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An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines
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An ecosystem-based resilience analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Philippines

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Noralene Menchavez UY, Rajib SHAW …

Noralene Menchavez UY, Rajib SHAW

Kyoto University, Japan

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  • 1. An Ecosystem-based Resilience Analysis of Infanta, Quezon, Phil ippines Noralene Menchavez Uy and Rajib Shaw 29 August 2012Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 2. Outline of Presentation 2OverviewResearch ObjectivesBackground of Study LocationMethodologyFindingsDiscussionLimitations of the StudyScope for Further Research Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 3. Overview 3When ecological integrity is not maintained, human well- being will be negatively affected. - Millennium Assessment Report (2005)Photos: Municipality of InfantaEcosystem degradation puts vulnerable communities at risk by reducing the resilience of natural systems and human societies against the impacts of climate change and increased risks of disaster. Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 4. Research Objectives 4 The study seeks to establish that ecosystem-based adaptation can enhance climate resilience.Research Objectives:1. Ecosystem Resilience Analysis - to assess the resilience of the mountain, river, urban, agricultural plain, estuarine and coastal ecosystems of Infanta2. Community Values for Ecosystems - to identify community values for ecosystems and their services - to determine autonomous and recommended adaptation actions3. Ecosystem-based Adaptation Plan - to develop an ecosystem-based adaptation plan for Infanta - to examine local institutions and governance systems Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 5. Background of Study Location (1) 5 Municipality of Infanta, PhilippinesTotal area: 342.76 km2Population: 62,251 (2008)Annual municipal income: 1.2 million USDEconomic activities: copra & rice production, fisheriesHazard vulnerability:(1)absorbs the frontal assault of typhoons(2)highly vulnerable to floods(3) an active fault traverses 2 villages Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 6. Background of Study Location (2) 6Ecosystem No of Total Land Area PopulationClassification Villages (in km2)Mountain 4 269.65 10,913Riverine 5 6.83 9,030Urban 5 2.00 9,683Agricultural Plain 5 8.12 6,369Estuarine 12 35.45 9,678Coastal 5 20.71 16,578 R5 C1Total 36 342.76 62,251 U5 R4 R3 P5 C2Source: Municipality of Infanta R1 R2 U2 U3 U4 P4 C3 P3 M4 U1 E11 C4 P2 E10 P1 E12 M3 E5 E9 E6 C5 E4 M2 E8 E1 E7 M1 E2 E3 Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 7. Background of Study Location (3) 7 Climate Trends Average Annual Rainfall Average Monthly Rainfall 800 7000 700 6000 600 5000 500 4000 mm mm 400 3000 300 2000 200 1000 100 0 0 1964 1969 1974 1979 1984 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Year 34Average Annual 32Temperature 30 C 28 26 24 22 1964 1967 1970 1973 1976 1979 1982 1985 1988 1991 1994 1997 2000 2003 2006 2009Source: PAGASA, Yearanalyzed by the author Minimum Temperature Maximum Temperature Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 8. Methodology (1) 8January-February 2011:(1)Workshop on ecosystem- based adaptation(2)Questionnaire survey in village councils (n=36)(3)Focus group discussion in 6 villages Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 9. Methodology (2) 9 Ecological Physical Economic Social InstitutionalEcosystem Richness Basic Infrastructure Finance Education and Governance awarenessEcosystem Services Land use Livelihood and Health Policy EmploymentClimate Housing and Structure Credit Skills and training InstitutionsEnvironmental Water and Sanitation Household assets Social arrangements BudgetDisturbanceEcology and Culture Technology Economic Tools Population CoordinationDescription of QuestionnaireMultiple-choice type: 5 dimensions, 25 parameters, 125 measuresAnalysis: weighted average and correlation Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 10. Findings (1) 101. Resilience Scores AnalysisEcosystem Overall Overall Overall Overall Overall Overall ResilienceClassification Ecological Physical Economic Social Institutional Ecosystem Category Score Score Score Score Score ScoreMountain 3.19 2.95 2.57 3.37 3.32 3.08 MediumRiverine 3.18 3.29 3.02 3.48 3.15 3.22 MediumUrban 2.64 3.51 2.97 3.35 3.08 3.11 MediumAgricultural Plain 3.15 3.39 2.82 3.46 3.36 3.24 MediumEstuarine 3.19 3.27 2.93 3.55 3.23 3.23 MediumCoastal 3.07 2.93 2.67 3.93 3.71 3.26 HighScale: Very High=3.75-5 Medium=2.75-3.24 Very Low=1-2.24 High=3.25-3.74 Low=2.25-2.74 Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 11. Findings (2) 11 1. Resilience Scores Analysis Ecological Ecological Ecological 5 5 5 4 4 4Institutional 3 Physical Institutional 3 2 Physical Institutional 3 2 Physical Main Findings: 2 1 1 1 1. Overall scores indicate medium Social Economic Social Economic Social Economic to high levels of Riverine Urban Mountain resilience 2. Coastal= highest Ecological Ecological 5 Ecological 5 resilience 5 4 4 4 Mountain= lowest 3 resilience 3 3Institutional Physical Institutional 2 Physical Institutional 2 Physical 2 1 1 1 Social Economic Social Economic Social Economic Agricultural Plain Estuarine Coastal Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 12. Findings (3) 122. Resilience Spatial Analysis Main Findings: 1. Overall scores show Very High High Very High highest scores in the social dimension Medium High Low Medium Very Low Low and lowest Very Low Ecological Physical scores in the economic dimension Very High High 2. Binulasan=Coastal= highest resilience Medium Low Very Low Institutional Tongohin= Mountain= lowest resilience Very High Very High High High Medium Medium Low Low Very Low Very Low Economic Social Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 13. Discussion 13 Variations among the resilience of ecosystems require a different approach to adaptation - specific dimensions that need to be improved may be prioritized more that the others - dimensions may need to be addressed collectively In general, economic and ecological resilience need to be enhanced in Infanta Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 14. Implications to Ecosystem-based Adaptation Planning 14 A baseline is determined where adaptation measures that represent the communities responses to the specific character of the ecosystem and the physical, economic, social and institutional driving forces can be based upon; Entry points are established for an ecosystem-based adaptation strategy which can enhance climate resilience in Infanta. Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 15. Limitations of the Study 15-Survey results are based on perceptions of a selectgroup, which could not be verified objectively.-By assuming the established classification of ecosystemsby the local government, the survey sample per ecosystemmay not give a desired statistically valid result.-It would have been ideal to pursue the study at a river basinspace (i.e. Agos River Basin) to observe ecosystem flowsbut different institutional, jurisdictional and administrativesettings existing in its boundaries make this scale ofanalysis in Infanta and its surrounding regions difficult. Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 16. Scope for Further Research 16-Consideration of the broader ecosystem (i.e. Agos RiverBasin) and identify the conditions and structures withinwhich the system functions,-Utilization of science-based tools to supplement the resultsof this research,-Analysis on how ecosystem-based approaches can beintegrated into policy and governance Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
  • 17. 17 Thank you for your kind attention.Kyoto University International Environment and Disaster Management Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies

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