)
THANK YOU       Ted Yu Shen Chent.chen2@pgrad.unimelb.edu.auArchitect AIA, PhD University of Melbourne
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Disaster cultural resilience of religious communities – case study from Sri Lanka post 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami

2,206 views
1,749 views

Published on

Ted Yu Shen CHEN

University of Melbourne, Australia

Published in: Education, Technology, Travel
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,206
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
80
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Disaster cultural resilience of religious communities – case study from Sri Lanka post 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami

  1. Cultural and spiritual resilienceof religious communities in Sri Lanka after the 2004 Tsunami Ted Yu Shen Chen PhD Candidate, University of Melbourne
  2. My PhD• Comparison between housing RNGOs religion > housing > resilience• RNGO reconstruction approaches: material + social ++ spiritual dimensions in recovery and resilience
  3. 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami
  4. Sri Lanka is religious70% Buddhist 15% Hindu 7.5% Christian 7.5% Muslim Affected areasSource: 2001 Census Govt of Sri Lanka
  5. Literature: religion & resilience * Religious financial resources (Korf et al., 2010, TraDer-Leigh, 2008)Material * Religious charity and alms giving (Jones, 2009, Askew, 2008, De Bernardi, 2008) * Preferential assistance to own religious communities (Gillard and Paton, 1999, Korf et al., 2010) * Religious social networks for relief (Airriess etSocial al., 2008, Fisher, 1985) * Religious social networks for emotional support (Hill and Pargament, 2008) * Spiritual counselling and pastoral care (Feldbush, 2007, Harris et al., 2010, Wilson and Boden, 2008, Smith et al., 2010)Spiritual * Positive outlook and explanatory styles for coping (Shah, 2010, Wortmann and Park, 2009, Tedeschi and Calhoun, 1995)
  6. Question Do religious cultures make a difference to people’s disaster resilience?
  7. Case studiesCommunity Location Village RNGOChristian Moratuwa Lanciyawatta Habitat for HumanityBuddhist Kalutara Lagoswatta Habitat for HumanityMuslim Hambantota Great Love Tzu Chi Village Foundation
  8. Material cope Interviews Social adapt RELIGION Spiritual respondHouseholds RNGO officers Resident focus Community groups leaders38 8 4 9
  9. Material ResilienceReligious teaching derived attitudes towardcharitable giving • Muslim ‘Zakat’ – obligatory, 2.5% of income (assist only Muslims) Muslim ‘Sadaqa’ – voluntary donation (assist anyone) • Buddhist offering – for monks and temple not poor and needy • Christian tithing - tithing to support church and church-based community activities
  10. Social ResilienceReligious leadership • Buddhist monks / Catholic Fathers /Muslim Imams + mosque committeeFamily organisation • Muslim family clusters vulnerable to single disaster eventGender roles • Buddhist and Christian women engaged in community recovery activities more than Muslim women
  11. Spiritual ResilienceRelationship to places of worship • Buddhist monthly Vesak / Christian Sunday congregations / Muslim daily prayers • Rebuilding the Tzu Chi MosqueSpiritual empowerment • Immediately after tsunami temples, churches, mosques opened their doors to survivors • Many religious people also served tirelessly to help recover their community, finding ‘greater purpose’ in life
  12. Conclusion 1) religious leadership 2) tradition of social work Christian 3) financial and human resources 4) Western and wealthy Christian NGOs that provide aid only to Christians in developing countries 5) decentralised family organisations 6) equal gender roles in community recovery works 1) Religious leadership: Monk-led relief efforts that encourage compassionate action Buddhist 2) Decentralised family organisation 3) Equal gender roles - Lack of Buddhist funding structure for community works such as post-disaster relief and recovery 1) Mosque committee leadership Muslim 2) Laws on charitable giving 3) Determination to recover and rebuild to glorify Allah - Family cluster vulnerabilities and lack of women participation
  13. ImplicationsSource: Gallup Poll - Importance of Religion (Crabtree and Pelham 2009)
  14. THANK YOU Ted Yu Shen Chent.chen2@pgrad.unimelb.edu.auArchitect AIA, PhD University of Melbourne

×