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Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces
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Davis R. Harper - Managing risk at the huamn-animal-ecosystems interfaces

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  • 1. Managing risks at thehuman-animal-ecosystems interfaces‘One Health and the Hyogo Framework for Action’ David R Harper
  • 2. One Health  A movement with considerable momentum  Recognizes essential link between the health of humans, and animals and ecosystems  Involves a coordinated, collaborative, multi- sectoral and multi-disciplinary approach at the human-animal-ecosystems interfaces2| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 3. Working together: the Tripartite FAO, OIE and WHO working together to address issues at the human-animal-ecosystem interfaces Recognizes that the interaction between animals, humans, and ecosystems impacts, inter alia, on public health and global health security Collaborative and complementary efforts 3| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 4. Concept Note Co-signed by the three Executive Heads of FAO, OIE and WHO in 2010 Complementary agenda and new synergies in: – normative work – public communication – pathogen detection, risk assessment and management – technical capacity building – research and development4| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 5. Vision"A world capable of preventing, detecting, containing, eliminating, and responding to animal and public health risks attributable to zoonoses and animal diseases with an impact on food security through multi-sectoral cooperation and strong partnerships"5| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 6. Strategic alignment Promoting strong  Promoting collaboration partnerships  Joint framework to address Coordination to avoid gaps and strengthen duplication of efforts collaboration in laboratory activities Strengthening animal and human health institutions  Alignment and coherence of global standard setting Improvement of governance, activities infrastructure and capacity building  Effective strategies for improving national, regional and community level pandemic preparedness and response6| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 7. High Level Technical Meeting (HLTM) Convened by the Government of Mexico, FAO, OIE and WHO (15-17 November 2011) 100 participants from the human and animal health, agriculture and environmental sectors, international technical experts, and regional and donor organisations and partners AMR, zoonotic influenza, and rabies used as ‘entry points’ for discussions http://www.hltm.org/7| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 8. HLTM: key messages High-level political will, trust among stakeholders, cultural and behavioural changes, and financial support are needed to establish multi-sectoral approaches Strong governance structures and aligned legal frameworks, building on existing mechanisms, are essential to achieving effective disease surveillance and response Communication is crucial to ensuring multi-sectoral coordination Actions and activities must address institutions and infrastructure at local, national, regional and international levels8| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 9. Tripartite and One Health Promoting and facilitating multi-sectoral, multi-disciplinary relationships and collaborations to support animal and human health internationally and with Member States Supporting governance, and systems required for disease prevention, detection and control9| Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 10. Tripartite and Hyogo Tripartite  Hyogo – governance – governance – assessment, surveillance – assessment, monitoring and and early warning early warning – educational curricula – knowledge and education – capacity building – reduce underlying risks – strategies for pandemic – preparedness and response preparedness and response10 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 11. Global challenge Public health emergencies start for many reasons: – infectious disease outbreaks • SARS, pandemic influenza …. – contaminated food or water • E. coli food contamination in Europe …. – environmental and technological hazards • chemicals, radio-nuclear incidents …. – natural or man-made humanitarian disasters • earthquakes, floods, deliberate use of biological agents, conflict, migration ….11 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 12. What is needed? Greater emphasis on preparedness – Political commitment is imperative Implementation of existing frameworks and initiatives as main approach to strengthen capacity systematically – IHR, PIP Framework, health systems strengthening, HFA ….. Greater multi-sectoral, ‘whole-of-society’ and ‘whole-of- government’ engagement Greater country collaboration – IHR monitoring, sharing procedures and resources 12 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 13. Preparedness Need to focus on strengthening those capabilities that are broadly essential for all emergencies – from infectious diseases such as pandemic influenza through to natural disasters …. Need to prioritize specific risks and ensure preparedness by focusing where necessary on unique aspects – for example, pandemic vaccine, severity, phases …. 13 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 14. Preparedness, surveillance and response WHO Twelfth General Programme of Work (2014-2019) CATEGORIES 1 2 3 4 5 Communicable Noncommunicable Health through Health systems Preparedness, diseases (HIV, diseases the life course surveillance and TB, malaria) response Preparedness, Surveillance and Response has to be: Comprehensive Multi-sectoral All-hazard Sustainable14 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012
  • 15. Conclusions WHO is working with sister organizations on action plan to follow Tripartite Concept Note Developing a generic, all-hazards approach, which is multi-sectoral and multi-disciplinary Supporting our Member States to follow through on existing frameworks and initiatives wherever we can – strong platform WHO remains fully committed to an active and constructive role with all partners15 | Health Security Preparedness Team | September 6, 2012

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