Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces

621 views
570 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
621
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
212
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces

  1. 1. Managing risks at thehuman-animal-ecosystems interfaces‘One Health and the Hyogo Framework for Action’ David R Harper
  2. 2. One Health  A movement with considerable momentum  Recognizes essential link between the health of humans, and animals and ecosystems  Involves a coordinated, collaborative, multi- sectoral and multi-disciplinary approach at the human-animal-ecosystems interfaces2| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  3. 3. Working together: the Tripartite FAO, OIE and WHO working together to address issues at the human-animal-ecosystem interfaces Recognizes that the interaction between animals, humans, and ecosystems impacts, inter alia, on public health and global health security Collaborative and complementary efforts 3| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  4. 4. Concept Note Co-signed by the three Executive Heads of FAO, OIE and WHO in 2010 Complementary agenda and new synergies in: – normative work – public communication – pathogen detection, risk assessment and management – technical capacity building – research and development4| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  5. 5. Vision"A world capable of preventing, detecting, containing, eliminating, and responding to animal and public health risks attributable to zoonoses and animal diseases with an impact on food security through multi-sectoral cooperation and strong partnerships"5| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  6. 6. Strategic alignment Promoting strong  Promoting collaboration partnerships  Joint framework to address Coordination to avoid gaps and strengthen duplication of efforts collaboration in laboratory activities Strengthening animal and human health institutions  Alignment and coherence of global standard setting Improvement of governance, activities infrastructure and capacity building  Effective strategies for improving national, regional and community level pandemic preparedness and response6| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  7. 7. High Level Technical Meeting (HLTM) Convened by the Government of Mexico, FAO, OIE and WHO (15-17 November 2011) 100 participants from the human and animal health, agriculture and environmental sectors, international technical experts, and regional and donor organisations and partners AMR, zoonotic influenza, and rabies used as ‘entry points’ for discussions http://www.hltm.org/7| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  8. 8. HLTM: key messages High-level political will, trust among stakeholders, cultural and behavioural changes, and financial support are needed to establish multi-sectoral approaches Strong governance structures and aligned legal frameworks, building on existing mechanisms, are essential to achieving effective disease surveillance and response Communication is crucial to ensuring multi-sectoral coordination Actions and activities must address institutions and infrastructure at local, national, regional and international levels8| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  9. 9. Tripartite and One Health Promoting and facilitating multi-sectoral, multi-disciplinary relationships and collaborations to support animal and human health internationally and with Member States Supporting governance, and systems required for disease prevention, detection and control9| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  10. 10. Tripartite and Hyogo Tripartite  Hyogo – governance – governance – assessment, surveillance – assessment, monitoring and and early warning early warning – educational curricula – knowledge and education – capacity building – reduce underlying risks – strategies for pandemic – preparedness and response preparedness and response10 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  11. 11. Global challenge Public health emergencies start for many reasons: – infectious disease outbreaks • SARS, pandemic influenza …. – contaminated food or water • E. coli food contamination in Europe …. – environmental and technological hazards • chemicals, radio-nuclear incidents …. – natural or man-made humanitarian disasters • earthquakes, floods, deliberate use of biological agents, conflict, migration ….11 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  12. 12. What is needed? Greater emphasis on preparedness – Political commitment is imperative Implementation of existing frameworks and initiatives as main approach to strengthen capacity systematically – IHR, PIP Framework, health systems strengthening, HFA ….. Greater multi-sectoral, ‘whole-of-society’ and ‘whole-of- government’ engagement Greater country collaboration – IHR monitoring, sharing procedures and resources 12 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  13. 13. Preparedness Need to focus on strengthening those capabilities that are broadly essential for all emergencies – from infectious diseases such as pandemic influenza through to natural disasters …. Need to prioritize specific risks and ensure preparedness by focusing where necessary on unique aspects – for example, pandemic vaccine, severity, phases …. 13 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  14. 14. Preparedness, surveillance and response WHO Twelfth General Programme of Work (2014-2019) CATEGORIES 1 2 3 4 5 Communicable Noncommunicable Health through Health systems Preparedness, diseases (HIV, diseases the life course surveillance and TB, malaria) response Preparedness, Surveillance and Response has to be: Comprehensive Multi-sectoral All-hazard Sustainable14 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  15. 15. Conclusions WHO is working with sister organizations on action plan to follow Tripartite Concept Note Developing a generic, all-hazards approach, which is multi-sectoral and multi-disciplinary Supporting our Member States to follow through on existing frameworks and initiatives wherever we can – strong platform WHO remains fully committed to an active and constructive role with all partners15 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012

×