IAM Institute of Applied Media Studies        4th International Disaster and Risk Conference, Davos, 26-30 August 2012    ...
Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• A media sociology point of view• Meta-analytical evidence based on cont...
Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social MediaFukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant• Natural disaster; marine earthquak...
Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• Social media is a most general term that keeps together blogs,  micro-b...
Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• It is a common place that social media may serve as an  important chann...
Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social MediaFunctions of social media in disaster communication•social media provide ...
Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• social media provide “raw material”-information for journalistic  repor...
Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• social media gave a voice to the workers in the nuclear power  plant; g...
Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• Research is still at its infancy• Caution: Which effects are (only) att...
Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• «Public relations professionals and academics have only just  begun to ...
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Davos presentation

  1. 1. IAM Institute of Applied Media Studies 4th International Disaster and Risk Conference, Davos, 26-30 August 2012 Social Media and Linguistics as a Part of an Integrative Risk Management Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media Michael SchanneZurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts
  2. 2. Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• A media sociology point of view• Meta-analytical evidence based on content analyses• Keyword search for studies from three fields: events, technical channels, communications• Anecdotal evidenceZurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts 2
  3. 3. Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social MediaFukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant• Natural disaster; marine earthquake, tsunami• Industrial accident; full meltdown of reactors• Wilful negligence of security and safety standards (The Official Report of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission; Executive Summary)Zurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts 3
  4. 4. Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• Social media is a most general term that keeps together blogs, micro-blogs, forums, audio-photo-video-sharings, Wikis, social bookmarking, social networking and other tools and applications that facilitate interactive communication and message or content exchange among and between individuals, audiences, publics, organizations.• Twitter and Facebook are best known and most studiedZurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts 4
  5. 5. Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• It is a common place that social media may serve as an important channel of information and communication during and in the aftermath of disasters.Zurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts 5
  6. 6. Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social MediaFunctions of social media in disaster communication•social media provide breaking news and updates; provide a flowof information•social media provide situational updates; provide geolocationinformation helping people to be aware of the situation; at least ofthe uncertainties of the situation•social media provide good advice just in time; provide guidelineshow to cope with changing situationsZurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts 6
  7. 7. Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• social media provide “raw material”-information for journalistic reporting; social media provide “frames” for journalistic reporting and public discussion – thus setting the public agenda• social media enable disaster-related citizen participation; mobilizing and activating information thus empowering people• social media make accessible sources of independent and reliable knowledge and expertise – thus providing a sort of counter-competenceZurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts 7
  8. 8. Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• social media gave a voice to the workers in the nuclear power plant; gave a voice to the evacuees; gave a voice to the protesters; gave a voice to children and mothers; that is to say give a voice to victims• social media serve people to organize protest against nuclear power• social media allow for expressing emotions, for emotional ventings, provide emotional support.Zurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts 8
  9. 9. Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• Research is still at its infancy• Caution: Which effects are (only) attributed (marketing jargon) and which effects are the «real» ones• Problem: accessibility• Problem: credibility• Problem: manageabilityZurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts 9
  10. 10. Disasters, Crisis Communication, and Social Media• «Public relations professionals and academics have only just begun to measure the impact of the blogosphere on public relation practices.» (Yan Lin, Brooke Liu Fisher 2010, 449)• And as an open end: It is useful to think of different social media as serving different functions among different user groups during different events (Palen et al 2010)Zurich Universities of Applied Sciences and Arts 10

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