Daniel Link - Promoting Port Resiliency - IDRC Davos Presentation

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5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice 24-28 August 2014 in Davos, Switzerland

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  • Introduction; presenting on behalf of:
    My doctoral advisor, Prof. Bernd Hellingrath, University of Münster
    AmericasRelief Team, in particular James F. Smith (Technical Director of their Port Resiliency Program) and Teo A. Babun, Head of ART
  • ~42,000 airports worldwide:
    airports with commercial airline service (~9,000)
    military airfields
    small general aviation airports

    More examples for airports:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    Maputo, Mozambique
    Cebu City, Philippines;
  • Daniel Link - Promoting Port Resiliency - IDRC Davos Presentation

    1. 1. 1 PROMOTING PORT RESILIENCY - VIA THE AIRPORT CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Promoting Port Resiliency Daniel Link, James F. Smith, Bernd Hellingrath, Teo A. Babun Jr. Chair for Information Chair Systems for IS and Supply Chain Management DANIEL LINK JAMES F. SMITH BERND HELLINGRATH TEO A. BABUN JR. 24TH-28TH AUGUST 2014
    2. 2. 2 PRESENTATION OUTLINE  Introduction  Airport Resiliency - State of the Art  Barriers to Airport Resiliency  The Airport Certification Program (ACP)  Dealing with the Motivation Problem Promoting Port Resiliency Daniel Link, James F. Smith, Bernd Hellingrath, Teo A. Babun Jr. Chair for IS and Supply Chain Management
    3. 3. 3 INTRODUCTION AIRPORTS, DISASTERS, RESILIENCY  Airports are often critically important for disaster relief and economic recovery; e.g.  Hurricane Katrina (2005): Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport  Haiti earthquake (2010): Toussaint Louverture International Airport, Port-au-Prince  Airports may be directly or indirectly affected by disasters.  Higher resiliency can reduce risks and potential losses.  Improved business continuity  Quickened restoration to an acceptable level of service Promoting Port Resiliency Daniel Link, James F. Smith, Bernd Hellingrath, Teo A. Babun Jr. Chair for IS and Supply Chain Management
    4. 4. 4 AIRPORT RESILIENCY – STATE OF THE ART DEFINITION, BASIC APPROACHES, EXISTING PROGRAMS  Airport resiliency is: the ability of an airport to cope with or adapt to stress  Two basically different approaches to improve resiliency  “hard” resiliency (structural measures)  “soft” resiliency (policy, organizational/relationships, procedural, and defensive measures)  Several individual programs at airports  e.g. at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport  Two systematic programs, focusing on soft resiliency  Get Airports Ready for Disasters (GARD) by Deutsche Post DHL and UNDP (applied to about seven airports)  The Port Resiliency Program (PReP) by AmericasRelief Team (applied to one airport) Promoting Port Resiliency Daniel Link, James F. Smith, Bernd Hellingrath, Teo A. Babun Jr. Chair for IS and Supply Chain Management
    5. 5. 5 BARRIERS TO AIRPORT RESILIENCY NEED, COST, MOTIVATION, GUIDANCE  Lack of perceived need  Due to faulty, incomplete, or absent risk and hazard analyses  High impact vs. low probability  Expected cost  Expensive “hard” resiliency, e.g. structural hardening and systems or equipment redundancy  Staff time for relatively inexpensive “soft” resiliency measures, e.g. relationship building  Lack of motivation  Resiliency measures usually viewed as unnecessary expenses  Adverse effects at other airports not motivating  Resiliency not associated with competitive advantage  Regulatory requirements for dealing with crashes seen as “enough”  Lack of guidance  No common resiliency definitions and standards Promoting Port Resiliency Daniel Link, James F. Smith, Bernd Hellingrath, Teo A. Babun Jr. Chair for IS and Supply Chain Management
    6. 6. 6 THE AIRPORT RESILIENCY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM (ACP) Airport requests application packet Airport takes actions to meet standards Airport submits packet Evaluation of packet and on-site audit Evaluation of packet and on-site audit PReP GARD Other qualified providers that have been trained & certified Re-certification (after 3 years) QUALIFIED PROVIDERS Program’s evaluators and auditors Certification Promoting Port Resiliency Daniel Link, James F. Smith, Bernd Hellingrath, Teo A. Babun Jr. Chair for IS and Supply Chain Management
    7. 7. 7 DEALING WITH THE MOTIVATION PROBLEM THREE BASIC APPROACHES  Seeking recognition from the insurance and reinsurance industry  Airport resiliency as a risk reduction or loss control measure worth rewarding with lower insurance rates or more favorable treatment in pay-outs  Essentially zero room in the current aviation insurance rate structure for incentives  Airport users see their risk spread over their entire networks  Making airport resiliency certification a regulatory requirement  Recent experiences with e.g. Safety Management Systems (SMS) indicate extreme resistance to new types of regulations  Education concerning the value of resiliency and preparedness  Lessons learned from the 2013 Philippines typhoon relief and recovery may engender a greater willingness to invest in airport resiliency and airport resiliency certification Promoting Port Resiliency Daniel Link, James F. Smith, Bernd Hellingrath, Teo A. Babun Jr. Chair for IS and Supply Chain Management
    8. 8. 8 DANIEL LINK UNIVERSITY OF MÜNSTER DANIEL.LINK@ERCIS.DE PROF. DR.-ING. BERND HELLINGRATH UNIVERSITY OF MÜNSTER BERND.HELLINGRATH@ERCIS.DE PROF. DR. JAMES F. SMITH AMERICASRELIEF TEAM / SMITH-WOOLVINE ASSOCIATES JS@AMERICASRELIEF.ORG DR. TEO A. BABUN JR. AMERICASRELIEF TEAM TB@AMERICASRELIEF.ORG Promoting Port Resiliency Daniel Link, James F. Smith, Bernd Hellingrath, Teo A. Babun Jr. Chair for IS and Supply Chain Management
    9. 9. 9 THE AIRPORT CERTIFICATION PROGRAM BASIC PRINICPLES, MAJOR ELEMENTS  Basic Principles  Cooperating with existing resiliency programs such as PReP  Can belong to a non-profit or for-profit organization  Self-funding after initial start-up period  Standards for certification based on existing resiliency programs to greatest extent possible  Supporting documentation required by insurance/reinsurance companies  Major elements  Standards  Certification Process  Training and qualification of inspectors and auditors  Qualification of “Qualified Providers”  Registry of Certified Airports  Registry of Qualified Providers  Periodic Re-Certification  Continual evaluation of effectiveness of program Promoting Port Resiliency Daniel Link, James F. Smith, Bernd Hellingrath, Teo A. Babun Jr. Chair for IS and Supply Chain Management
    10. 10. Added value for the Post 2015 Framework for 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Disaster Risk Reduction • How did your work support the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action: – Global, industry-wide standards for resiliency and preparedness assessment – Nurturing of key stakeholder relationships – Integration of early warning systems – Resiliency and safety benefits reach beyond the airport into the hinterland – Periodical review of changing risk factors, including those linked to climate change – Strengthening of critical infrastructure resiliency and disaster relief • From your perspective what are the main gaps, needs and further steps to be addressed in the Post 2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in – Research: Better understanding of CI provider landscape and motivation; Measures for airport resiliency – Education & Training: Raised awareness for resiliency needs and benefits at CI sites – Implementation & Practice: Willingness of the private sector to invest in resiliency – Policy: Reconciliation of CI use for concurrent relief and non-relief operations; focus on ports as vital CI parts and points of entry

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