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Monitoring and evaluation of One Health projects; lessons from ecohealth in Asia.

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GRF 2nd One Health Summit 2013: Presentation by HALL, Dr. David Clement, University of Calgary

GRF 2nd One Health Summit 2013: Presentation by HALL, Dr. David Clement, University of Calgary

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Monitoring and evaluation of One Health projects; lessons from ecohealth in Asia. Monitoring and evaluation of One Health projects; lessons from ecohealth in Asia. Presentation Transcript

  • Monitoring and Evaluation of One Health Projects Lessons from Ecohealth in Asia David Hall, DVM, PhD, Quynh Ba Le, MD, MPH, and Meg Lunney, BSc, MSc dchall@ucalgary.ca GRF Davos One Health Summit 2013 November 20, 2013 Davos, Switzerland
  • Building Ecohealth Capacity in Asia  3.5 year project  Research Grant: IDRC and AusAID  Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam  Key Personnel • • • • Principal Investigator – David Hall (VWB/ Univ. Calgary) Co-PI – Jeff Davidson (VWB/ Univ. PEI) Co-PI – David Waltner-Toews (VWB/ Univ. Guelph) Project manager: Quynh Ba Le • Focal Points: • Cambodia: Naran Ly • Indonesia: Iwan Wilyanto • Thailand: Suwit Chotinun China: Fang Jing Laos: Boualam Khamlome Vietnam: Dinh Xuan Tung
  • BECA Objectives in a nutshell 1. Develop ecohealth capacity (applic. & research) in SEAsia 2. Promote regional networking and collaboration 3. Identify an approach to monitoring and evaluation
  • Building Ecohealth Capacity in Asia – Methods Workshops and meetings Blogs, online discussions Joint activity reporting Policy Briefs Academic presentations & articles
  • Use of Outcome Mapping – informal & formal Source: Outcome Mapping Facilitation manual. Earl, Carden, and Smutylo. IDRC, 2001.
  • Use of engagement tools – discussion matters Use tools to engage participants in project monitoring Allow for guided discussion of activities/ outcomes Accept differences of opinion
  • Use of engagement tools – discussion matters
  • Choice of participants Criteria for selection: •Enroll help of leaders (Focal Points) •Range of ages/seniority, but left biased •Gender balance (not easy!) •Transdisciplinary representation •Engagement with research projects •Willingness to pass on training
  • Large workshops & small meetings •Large workshops • great for general training • wide range of participants •Small meetings • more focused • EcoHealth leader training
  • Include social/ cultural activities in meetings •Opportunities for informal project evaluation •Builds sense of partnership & project ownership •Recognition of cultural values •Develop professional friendships
  • “Our best outcome” – self reporting Partners presented most successful applications of ecohealth principles • Identified project applications and impact • Showcased project partners • Developed ecohealth network • Displayed heightened understanding and application of EcoHealth Pillars
  • BECA M&E tools Core M&E Tools: •Pre and post workshop questionnaires •End of workshop evaluations •Blogs, online discussions •Project website •Meeting reports Other ongoing evaluation tools: •One-on-one semi-structured interviews •Structured telephone interviews Final evaluation tools: •SWOT analysis • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, & Threats •GAP analysis • Where are the gaps to outputs •Performance Indicator analysis •Ecohealth project presentations
  • BECA M&E tools Core M&E Tools: •Pre and post workshop questionnaires •End of workshop evaluations •Blogs, online discussions •Project website •Meeting reports Other ongoing evaluation tools: •One-on-one semi-structured interviews •Structured telephone interviews Final evaluation tools: •SWOT analysis • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, & Threats •GAP analysis • Where are the gaps to outputs •Performance Indicator analysis •Ecohealth project presentations
  • BECA M&E tools Highly useful but unintended M&E Tools: •Coffee breaks, lunches, & dinners •Informal discussion with colleagues at meetings • helped identify ecohealth related inputs/outputs to/from other projects
  • BECA M&E tools Key questions: •Milestones in capacity development of institutions, networks, etc. • e.g., ecohealth programmes developed at target institutions •Capacity of target institutions to direct own programmes • e.g., three institutions cited BECA training when asking administration to fund ecohealth teaching and research
  • Conclusions • Have an M&E framework in place from Day 1 • Use a combination of formal & informal M&E tools • Use broad and focused activities • Engage with key focal points regularly • Difficult to measure intangible impact (e.g. institution building) • Current academic T&P guidelines do not favour this
  • Building Ecohealth Capacity in Asia BECA funding: • International Development Research Centre (IDRC) • Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID)
  • Monitoring and Evaluation of One Health Projects Lessons from Ecohealth in Asia David Hall, DVM, PhD, Quynh Ba Le, MD, MPH, and Meg Lunney, BSc, MSc dchall@ucalgary.ca GRF Davos One Health Summit 2013 November 20, 2013 Davos, Switzerland